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2.
Hum Mol Genet ; 2021 Jan 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33481009

RESUMO

Integrating findings from genome-wide association studies with molecular datasets can develop insight into the underlying functional mechanisms responsible for trait-associated genetic variants. We have applied the principles of Mendelian randomization (MR) to investigate whether brain-derived gene expression (n = 1194) may be responsible for mediating the effect of genetic variants on eight cognitive and psychological outcomes (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Alzheimer's disease, bipolar disorder, depression, intelligence, insomnia, neuroticism and schizophrenia). Transcriptome-wide analyses identified 83 genes associated with at least one outcome (PBonferroni < 6.72 × 10-6), with multiple-trait colocalization also implicating changes to brain-derived DNA methylation at nine of these loci. Comparing effects between outcomes identified evidence of enrichment which may reflect putative causal relationships, such as an inverse relationship between genetic liability towards schizophrenia risk and cognitive ability in later life. Repeating these analyses in whole blood (n = 31 684), we replicated 58.2% of brain-derived effects (based on P < 0.05). Finally, we undertook phenome-wide evaluations at associated loci to investigate pleiotropic effects with 700 complex traits. This highlighted pleiotropic loci such as FURIN (initially implicated in schizophrenia risk (P = 1.05 × 10-7)) which had evidence of an effect on 28 other outcomes, as well as genes which may have a more specific role in disease pathogenesis (e.g. SLC12A5 which only provided evidence of an effect on depression (P = 7.13 × 10-10)). Our results support the utility of whole blood as a valuable proxy for informing initial target identification but also suggest that gene discovery in a tissue-specific manner may be more informative. Finally, non-pleiotropic loci highlighted by our study may be of use for therapeutic translational endeavours.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33318029

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Evidence for aspirin's chemopreventative properties on colorectal cancer (CRC) is substantial, but its mechanism of action is not well-understood. We combined a proteomic approach with Mendelian randomization (MR) to identify possible new aspirin targets that decrease CRC risk. METHODS: Human colorectal adenoma cells (RG/C2) were treated with aspirin (24 hours) and a stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) based proteomics approach identified altered protein expression. Protein quantitative trait loci (pQTLs) from INTERVAL (N = 3,301) and expression QTLs (eQTLs) from the eQTLGen Consortium (N = 31,684) were used as genetic proxies for protein and mRNA expression levels. Two-sample MR of mRNA/protein expression on CRC risk was performed using eQTL/pQTL data combined with CRC genetic summary data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR), Colorectal Transdisciplinary (CORECT), Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (GECCO) consortia and UK Biobank (55,168 cases and 65,160 controls). RESULTS: Altered expression was detected for 125/5886 proteins. Of these, aspirin decreased MCM6, RRM2, and ARFIP2 expression, and MR analysis showed that a standard deviation increase in mRNA/protein expression was associated with increased CRC risk (OR: 1.08, 95% CI, 1.03-1.13; OR: 3.33, 95% CI, 2.46-4.50; and OR: 1.15, 95% CI, 1.02-1.29, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: MCM6 and RRM2 are involved in DNA repair whereby reduced expression may lead to increased DNA aberrations and ultimately cancer cell death, whereas ARFIP2 is involved in actin cytoskeletal regulation, indicating a possible role in aspirin's reduction of metastasis. IMPACT: Our approach has shown how laboratory experiments and population-based approaches can combine to identify aspirin-targeted proteins possibly affecting CRC risk.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33187967

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Past history of gallstones is associated with increased risk of gallbladder cancer (GBC) in observational studies. We conducted complementary observational and Mendelian Randomization (MR) analyses to determine whether history of gallstones is causally related to development of GBC in an Indian population. METHODS: To investigate associations between history of gallstones and GBC, we used questionnaire and imaging data from a GBC case-control study conducted at Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (cases=1170; controls=2525). We then used 26 genetic variants identified in a genome-wide association study of 27,174 gallstones cases and 736,838 controls of European ancestry in a Mendelian randomization approach to assess causality. The association of these genetic variants with both gallstones and GBC was examined in the GBC case-control study. Various complementary MR approaches were used to evaluate the robustness of our results in the presence of pleiotropy and heterogeneity, and to consider the suitability of the selected SNPs as genetic instruments for gallstones in an Indian population. RESULTS: We found a strong observational association between gallstones and GBC using self-reported history of gallstones (OR=4.5, 95%CI=3.5-5.8) and with objective measures of gallstone presence using imaging techniques (OR=2.0, 95%CI=1.5-2.7). We found consistent causal estimates across all MR techniques, with odds ratios for GBC in the range of 1.3-1.6. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate a causal relationship between history of gallstones and increased risk of GBC, albeit of a smaller magnitude to those found in observational analysis. IMPACT: Our findings emphasise the importance of gallstone treatment for preventing GBC in high risk individuals.

5.
Int J Epidemiol ; 2020 Nov 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33150399

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: It is established that Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients experience sleep disruption. However, it remains unknown whether disruption in the quantity, quality or timing of sleep is a risk factor for the onset of AD. METHODS: We used the largest published genome-wide association studies of self-reported and accelerometer-measured sleep traits (chronotype, duration, fragmentation, insomnia, daytime napping and daytime sleepiness), and AD. Mendelian randomization (MR) was used to estimate the causal effect of self-reported and accelerometer-measured sleep parameters on AD risk. RESULTS: Overall, there was little evidence to support a causal effect of sleep traits on AD risk. There was some suggestive evidence that self-reported daytime napping was associated with lower AD risk [odds ratio (OR): 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50-0.99). Some other sleep traits (accelerometer-measured 'eveningness' and sleep duration, and self-reported daytime sleepiness) had ORs of a similar magnitude to daytime napping, but were less precisely estimated. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found very limited evidence to support a causal effect of sleep traits on AD risk. Our findings provide tentative evidence that daytime napping may reduce AD risk. Given that this is the first MR study of multiple self-report and objective sleep traits on AD risk, findings should be replicated using independent samples when such data become available.

6.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 6071, 2020 11 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33247085

RESUMO

The independent effects of smoking and alcohol in head and neck cancer are not clear, given the strong association between these risk factors. Their apparent synergistic effect reported in previous observational studies may also underestimate independent effects. Here we report multivariable Mendelian randomization performed in a two-sample approach using summary data on 6,034 oral/oropharyngeal cases and 6,585 controls from a recent genome-wide association study. Our results demonstrate strong evidence for an independent causal effect of smoking on oral/oropharyngeal cancer (IVW OR 2.6, 95% CI = 1.7, 3.9 per standard deviation increase in lifetime smoking behaviour) and an independent causal effect of alcohol consumption when controlling for smoking (IVW OR 2.1, 95% CI = 1.1, 3.8 per standard deviation increase in drinks consumed per week). This suggests the possibility that the causal effect of alcohol may have been underestimated. However, the extent to which alcohol is modified by smoking requires further investigation.

7.
Environ Res ; 190: 109971, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32745538

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The extent of the biological impact of passive smoke exposure is unclear. We sought to investigate the association between passive smoke exposure and DNA methylation, which could serve as a biomarker of health risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We derived passive smoke exposure from self-reported questionnaire data among smoking and non-smoking partners of participants enrolled in the UK Household Longitudinal Study 'Understanding Society' (n=769). We performed an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) of passive smoke exposure with DNA methylation in peripheral blood measured using the Illumina Infinium Methylation EPIC array. RESULTS: No CpG sites surpassed the epigenome-wide significance threshold of p<5.97 × 10-8 in relation to partner smoking, compared with 10 CpG sites identified in relation to own smoking. However, 10 CpG sites surpassed a less stringent threshold of p<1 × 10-5 in a model of partner smoking adjusted for own smoking (model 1), 7 CpG sites in a model of partner smoking restricted to non-smokers (model 2) and 16 CpGs in a model restricted to regular smokers (model 3). In addition, there was evidence for an interaction between own smoking status and partners' smoking status on DNA methylation levels at the majority of CpG sites identified in models 2 and 3. There was a clear lack of enrichment for previously identified smoking signals in the EWAS of passive smoke exposure compared with the EWAS of own smoking. CONCLUSION: The DNA methylation signature associated with passive smoke exposure is much less pronounced than that of own smoking, with no positive findings for 'expected' signals. It is unlikely that changes to DNA methylation serve as an important mechanism underlying the health risks of passive smoke exposure.

8.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0235629, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32663218

RESUMO

Biomarkers can be used to assess smoking behaviour more accurately and objectively than self-report. This study assessed the association between cotinine (a biomarker of smoke exposure) and later e-cigarette use among a population who were unexposed to e-cigarettes in youth. Young people in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children took part in the study. We observed associations between cotinine at 15 years (measured between 2006 and 2008 before the wide availability of e-cigarettes) and self-reported ever use of e-cigarettes at 22 (measured between 2014 and 2015 when e-cigarettes were widely available) using logistic regression. A range of potential confounders were adjusted for (age, sex, body mass index, alcohol use and passive smoke exposure). Additionally, we adjusted for the young people's self-reported smoking status/history to explore potential misreporting and measurement error. In a sample of N = 1,194 young people, cotinine levels consistent with active smoking at 15 years were associated with increased odds of e-cigarette ever use at 22 years (Odds Ratio [OR] = 7.24, 95% CI 3.29 to 15.93) even when self-reported active smoking status at age 16 (OR = 3.14, 95% CI 1.32 to 7.48) and latent classes of smoking behaviour from 14 to 16 (OR = 2.70, 95% CI 0.98 to 7.44) were included in the model. Cotinine levels consistent with smoking in adolescence were strongly associated with increased odds of later e-cigarette use, even after adjusting for reported smoking behaviour at age 16 and smoking transitions from 14 to 16.


Assuntos
Sistemas Eletrônicos de Liberação de Nicotina/estatística & dados numéricos , Autorrelato , Fumar/epidemiologia , Fumar/metabolismo , Adolescente , Adulto , Biomarcadores/metabolismo , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Reino Unido/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
9.
Clin Epigenetics ; 12(1): 58, 2020 04 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32321578

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: DNA methylation (DNAm) variation is an established predictor for several traits. In the context of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC), where 5-year survival is ~ 65%, DNA methylation may act as a prognostic biomarker. We examined the accuracy of DNA methylation biomarkers of 4 complex exposure traits (alcohol consumption, body mass index [BMI], educational attainment and smoking status) in predicting all-cause mortality in people with OPC. RESULTS: DNAm predictors of alcohol consumption, BMI, educational attainment and smoking status were applied to 364 individuals with OPC in the Head and Neck 5000 cohort (HN5000; 19.6% of total OPC cases in the study), followed up for median 3.9 years; inter-quartile range (IQR) 3.3 to 5.2 years (time-to-event-death or censor). The proportion of phenotypic variance explained in each trait was as follows: 16.5% for alcohol consumption, 22.7% for BMI, 0.4% for educational attainment and 51.1% for smoking. We then assessed the relationship between each DNAm predictor and all-cause mortality using Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis. DNAm prediction of smoking was most consistently associated with mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR], 1.38 per standard deviation (SD) increase in smoking DNAm score; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04 to 1.83; P 0.025, in a model adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, health and biological variables). Finally, we examined the accuracy of each DNAm predictor of mortality. DNAm predictors explained similar levels of variance in mortality to self-reported phenotypes. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves for the DNAm predictors showed a moderate discrimination of alcohol consumption (area under the curve [AUC] 0.63), BMI (AUC 0.61) and smoking (AUC 0.70) when predicting mortality. The DNAm predictor for education showed poor discrimination (AUC 0.57). Z tests comparing AUCs between self-reported phenotype ROC curves and DNAm score ROC curves did not show evidence for difference between the two (alcohol consumption P 0.41, BMI P 0.62, educational attainment P 0.49, smoking P 0.19). CONCLUSIONS: In the context of a clinical cohort of individuals with OPC, DNAm predictors for smoking, alcohol consumption, educational attainment and BMI exhibit similar predictive values for all-cause mortality compared to self-reported data. These findings may have translational utility in prognostic model development, particularly where phenotypic data are not available.

10.
Am J Hum Genet ; 106(3): 315-326, 2020 03 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32084330

RESUMO

Whether smoking-associated DNA methylation has a causal effect on lung function has not been thoroughly evaluated. We first investigated the causal effects of 474 smoking-associated CpGs on forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) in UK Biobank (n = 321,047) by using two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) and then replicated this investigation in the SpiroMeta Consortium (n = 79,055). Second, we used two-step MR to investigate whether DNA methylation mediates the effect of smoking on FEV1. Lastly, we evaluated the presence of horizontal pleiotropy and assessed whether there is any evidence for shared causal genetic variants between lung function, DNA methylation, and gene expression by using a multiple-trait colocalization ("moloc") framework. We found evidence of a possible causal effect for DNA methylation on FEV1 at 18 CpGs (p < 1.2 × 10-4). Replication analysis supported a causal effect at three CpGs (cg21201401 [LIME1 and ZGPAT], cg19758448 [PGAP3], and cg12616487 [EML3 and AHNAK] [p < 0.0028]). DNA methylation did not clearly mediate the effect of smoking on FEV1, although DNA methylation at some sites might influence lung function via effects on smoking. By using "moloc", we found evidence of shared causal variants between lung function, gene expression, and DNA methylation. These findings highlight potential therapeutic targets for improving lung function and possibly smoking cessation, although larger, tissue-specific datasets are required to confirm these results.


Assuntos
Metilação de DNA , Pulmão/fisiologia , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana/métodos , Fumar , Ilhas de CpG , Volume Expiratório Forçado , Pleiotropia Genética , Humanos
11.
Syst Rev ; 9(1): 10, 2020 01 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31918756

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The workplace environment potentially provides access to a large population who are employed, and it is an employer's responsibility to provide appropriate conditions for its employees. Whilst the aetiology of cardiovascular disease is multifactorial, it is generally acknowledged that working conditions, gender and age are involved in its development. Male-dominated industries (comprising > 70% male workers, e.g., agriculture, construction, manufacturing, mining, transport and technology) have a higher prevalence of health risk behaviours than other population subgroups. Working in a gender-dominated industry can impact an employee's health and wellbeing, particularly for the opposite sex. This systematic review examines workplace interventions that address the health and wellbeing of employees in male-dominated industries. METHODS: We will include randomised controlled trials and studies with non-randomised intervention groups. The interventions must aim to improve employee physical and/or mental health and wellbeing implemented in the workplace in male-dominated industries. There will be no limits on date. The following electronic databases will be searched for published studies: Web of Science, Embed, MedLine, PsycInfo and the Cochrane Database. The search strategy will include free-text terms and MeSH vocabulary, including 'male-dominated industries', 'workplace interventions', 'occupational stress', 'mental health', 'cardiovascular disease', 'blood pressure', 'body mass index' and 'exercise'. Two authors will independently select, review and extract data from studies that meet the inclusion criteria. The Cochrane's Risk of Bias tool will be used to assess risk of bias. We will perform structured summaries of the included studies and, if possible, conduct meta-analyses or construct an Albatross plot. DISCUSSION: There are an increasing number of interventions designed to improve employee health and wellbeing in the workplace, but no prior review that systematically evaluates their effectiveness. A systematic review is required to prioritise the future implementation of those interventions found to be most effective. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42019161283.

12.
PLoS One ; 15(1): e0228206, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31978120

RESUMO

Recent experimental studies indicated that a periodontitis-causing bacterium might be a causal factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We applied a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) approach to examine the potential causal relationship between chronic periodontitis and AD bidirectionally in the population of European ancestry. We used publicly available data of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on periodontitis and AD. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used as instrumental variables for periodontitis. For the MR analysis of periodontitis on risk of AD, the causal odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were derived from the GWAS of periodontitis (4,924 cases vs. 7,301 controls) and from the GWAS of AD (21,982 cases vs. 41,944 controls). Seven non-overlapping SNPs from another latest GWAS of periodontitis was used to validate the above association. Twenty SNPs were used as instrumental variables for AD. For the MR analysis of liability to AD on risk of periodontitis, the causal OR was derived from the GWAS of AD including 30,344 cases and 52,427 controls and from the GWAS of periodontitis consisted of 12,289 cases and 22,326 controls. We employed multiple methods of MR. Using the five SNPs as instruments of periodontitis, there was suggestive evidence of genetically predicted periodontitis being associated with a higher risk of AD (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.19, P = 0.02). However, this association was not verified using the seven independent SNPs (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.08, P = 0.59). There was no association of genetically predicted AD with the risk of periodontitis (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.04, P = 0.85). In summary, we did not find convincing evidence to support periodontitis being a causal factor for the development of AD. There was also limited evidence to suggest genetic liability to AD being associated with the risk of periodontitis.


Assuntos
Doença de Alzheimer/patologia , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana/métodos , Periodontite/patologia , Doença de Alzheimer/etiologia , Doença de Alzheimer/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Razão de Chances , Periodontite/complicações , Periodontite/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Risco
13.
Psychol Med ; 50(14): 2435-2443, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31689377

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Smoking prevalence is higher amongst individuals with schizophrenia and depression compared with the general population. Mendelian randomisation (MR) can examine whether this association is causal using genetic variants identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). METHODS: We conducted two-sample MR to explore the bi-directional effects of smoking on schizophrenia and depression. For smoking behaviour, we used (1) smoking initiation GWAS from the GSCAN consortium and (2) we conducted our own GWAS of lifetime smoking behaviour (which captures smoking duration, heaviness and cessation) in a sample of 462690 individuals from the UK Biobank. We validated this instrument using positive control outcomes (e.g. lung cancer). For schizophrenia and depression we used GWAS from the PGC consortium. RESULTS: There was strong evidence to suggest smoking is a risk factor for both schizophrenia (odds ratio (OR) 2.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.67-3.08, p < 0.001) and depression (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.71-2.32, p < 0.001). Results were consistent across both lifetime smoking and smoking initiation. We found some evidence that genetic liability to depression increases smoking (ß = 0.091, 95% CI 0.027-0.155, p = 0.005) but evidence was mixed for schizophrenia (ß = 0.022, 95% CI 0.005-0.038, p = 0.009) with very weak evidence for an effect on smoking initiation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the association between smoking, schizophrenia and depression is due, at least in part, to a causal effect of smoking, providing further evidence for the detrimental consequences of smoking on mental health.

14.
Int J Epidemiol ; 48(5): 1493-1504, 2019 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31549173

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: DNA methylation changes in peripheral blood have recently been identified in relation to lung cancer risk. Some of these changes have been suggested to mediate part of the effect of smoking on lung cancer. However, limitations with conventional mediation analyses mean that the causal nature of these methylation changes has yet to be fully elucidated. METHODS: We first performed a meta-analysis of four epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) of lung cancer (918 cases, 918 controls). Next, we conducted a two-sample Mendelian randomization analysis, using genetic instruments for methylation at CpG sites identified in the EWAS meta-analysis, and 29 863 cases and 55 586 controls from the TRICL-ILCCO lung cancer consortium, to appraise the possible causal role of methylation at these sites on lung cancer. RESULTS: Sixteen CpG sites were identified from the EWAS meta-analysis [false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05], for 14 of which we could identify genetic instruments. Mendelian randomization provided little evidence that DNA methylation in peripheral blood at the 14 CpG sites plays a causal role in lung cancer development (FDR > 0.05), including for cg05575921-AHRR where methylation is strongly associated with both smoke exposure and lung cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: The results contrast with previous observational and mediation analysis, which have made strong claims regarding the causal role of DNA methylation. Thus, previous suggestions of a mediating role of methylation at sites identified in peripheral blood, such as cg05575921-AHRR, could be unfounded. However, this study does not preclude the possibility that differential DNA methylation at other sites is causally involved in lung cancer development, especially within lung tissue.


Assuntos
Fatores de Transcrição Hélice-Alça-Hélice Básicos/genética , Ilhas de CpG/genética , Metilação de DNA/genética , Neoplasias Pulmonares/genética , Proteínas Repressoras/genética , Metilação de DNA/fisiologia , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana
15.
Epigenomics ; 11(13): 1487-1500, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31536415

RESUMO

Aim: Cigarette smoking influences DNA methylation genome wide, in newborns from pregnancy exposure and in adults from personal smoking. Whether a unique methylation signature exists for in utero exposure in newborns is unknown. Materials & methods: We separately meta-analyzed newborn blood DNA methylation (assessed using Illumina450k Beadchip), in relation to sustained maternal smoking during pregnancy (9 cohorts, 5648 newborns, 897 exposed) and adult blood methylation and personal smoking (16 cohorts, 15907 participants, 2433 current smokers). Results & conclusion: Comparing meta-analyses, we identified numerous signatures specific to newborns along with many shared between newborns and adults. Unique smoking-associated genes in newborns were enriched in xenobiotic metabolism pathways. Our findings may provide insights into specific health impacts of prenatal exposure on offspring.


Assuntos
Metilação de DNA , Epigenômica/métodos , Efeitos Tardios da Exposição Pré-Natal/genética , Fumar Tabaco/genética , Adulto , Estudos de Coortes , Ilhas de CpG , Epigênese Genética , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Exposição Materna/efeitos adversos , Gravidez , Efeitos Tardios da Exposição Pré-Natal/epidemiologia , Fumar Tabaco/epidemiologia
16.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 3503, 2019 08 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31409809

RESUMO

Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) affects 10-20% of the population and is associated with substantial functional deficits. Here, we identify 42 loci for self-reported daytime sleepiness in GWAS of 452,071 individuals from the UK Biobank, with enrichment for genes expressed in brain tissues and in neuronal transmission pathways. We confirm the aggregate effect of a genetic risk score of 42 SNPs on daytime sleepiness in independent Scandinavian cohorts and on other sleep disorders (restless legs syndrome, insomnia) and sleep traits (duration, chronotype, accelerometer-derived sleep efficiency and daytime naps or inactivity). However, individual daytime sleepiness signals vary in their associations with objective short vs long sleep, and with markers of sleep continuity. The 42 sleepiness variants primarily cluster into two predominant composite biological subtypes - sleep propensity and sleep fragmentation. Shared genetic links are also seen with obesity, coronary heart disease, psychiatric diseases, cognitive traits and reproductive ageing.


Assuntos
Loci Gênicos , Sono/genética , Sonolência , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Polissonografia , Autorrelato/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Sexuais , Adulto Jovem
17.
Int J Epidemiol ; 48(3): 887-898, 2019 06 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31257439

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is mounting evidence that our environment and lifestyle has an impact on epigenetic regulatory mechanisms, such as DNA methylation. It has been suggested that these molecular processes may mediate the effect of risk factors on disease susceptibility, although evidence in this regard has been challenging to uncover. Using genetic variants as surrogate variables, we have used two-sample Mendelian randomization (2SMR) to investigate the potential implications of putative changes to DNA methylation levels on disease susceptibility. METHODS: To illustrate our approach, we identified 412 CpG sites where DNA methylation was associated with prenatal smoking. We then applied 2SMR to investigate potential downstream effects of these putative changes on 643 complex traits using findings from large-scale genome-wide association studies. To strengthen evidence of mediatory mechanisms, we used multiple-trait colocalization to assess whether DNA methylation, nearby gene expression and complex trait variation were all influenced by the same causal genetic variant. RESULTS: We identified 22 associations that survived multiple testing (P < 1.89 × 10-7). In-depth follow-up analyses of particular note suggested that the associations between DNA methylation at the ASPSCR1 and REST/POL2RB gene regions, both linked with reduced lung function, may be mediated by changes in gene expression. We validated associations between DNA methylation and traits using independent samples from different stages across the life course. CONCLUSION: Our approach should prove valuable in prioritizing CpG sites that may mediate the effect of causal risk factors on disease. In-depth evaluations of findings are necessary to robustly disentangle causality from alternative explanations such as horizontal pleiotropy.


Assuntos
Metilação de DNA/genética , Epigênese Genética/genética , Efeitos Tardios da Exposição Pré-Natal/genética , Fumar , Pressão Sanguínea/genética , Densidade Óssea/genética , Ilhas de CpG , Feminino , Volume Expiratório Forçado/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Fenótipo , Gravidez , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Reino Unido , Capacidade Vital/genética
18.
Clin Epigenetics ; 11(1): 97, 2019 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31262328

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with adverse offspring health outcomes across their life course. We hypothesize that DNA methylation is a potential mediator of this relationship. METHODS: We examined the association of prenatal maternal smoking with offspring blood DNA methylation in 2821 individuals (age 16 to 48 years) from five prospective birth cohort studies and perform Mendelian randomization and mediation analyses to assess whether methylation markers have causal effects on disease outcomes in the offspring. RESULTS: We identify 69 differentially methylated CpGs in 36 genomic regions (P value < 1 × 10-7) associated with exposure to maternal smoking in adolescents and adults. Mendelian randomization analyses provided evidence for a causal role of four maternal smoking-related CpG sites on an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease or schizophrenia. Further mediation analyses showed some evidence of cg25189904 in GNG12 gene mediating the effect of exposure to maternal smoking on schizophrenia-related outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: DNA methylation may represent a biological mechanism through which maternal smoking is associated with increased risk of psychiatric morbidity in the exposed offspring.


Assuntos
Metilação de DNA , Subunidades gama da Proteína de Ligação ao GTP/genética , Exposição Materna/efeitos adversos , Efeitos Tardios da Exposição Pré-Natal/genética , Esquizofrenia/genética , Fumar/efeitos adversos , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudos de Coortes , Ilhas de CpG , Epigênese Genética , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gravidez , Efeitos Tardios da Exposição Pré-Natal/induzido quimicamente , Estudos Prospectivos , Esquizofrenia/induzido quimicamente , Adulto Jovem
19.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 28(12): 2070-2078, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31315910

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The 5-year mortality rate for pancreatic cancer is among the highest of all cancers. Greater understanding of underlying causes could inform population-wide intervention strategies for prevention. Summary genetic data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have become available for thousands of phenotypes. These data can be exploited in Mendelian randomization (MR) phenome-wide association studies (PheWAS) to efficiently screen the phenome for potential determinants of disease risk. METHODS: We conducted an MR-PheWAS of pancreatic cancer using 486 phenotypes, proxied by 9,124 genetic variants, and summary genetic data from a GWAS of pancreatic cancer (7,110 cancer cases, 7,264 controls). ORs and 95% confidence intervals per 1 SD increase in each phenotype were generated. RESULTS: We found evidence that previously reported risk factors of body mass index (BMI; 1.46; 1.20-1.78) and hip circumference (1.42; 1.21-1.67) were associated with pancreatic cancer. We also found evidence of novel associations with metabolites that have not previously been implicated in pancreatic cancer: ADpSGEGDFXAEGGGVR*, a fibrinogen-cleavage peptide (1.60; 1.31-1.95), and O-sulfo-l-tyrosine (0.58; 0.46-0.74). An inverse association was also observed with lung adenocarcinoma (0.63; 0.54-0.74). CONCLUSIONS: Markers of adiposity (BMI and hip circumference) are potential intervention targets for pancreatic cancer prevention. Further clarification of the causal relevance of the fibrinogen-cleavage peptides and O-sulfo-l-tyrosine in pancreatic cancer etiology is required, as is the basis of our observed association with lung adenocarcinoma. IMPACT: For pancreatic cancer, MR-PheWAS can augment existing risk factor knowledge and generate novel hypotheses to investigate.


Assuntos
Obesidade/genética , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/genética , Adiposidade , Antropometria , Índice de Massa Corporal , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana/métodos , Obesidade/metabolismo , Obesidade/patologia , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/metabolismo , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/patologia , Fenômica , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Risco
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