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1.
Occup Environ Med ; 77(3): 172-178, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31949041

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the association between maternal occupational exposure to solvents and gastroschisis in offspring. METHODS: We used data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a large population-based case-control study of major birth defects conducted in 10 US states from 1997 to 2011. Infants with gastroschisis were ascertained by active birth defects surveillance systems. Control infants without major birth defects were selected from vital records or birth hospital records. Self-reported maternal occupational histories were collected by telephone interview. Industrial hygienists reviewed this information to estimate exposure to aromatic, chlorinated and petroleum-based solvents from 1 month before conception through the first trimester of pregnancy. Cumulative exposure to solvents was estimated for the same period accounting for estimated exposure intensity and frequency, job duration and hours worked per week. ORs and 95% CIs were estimated to assess the association between exposure to any solvents or solvent classes, and gastroschisis risk. RESULTS: Among 879 cases and 7817 controls, the overall prevalence of periconceptional solvent exposure was 7.3% and 7.4%, respectively. Exposure to any solvent versus no exposure to solvents was not associated with gastroschisis after adjusting for maternal age (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.32), nor was an association noted for solvent classes. There was no exposure-response relationship between estimated cumulative solvent exposure and gastroschisis after adjusting for maternal age. CONCLUSION: Our study found no association between maternal occupational solvent exposure and gastroschisis in offspring. Further research is needed to understand risk factors for gastroschisis.

2.
Birth Defects Res ; 2020 Jan 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31944002

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggested associations between maternal smoking, a source of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other chemicals, and central nervous system and face birth defects; however, no previous studies have evaluated maternal occupational PAH exposure itself. METHODS: Jobs held in the periconceptional period were retrospectively assigned for occupational PAH exposures. Associations between maternal occupational PAH exposure and selected rare defects of the face (cataracts, microphthalmia, glaucoma, microtia, and choanal atresia) and central nervous system (holoprosencephaly, hydrocephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia, and Dandy-Walker malformation) were evaluated using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a population-based case-control study in the United States. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated to estimate associations between each evaluated defect and PAH exposure using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Food and beverage serving, as well as cooks and food preparation occupations, were among the most frequent jobs held by exposed mothers. Cataracts, microtia, microphthalmia, and holoprosencephaly were significantly associated with PAH exposure with evidence of dose-response (P-values for trend ≤.05). Hydrocephaly was associated with any PAH exposure, but not significant for trend. Sensitivity analyses that reduced possible sources of exposure misclassification tended to strengthen associations. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first population-based case-control study to evaluate associations between maternal occupational PAH exposures and these rare birth defects of the central nervous system and face.

3.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(1): 1-5, 2020 Jan 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31917782

RESUMO

In May 2018, a study of birth defects in infants born to women with diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Botswana reported an eightfold increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs) among births with periconceptional exposure to antiretroviral therapy (ART) that included the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (DTG) compared with other ART regimens (1). The World Health Organization* (WHO) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services† (HHS) promptly issued interim guidance limiting the initiation of DTG during early pregnancy and in women of childbearing age with HIV who desire pregnancy or are sexually active and not using effective contraception. On the basis of additional data, WHO now recommends DTG as a preferred treatment option for all populations, including women of childbearing age and pregnant women. Similarly, the U.S. recommendations currently state that DTG is a preferred antiretroviral drug throughout pregnancy (with provider-patient counseling) and as an alternative antiretroviral drug in women who are trying to conceive.§ Since 1981 and 1994, CDC has supported separate surveillance programs for HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (2) and birth defects (3) in state health departments. These two surveillance programs can inform public health programs and policy, linkage to care, and research activities. Because birth defects surveillance programs do not collect HIV status, and HIV surveillance programs do not routinely collect data on occurrence of birth defects, the related data have not been used by CDC to characterize birth defects in births to women with HIV. Data from these two programs were linked to estimate overall prevalence of NTDs and prevalence of NTDs in HIV-exposed pregnancies during 2013-2017 for 15 participating jurisdictions. Prevalence of NTDs in pregnancies among women with diagnosed HIV infection was 7.0 per 10,000 live births, similar to that among the general population in these 15 jurisdictions, and the U.S. estimate based on data from 24 states. Successful linking of data from birth defects and HIV/AIDS surveillance programs for pregnancies among women with diagnosed HIV infection suggests that similar data linkages might be used to characterize possible associations between maternal diseases or maternal use of medications, such as integrase strand transfer inhibitors used to manage HIV, and pregnancy outcomes. Although no difference in NTD prevalence in HIV-exposed pregnancies was found, data on the use of integrase strand transfer inhibitors in pregnancy are needed to understand the safety and risks of these drugs during pregnancy.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Defeitos do Tubo Neural/epidemiologia , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/diagnóstico , Adolescente , Adulto , Antirretrovirais/efeitos adversos , Antirretrovirais/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Gravidez , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/tratamento farmacológico , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
4.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(2): 25-29, 2020 Jan 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31945037

RESUMO

Birth defects are a leading cause of infant mortality in the United States, accounting for 20.6% of infant deaths in 2017 (1). Rates of infant mortality attributable to birth defects (IMBD) have generally declined since the 1970s (1-3). U.S. linked birth/infant death data from 2003-2017 were used to assess trends in IMBD. Overall, rates declined 10% during 2003-2017, but decreases varied by maternal and infant characteristics. During 2003-2017, IMBD rates decreased 4% for infants of Hispanic mothers, 11% for infants of non-Hispanic black (black) mothers, and 12% for infants of non-Hispanic white (white) mothers. In 2017, these rates were highest among infants of black mothers (13.3 per 10,000 live births) and were lowest among infants of white mothers (9.9). During 2003-2017, IMBD rates for infants who were born extremely preterm (20-27 completed gestational weeks), full term (39-40 weeks), and late term/postterm (41-44 weeks) declined 20%-29%; rates for moderate (32-33 weeks) and late preterm (34-36 weeks) infants increased 17%. Continued tracking of IMBD rates can help identify areas where efforts to reduce IMBD are needed, such as among infants born to black and Hispanic mothers and those born moderate and late preterm (32-36 weeks).


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/mortalidade , Mortalidade Infantil/tendências , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Anormalidades Congênitas/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Lactente , Mortalidade Infantil/etnologia , Lactente Extremamente Prematuro , Recém-Nascido , Criança Pós-Termo , Recém-Nascido Prematuro , Masculino , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
5.
Am J Obstet Gynecol ; 222(2): 176.e1-176.e11, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31454511

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Diabetes is associated with an increased risk for many birth defects and is likely to have an increasing impact on birth defect prevalence because of the rise in diabetes in the United States in recent decades. One of the first analyses in which specific birth defects were assessed for their relationship with both pregestational and gestational diabetes used data from the initial 6 years of the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. That analysis reported strong associations for pregestational diabetes with several birth defects, but few exposures among some of the less common birth defects led to unstable estimates with wide confidence intervals. Since that analysis, the study continued to collect data for another 8 years, including information on approximately 19,000 additional cases and 6900 additional controls. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to use data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, the largest population-based birth defects case-control study in the United States, to provide updated and more precise estimates of the association between diabetes and birth defects, including some defects not previously assessed. STUDY DESIGN: We analyzed data on deliveries from October 1997 through December 2011. Mothers of case and control infants were interviewed about their health conditions and exposures during pregnancy, including diagnosis of pregestational (type 1 or type 2) diabetes before the index pregnancy or gestational diabetes during the index pregnancy. Using logistic regression, we separately assessed the association between pregestational and gestational diabetes with specific categories of structural birth defects for which there were at least 3 exposed case infants. For birth defect categories for which there were at least 5 exposed case infants, we calculated odds ratios adjusted for maternal body mass index, age, education, race/ethnicity, and study site; for defect categories with 3 or 4 exposed cases, we calculated crude odds ratios. RESULTS: Pregestational diabetes was reported by 0.6% of mothers of control infants (71 of 11,447) and 2.5% of mothers of case infants (775 of 31,007). Gestational diabetes during the index pregnancy was reported by 4.7% of mothers of control infants (536 of 11,447) and 5.3% of mothers of case infants (1,653 of 31,007). Pregestational diabetes was associated with strong, statistically significant odds ratios (range, 2.5-80.2) for 46 of 50 birth defects considered. The largest odds ratio was observed for sacral agenesis (adjusted odds ratio, 80.2; 95% confidence interval, 46.1-139.3). A greater than 10-fold increased risk was also observed for holoprosencephaly (adjusted odds ratio, 13.1; 95% confidence interval, 7.0-24.5), longitudinal limb deficiency (adjusted odds ratio, 10.1; 95% confidence interval, 6.2-16.5), heterotaxy (adjusted odds ratio, 12.3; 95% confidence interval, 7.3-20.5), truncus arteriosus (adjusted odds ratio, 14.9; 95% confidence interval, 7.6-29.3), atrioventricular septal defect (adjusted odds ratio, 10.5; 95% confidence interval, 6.2-17.9), and single ventricle complex (adjusted odds ratio, 14.7; 95% confidence interval, 8.9-24.3). For gestational diabetes, statistically significant odds ratios were fewer (12 of 56) and of smaller magnitude (range, 1.3- 2.1; 0.5 for gastroschisis). CONCLUSION: Pregestational diabetes is associated with a markedly increased risk for many specific births defects. Because glycemic control before pregnancy is associated with a reduced risk for birth defects, ongoing quality care for persons with diabetes is an important opportunity for prevention.

6.
J Atten Disord ; 24(3): 479-489, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29519207

RESUMO

Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of, and maternal characteristics associated with, ADHD medication use before and during pregnancy, and associations between early pregnancy ADHD medication use and risk for 12 selected birth defects. Method: We used data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (1998-2011), a U.S. population-based case-control study examining risk factors for major structural birth defects. Results: There was an increase in ADHD medication use from 1998-1999 (0.2%) to 2010-2011 (0.5%; p < .001). Early pregnancy ADHD medication use was more commonly reported by mothers of infants/fetuses with gastroschisis (crude odds ratio [cOR]: 2.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.2, 6.9]), omphalocele (cOR: 4.0, 95% CI = [1.2, 13.6]), and transverse limb deficiency (cOR: 3.3, 95% CI = [1.1, 9.6]). Conclusion: ADHD medication use before and during pregnancy was rare, but the prevalence of use has increased over time. In this analysis, early pregnancy ADHD medication use was associated with three of 12 selected birth defects.

7.
Birth Defects Res ; 112(2): 162-174, 2020 Jan 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31840947

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is little recent research on the teratogenicity of maternal anesthesia exposure. We used National Birth Defects Prevention Study data to describe surgical procedures conducted during pregnancy and to estimate the risk of birth defects associated with periconceptional anesthesia exposure. METHODS: We used logistic regression to assess associations between general and local anesthesia for surgery during the periconceptional period and specific birth defects. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for 25 birth defects with at least five exposed cases (11,501 controls, 24,337 cases), adjusted for maternal race/ethnicity, age, body mass index, periconceptional exposure to X-ray, CT, or radionuclide scans, and study site. RESULTS: The most commonly reported procedures were dental, dermatologic, and cervical cerclage procedures, regardless of gestational timing. Overall, 226 case and 73 control women reported periconceptional general anesthesia; 230 case and 89 control women reported periconceptional local anesthesia. Women who reported general or local anesthesia were disproportionately non-Hispanic white and were more likely to report periconceptional opioid use and at least one periconceptional X-ray/CT/radionuclide scan. Women who reported general anesthesia were also more likely to report periconceptional injury. We did not observe any significant associations between either type of anesthesia exposure and the birth defects studied. Odds ratios were generally close to null and imprecise. CONCLUSIONS: Our study population reported a wide range of surgical procedures during pregnancy, requiring both general and local anesthesia. Our findings suggest that periconceptional anesthesia is not strongly associated with the birth defects assessed in this study.

8.
Schizophr Res ; 2019 Nov 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31761471

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To examine the prevalence of, and factors associated with, atypical antipsychotic use among U.S. pregnant women, and potential associations between early pregnancy atypical antipsychotic use and risk for 14 birth defects. METHODS: We analyzed data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (1997-2011), a U.S. population-based case-control study examining risk factors for major structural birth defects. RESULTS: Atypical antipsychotic use during pregnancy was more common among women with pre-pregnancy obesity, and women who reported illicit drug use before and during pregnancy, smoking during pregnancy, alcohol use during pregnancy, or use of other psychiatric medications during pregnancy. We observed elevated associations (defined as a crude odds ratio [cOR] ≥2.0) between early pregnancy atypical antipsychotic use and conotruncal heart defects (6 exposed cases; cOR: 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9-6.1), and more specifically Tetralogy of Fallot (3 exposed cases; cOR: 2.5, 95% CI: 0.7-8.8), cleft palate (4 exposed cases, cOR: 2.5, 95% CI: 0.8-7.6), anorectal atresia/stenosis (3 exposed cases, cOR: 2.8, 95% CI: 0.8-9.9), and gastroschisis (3 exposed cases, cOR: 2.1, 95% CI: 0.6-7.3). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the close clinical monitoring of pregnant women using atypical antipsychotics. Women treated with atypical antipsychotics generally access healthcare services before pregnancy; efforts to reduce correlates of atypical antipsychotic use might improve maternal and infant health in this population.

9.
Birth Defects Res ; 111(20): 1618-1632, 2019 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31328417

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS) is a multisite, population-based, case-control study of genetic and nongenetic risk factors for major structural birth defects. Eligible women had a pregnancy affected by a birth defect or a liveborn child without a birth defect between 1997 and 2011. They were invited to complete a telephone interview to collect pregnancy exposure data and were mailed buccal cell collection kits to collect specimens from themselves, their child (if living), and their child's father. Over 23,000 families representing more than 30 major structural birth defects provided DNA specimens. METHODS: To evaluate their utility for exome sequencing (ES), specimens from 20 children with colonic atresia were studied. Evaluations were conducted on specimens collected using cytobrushes stored and transported in open versus closed packaging, on native genomic DNA (gDNA) versus whole genome amplified (WGA) products and on a library preparation protocol adapted to low amounts of DNA. RESULTS: The DNA extracted from brushes in open packaging yielded higher quality sequence data than DNA from brushes in closed packaging. Quality metrics of sequenced gDNA were consistently higher than metrics from corresponding WGA products and were consistently high when using a low input protocol. CONCLUSIONS: This proof-of-principle study established conditions under which ES can be applied to NBDPS specimens. Successful sequencing of exomes from well-characterized NBDPS families indicated that this unique collection can be used to investigate the roles of genetic variation and gene-environment interaction effects in birth defect etiologies, providing a valuable resource for birth defect researchers.

10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31060207

RESUMO

Workers in various industries can be exposed to oil mists when oil-based fluids are aerosolized during work processes. Oil mists can be inhaled or deposited on the skin. Little research exists on the reproductive effects of oil mist exposure in pregnant workers. We aimed to investigate associations between occupational oil mist exposure in early pregnancy and a spectrum of birth defects using data from 22,011 case mothers and 8140 control mothers in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. In total, 150 mothers were rated as exposed. Manufacturing jobs, particularly apparel manufacturing, comprised the largest groups of exposed mothers. Mothers of infants with septal heart defects (odds ratio (OR): 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.0-3.3), and especially perimembranous ventricular septal defects (OR: 2.5, CI: 1.2-5.2), were more likely to be occupationally exposed to oil mists in early pregnancy than control mothers; and their rater-estimated cumulative exposure was more likely to be higher. This was the first U.S. study evaluating associations between oil mist exposure and a broad spectrum of birth defects. Our results are consistent with previous European studies, supporting a potential association between oil-based exposures and congenital heart defects. Further research is needed to evaluate the reproductive effects of occupational oil mist exposure.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/etiologia , Óleos Industriais/efeitos adversos , Exposição Materna/efeitos adversos , Exposição Ocupacional/efeitos adversos , Complicações na Gravidez/induzido quimicamente , Adulto , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Razão de Chances , Gravidez , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
11.
BMJ Open ; 9(3): e026297, 2019 03 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30928950

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between occurrence and timing of maternal self-reported genitourinary tract infection (urinary tract infections [UTIs] and/or sexually transmitted infection [STI]) and risk for gastroschisis in the offspring. DESIGN: Population-based case-control study. SETTING: National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a multisite study in the USA. PARTICIPANTS: Mothers of 1366 gastroschisis cases and 11 238 healthy controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Crude and adjusted ORs (aORs) with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Genitourinary infections were frequent in case (19.3%) and control women (9.9%) during the periconceptional period (defined as 3 months prior to 3 months after conception). UTI and/or STI in the periconceptional period were associated with similarly increased risks for gastroschisis (aOR 1.5, 95% CI 1.3 to 1.8; aOR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.3, respectively). The risk was increased with a UTI before (aOR 2.5; 95% CI 1.4 to 4.5) or after (aOR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.6) conception only among women ≥25 years of age. The risk was highest among women <20 years of age with an STI before conception (aOR 3.6; 95% CI 1.5 to 8.4) and in women ≥25 years of age, the risk was similar for before (aOR 2.9; 95% CI 1.0 to 8.5) and after (aOR 2.8; 95% CI 1.3 to 6.1) conception. A specific STI pathogen was reported in 89.3% (50/56) of cases and 84.3% (162/191) of controls with Chlamydia trachomatis the most common (25/50 cases, 50%; 58/162 controls, 36%) and highest among women <20 years of age (16/25 cases, 64%; 22/33 controls, 67%). CONCLUSIONS: UTI and/or STI were associated with an increased risk for gastroschisis, with the strength of the association varying by maternal age and timing of infection.

12.
Birth Defects Res ; 111(10): 613-620, 2019 06 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30891943

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Benzodiazepine medications can be used to treat anxiety, a condition affecting 15% of women of childbearing age in the United States. Studies have shown conflicting results for the association between benzodiazepine use during pregnancy and birth defects. METHODS: We analyzed 1997-2011 data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a multisite, population-based case-control study. We assessed the prevalence of and factors associated with benzodiazepine use in pregnancy among mothers of live-born infants without a birth defect (control mothers). We used logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between specific birth defects and benzodiazepine use; we estimated crude odds ratios (cORs) for defect categories with 3-4 exposed cases. RESULTS: Exposure to benzodiazepines during pregnancy was rare (N = 93/11,614; 0.8%). Benzodiazepine use was more common among control mothers who were ≥30 years, non-Hispanic white, had more education, smoked, and took antidepressant medication. We observed significantly elevated ORs for any benzodiazepine and Dandy-Walker malformation (cOR: 3.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 8.6); for alprazolam and anophthalmia or microphthalmia (cOR: 4.0; 95% CI: 1.2, 13.1) and esophageal atresia or stenosis (aOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.2, 5.9); and lorazepam and pulmonary valve stenosis (cOR: 4.1; 95% CI: 1.2, 14.2), but sample sizes were limited and therefore CIs were wide. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that benzodiazepines use is rare and may be associated with risk for certain birth defects. However, these results need replication and should be interpreted with caution.

13.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(7): 177-180, 2019 Feb 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30789880

RESUMO

Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is a drug withdrawal syndrome that can occur following prenatal exposure to opioids (1). NAS surveillance in the United States is based largely on diagnosis codes in hospital discharge data, without validation of these codes or case confirmation. During 2004-2014, reported NAS incidence increased from 1.5 to 8.0 per 1,000 U.S. hospital births (2), based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis codes identified in hospital discharge data, without case confirmation. However, little is known about how well these codes identify NAS or how the October 1, 2015, transition from ICD-9-CM to the tenth revision of ICD-CM (ICD-10-CM) codes affected estimated NAS incidence. This report describes a pilot project in Illinois, New Mexico, and Vermont to use birth defects surveillance infrastructure to obtain state-level, population-based estimates of NAS incidence among births in 2015 (all three states) and 2016 (Illinois) using hospital discharge records and other sources (varied by state) with case confirmation, and to evaluate the validity of NAS diagnosis codes used by each state. Wide variation in NAS incidence was observed across the three states. In 2015, NAS incidence for Illinois, New Mexico, and Vermont was 3.0, 7.5, and 30.8 per 1,000 births, respectively. Among evaluated diagnosis codes, those with the highest positive predictive values (PPVs) for identifying confirmed cases of NAS, based on a uniform case definition, were drug withdrawal syndrome in a newborn (ICD-9-CM code 779.5; state range = 58.6%-80.2%) and drug withdrawal, infant of dependent mother (ICD-10-CM code P96.1; state range = 58.5%-80.2%). The methods used to assess NAS incidence in this pilot project might help inform other states' NAS surveillance efforts.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Síndrome de Abstinência Neonatal/epidemiologia , Vigilância da População/métodos , Humanos , Illinois/epidemiologia , Recém-Nascido , New Mexico/epidemiologia , Vermont/epidemiologia
14.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(1): 6-10, 2019 Jan 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30629576

RESUMO

From 2004 to 2014, the incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in the United States increased 433%, from 1.5 to 8.0 per 1,000 hospital births. The latest national data from 2014 indicate that one baby was born with signs of NAS every 15 minutes in the United States (1). NAS is a drug withdrawal syndrome that most commonly occurs among infants after in utero exposure to opioids, although other substances have also been associated with NAS. Prenatal opioid exposure has also been associated with poor fetal growth, preterm birth, stillbirth, and possible specific birth defects (2-5). NAS surveillance has often depended on hospital discharge data, which historically underestimate the incidence of NAS and are not available in real time, thus limiting states' ability to quickly direct public health resources (6,7). This evaluation focused on six states with state laws implementing required NAS case reporting for public health surveillance during 2013-2017 and reviews implementation of the laws, state officials' reports of data quality before and after laws were passed, and advantages and challenges of legally mandating NAS reporting for public health surveillance in the absence of a national case definition. Using standardized search terms in an online legal research database, laws in six states mandating reporting of NAS from medical facilities to state health departments (SHDs) or from SHDs to a state legislative body were identified. SHD officials in these six states completed a questionnaire followed by a semistructured telephone interview to clarify open-text responses from the questionnaire. Variability was found in the type and number of surveillance data elements reported and in how states used NAS surveillance data. Following implementation, five states with identified laws reported receiving NAS case reports within 30 days of diagnosis. Mandated NAS case reporting allowed SHDs to quantify the incidence of NAS in their states and to inform programs and services. This information might be useful to states considering implementing mandatory NAS surveillance.


Assuntos
Notificação de Abuso , Síndrome de Abstinência Neonatal/epidemiologia , Vigilância em Saúde Pública , Humanos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
15.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(2): 31-36, 2019 Jan 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30653484

RESUMO

Prevalence of gastroschisis, a serious birth defect of the abdominal wall resulting in some of the abdominal contents extending outside the body at birth, has been increasing worldwide (1,2). Gastroschisis requires surgical repair after birth and is associated with digestive and feeding complications during infancy, which can affect development. Recent data from 14 U.S. states indicated an increasing prevalence of gastroschisis from 1995 to 2012 (1). Young maternal age has been strongly associated with gastroschisis, but research suggests that risk factors such as smoking, genitourinary infections, and prescription opioid use also might be associated (3-5). Data from 20 population-based state surveillance programs were pooled and analyzed to assess age-specific gastroschisis prevalence during two 5-year periods, 2006-2010 and 2011-2015, and an ecologic approach was used to compare annual gastroschisis prevalence by annual opioid prescription rate categories. Gastroschisis prevalence increased only slightly (10%) from 2006-2010 to 2011-2015 (prevalence ratio = 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-1.1), with the highest prevalence among mothers aged <20 years. During 2006-2015, the prevalence of gastroschisis was 1.6 times higher in counties with high opioid prescription rates (5.1 per 10,000 live births; CI = 4.9-5.3) and 1.4 times higher where opioid prescription rates were medium (4.6 per 10,000 live births; CI = 4.4-4.8) compared with areas with low prescription rates (3.2 per 10,000 live births; CI = 3.1-3.4). Public health research is needed to understand factors contributing to the association between young maternal age and gastroschisis and assess the effect of prescription opioid use during pregnancy on this pregnancy outcome.


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Prescrições de Medicamentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Fenômenos Ecológicos e Ambientais , Gastrosquise/epidemiologia , Adulto , Distribuição por Idade , Analgésicos Opioides/efeitos adversos , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Gastrosquise/etnologia , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Mães/estatística & dados numéricos , Gravidez , Efeitos Tardios da Exposição Pré-Natal , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
16.
Birth Defects Res ; 110(19): 1468-1477, 2018 11 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30338937

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Limited epidemiologic research exists on the association between weather-related extreme heat events (EHEs) and orofacial clefts (OFCs). We estimated the associations between maternal exposure to EHEs in the summer season and OFCs in offspring and investigated the potential modifying effect of body mass index on these associations. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study among mothers who participated in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study for whom at least 1 day of their first two post-conception months occurred during summer. Cases were live-born infants, stillbirths, and induced terminations with OFCs; controls were live-born infants without major birth defects. We defined EHEs using the 95th and the 90th percentiles of the daily maximum universal apparent temperature distribution. We used unconditional logistic regression with Firth's penalized likelihood method to estimate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, controlling for maternal sociodemographic and anthropometric variables. RESULTS: We observed no association between maternal exposure to EHEs and OFCs overall, although prolonged duration of EHEs may increase the risk of OFCs in some study sites located in the Southeast climate region. Analyses by subtypes of OFCs revealed no associations with EHEs. Modifying effect by BMI was not observed. CONCLUSIONS: We did not find a significantly increased risk of OFCs associated with maternal exposure to EHEs during the relevant window of embryogenesis. Future studies should account for maternal indoor and outdoor activities and for characteristics such as hydration and use of air conditioning that could modify the effect of EHEs on pregnant women.


Assuntos
Encéfalo/anormalidades , Fenda Labial/etiologia , Fissura Palatina/etiologia , Calor Extremo/efeitos adversos , Vigilância da População/métodos , Adulto , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Exposição Materna/efeitos adversos , Mães , Razão de Chances , Gravidez , Primeiro Trimestre da Gravidez , Efeitos Tardios da Exposição Pré-Natal/induzido quimicamente , Fatores de Risco , Estações do Ano , Autorrelato , Temperatura Ambiente , Tempo (Meteorologia)
17.
Birth Defects Res ; 110(12): 1027-1042, 2018 07 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30133956

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Maternal exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBP)s may contribute to orofacial cleft (OFC) development, but studies are sparse and beset with limitations. METHODS: Population-based, maternal interview reports of drinking water filtration and consumption for 680 OFC cases (535 isolated) and 1826 controls were linked with DBP concentration data using maternal residential addresses and public water system monitoring data. Maternal individual-level exposures to trihalomethanes (THM)s and haloacetic acids (HAA)s (µg/L of water consumed) were estimated from reported consumption at home, work, and school. Compared to no exposure, associations with multisource maternal exposure <1/2 or ≥1/2 the Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL)s for total THMs (TTHM)s and HAAs (HAA5) or Maximum Contaminant Level Goals (MCLG)s for individual THMs and HAAs (if non-zero) were estimated for all OFCs and isolated OFCs, cleft palate (CP), and cleft lip ± cleft palate (CL/P) using logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Compared to controls, associations were near or below unity for maternal TTHM, HAA5, and individual THM exposures with all OFCs and isolated OFCs, CP, and CL/P. Associations also were near or below unity for individual HAAs with statistically significant, inverse associations observed with each OFC outcome group except CL/P. CONCLUSIONS: This study examined associations for maternal reports of drinking water filtration and consumption and maternal DBP exposure from drinking water with OFCs in offspring. Associations observed were near or below unity and mostly nonsignificant. Continued, improved research using maternal individual-level exposure data will be useful in better characterizing these associations.


Assuntos
Encéfalo/anormalidades , Fenda Labial/etiologia , Fenda Labial/prevenção & controle , Fissura Palatina/etiologia , Fissura Palatina/prevenção & controle , Desinfecção , Água Potável/efeitos adversos , Acetatos/análise , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Exposição Materna , Razão de Chances , Fatores de Risco , Trialometanos/análise
18.
Environ Int ; 118: 211-221, 2018 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29886237

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Few studies have assessed the effect of ambient heat during the fetal development period on congenital heart defects (CHDs), especially in transitional seasons. We examined and compared the associations between extreme heat and CHD phenotypes in summer and spring, assessed their geographical differences, and compared different heat indicators. METHODS: We identified 5848 CHD cases and 5742 controls (without major structural defects) from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a US multicenter, population-based case-control study. Extreme heat events (EHEs) were defined by using the 95th (EHE95) or 90th (EHE90) percentile of daily maximum temperature and its frequency and duration during postconceptional weeks 3-8. We used a two-stage Bayesian hierarchical model to examine both regional and study-wide associations. Exposure odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analyses, while controlling for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: Overall, we observed no significant relationships between maternal EHE exposure and CHDs in most regions during summer. However, we found that 3-11 days of EHE90 during summer and spring was significantly associated with ventricular septal defects (VSDs) study-wide (ORs ranged: 2.17-3.24). EHE95 in spring was significantly associated with conotruncal defects and VSDs in the South (ORs: 1.23-1.78). Most EHE indicators in spring were significantly associated with increased septal defects (both VSDs and atrial septal defects (ASDs)) in the Northeast. CONCLUSION: While generally null results were found, long duration of unseasonable heat was associated with the increased risks for VSDs and ASDs, mainly in South and Northeast of the US. Further research to confirm our findings is needed.


Assuntos
Cardiopatias Congênitas/epidemiologia , Exposição Materna/estatística & dados numéricos , Teorema de Bayes , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Temperatura Alta , Humanos , Razão de Chances , Gravidez , Estações do Ano , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
19.
Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet ; 178(2): 151-164, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29761639

RESUMO

Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a major structural birth defect of the brain that occurs in approximately 1 in 10,000 live births. Although some genetic causes of HPE are known, a substantial proportion of cases have an unknown etiology. Due to the low birth prevalence and rarity of exposure to many potential risk factors for HPE, few epidemiologic studies have had sufficient sample size to examine risk factors. A 2010 review of the literature identified several risk factors that had been consistently identified as occurring more frequently among cases of HPE, including maternal diabetes, twinning, and a predominance of females, while also identifying a number of potential risk factors that had been less widely studied. In this article, we summarize a systematic literature review conducted to update the evidence for nongenetic risk factors for HPE.


Assuntos
Holoprosencefalia/epidemiologia , Holoprosencefalia/etiologia , Diabetes Mellitus , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez , Fatores de Risco , Gêmeos
20.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 67(1): 18-22, 2018 Jan 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29324733

RESUMO

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) occur in about 8% of pregnant women, and untreated UTIs can have serious consequences, including pyelonephritis, preterm labor, low birth weight, and sepsis (1). Pregnant women are typically screened for UTIs during early pregnancy, and those with bacteriuria are treated with antibiotics (1,2). Antibiotic stewardship is critical to improving patient safety and to combating antibiotic resistance. Because of the potential risk for birth defects, including anencephaly, heart defects, and orofacial clefts, associated with use of sulfonamides and nitrofurantoin during pregnancy (3), a 2011 committee opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommended that sulfonamides and nitrofurantoin may be prescribed in the first trimester of pregnancy only when other antimicrobial therapies are deemed clinically inappropriate (4). To assess the effects of these recommendations, CDC analyzed the Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Database* to examine antibiotic prescriptions filled by pregnant women with UTIs. Among 482,917 pregnancies in 2014, 7.2% of women had an outpatient UTI diagnosis during the 90 days before the date of last menstrual period (LMP) or during pregnancy. Among pregnant women with UTIs, the most frequently prescribed antibiotics during the first trimester were nitrofurantoin, ciprofloxacin, cephalexin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Given the potential risks associated with use of some of these antibiotics in early pregnancy and the potential for unrecognized pregnancy, women's health care providers should be familiar with the ACOG recommendations and consider the possibility of early pregnancy when treating women of reproductive age.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Prescrições de Medicamentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Seguro Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Setor Privado , Infecções Urinárias/tratamento farmacológico , Feminino , Humanos , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Gravidez , Primeiro Trimestre da Gravidez , Estados Unidos
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