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1.
Arch. bronconeumol. (Ed. impr.) ; 57(supl.2): 0-0, abr. 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | IBECS | ID: ibc-196726

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Patients with pre-existing respiratory diseases in the setting of COVID-19 may have a greater risk of severe complications and even death. METHODS: A retrospective, multicenter, cohort study with 5847 COVID-19 patients admitted to hospitals. Patients were separated in two groups, with/without previous lung disease. Evaluation of factors associated with survival and secondary composite end-point such as ICU admission and respiratory support, were explored. RESULTS: 1,271 patients (22%) had a previous lung disease, mostly COPD. All-cause mortality occurred in 376 patients with lung disease (29.5%) and in 819 patients without (17.9%) (p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier curves showed that patients with lung diseases had a worse 30-day survival (HR = 1.78; 95%C.I. 1.58-2.01; p < 0.001) and COPD had almost 40% mortality. Multivariable Cox regression showed that prior lung disease remained a risk factor for mortality (HR, 1.21; 95%C.I. 1.02-1.44; p = 0.02). Variables independently associated with all-cause mortality risk in patients with lung diseases were oxygen saturation less than 92% on admission (HR, 4.35; 95% CI 3.08-6.15) and elevated D-dimer (HR, 1.84; 95% CI 1.27-2.67). Age younger than 60 years (HR 0.37; 95% CI 0.21-0.65) was associated with decreased risk of death. CONCLUSIONS: Previous lung disease is a risk factor for mortality in patients with COVID-19. Older age, male gender, home oxygen therapy, and respiratory failure on admission were associated with an increased mortality. Efforts must be done to identify respiratory patients to set measures to improve their clinical outcomes


INTRODUCCIÓN: Los pacientes con enfermedades respiratorias preexistentes pueden tener en el contexto de la covid-19 un mayor riesgo de complicaciones graves e incluso de muerte. MÉTODOS: Estudio de cohortes multicéntrico y retrospectivo de 5.847 pacientes con covid-19 ingresados en hospitales. Los pacientes se separaron en 2 grupos, sin y con enfermedad pulmonar previa. Se evaluaron factores asociados con la supervivencia y criterios combinados de valoración secundarios, como el ingreso en la UCI y la necesidad de asistencia respiratoria. RESULTADOS: Mil doscientos setenta y un (1.271) pacientes (22%) tenían una enfermedad pulmonar previa, principalmente EPOC. La mortalidad por todas las causas ocurrió en 376 pacientes con enfermedad pulmonar (29,5%) y en 819 pacientes sin enfermedad pulmonar (17,9%; p < 0,001). Las curvas de Kaplan-Meier mostraron que los pacientes con enfermedades pulmonares tenían una peor supervivencia a los 30 días (HR: 1,78; IC del 95%: 1,58-2,01; p < 0,001) y la EPOC tenía una mortalidad de casi el 40%. La regresión de Cox multivariante mostró que la enfermedad pulmonar previa seguía siendo un factor de riesgo de mortalidad (HR: 1,21; IC del 95%: 1,02-1,44; p = 0,02). Las variables asociadas de forma independiente con el riesgo de muerte por todas las causas en pacientes con enfermedades pulmonares fueron la saturación de oxígeno inferior al 92% al ingreso (HR: 4,35; IC del 95%: 3,08-6,15) y el dímero D elevado (HR: 1,84; IC del 95%: 1,27-2,67). La edad menor de 60 años (HR: 0,37; IC del 95%: 0,21-0,65) se asoció con una disminución del riesgo de muerte. CONCLUSIONES: La enfermedad pulmonar previa es un factor de riesgo de muerte en pacientes con covid-19. La edad avanzada, el sexo masculino, la oxigenoterapia domiciliaria y la insuficiencia respiratoria al ingreso se asociaron con un aumento de la mortalidad. Se deben realizar esfuerzos para identificar a los pacientes respiratorios y establecer medidas para mejorar sus resultados clínicos


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Idoso , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Pneumopatias/mortalidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Pandemias , Pneumopatias/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Estudos Retrospectivos , Prevalência , Fatores Sexuais , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/complicações , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/mortalidade , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Prognóstico , Comorbidade
2.
ASAIO J ; 2021 Mar 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33769353

RESUMO

Inadequate venous drainage decreases the efficiency of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Pump augmentation may even make it worse due to collapse of the venous system under negative pressures. Furthermore, recirculation is a phenomenon that occurs when oxygenated blood supplied through the infusion cannula is withdrawn directly through the drainage cannula without contributing to the oxygenation of the patient and also compromises the efficacy of the therapy. Large drainage cannulas allow for similar flow rates at lower pump speed. But percutaneous insertion of these larger cannulas could be challenging. When using a self-expandable cannula, the diameter of the cannula for the insertion can be reduced, and once inserted, its intravascular diameter maximized, resulting in a large venous cannula due to in situ expansion after mandrel removal (up to 36F). We present a retrospective series of selfexpanding venous cannula 430 or 530 mm in length in six consecutive patients undergoing venovenous (VV) ECMO. No vascular or cardiac iatrogenic injury was caused during implantation. Target flows were reached, and no clinically significant recirculation was described in any case. The use of selfexpanding drainage cannulas was safe, and efficient drainage was achieved with easy and definitive unique positioning during cannulation.

3.
Obes Res Clin Pract ; 2021 Mar 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33741308

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Obesity has been described as a protective factor in cardiovascular and other diseases being expressed as 'obesity paradox'. However, the impact of obesity on clinical outcomes including mortality in COVID-19 has been poorly systematically investigated until now. We aimed to compare clinical outcomes among COVID-19 patients divided into three groups according to the body mass index (BMI). METHODS: We retrospectively collected data up to May 31st, 2020. 3635 patients were divided into three groups of BMI (<25 kg/m2; n = 1110, 25-30 kg/m2; n = 1464, and >30 kg/m2; n = 1061). Demographic, in-hospital complications, and predictors for mortality, respiratory insufficiency, and sepsis were analyzed. RESULTS: The rate of respiratory insufficiency was more recorded in BMI 25-30 kg/m2 as compared to BMI < 25 kg/m2 (22.8% vs. 41.8%; p < 0.001), and in BMI > 30 kg/m2 than BMI < 25 kg/m2, respectively (22.8% vs. 35.4%; p < 0.001). Sepsis was more observed in BMI 25-30 kg/m2 and BMI > 30 kg/m2 as compared to BMI < 25 kg/m2, respectively (25.1% vs. 42.5%; p = 0.02) and (25.1% vs. 32.5%; p = 0.006). The mortality rate was higher in BMI 25-30 kg/m2 and BMI > 30 kg/m2 as compared to BMI < 25 kg/m2, respectively (27.2% vs. 39.2%; p = 0.31) (27.2% vs. 33.5%; p = 0.004). In the Cox multivariate analysis for mortality, BMI < 25 kg/m2 and BMI > 30 kg/m2 did not impact the mortality rate (HR 1.15, 95% CI: 0.889-1.508; p = 0.27) (HR 1.15, 95% CI: 0.893-1.479; p = 0.27). In multivariate logistic regression analyses for respiratory insufficiency and sepsis, BMI < 25 kg/m2 is determined as an independent predictor for reduction of respiratory insufficiency (OR 0.73, 95% CI: 0.538-1.004; p = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: HOPE COVID-19-Registry revealed no evidence of obesity paradox in patients with COVID-19. However, Obesity was associated with a higher rate of respiratory insufficiency and sepsis but was not determined as an independent predictor for a high mortality.

4.
Arch Bronconeumol ; 57 Suppl 2: 13-20, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês, Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33423874

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Patients with pre-existing respiratory diseases in the setting of COVID-19 may have a greater risk of severe complications and even death. METHODS: A retrospective, multicenter, cohort study with 5847 COVID-19 patients admitted to hospitals. Patients were separated in two groups, with/without previous lung disease. Evaluation of factors associated with survival and secondary composite end-point such as ICU admission and respiratory support, were explored. RESULTS: 1,271 patients (22%) had a previous lung disease, mostly COPD. All-cause mortality occurred in 376 patients with lung disease (29.5%) and in 819 patients without (17.9%) (p<0.001). Kaplan-Meier curves showed that patients with lung diseases had a worse 30-day survival (HR=1.78; 95%C.I. 1.58-2.01; p<0.001) and COPD had almost 40% mortality. Multivariable Cox regression showed that prior lung disease remained a risk factor for mortality (HR, 1.21; 95%C.I. 1.02-1.44; p=0.02). Variables independently associated with all-cause mortality risk in patients with lung diseases were oxygen saturation less than 92% on admission (HR, 4.35; 95% CI 3.08-6.15) and elevated D-dimer (HR, 1.84; 95% CI 1.27-2.67). Age younger than 60 years (HR 0.37; 95% CI 0.21-0.65) was associated with decreased risk of death. CONCLUSIONS: Previous lung disease is a risk factor for mortality in patients with COVID-19. Older age, male gender, home oxygen therapy, and respiratory failure on admission were associated with an increased mortality. Efforts must be done to identify respiratory patients to set measures to improve their clinical outcomes.

5.
Artigo em Inglês, Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32778402

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the interaction between comorbidity burden and the benefits of in-hospital revascularization in elderly patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS). METHODS: This retrospective study included 7211 patients aged ≥ 70 years from 11 Spanish NSTEACS registries. Six comorbidities were evaluated: diabetes, peripheral artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, chronic pulmonary disease, renal failure, and anemia. A propensity score was estimated to enable an adjusted comparison of in-hospital revascularization and conservative management. The end point was 1-year all-cause mortality. RESULTS: In total, 1090 patients (15%) died. The in-hospital revascularization rate was 60%. Revascularization was associated with lower 1-year mortality; the strength of the association was unchanged by the addition of comorbidities to the model (HR, 0.61; 95%CI, 0.53-0.69; P=.0001). However, the effects of revascularization were attenuated in patients with renal failure, peripheral artery disease, and chronic pulmonary disease (P for interaction=.004, .007, and .03, respectively) but were not modified by diabetes, anemia, and previous stroke (P=.74, .51, and .28, respectively). Revascularization benefits gradually decreased as the number of comorbidities increased (from a HR of 0.48 [95%CI, 0.39-0.61] with 0 comorbidities to 0.83 [95%CI, 0.62-1.12] with ≥ 5 comorbidities; omnibus P=.016). The results were similar for the propensity score model. The same findings were obtained when invasive management was considered the exposure variable. CONCLUSIONS: In-hospital revascularization improves 1-year mortality regardless of comorbidities in elderly patients with NSTEACS. However, the revascularization benefit is progressively reduced with an increased comorbidity burden. Renal failure, peripheral artery disease, and chronic lung disease were the comorbidities with the most detrimental effects on revascularization benefits.

8.
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg ; 29(3): 371-377, 2019 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31220291

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Frailty syndrome predicts adverse outcomes after surgical aortic valve replacement. However, disability or comorbidity is frequently associated with preoperative frailty evaluation. The effects of these domains on early and late outcomes were analysed. METHODS: A prospective study including patients aged ≥75 years with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who received aortic valve replacement with or without coronary artery bypass grafting was conducted. We used the Cardiovascular Health Study Frailty Phenotype to assess frailty, the Lawton-Brody index to define disability and the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) to evaluate comorbidity. RESULTS: Frailty was identified in 57 (31%), dependence in 18 (9.9%) and advanced comorbidity (CCI ≥ 4) in 67 (36.6%) of the 183 enrolled patients. Operative mortality (1.6%), transfusion rate and duration of stay increased in patients with CCI ≥4 (P < 0.005). There was a non-significant trend for these adverse outcomes among the frail patients. Follow-up was achieved in all patients (median/interquartile range 869/699-1099 days). Kaplan-Meier univariable analysis showed a reduced survival rate for frail and dependent patients and for those with multiple comorbidities (P < 0.05). According to multivariable analysis, frailty and comorbidity were independent risk factors for 1-year mortality, while disability and comorbidity, but not frailty, were risk factors for 3-year mortality (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Surgical aortic valve replacement in patients aged ≥75 years is a safe procedure with low mortality rates. Operative outcomes are mainly affected by comorbidities. The main influence of survival occurs throughout the first year, and an improved functional status prevents any progression towards disabilities, which could potentially benefit long-term outcomes. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02745314.


Assuntos
Estenose da Valva Aórtica/complicações , Estenose da Valva Aórtica/cirurgia , Fragilidade/complicações , Substituição da Valva Aórtica Transcateter , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estenose da Valva Aórtica/mortalidade , Comorbidade , Feminino , Idoso Fragilizado , Nível de Saúde , Próteses Valvulares Cardíacas , Humanos , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Masculino , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Taxa de Sobrevida , Resultado do Tratamento
9.
Int J Cardiol ; 223: 436-443, 2016 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27557484

RESUMO

Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is an important health problem. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs following AMI have shown to be effective in reducing mortality. We aim to systematically review the existing literature that analyzes the factors that affect participation and adherence to cardiac rehabilitation programs. We reviewed Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases from 01/01/2004 to June 2016 using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. We classified the results into factors affecting participation and factors influencing adherence to CR programs. We included 29 studies, and there was a general agreement in those factors predicting participation and adherence to CR programs. These factors can be classified into person-related factors and aspects related to CR programs. Older participants, women, patients with comorbidities, unemployed and uncoupled persons, less educated people and those with lower income had a lower participation. A similar pattern was observed for CR adherence. Also, those potential participants who live farther from CR facilities, do not have transportation, or do not drive, attended less to CR programs. These factors were very similar when analyzing adherence to CR programs. These aspects were similar in Europe and the USA. These results clearly show that participation in CR programs follows a determined pattern that is very homogeneous in different settings. Health professionals should also be aware of patients reluctant to participate in CR programs and adapt their messages and redesign CR programs, to promote participation and adherence.


Assuntos
Reabilitação Cardíaca/métodos , Infarto do Miocárdio/reabilitação , Cooperação do Paciente , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Humanos , Encaminhamento e Consulta
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