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1.
J Robot Surg ; 2020 Jan 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31989441

RESUMO

The model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score is objective, reproducible, and it has shown to predict mortality related to cirrhosis. This study was undertaken to investigate safety of robotic hepatectomy in patients with elevated preoperative MELD score and to examine correlation between preoperative MELD scores and postoperative outcomes after robotic hepatectomy for liver tumors. Demographic data, MELD score, and clinical outcomes were prospectively collected. Regression analysis was used. Data are presented as median (mean ± SD). 75 patients underwent robotic hepatectomy. Age was 64 (62.5 ± 14.2) years and BMI 28 (29 ± 7.0) kg/m2; 56% women. 60 (81%) of the hepatectomies were undertaken for malignancy (25% hepatocellular carcinoma, 20% colorectal metastasis, 15% cholangiocarcinoma). On regression analysis, MELD score did not correlate with operative time (p = 0.518) or blood loss (p = 0.583). MELD score, however, correlated with length of stay (p = 0.002). 8 (11%) patients experienced postoperative complications; their MELD score was 7 (8 ± 2.5). 68 (91%) patients did not experience postoperative complications; their MELD score was 7 (8 ± 2.8) (p = 0.803). One patient died in this series. In patients undergoing robotic hepatectomy to treat liver tumors, preoperative MELD score only correlates with length of stay. Preoperative MELD score does not correlate with operative time and amount of blood loss. An elevated MELD score should not deter surgeons from offering robotic hepatectomy.

2.
Surg Endosc ; 2020 Jan 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31907663

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Surgery has long been a man-dominated discipline with gender roles traditionally defined along societal norms. Presumably, as society has evolved, so have men surgeons' perceptions of women surgeons, though data are lacking. This study was undertaken to determine if men surgeons' perceptions of women surgeons represent a bias against women in Surgery. METHODS: 190 men surgeons were queried about attitudes toward women surgeons utilizing a validated questionnaire. The survey included binary, multiple choice, and Likert scale questions (1 = definitely disagree to 5 = definitely agree). RESULTS: 84% of the men surgeons have been attending surgeons for more than 5 years; 80% deem women surgeons as capable as their man colleagues. 80% of respondents consider it possible for a woman to be a good surgeon, mother, and spouse; however, 76% believe women surgeons experience more pressure to balance work and family. 75% of the men surgeons think women surgeons have the same advancement opportunities as men, though 30% believe gender discrimination exists in Surgery. 45% of the respondents consider the "surgical discipline" accountable for fewer women finishing training, yet 57% think the rate of women entering Surgery is not a problem to address. CONCLUSION: While most men surgeons have favorable opinions of the personal and professional abilities of women surgeons, favorable opinions are not universal; a bias against women persists in Surgery. Considering most medical students today are women, the discipline of Surgery dismisses this talent pool only to its detriment. Surgery, and men in Surgery specifically, must evolve to eliminate bias against women in Surgery, promoting an equitable and inclusive work environment for the betterment of Surgery and all its stakeholders, including patients.

4.
Am J Surg ; 219(1): 106-109, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31146884

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Hepatectomy is the gold standard curative treatment for hepatic neoplasms in patients with preserved liver function. Many large tumors require extended hepatectomy (EH). Possibility of developing major postoperative complications including liver failure is feared by many surgeons. We aim to describe our outcomes of EH for large hepatobiliary tumors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All patients undergoing hepatectomy between 2012 and 2017 were prospectively followed. RESULTS: 91 patients underwent hepatectomy with ten patients underwent EH. The majority of patients were women, age of 63, BMI of 24, and MELD score of 11. Six patients underwent an extended right hepatectomy, while four patients underwent extended left hepatectomy. Operative time was 224 min with estimated blood loss of 500 ml. No intraoperative complications were seen. Two patients experienced postoperative complications (pleural effusion in one patient and respiratory failure in another). Length of ICU stay was 2 days, and hospital stay was 5 days. 80% of the patients are currently alive with median follow-up of 41.2 months. CONCLUSION: EH can be undertaken safely with acceptable morbidity and mortality in our center.

5.
Am Surg ; 85(9): 944-948, 2019 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31638504

RESUMO

The incidence of esophageal cancer in the United States seems to have significantly increased since the 1970s. In undertaking this study, we sought to describe changes in the incidence, histologic type, and presenting stage of esophageal cancer over the past four decades. With Institutional Review Board approval, the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database of the National Cancer Institute was queried. Regression analysis was used to analyze data, and significance was accepted with 95 per cent probability. Forty-two thousand seven hundred thirty-nine patients had squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma located in their upper, middle, and/or lower esophagus from 1973 through 2010, reflecting a 7.5-fold annual increase from 1973 through 2010. Squamous cell carcinoma increased annually 2.5-fold (P < 0.001) and esophageal adenocarcinoma increased annually 57-fold from 1973 through 2010 (P < 0.001), whereas the overall population in the United States increased only 43 per cent (215,092,900 to 308,745,538) in the same period. From 1973 through 2010, there was a significant increase in the incidence of esophageal cancer in the United States. This increase was much greater than the increase in the population in the United States. The incidence of adenocarcinoma increased much more than that of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus from 1973 through 2010.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma/epidemiologia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Esofágicas/epidemiologia , Adenocarcinoma/patologia , Idoso , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/patologia , Comorbidade , Neoplasias Esofágicas/patologia , Feminino , Refluxo Gastroesofágico/epidemiologia , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco , Programa de SEER , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
6.
Am Surg ; 85(9): 978-984, 2019 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31638510

RESUMO

Only a small percentage of patients fail laparoscopic fundoplications undertaken for gastroesophageal reflux disease. But because many laparoscopic fundoplications have been undertaken, surgeons frequently encounter patients in need of "redo" operations. This study was undertaken to evaluate the robotic approach versus laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) approach for redo fundoplications. With an Institutional Review Board approval, 64 patients undergoing LESS (n = 32) or robotic (n = 32) redo antireflux operations were prospectively followed up. Data are presented as median (mean + SD). For LESS versus robotic redo operations, the operative duration was 145 (143 ± 33.5) versus 196 (208 ± 76.7) minutes (P < 0.01), estimated blood loss was 50 (80 ± 92.1) versus 20 (43 ± 57.1) mL (P = 0.07), and length of stay was 1 (3 ± 5.4) versus 1 (2 ± 1.9) day (P = 0.57); 1 LESS operation was converted to "open." Operative duration was longer for men (P = 0.01). Postoperative complications were not more frequent after Nissen (n = 36) or Toupet (n = 28) fundoplication, regardless of the approach. When matched by BMI, operative duration was prolonged by a large Type I to IV hiatal hernia (P = 0.01). Symptoms improved dramatically and were similar with both approaches, and patient satisfaction was high. Robotic redo antireflux operations take longer than LESS operations. LESS and robotic redo antireflux operations are both safe and offer significant and similar amelioration of symptoms after failed fundoplications.


Assuntos
Fundoplicatura/métodos , Hérnia Hiatal/cirurgia , Laparoscopia/métodos , Reoperação , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos/métodos , Idoso , Perda Sanguínea Cirúrgica , Conversão para Cirurgia Aberta , Feminino , Seguimentos , Fundoplicatura/efeitos adversos , Humanos , Laparoscopia/efeitos adversos , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Duração da Cirurgia , Satisfação do Paciente , Complicações Pós-Operatórias , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos/efeitos adversos , Resultado do Tratamento
7.
Am Surg ; 85(9): 1061-1065, 2019 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31638525

RESUMO

As minimally invasive operations evolve, it is imperative to evaluate the advantages and risks involved. The aim of our study was to evaluate our institution's experience in incorporating a robotic platform for transhiatal esophagectomy (THE). Patients undergoing robotic THE were prospectively followed. Data are presented as median (mean ± SD). Forty-five patients were of 67 (67 ± 6.9) years and BMI 26 (27 ± 5.5) kg/m². Nine per cent of operations were converted to "open," but none in the last 25 operations. Operative duration of robotic THE was 334 (364 ± 108.8) minutes and estimated blood loss was 200 (217 ± 144.0) mL, which decreased with time (P = 0.017). Length of stay was 8 (12 ± 11.1) days. Twenty per cent had respiratory failure requiring intubation that resolved, 4 per cent developed pneumonia, 11 per cent developed a surgical site infection, 2 per cent developed renal insufficiency, and 2 per cent developed a UTI. Two per cent (one patient) died within 30 days postoperatively, because of cardiac arrest. Our experience with robotic THE promotes robotic application because we endeavor to achieve high-level proficiency. With experience, we improved estimated blood loss and converted fewer transhiatal esophagectomies to "open." Our length of hospital stay seems long but reflects the ill-health of patients, as does the variety of complications. Our data support the evolving future of THE, which will integrally include a robotic approach.


Assuntos
Esofagectomia/efeitos adversos , Esofagectomia/métodos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos/efeitos adversos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos/métodos , Idoso , Perda Sanguínea Cirúrgica , Índice de Massa Corporal , Conversão para Cirurgia Aberta , Feminino , Seguimentos , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Intubação Intratraqueal , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Duração da Cirurgia , Pneumonia/diagnóstico , Complicações Pós-Operatórias , Estudos Prospectivos , Insuficiência Respiratória/terapia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica , Infecções Urinárias
9.
J Robot Surg ; 13(6): 713-716, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30989618

RESUMO

Benign bile duct stricture poses a significant challenge for gastroenterologists and general surgeons due to the inherent nature of the disease, difficulty in sustaining long-term solutions and fear of pitfalls in performing biliary tract operations. Operative management with an open biliary bypass is mainly reserved for patients who have failed multiple attempts of endoscopic and percutaneous treatments. However, recent advances in minimally invasive technology, notably in the form of the robotics, have provided a new approach to tackling biliary disease. In this technical report, we describe our standardized method of robotic choledochoduodenostomy in a 59-year-old woman with history of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass who presents with benign distal common bile duct stricture following failure of non-operative management. Key steps in this approach involved adequate duodenal Kocherization, robotic portal dissection and creation of a side-to-side choledochoduodenal anastomosis. The operative time was 200 min with no intraoperative complications and estimated blood loss was less than 50 mL. No abdominal drains were placed. The patient was discharged home on postoperative day 1 tolerating regular diet and able to resume her usual activities within 1 week of her operation. A video is attached to this report.

10.
J Robot Surg ; 2019 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30707422

RESUMO

High body mass index (BMI) is associated with other multiple comorbidities such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, steatohepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and cardiopulmonary diseases, which can impact the perioperative outcomes following liver resection. We aimed to study the impact of BMI on perioperative outcomes after robotic liver resection. All the patients undergoing robotic liver resection between 2013 and 2017 were prospectively followed. The patients were divided into three groups (BMI < 25, BMI 25-35, BMI > 35 kg/m2) for illustrative purposes. Demographic and perioperative outcome data were compared. Data are presented as median (mean ± SD). Thirty-eight patients underwent robotic hepatectomy, 73% were women, age was 58 (57 ± 17.6) years, and ASA class was 3 (3 ± 0.5). Indications for surgery were neoplastic lesions in 34 patients (89%), hemangioma in two patients (6%), fibrous mass in one patient (2.5%), and focal nodular hyperplasia in one patient (2.5%). 32% of the patients underwent right or left hemihepatectomy, 21% underwent sectionectomy, 5% underwent central hepatectomy and the reminder underwent non-anatomical liver resection. Operative time was 261 (254.6 ± 94.3) min. Estimated blood loss was 175 (276 ± 294.8) ml. Length of hospital stay was 3 (5 ± 4.9) days. By regression analysis of the three BMI groups, estimated blood loss, rate of postoperative complication, rate of conversion, need for transfusion, length of ICU stay, and length of hospital stay did not have a significant relationship with BMI. A total of five patients (13%) experience complications. Four patients had complications that were nonspecific to liver resection, including acute renal injury, respiratory failure, and enterocutaneous fistula. One patient had bile leak, treated with ERCP stenting. No mortality was seen in this study. Obesity should not dissuade surgeons from utilizing minimally invasive robotic approach for liver resection. Robotic technique is a safe and feasible in patients with high BMI. The impact of BMI on outcomes is insignificant.

11.
Am Surg ; 85(1): 115-119, 2019 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30760356

RESUMO

Robotic liver resection is being introduced with its potential to overcome limitations of conventional laparoscopy. This study was undertaken to document early experience and learning curve of robotic liver resection in our institution. All patients undergoing liver resection between 2013 and 2017 were prospectively followed. Patients were divided into three consecutive tertiles (cohort I-III). Thirty-three patients underwent robotic liver resection within the study period. Twenty-four per cent of patients underwent formal right or left hemihepatectomy, 21 per cent underwent sectionectomy, 6 per cent underwent central hepatectomy, and the remainder underwent nonanatomical liver resection. Formal hemihepatectomy and right posterosuperior segment resection were undertaken in two patients in cohort I, four patients in cohort II, and four patients in cohort III. Two cases were converted to "open" operation. Operative time was 172 (194.5 ± 65.1) minutes in cohort I, 222 (247.8 ± 109.8) minutes in cohort II, and 280 (302.5 ± 84.9) minutes in cohort III, reflecting increasing degree of technical complexity. Estimated blood loss decreased significantly throughout the cohorts, being 400 mL, 200 mL, and 100 mL in cohorts I to III, respectively. Major intraoperative complications were not seen. Three patients experienced postoperative complications, resulting in a single mortality. Length of hospital stay was three days, with two patients being readmitted within 30 days. Robotic technique for liver resection is feasible and safe. It offers good short-term clinical outcomes, including for patients who require major liver resection. As the proficiency developed, a notable improvement in technically ability to undertake more complex resections with decreasing blood loss and minimal morbidity was seen.


Assuntos
Hepatectomia/educação , Curva de Aprendizado , Neoplasias Hepáticas/cirurgia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos/educação , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Hepatectomia/efeitos adversos , Humanos , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Duração da Cirurgia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos/efeitos adversos
12.
J Robot Surg ; 2019 Feb 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30798483

RESUMO

Minimally invasive hepatectomy for benign and malignant liver lesions has gained popularity in the past decade due to improved perioperative outcomes when compared to conventional 'open' technique. We aim to investigate our initial experience of robotic hepatectomy undertaken in our hepatobiliary program. All patients undergoing robotic hepatectomy between 2013 and 2018 were prospectively followed. Data are presented as median (mean ± SD). A total of 80 patients underwent robotic hepatectomy within the study period. 60% of the patients were women, age of 63 (62.4 ± 14.1), body mass index of 28 (29.6 ± 9.4), ASA class of 2.5 (2.5 ± 0.6), and MELD score of 7 (8.2 ± 2.8). Size of resected lesion was 3.9 (4.6 ± 3) cm. Indications for resection were metastatic lesions (30%), hepatocellular carcinoma (28%), cholangiocarcinoma (7%), gallbladder cancer (5%), neuroendocrine tumors (4%), and benign lesions (26%). Formal hepatectomy (right or left) was performed in 30% of the patients. Operative time was 233 (267.2 ± 109.6) minutes, and estimated blood loss was 150 (265.7 ± 319.9) ml. Length of hospital stay was 3 (5.0 ± 4.6) days. One patient was converted to 'open' approach. 10 patients experienced postoperative complications. Readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge were seen in eight patients. Our data support that robotic hepatectomy is safe and feasible, with favorable short-term outcomes and low conversion rate. Robotic technology extends the application of minimally invasive techniques in the field of hepatobiliary surgery.

13.
J Am Coll Surg ; 228(4): 613-624, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30682410

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This study was undertaken to examine our outcomes after robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy and to compare our outcomes with predicted outcomes using the American College of Surgeons (ACS) NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator and with outcomes reported through ACS NSQIP. METHODS: We prospectively followed 155 patients undergoing robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy. Outcomes were compared with predicted outcomes calculated using the ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator and with outcomes documented in ACS NSQIP for pancreaticoduodenectomy from 2012 to 2017. Median data are presented. RESULTS: Eighty-eight percent of our robotic pancreaticoduodenectomies were performed in 2015 to 2018. Predicted outcomes were like those reported in ACS NSQIP. Actual outcomes were superior to predicted outcomes and outcomes reported in ACS NSQIP for overall complications, serious complications, returned to operating room, surgical site infections, deep vein thrombosis, and length of stay. Seventeen percent had conversions to open operations, generally due to failure to progress or need for major vascular reconstruction; only 3 (3.5%) of the last 80 operations were converted to open. Robotic operations took 423 minutes; estimated blood loss was 200 mL. Biliary fistulas occurred in 5% and pancreatic fistulas occurred in 5%. Six percent of patients died perioperatively; 5 patients died due to cardiac deterioration and 4 (3.1%) patients died after pancreaticoduodenectomy completed robotically. CONCLUSIONS: Our patients were not a select group, they were like those reported in ACS NSQIP. Their outcomes after robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy were like or better than predicted outcomes or national data. Our mortality was high because of preoperative ill health (eg renal failure) and cardiac risk. Although we believe our results will continue to improve, our current data document the salutary benefits of minimally invasive robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy.

14.
J Robot Surg ; 13(2): 201-207, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30406886

RESUMO

Minimally invasive technique has been adopted as the standard of care in many surgical fields within general surgery. Hepatobiliary surgery, however, is lacking behind due to the complex nature of the operation and concerns of major bleeding. Several centers suggested that inherent limitations of conventional laparoscopy precludes its wide adoption. Robotic technique provides solutions to these limitations. In this study, we report our standardized technique of robotic left hepatectomy. We discuss aspects of robotic hepatectomy and describe our standardized approach for robotic left hepatectomy. A video is attached to this article. A 76-year-old man with a 4.5 cm biopsy-proven hepatocellular carcinoma was taken to the operating room for a robotic left hepatectomy. His past medical and surgical history was only consistent with hypertension and diabetes. Robotic extrahepatic glissonian pedicle approach was applied to gain inflow control. Left hepatic artery and portal vein were individually dissected and isolated prior to division. An intraoperative robotic ultrasound was utilized to ensure negative resection margins. Left hepatic vein was transected intrahepatically using a laparoscopic Endo GIA stapler. Segment 2,3, and part of 4 were removed. Operative time was 180 min without intraoperative complications. Estimated blood loss was less than 50 cc. The patient was discharged home on postoperative day 3. The use of robotic technology during complex hepatic resections such as left hepatectomy is safe and feasible. This approach provides an alternative technique in minimally invasive liver surgery.


Assuntos
Hepatectomia/métodos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Minimamente Invasivos/métodos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos/métodos , Idoso , Carcinoma Hepatocelular/cirurgia , Artéria Hepática/cirurgia , Veias Hepáticas/cirurgia , Humanos , Neoplasias Hepáticas/cirurgia , Masculino , Duração da Cirurgia , Veia Porta/cirurgia , Cirurgia Assistida por Computador/métodos , Grampeadores Cirúrgicos , Resultado do Tratamento , Ultrassonografia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/instrumentação , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/métodos
15.
J Robot Surg ; 13(2): 193-199, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30276634

RESUMO

Despite advantages of minimally invasive surgery, many hepatobiliary surgeons are hesitant to offer this approach for major hepatic resection due to concerns of difficulty in liver manipulation, bleeding control, and suboptimal oncologic outcomes. The robotic surgical system has revolutionized the way traditional laparoscopic liver resection is undertaken. Limitations of traditional laparoscopy are being resolved by robotic technology. We aimed to describe aspects of minimally invasive liver surgery and our standardized technical approach. We discussed technical aspects of performing robotic total right hepatic lobectomy and described our standardized institutional method. A 79-year-old man with an 11-cm biopsy-proven hepatocellular carcinoma was taken to the operating room for a robotic total right hepatic lobectomy. Past medical and surgical history was consistent with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Robotic extrahepatic Glissonean pedicle approach was used to gain inflow vascular control. Right hepatic artery and portal vein were individually dissected and isolated prior to division. An intraoperative robotic ultrasound was utilized to guide liver parenchymal transection, securing negative margins. Robotic vessel sealing device was used as the main energy device during the parenchymal transection. Right hepatic vein was transected intrahepatically using a linear stapler. Operative time was 200 min without intraoperative complications. Estimated blood loss was 100 ml. Postsurgical recovery was uneventful and he was discharged home on postoperative day 4. Minimally invasive robotic total right hepatic lobectomy is feasible with excellent perioperative outcomes.


Assuntos
Hepatectomia/métodos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos/métodos , Idoso , Carcinoma Hepatocelular/cirurgia , Artéria Hepática/cirurgia , Veias Hepáticas/cirurgia , Humanos , Neoplasias Hepáticas/cirurgia , Masculino , Margens de Excisão , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Minimamente Invasivos/métodos , Duração da Cirurgia , Veia Porta/cirurgia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos/instrumentação , Cirurgia Assistida por Computador/métodos , Grampeadores Cirúrgicos , Resultado do Tratamento , Ultrassonografia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/instrumentação , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/métodos
16.
Am Surg ; 84(2): 165-173, 2018 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29580341

RESUMO

This study was undertaken to determine whether postoperative outcomes after laparoscopic Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication could be predicted by preoperative findings on esophagography. Preoperative barium esophagograms of 135 patients undergoing laparoscopic Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication were reviewed. The number of esophageal curves, esophageal width, and angulation of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) were determined; correlations between these determined parameters and symptoms were assessed using linear regression analysis. The number of esophageal curves correlated with the preoperative frequency of dysphagia, vomiting, chest pain, regurgitation, and heartburn. The width of the esophagus negatively correlated with the preoperative frequency of regurgitation. The angulation of the GEJ did not correlate with preoperative symptoms. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication significantly reduced the frequency and severity of all symptoms, regardless of the number of esophageal curves, esophageal width, or angulation of the GEJ. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication provides dramatic palliation for achalasia. More esophageal curves on preoperative esophagography correlate well with the frequency of a broad range of preoperative symptoms, including the frequency of dysphagia and regurgitation. Patients experience dramatically improved frequency and severity of symptoms after laparoscopic Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication for achalasia regardless of the number of esophageal curves, esophageal width, or the angulation of the GEJ. Findings on barium esophagogram, in evaluating achalasia, should not deter the application of laparosocopic Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication.


Assuntos
Acalasia Esofágica/cirurgia , Esôfago/diagnóstico por imagem , Fundoplicatura/métodos , Miotomia de Heller/métodos , Laparoscopia , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Adulto , Idoso , Acalasia Esofágica/diagnóstico por imagem , Esôfago/cirurgia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cuidados Pré-Operatórios , Estudos Prospectivos , Radiografia , Resultado do Tratamento
17.
Am Surg ; 84(2): 254-261, 2018 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29580355

RESUMO

Surgical Site Infections (SSI) represent an onerous burden on our health-care system. This study was undertaken to determine the impact of a protocol aimed at reducing SSIs on the frequency and cost of SSIs after abdominal surgery. Beginning in 2013, 811 patients undergoing gastrointestinal operations were prospectively followed. In 2014, we initiated a protocol to reduce SSIs. SSIs were monitored before and after protocol implementation, and differences in SSI incidence and associated costs were determined. Before protocol initiation, standardized operative preparation cost was $40.85 to $126.94 per patient depending on the results of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screen; after protocol initiation, the cost was $43.85 per patient, saving up to $83.09 per patient. With the protocol in place, SSI rate was reduced from 4.9 to 3.4 per cent (13 of 379) representing a potential prevention of eight infections that would have cost payers $166,280 ($20,785 per infection). Notably, the SSI rate after pancreatectomy was reduced by 63 per cent (P = 0.04). With preparation and diligence, SSI rate can be meaningfully reduced and potential cost savings can be achieved. In particular, SSI rate reduction for major abdominal operations and especially pancreatic resections can be achieved. A protocol to reduce SSI is a "win-win" for all stakeholders and should be encouraged with thoughtful and active participation from all hospital disciplines.


Assuntos
Análise Custo-Benefício , Custos Hospitalares/estatística & dados numéricos , Assistência Perioperatória/economia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/prevenção & controle , Adulto , Idoso , Protocolos Clínicos , Redução de Custos/estatística & dados numéricos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos do Sistema Digestório , Feminino , Florida , Seguimentos , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Assistência Perioperatória/métodos , Estudos Prospectivos , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/economia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/epidemiologia
18.
Int J Surg Oncol (N Y) ; 2(3): e15, 2017 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29177213

RESUMO

Patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma have an increased propensity for diabetes. Recent studies suggest patients with diabetes and pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with metformin have increased survival. This study was undertaken to determine whether metformin use is associated with increased survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods: Patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma from 1991 to 2013 were included in this study. Survival was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Median data are reported. Significance was accepted with 95% probability. Results: Of 414 patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 132 (32%) were diabetic. Of patients with diabetes, 35 (27%) were diet-controlled, 34 (26%) were treated with insulin alone, 18 (14%) were treated with metformin alone, 14 (10%) were treated with sulfonylureas alone, 7 (5%) were taking sulfonylureas with insulin, and 24 (18%) patients were taking metformin with sulfonylureas and/or insulin. Patients with/without diabetes not taking sulfonylureas had survival of 16.4 months compared with patients taking sulfonylureas who achieved survival of 27.5 months after undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (P<0.05). Conclusions: Patients taking sulfonylureas with or without other therapy had improved survival compared with patients not taking sulfonylureas after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Metformin does not seem to be beneficial for patients with resectable disease, but may be beneficial for patients with unresectable and/or metastatic disease as shown in prior studies. The use of sulfonylureas is associated with a survival benefit for patients undergoing resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Tumor staging and margin status continue to be the overriding predictors of survival in patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma, not metformin therapy.

19.
Am Surg ; 83(9): 952-961, 2017 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28958274

RESUMO

Heller myotomy is the "gold-standard" therapy for achalasia, alleviating symptoms by defunctionalizing the lower esophageal sphincter mechanism. Observation has suggested many differences between young and old patients with achalasia, raising the question: is achalasia in younger patients a different disorder than it is in older patients? This study was undertaken to answer this question. With Institutional Review Board approval, 648 patients undergoing laparoscopic Heller myotomy from 1992-2016 were prospectively followed up. Patients self-assessed symptom frequency/severity preoperatively and postoperatively using a Likert scale; 0 (never/not bothersome) to 10 (always/very bothersome). Before myotomy, frequency/severity of many symptoms (e.g., "dysphagia," "chest pain," and "regurgitation") inversely correlated with age (P < 0.01 each). Symptom duration and the number of previous abdominal operations correlated with age, as did intraoperative complications (e.g., gastrotomy), postoperative complications (e.g., atrial fibrillation), and length of stay (P < 0.01 for each). Patients experienced amelioration of all symptoms queried, regardless of age (P < 0.01 each). Age did affect outcome because older patients had less frequent and severe symptoms. Age did not affect improvement of symptoms (e.g., dysphagia) (i.e., differences between preoperative and postoperative scores) (P = 0.88). Age did not influence symptom resolution or patient satisfaction (P = 0.98 and P = 0.15, respectively). The presentation with achalasia, hospital course, and outcome after myotomy are significantly impacted by age, whereas patient improvement after myotomy is constant independent of age. Younger and older patients have different presentations, experiences, and outcomes; these patients seem to have "different disorders", but Heller myotomy provides similar significant amelioration of symptoms independent of age.


Assuntos
Acalasia Esofágica/cirurgia , Laparoscopia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Acalasia Esofágica/complicações , Esfíncter Esofágico Inferior/cirurgia , Feminino , Humanos , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Satisfação do Paciente , Resultado do Tratamento
20.
Am J Surg ; 214(5): 862-870, 2017 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28760357

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Regionalization of care raises potential for differences in cost of care and outcome. This study was undertaken to determine if costs and outcome after pancreaticoduodenectomy vary by region in Florida, and whether costs and outcome are related. METHODS: Inpatient data for pancreaticoduodenectomy in Florida during 2010-2012 were obtained from the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration. Seven geographically different regions were designated based on "cost of living index" and "urban to rural population ratio". Hospital costs, LOS, in-hospital mortality, and the frequency with which surgeons performed pancreaticoduodenectomy were evaluated for these regions. RESULTS: Median hospital costs for pancreaticoduodenectomy by region ranged from $101,436-$214,971. Median hospital costs by region correlated positively with LOS (p < 0.0001) and in-hospital mortality (p < 0.0001), and negatively with the frequency of pancreaticoduodenectomies performed by high-volume surgeons (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: There are regional differences for hospital costs and outcome with pancreaticoduodenectomy in Florida. Regions with lower costs had more pancreaticoduodenectomies performed by high-volume surgeons, shorter LOS, and lower in-hospital mortality rates. Regional differences in cost and quality-of-care need to be studied and abrogated to provide uniform optimal care.


Assuntos
Pancreaticoduodenectomia/economia , Pancreaticoduodenectomia/estatística & dados numéricos , Florida , Custos Hospitalares , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Resultado do Tratamento
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