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1.
Genet Epidemiol ; 2019 Aug 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31407831

RESUMO

Epidemiologic studies show an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in patients with autoimmune disease (AD), due to a combination of shared environmental factors and/or genetic factors, or a causative cascade: chronic inflammation/antigen-stimulation in one disease leads to another. Here we assess shared genetic risk in genome-wide-association-studies (GWAS). Secondary analysis of GWAS of NHL subtypes (chronic lymphocytic leukemia, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and marginal zone lymphoma) and ADs (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis). Shared genetic risk was assessed by (a) description of regional genetic of overlap, (b) polygenic risk score (PRS), (c)"diseasome", (d)meta-analysis. Descriptive analysis revealed few shared genetic factors between each AD and each NHL subtype. The PRS of ADs were not increased in NHL patients (nor vice versa). In the diseasome, NHLs shared more genetic etiology with ADs than solid cancers (p = .0041). A meta-analysis (combing AD with NHL) implicated genes of apoptosis and telomere length. This GWAS-based analysis four NHL subtypes and three ADs revealed few weakly-associated shared loci, explaining little total risk. This suggests common genetic variation, as assessed by GWAS in these sample sizes, may not be the primary explanation for the link between these ADs and NHLs.

3.
Occup Environ Med ; 76(10): 746-753, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31358566

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Previously published studies on parental occupational exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) and risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in their offspring were inconsistent. We therefore evaluated this question within the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. METHODS: We pooled 11 case-control studies including 9723 childhood leukaemia cases and 17 099 controls. Parental occupational ELF-MF exposure was estimated by linking jobs to an ELF-MF job-exposure matrix (JEM). Logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs in pooled analyses and meta-analyses. RESULTS: ORs from pooled analyses for paternal ELF-MF exposure >0.2 microtesla (µT) at conception were 1.04 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.13) for ALL and 1.06 (95% CI 0.87 to 1.29) for AML, compared with ≤0.2 µT. Corresponding ORs for maternal ELF-MF exposure during pregnancy were 1.00 (95% CI 0.89 to 1.12) for ALL and 0.85 (95% CI 0.61 to 1.16) for AML. No trends of increasing ORs with increasing exposure level were evident. Furthermore, no associations were observed in the meta-analyses. CONCLUSIONS: In this large international dataset applying a comprehensive quantitative JEM, we did not find any associations between parental occupational ELF-MF exposure and childhood leukaemia.

4.
Eur J Oncol Nurs ; 39: 70-80, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30850141

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Patients with haematological malignancies are more likely to die in hospital, and less likely to access palliative care than people with other cancers, though the reasons for this are not well understood. The purpose of our study was to explore haematology nurses' perspectives of their patients' places of care and death. METHOD: Qualitative description, based on thematic content analysis. Eight haematology nurses working in secondary and tertiary hospital settings were purposively selected and interviewed. Transcriptions were coded and analysed for themes using a mainly inductive, cross-comparative approach. RESULTS: Five inter-related factors were identified as contributing to the likelihood of patients' receiving end of life care/dying in hospital: the complex nature of haematological diseases and their treatment; close clinician-patient bonds; delays to end of life discussions; lack of integration between haematology and palliative care services; and barriers to death at home. CONCLUSIONS: Hospital death is often determined by the characteristics of the cancer and type of treatment. Prognostication is complex across subtypes and hospital death perceived as unavoidable, and sometimes the preferred option. Earlier, frank conversations that focus on realistic outcomes, closer integration of palliative care and haematology services, better communication across the secondary/primary care interface, and an increase in out-of-hours nursing support could improve end of life care and facilitate death at home or in hospice, when preferred.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Neoplasias Hematológicas/terapia , Hematologia , Recursos Humanos de Enfermagem no Hospital/psicologia , Assistência Terminal , Comunicação , Humanos , Cuidados Paliativos , Percepção , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Reino Unido
5.
Cancer Epidemiol ; 59: 236-243, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30844679

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Autoimmune inflammatory disease increases the risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL), but findings for other mature B-cell malignancies are equivocal. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the increase in DLBCL is due to the activated B-cell (ABC) subtype; but data on this, and the impact of inflammatory co-morbidities on survival, are sparse and contradictory. METHODS: Data are from an established UK population-based cohort. Patients (n = 6834) diagnosed between 01/2009 and 08/2015 are included; DLBCL (n = 1771), myeloma (n = 1760), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL, n = 1580), MZL (n = 936), and follicular lymphoma (FL, n = 787). Information on rheumatological disorders and deaths was obtained by record-linkage to nationally compiled Hospital Episode Statistics, with age-and sex-matched individuals (n = 68,340) from the same catchment population (˜4 million people) providing the comparator. RESULTS: Significantly increased risks for DLBCL (OR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.8-2.8) and MZL (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.5-2.7) were found for those with rheumatological disorders; the site distribution of those with/without rheumatological conditions differing for DLBCL (p = 0.007) and MZL (p = 0.002). No increases in risk were observed for the remaining mature B-cell malignancies, and no associations with survival were detected for DLBCL (age-adjusted HR = 1.2, 95% CI 0.9-1.6) or MZL (age-adjusted HR = 1.0, 95% CI 0.6-1.9). Furthermore, whilst our findings provide evidence for an association with rheumatological disease severity for DLBCL, they offer little support for the notion that the association is driven by an increase in the incidence of the ABC subtype. CONCLUSION: Our findings support the hypothesis that the chronic activation and proliferation of specific B-cell populations which characterize autoimmune disease increase the potential for the lymphomagenic events that lead to DLBCL and MZL in both males and females; but have no impact on the development of CLL, FL or MM, or on survival.

6.
Cancer Epidemiol ; 59: 158-165, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30776582

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Parental age has been associated with several childhood cancers, albeit the evidence is still inconsistent. AIM: To examine the associations of parental age at birth with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) among children aged 0-14 years using individual-level data from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) and non-CLIC studies. MATERIAL/METHODS: We analyzed data of 3182 incident AML cases and 8377 controls from 17 studies [seven registry-based case-control (RCC) studies and ten questionnaire-based case-control (QCC) studies]. AML risk in association with parental age was calculated using multiple logistic regression, meta-analyses, and pooled-effect estimates. Models were stratified by age at diagnosis (infants <1 year-old vs. children 1-14 years-old) and by study design, using five-year parental age increments and controlling for sex, ethnicity, birthweight, prematurity, multiple gestation, birth order, maternal smoking and education, age at diagnosis (cases aged 1-14 years), and recruitment time period. RESULTS: Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) derived from RCC, but not from the QCC, studies showed a higher AML risk for infants of mothers ≥40-year-old (OR = 6.87; 95% CI: 2.12-22.25). There were no associations observed between any other maternal or paternal age group and AML risk for children older than one year. CONCLUSIONS: An increased risk of infant AML with advanced maternal age was found using data from RCC, but not from QCC studies; no parental age-AML associations were observed for older children.

8.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 419, 2019 Jan 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30664635

RESUMO

The original version of this Article contained an error in the spelling of a member of the PRACTICAL Consortium, Manuela Gago-Dominguez, which was incorrectly given as Manuela Gago Dominguez. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article. Furthermore, in the original HTML version of this Article, the order of authors within the author list was incorrect. The PRACTICAL consortium was incorrectly listed after Richard S. Houlston and should have been listed after Nora Pashayan. This error has been corrected in the HTML version of the Article; the PDF version was correct at the time of publication.

9.
Palliat Med ; 33(5): 518-530, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30696347

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: People with haematological malignancies have different end-of-life care patterns from those with other cancers and are more likely to die in hospital. Little is known about patient and relative preferences at this time and whether these are achieved. AIM: To explore the experiences and reflections of bereaved relatives of patients with leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma, and examine (1) preferred place of care and death; (2) perceptions of factors influencing attainment of preferences; and (3) changes that could promote achievement of preferences. DESIGN: Qualitative interview study incorporating 'Framework' analysis. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: A total of 10 in-depth interviews with bereaved relatives. RESULTS: Although most people expressed a preference for home death, not all attained this. The influencing factors include disease characteristics (potential for sudden deterioration and death), the occurrence and timing of discussions (treatment cessation, prognosis, place of care/death), family networks (willingness/ability of relatives to provide care, knowledge about services, confidence to advocate) and resource availability (clinical care, hospice beds/policies). Preferences were described as changing over time and some family members retrospectively came to consider hospital as the 'right' place for the patient to have died. Others shared strong preferences with patients for home death and acted to ensure this was achieved. No patients died in a hospice, and relatives identified barriers to death in this setting. CONCLUSION: Preferences were not always achieved due to a series of complex, interrelated factors, some amenable to change and others less so. Death in hospital may be preferred and appropriate, or considered the best option in hindsight.

10.
Br J Gen Pract ; 69(679): e134-e145, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30692091

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Expediting cancer diagnosis is widely perceived as one way to improve patient outcomes. Evidence indicates that lymphoma diagnosis is often delayed, yet understanding of issues influencing this is incomplete. AIM: To explore patients' and their relatives' perceptions of disease-related factors affecting time to diagnosis of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. DESIGN AND SETTING: Qualitative UK study involving patients with indolent and aggressive lymphomas, and their relatives, from an established population-based cohort in the north of England. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews with 35 patients and 15 of their relatives. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed, and qualitative descriptive analysis was undertaken. RESULTS: Participant accounts suggest that certain features of lymphoma can impact on patients' and healthcare providers' (HCPs) responses to disease onset. Three characteristics stand out: disease occurrence (rare), manifestation (varied), and investigative options (often inconclusive). Interviewees described how they, and some HCPs, lacked familiarity with lymphoma, seldom considering it a likely explanation for their symptoms. Symptoms reported were highly variable, frequently non-specific, and often initially thought to be associated with various benign, self-limiting causes. Blood tests and other investigations, while frequently able to detect abnormalities, did not reliably indicate malignancy. Interviewees reported the potential for improvements among HCPs in information gathering, communication of uncertainty, and re-presentation advice for non-resolving/progressive health changes. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the complex characteristics of lymphoma, perceived by patients as prolonging time to diagnosis, often despite significant effort by themselves, their relatives, and HCPs to expedite this process. The findings also illustrate why simple solutions to delayed diagnosis of lymphoma are lacking.

11.
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol ; 32(6): 568-583, 2018 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30466188

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Childhood cancer is a rare but leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Established risk factors, accounting for <10% of incidence, have been identified primarily from case-control studies. However, recall, selection and other potential biases impact interpretations particularly, for modest associations. A consortium of pregnancy and birth cohorts (I4C) was established to utilise prospective, pre-diagnostic exposure assessments and biological samples. METHODS: Eligibility criteria, follow-up methods and identification of paediatric cancer cases are described for cohorts currently participating or planning future participation. Also described are exposure assessments, harmonisation methods, biological samples potentially available for I4C research, the role of the I4C data and biospecimen coordinating centres and statistical approaches used in the pooled analyses. RESULTS: Currently, six cohorts recruited over six decades (1950s-2000s) contribute data on 388 120 mother-child pairs. Nine new cohorts from seven countries are anticipated to contribute data on 627 500 additional projected mother-child pairs within 5 years. Harmonised data currently includes over 20 "core" variables, with notable variability in mother/child characteristics within and across cohorts, reflecting in part, secular changes in pregnancy and birth characteristics over the decades. CONCLUSIONS: The I4C is the first cohort consortium to have published findings on paediatric cancer using harmonised variables across six pregnancy/birth cohorts. Projected increases in sample size, expanding sources of exposure data (eg, linkages to environmental and administrative databases), incorporation of biological measures to clarify exposures and underlying molecular mechanisms and forthcoming joint efforts to complement case-control studies offer the potential for breakthroughs in paediatric cancer aetiologic research.

13.
Value Health ; 21(10): 1176-1185, 2018 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30314618

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To use real-world data to develop a flexible generic decision model to predict cost, life expectancy, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for follicular lymphoma (FL) in the general patient population. METHODS: All patients newly diagnosed with FL in the UK's population-based Haematological Malignancy Research Network (www.hmrn.org) between 2004 and 2011 were followed until 2015 (N = 740). Treatment pathways, QALYs, and costs were incorporated into a discrete event simulation to reflect patient heterogeneity, including age and disease management. Two scenario analyses, based on the latest National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines (rituximab induction therapy for newly diagnosed asymptomatic patients and rituximab maintenance therapy for patients between treatments), were conducted and their economic impacts were compared to current practice. RESULTS: Incidence-based analysis revealed expected average lifetime costs ranging from £6,165 [US$7,709] to £63,864 [US$79,862] per patient, and average life expectancy from 75 days to 17.56 years. Prevalence-based analysis estimated average annual treatment costs of £60-65 million [US$75-80 million], accounting for approximately 10% of the United Kingdom's annual National Health Service budget for hematological cancers as a whole. Assuming that treatment effects reported in trials are applicable to all patient groups, scenario analyses for two recent NICE guidelines demonstrated potential annual cost savings for the United Kingdom that ranged with uptake frequency from £0.6 million to £11 million [US$0.75-2.75 million]. CONCLUSIONS: Costs, survival, and QALYs associated with FL vary markedly with patient characteristics and disease management. Allowing the production of more realistic outcomes across the patient population as a whole, our model addresses this heterogeneity and is a useful tool with which to evaluate new technologies/treatments to support healthcare decision makers.


Assuntos
Análise Custo-Benefício/tendências , Técnicas de Apoio para a Decisão , Expectativa de Vida/tendências , Linfoma Folicular/economia , Vigilância da População , Anos de Vida Ajustados por Qualidade de Vida , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Análise Custo-Benefício/métodos , Feminino , Previsões , Humanos , Linfoma Folicular/mortalidade , Linfoma Folicular/terapia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Vigilância da População/métodos , Estatística como Assunto/métodos , Estatística como Assunto/tendências , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
14.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 2018 May 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29761423

RESUMO

Advanced parental age has been associated with adverse health effects in the offspring including childhood (0-14 years) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), as reported in our meta-analysis of published studies. We aimed to further explore the association using primary data from 16 studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Data were contributed by 11 case-control (CC) studies (7919 cases and 12,942 controls recruited via interviews) and five nested case-control (NCC) studies (8801 cases and 29,690 controls identified through record linkage of population-based health registries) with variable enrollment periods (1968-2015). Five-year paternal and maternal age increments were introduced in two meta-analyses by study design using adjusted odds ratios (OR) derived from each study. Increased paternal age was associated with greater ALL risk in the offspring (ORCC 1.05, 95% CI 1.00-1.11; ORNCC 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07). A similar positive association with advanced maternal age was observed only in the NCC results (ORCC 0.99, 95% CI 0.91-1.07, heterogeneity I2 = 58%, p = 0.002; ORNCC 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.08). The positive association between parental age and risk of ALL was most marked among children aged 1-5 years and remained unchanged following mutual adjustment for the collinear effect of the paternal and maternal age variables; analyses of the relatively small numbers of discordant paternal-maternal age pairs were not fully enlightening. Our results strengthen the evidence that advanced parental age is associated with increased childhood ALL risk; collinearity of maternal with paternal age complicates causal interpretation. Employing datasets with cytogenetic information may further elucidate involvement of each parental component and clarify underlying mechanisms.

15.
PLoS One ; 13(4): e0194788, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29617390

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pathways to myeloma diagnosis can be prolonged, and are often preceded by multiple GP consultations and emergency presentation. This is the first qualitative study to examine events leading to diagnosis by asking patients about their experiences during this time. METHODS: Set within a UK population-based cohort, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 myeloma patients with varying characteristics and pathways, 12 of whom invited their relatives to take part. Interviews were audio-recorded and qualitative analysis undertaken. RESULTS: Pre-diagnostic awareness of myeloma was minimal. Disease onset was typically described as gradual, and health changes vague but progressive, with increasing loss of function. A wide range of symptoms was reported, with the similarity of these to self-limiting conditions failing to raise suspicion of myeloma among patients and GPs. Patients tended to normalise symptoms at first, although all eventually sought GP advice. GPs often initially suggested benign diagnoses, which were sometimes only revised after multiple consultations with persistent/worsening symptoms. Referrals were made to various hospital specialities, and haematology if associated with abnormal blood tests suggestive of myeloma. Once in secondary care, progress towards diagnosis was generally rapid. CONCLUSIONS: Accounts confirmed that pathways to diagnosis could be difficult, largely due to the way myeloma presents, and how symptoms are interpreted and managed by patients and GPs. Recognition of 'normal' health and consultation patterns for the individual could promote appropriate help-seeking and timely referral when changes occur, and may be more effective than raising awareness about the myriad of potential symptoms associated with this disease.


Assuntos
Mieloma Múltiplo/diagnóstico , Adulto , Idoso , Conscientização , Estudos de Coortes , Diagnóstico Tardio , Feminino , Clínicos Gerais/psicologia , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mieloma Múltiplo/psicologia , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Atenção Secundária à Saúde
17.
Nat Commun ; 9(1): 1340, 2018 04 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29632299

RESUMO

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have advanced our understanding of susceptibility to B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL); however, much of the heritable risk remains unidentified. Here, we perform a GWAS and conduct a meta-analysis with two existing GWAS, totaling 2442 cases and 14,609 controls. We identify risk loci for BCP-ALL at 8q24.21 (rs28665337, P = 3.86 × 10-9, odds ratio (OR) = 1.34) and for ETV6-RUNX1 fusion-positive BCP-ALL at 2q22.3 (rs17481869, P = 3.20 × 10-8, OR = 2.14). Our findings provide further insights into genetic susceptibility to ALL and its biology.

18.
Br J Haematol ; 181(2): 215-228, 2018 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29532919

RESUMO

The treatment landscape for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) has changed dramatically in recent years, with findings from clinical trials reporting improvements in survival. Data on the general patient population are, however, sparse; and it is unclear whether the effects observed in clinical trials have translated into the real-world setting. To investigate this, we examined first-line and relapsed/refractory (RR) disease management in 335 MCL patients diagnosed between 2004 and 2015 in an established population-based patient cohort, along with data on demographic, diagnostic and prognostic factors. Marked treatment and survival changes were observed; first-line rituximab immunotherapy, for example, increased from 32% to 86% over the 11-year period, and median survival increased from 2·0 years among those first treated in 2004-2011 to 3·5 years among those treated in 2012-2015. Outcomes for RR disease also improved, from 8 months in 2004-2011 to 16·8 months in 2012-2015, coinciding with the introduction of agents, such as bendamustine and ibrutinib. Encouragingly, improvements were seen across all ages; 1-year overall survival among patients over 70 years treated for RR disease almost doubled. Our analyses underscore the importance of monitoring the impact of treatment changes in the real-world setting.

19.
BMC Palliat Care ; 17(1): 33, 2018 Feb 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29466968

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Haematological malignancies (leukaemias, lymphomas and myeloma) are complex cancers that are relatively common, affect all ages and have divergent outcomes. Although the symptom burden of these diseases is comparable to other cancers, patients do not access specialist palliative care (SPC) services as often as those with other cancers. To determine the reasons for this, we asked SPC practitioners about their perspectives regarding the barriers and facilitators influencing haematology patient referrals. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative study, set within the United Kingdom's (UK's) Haematological Malignancy Research Network (HMRN: www.hmrn.org ), a population-based cohort in the North of England. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 SPC doctors and nurses working in hospital, community and hospice settings between 2012 and 2014. Interviews were digitally audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed for thematic content using the 'Framework' method. RESULTS: Study participants identified a range of barriers and facilitators influencing the referral of patients with haematological malignancies to SPC services. Barriers included: the characteristics and pathways of haematological malignancies; the close patient/haematology team relationship; lack of role clarity; late end of life discussions and SPC referrals; policy issues; and organisational issues. The main facilitators identified were: establishment of inter-disciplinary working patterns (co-working) and enhanced understanding of roles; timely discussions with patients and early SPC referral; access to information platforms able to support information sharing; and use of indicators to 'flag' patients' needs for SPC. Collaboration between haematology and SPC was perceived as beneficial and desirable, and was said to be increasing over time. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first UK study to explore SPC practitioners' perceptions concerning haematology patient referrals. Numerous factors were found to influence the likelihood of referral, some of which related to the organisation and delivery of SPC services, so were amenable to change, and others relating to the complex and unique characteristics and pathways of haematological cancers. Further research is needed to assess the extent to which palliative care is provided by haematology doctors and nurses and other generalists and ways in which clinical uncertainty could be used as a trigger, rather than a barrier, to referral.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Neoplasias Hematológicas/terapia , Hematologia/métodos , Cuidados Paliativos , Percepção , Encaminhamento e Consulta/normas , Neoplasias Hematológicas/psicologia , Hematologia/tendências , Cuidados Paliativos na Terminalidade da Vida , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Cuidados Paliativos/normas , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Encaminhamento e Consulta/tendências , Reino Unido , Recursos Humanos
20.
BMJ Support Palliat Care ; 8(1): 78-86, 2018 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28663341

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Current UK health policy promotes enabling people to die in a place they choose, which for most is home. Despite this, patients with haematological malignancies (leukaemias, lymphomas and myeloma) are more likely to die in hospital than those with other cancers, and this is often considered a reflection of poor quality end-of-life care. This study aimed to explore the experiences of clinicians and relatives to determine why hospital deaths predominate in these diseases. METHODS: The study was set within the Haematological Malignancy Research Network (HMRN-www.hmrn.org), an ongoing population-based cohort that provides infrastructure for evidence-based research. Qualitative interviews were conducted with clinical staff in haematology, palliative care and general practice (n=45) and relatives of deceased HMRN patients (n=10). Data were analysed for thematic content and coding and classification was inductive. Interpretation involved seeking meaning, salience and connections within the data. RESULTS: Five themes were identified relating to: the characteristics and trajectory of haematological cancers, a mismatch between the expectations and reality of home death, preference for hospital death, barriers to home/hospice death and suggested changes to practice to support non-hospital death, when preferred. CONCLUSIONS: Hospital deaths were largely determined by the characteristics of haematological malignancies, which included uncertain trajectories, indistinct transitions and difficulties predicting prognosis and identifying if or when to withdraw treatment. Advance planning (where possible) and better communication between primary and secondary care may facilitate non-hospital death.


Assuntos
Atitude Frente a Morte , Neoplasias Hematológicas/mortalidade , Preferência do Paciente , Assistência Terminal , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Cuidados Paliativos na Terminalidade da Vida , Hospitais/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Cuidados Paliativos , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Qualidade de Vida , Reino Unido
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