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1.
Front Immunol ; 10: 1936, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31440263

RESUMO

The complement system is crucial for defense against pathogens and the removal of dying cells or immune complexes. Thus, clinical indications for possible complete complement deficiencies include, among others, recurrent mild or serious bacterial infections as well as autoimmune diseases (AID). The diagnostic approach includes functional activity measurements of the classical (CH50) and alternative pathway (AP50) and the determination of the C3 and C4 levels, followed by the quantitative analysis of individual components or regulators. When biochemical analysis reveals the causal abnormality of the complement deficiency (CD), molecular mechanisms remains frequently undetermined. Here, using direct sequencing analysis of the coding region we report the pathogenic variants spectrum that underlie the total or subtotal complement deficiency in 212 patients. We identified 107 different hemizygous, homozygous, or compound heterozygous pathogenic variants in 14 complement genes [C1Qß (n = 1), C1r (n = 3), C1s (n = 2), C2 (n = 12), C3 (n = 5), C5 (n = 12), C6 (n = 9), C7 (n = 17), C8 ß (n = 7), C9 (n = 3), CFH (n = 7), CFI (n = 18), CFP (n = 10), CFD (n = 2)]. Molecular analysis identified 17 recurrent pathogenic variants in 6 genes (C2, CFH, C5, C6, C7, and C8). More than half of the pathogenic variants identified in unrelated patients were also found in healthy controls from the same geographic area. Our study confirms the strong association of meningococcal infections with terminal pathway deficiency and highlights the risk of pneumococcal and auto-immune diseases in the classical and alternative pathways. Results from this large genetic investigation provide evidence of a restricted number of molecular mechanisms leading to complement deficiency and describe the clinical potential adverse events of anti-complement therapy.

3.
Blood ; 134(1): 9-21, 2019 Jul 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30940614

RESUMO

Evans syndrome (ES) is a rare severe autoimmune disorder characterized by the combination of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia. In most cases, the underlying cause is unknown. We sought to identify genetic defects in pediatric ES (pES), based on a hypothesis of strong genetic determinism. In a national, prospective cohort of 203 patients with early-onset ES (median [range] age at last follow-up: 16.3 years ([1.2-41.0 years]) initiated in 2004, 80 nonselected consecutive individuals underwent genetic testing. The clinical data were analyzed as a function of the genetic findings. Fifty-two patients (65%) received a genetic diagnosis (the M+ group): 49 carried germline mutations and 3 carried somatic variants. Thirty-two (40%) had pathogenic mutations in 1 of 9 genes known to be involved in primary immunodeficiencies (TNFRSF6, CTLA4, STAT3, PIK3CD, CBL, ADAR1, LRBA, RAG1, and KRAS), whereas 20 patients (25%) carried probable pathogenic variants in 16 genes that had not previously been reported in the context of autoimmune disease. Lastly, no genetic abnormalities were found in the remaining 28 patients (35%, the M- group). The M+ group displayed more severe disease than the M- group, with a greater frequency of additional immunopathologic manifestations and a greater median number of lines of treatment. Six patients (all from the M+ group) died during the study. In conclusion, pES was potentially genetically determined in at least 65% of cases. Systematic, wide-ranging genetic screening should be offered in pES; the genetic findings have prognostic significance and may guide the choice of a targeted treatment.

4.
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant ; 25(7): 1363-1373, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30876929

RESUMO

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative treatment for some inherited disorders, including selected primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). In the absence of a well-matched donor, HSCT from a haploidentical family donor (HIFD) may be considered. In adult recipients high-dose post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCY) is increasingly used to mitigate the risks of graft failure and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, data on the use of PTCY in children (and especially those with inherited disorders) are scarce. We reviewed the outcomes of 27 children transplanted with an HIFD and PTCY for a PID (n = 22) or osteopetrosis (n = 5) in a single center. The median age was 1.5 years (range, .2 to 17). HSCT with PTCY was a primary procedure (n = 21) or a rescue procedure after graft failure (n = 6). The conditioning regimen was myeloablative in most primary HSCTs and nonmyeloablative in rescue procedures. After a median follow-up of 25.6 months, 24 of 27 patients had engrafted. Twenty-one patients are alive and have been cured of the underlying disease. The 2-year overall survival rate was 77.7%. The cumulative incidences of acute GVHD grade ≥ II, chronic GVHD, and autoimmune disease were 45.8%, 24.2%, and 29.6%, respectively. There were 2 cases of grade III acute GVHD and no extensive cGVHD. The cumulative incidences of blood viral replication and life-threatening viral events were 58% and 15.6%, respectively. There was evidence of early T cell immune reconstitution. In the absence of an HLA-identical donor, HIFD HSCT with PTCY is a viable option for patients with life-threatening inherited disorders.

6.
J Clin Immunol ; 39(1): 55-64, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30552536

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but severe demyelinating disease caused by the polyomavirus JC (JCV) in immunocompromised patients. We report a series of patients with primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) who developed PML. METHODS: Retrospective observational study including PID patients with PML. Clinical, immunological, imaging features, and outcome are provided for each patient. RESULTS: Eleven unrelated patients with PIDs developed PML. PIDs were characterized by a wide range of syndromic or genetically defined defects, mostly with combined B and T cell impairment. Genetic diagnosis was made in 7 patients. Before the development of PML, 10 patients had recurrent infections, 7 had autoimmune and/or inflammatory manifestations, and 3 had a history of malignancies. Immunologic investigations showed CD4+ lymphopenia (median 265, range 50-344) in all cases. Six patients received immunosuppressive therapy in the year before PML onset, including prolonged steroid therapy in 3 cases, rituximab in 5 cases, anti-TNF-α therapy, and azathioprine in 1 case each. Despite various treatments, all but 1 patient died after a median of 8 months following PML diagnosis. CONCLUSION: PML is a rare but fatal complication of PIDs. Many cases are secondary to immunosuppressive therapy warranting careful evaluation before initiation subsequent immunosuppression during PIDs.

7.
PLoS One ; 13(10): e0205826, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30365510

RESUMO

Mutations in interleukin-10 receptor (IL-10R) genes are one cause of very early-onset inflammatory bowel disease with perianal lesions, which can be cured by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Using a functional test, which assesses responsiveness of peripheral monocytes to IL-10, we identified three unrelated Portuguese patients carrying two novel IL-10RB mutations. In the three patients, sequencing of genomic DNA identified the same large deletion of exon 3 which precluded protein expression. This mutation was homozygous in two patients born from consanguineous families and heterozygous in the third patient born from unrelated parents. Microsatellite analysis of the IL10RB genomic region revealed a common haplotype in the three Portuguese families pointing to a founder deletion inherited from a common ancestor 400 years ago. In the third patient, surface expression of IL-10R was normal but signaling in response to IL-10 was impaired. Complementary DNA sequencing and next-generation sequencing of IL10RB locus with custom-made probes revealed a ≈ 6 Kb duplication encompassing the exon 6 which leads to a frameshift mutation and a loss of the TYK2-interacting Box 2 motif. Altogether, we describe two novel copy number variations in IL10RB, one with founder effect and one preserving cell surface expression but abolishing signaling.

8.
Blood ; 132(22): 2362-2374, 2018 Nov 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30254128

RESUMO

ARPC1B is a key factor for the assembly and maintenance of the ARP2/3 complex that is involved in actin branching from an existing filament. Germline biallelic mutations in ARPC1B have been recently described in 6 patients with clinical features of combined immunodeficiency (CID), whose neutrophils and platelets but not T lymphocytes were studied. We hypothesized that ARPC1B deficiency may also lead to cytoskeleton and functional defects in T cells. We have identified biallelic mutations in ARPC1B in 6 unrelated patients with early onset disease characterized by severe infections, autoimmune manifestations, and thrombocytopenia. Immunological features included T-cell lymphopenia, low numbers of naïve T cells, and hyper-immunoglobulin E. Alteration in ARPC1B protein structure led to absent/low expression by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. This molecular defect was associated with the inability of patient-derived T cells to extend an actin-rich lamellipodia upon T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and to assemble an immunological synapse. ARPC1B-deficient T cells additionally displayed impaired TCR-mediated proliferation and SDF1-α-directed migration. Gene transfer of ARPC1B in patients' T cells using a lentiviral vector restored both ARPC1B expression and T-cell proliferation in vitro. In 2 of the patients, in vivo somatic reversion restored ARPC1B expression in a fraction of lymphocytes and was associated with a skewed TCR repertoire. In 1 revertant patient, memory CD8+ T cells expressing normal levels of ARPC1B displayed improved T-cell migration. Inherited ARPC1B deficiency therefore alters T-cell cytoskeletal dynamics and functions, contributing to the clinical features of CID.

9.
J Clin Immunol ; 38(7): 787-793, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30255293

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Inborn errors of IFN-γ-mediated immunity underlie Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease (MSMD), which is characterized by an increased susceptibility to severe and recurrent infections caused by weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines and environmental, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). METHODS: In this study, we investigated four patients from four unrelated consanguineous families from Isfahan, Iran, with disseminated BCG disease. We evaluated the patients' whole blood cell response to IL-12 and IFN-γ, IL-12Rß1 expression on T cell blasts, and sequenced candidate genes. RESULTS: We report four patients from Isfahan, Iran, ranging from 3 months to 26 years old, with impaired IL-12 signaling. All patients suffered from BCG disease. One of them presented mycobacterial osteomyelitis. By Sanger sequencing, we identified three different types of homozygous mutations in IL12RB1. Expression of IL-12Rß1 was completely abolished in the four patients with IL12RB1 mutations. CONCLUSIONS: IL-12Rß1 deficiency was found in the four MSMD Iranian families tested. It is the first report of an Iranian case with S321* mutant IL-12Rß1 protein. Mycobacterial osteomyelitis is another type of location of BCG infection in an IL-12Rß1-deficient patient, notified for the first time in this study.

10.
Immunol Cell Biol ; 2018 Sep 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30264912

RESUMO

Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is caused by inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity. Since 1996, disease-causing mutations have been found in 11 genes, which, through allelic heterogeneity, underlie 21 different genetic disorders. We briefly review here progress in the study of molecular, cellular and clinical aspects of MSMD since the last comprehensive review published in 2014. Highlights include the discoveries of (1) a new genetic etiology, autosomal recessive signal peptide peptidase-like 2 A deficiency, (2) TYK2-deficient patients with a clinical phenotype of MSMD, (3) an allelic form of partial recessive IFN-γR2 deficiency, and (4) two forms of syndromic MSMD: RORγ/RORγT and JAK1 deficiencies. These recent findings illustrate how genetic and immunological studies of MSMD can shed a unique light onto the mechanisms of protective immunity to mycobacteria in humans.

12.
J Clin Immunol ; 2018 Jul 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29995221

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlie Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD). Autosomal recessive complete IL-12Rß1 deficiency is the most frequent genetic etiology of MSMD. Only two of the 84 known mutations are copy number variations (CNVs), identified in two of the 213 IL-12Rß1-deficient patients and two of the 164 kindreds reported. These two CNVs are large deletions found in the heterozygous or homozygous state. We searched for novel families with IL-12Rß1 deficiency due to CNVs. METHODS: We studied six MSMD patients from five unrelated kindreds displaying adverse reactions to BCG vaccination. Three of the patients also presented systemic salmonellosis, two had mucocutaneous candidiasis, and one had disseminated histoplasmosis. We searched for CNVs and other variations by IL12RB1-targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS). RESULTS: We identified six new IL-12Rß1-deficient patients with a complete loss of IL-12Rß1 expression on phytohemagglutinin-activated T cells and/or EBV-transformed B cells. The cells of these patients did not respond to IL-12 and IL-23. Five different CNVs encompassing IL12RB1 (four deletions and one duplication) were identified in these patients by NGS coverage analysis, either in the homozygous state (n = 1) or in trans (n = 4) with a single-nucleotide variation (n = 3) or a small indel (n = 1). Seven of the nine mutations are novel. Interestingly, four of the five CNVs were predicted to be driven by nearby Alu elements, as well as the two previously reported large deletions. The IL12RB1 locus is actually enriched in Alu elements (44.7%), when compared with the rest of the genome (10.5%). CONCLUSION: The IL12RB1 locus is Alu-enriched and therefore prone to rearrangements at various positions. CNVs should be considered in the genetic diagnosis of IL-12Rß1 deficiency.

13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29906526

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: V(D)J recombination ensures the diversity of the adaptive immune system. Although its complete defect causes severe combined immunodeficiency (ie, T-B- severe combined immunodeficiency), its suboptimal activity is associated with a broad spectrum of immune manifestations, such as late-onset combined immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. The earliest molecular diagnosis of these patients is required to adopt the best therapy strategy, particularly when it involves a myeloablative conditioning regimen for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. OBJECTIVE: We aimed at developing biomarkers based on analysis of the T-cell receptor (TCR) α repertoire to assist in the diagnosis of patients with primary immunodeficiencies with V(D)J recombination and DNA repair deficiencies. METHODS: We used flow cytometric (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) analysis to quantify TCR-Vα7.2-expressing T lymphocytes in peripheral blood and developed PROMIDISα, a multiplex RT-PCR/next-generation sequencing assay, to evaluate a subset of the TCRα repertoire in T lymphocytes. RESULTS: The combined fluorescence-activated cell sorting and PROMIDISα analyses revealed specific signatures in patients with V(D)J recombination-defective primary immunodeficiencies or ataxia telangiectasia/Nijmegen breakage syndromes. CONCLUSION: Analysis of the TCRα repertoire is particularly appropriate in a prospective way to identify patients with partial immune defects caused by suboptimal V(D)J recombination activity, a DNA repair defect, or both. It also constitutes a valuable tool for the retrospective in vivo functional validation of variants identified through exome or panel sequencing. Its broader implementation might be of interest to assist early diagnosis of patients presenting with hypomorphic DNA repair defects inclined to experience acute toxicity during prehematopoietic stem cell transplantation conditioning.

15.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 75(5): 580-588, 2017 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28958970

RESUMO

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare acquired hematopoietic stem cell disorder that must be correctly diagnose because it is a chronic disease with a real impact on the quality of life and the survival of the patients. PNH screening of all patients with anemia or thrombosis is not recommended. We report the case of a 71-year-old male patient referred for chronic anemia. Anemia work-up revealed a misunderstood association of a hemolytic anemia with a negative direct antiglobulin test and iron deficiency. The patient exhibits biological signs of intravascular hemolysis, as well as a recent history of two episodes of deep vein thrombosis. Screening for PNH by flow cytometry shown a PNH clone with a size of approximately 33% of the granulocytes and 11% of the red blood cells. An interstitial deletion of the chromosome 13 was found in the medullar karyotype. PNH through chronic intravascular hemolysis induces an urinary iron loss. This is the only cause of hemolytic anemia inducing iron deficiency.


Assuntos
Anemia Hemolítica/complicações , Anemia Ferropriva/complicações , Hemoglobinúria Paroxística/diagnóstico , Trombose Venosa/complicações , Idoso , Anemia Hemolítica/diagnóstico , Anemia Ferropriva/diagnóstico , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Hemoglobinúria Paroxística/complicações , Humanos , Masculino , Trombose Venosa/diagnóstico
16.
Blood ; 130(12): 1456-1467, 2017 09 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28679735

RESUMO

X-linked recessive ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency caused by hypomorphic mutations of the IKBKG gene encoding the nuclear factor κB essential modulator (NEMO) protein. This condition displays enormous allelic, immunological, and clinical heterogeneity, and therapeutic decisions are difficult because NEMO operates in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is potentially life-saving, but the small number of case reports available suggests it has been reserved for only the most severe cases. Here, we report the health status before HSCT, transplantation outcome, and clinical follow-up for a series of 29 patients from unrelated kindreds from 11 countries. Between them, these patients carry 23 different hypomorphic IKBKG mutations. HSCT was performed from HLA-identical related donors (n = 7), HLA-matched unrelated donors (n = 12), HLA-mismatched unrelated donors (n = 8), and HLA-haploidentical related donors (n = 2). Engraftment was documented in 24 patients, and graft-versus-host disease in 13 patients. Up to 7 patients died 0.2 to 12 months after HSCT. The global survival rate after HSCT among NEMO-deficient children was 74% at a median follow-up after HSCT of 57 months (range, 4-108 months). Preexisting mycobacterial infection and colitis were associated with poor HSCT outcome. The underlying mutation does not appear to have any influence, as patients with the same mutation had different outcomes. Transplantation did not appear to cure colitis, possibly as a result of cell-intrinsic disorders of the epithelial barrier. Overall, HSCT can cure most clinical features of patients with a variety of IKBKG mutations.


Assuntos
Transplante de Células-Tronco Hematopoéticas , Quinase I-kappa B/genética , Mutação/genética , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Transplante de Células-Tronco Hematopoéticas/efeitos adversos , Heterozigoto , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Inflamação/patologia , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/etiologia , NF-kappa B/metabolismo , Fenótipo , Transdução de Sinais/genética , Análise de Sobrevida , Doadores de Tecidos , Condicionamento Pré-Transplante , Resultado do Tratamento
18.
J Infect Dis ; 215(8): 1331-1338, 2017 04 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28368462

RESUMO

Background: Patients with terminal complement pathway deficiency (TPD) are susceptible to recurrent invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) strains infecting these patients are poorly documented in the literature. Methods: We identified patients with TPD and available Nm strains isolated during IMD. We investigated the genetic basis of the different TPDs and the characteristics of the Nm strains. Results: We included 56 patients with C5 (n = 8), C6 (n = 20), C7 (n = 18), C8 (n = 9), or C9 (n = 1) deficiency. Genetic study was performed in 47 patients and 30 pathogenic variants were identified in the genes coding for C5 (n = 4), C6 (n = 5), C7 (n = 12), C8 (n = 7), and C9 (n = 2). We characterized 61 Nm strains responsible for IMD in the 56 patients with TPD. The most frequent strains belonged to groups Y (n = 27 [44%]), B (n = 18 [30%]), and W (n = 8 [13%]). Hyperinvasive clonal complexes (CC11, CC32, CC41/44, and CC269) were responsible for 21% of IMD cases. The CC23 predominates and represented 26% of all invasive isolates. Eleven of the 15 clonal complexes identified fit to 12 different clonal complexes belonging to carriage strains. Conclusions: Unusual meningococcal strains with low level of virulence similar to carriage strains are most frequently responsible for IMD in patients with TPD.


Assuntos
Ativação do Complemento , Complexo de Ataque à Membrana do Sistema Complemento/deficiência , Infecções Meningocócicas/microbiologia , Neisseria meningitidis/genética , Adolescente , Criança , Complexo de Ataque à Membrana do Sistema Complemento/imunologia , Feminino , Testes Genéticos , Humanos , Masculino , Infecções Meningocócicas/imunologia , Neisseria meningitidis/isolamento & purificação , Paris , Estudos Retrospectivos , Virulência
20.
Transfus Apher Sci ; 54(2): 212-9, 2016 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27177491

RESUMO

The spectrum of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) encompasses a heterogeneous group of disorders with hereditary and acquired forms. Endothelial cell injury in the microvasculature is common to all TMAs, whatever the pathophysiological process. In this review we describe genetic mutations characteristic of certain TMAs and review their contributions to disease. Recent identification of novel pathologic mutations has been enabled by exome studies. The monogenic forms of TMA are more frequently caused by recessive alterations in von Willebrand factor cleaving protease ADAMST13, leading to congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, or cobalamine C and DGKE genes, leading to an atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS)-like TMA. aHUS, whether idiopathic or linked to a known complement amplifying condition, is a TMA that primarily affects kidney function. It often results from a combination of an underlying genetic susceptibility with environmental factors activating the alternative complement pathway. Pathogenic variants in at least five complement genes coding for complement factor H (CFH) complement factor I (CFI), MCP (CD46), C3 and complement factor B (CFB) have been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing aHUS, but several more genes have been implicated. A new challenge is to separate disease-associated genetic variants from the broader background of variants or polymorphisms present in all human genomes that are rare, potentially functional, but may or may not be pathogenic.


Assuntos
Proteína ADAMTS13/genética , Síndrome Hemolítico-Urêmica Atípica/genética , Proteínas do Sistema Complemento/genética , Genoma Humano , Proteína Cofatora de Membrana/genética , Polimorfismo Genético , Microangiopatias Trombóticas/genética , Animais , Humanos
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