Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 393
Filtrar
1.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 896, 2020 Feb 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32060274

RESUMO

Predicting the outcome of immunotherapy treatment in melanoma patients is challenging. Alterations in genes involved in antigen presentation and the interferon gamma (IFNγ) pathway play an important role in the immune response to tumors. We describe here that the overexpression of PSMB8 and PSMB9, two major components of the immunoproteasome, is predictive of better survival and improved response to immune-checkpoint inhibitors of melanoma patients. We study the mechanism underlying this connection by analyzing the antigenic peptide repertoire of cells that overexpress these subunits using HLA peptidomics. We find a higher response of patient-matched tumor infiltrating lymphocytes against antigens diferentially presented after immunoproteasome overexpression. Importantly, we find that PSMB8 and PSMB9 expression levels are much stronger predictors of melanoma patients' immune response to checkpoint inhibitors than the tumors' mutational burden. These results suggest that PSMB8 and PSMB9 expression levels can serve as important biomarkers for stratifying melanoma patients for immune-checkpoint treatment.

2.
J Immunother Cancer ; 8(1)2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31959727

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a potent, proinflammatory cytokine that holds promise for cancer immunotherapy, but its clinical use has been limited by its toxicity. To minimize systemic exposure and potential toxicity while maintaining the beneficial effects of IL-12, we developed a novel IL-12-based therapeutic system that combines tumor-specific T-cell-mediated delivery of IL-12 with membrane-restricted IL-12 localization and inducible IL-12 expression. METHODS: Therapeutic T cells targeting a tumor antigen were genetically engineered to express membrane-anchored IL-12 (aIL-12). Expression, function, and shedding of the aIL-12 molecule was assessed in vitro. Tumor treatment efficacy was assessed in vivo with T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic murine tumor models and a tumor xenograft model. Key outcomes were change in tumor size, circulating levels of IL-12 and other cytokines, and survival. Toxicity was assessed via change in body weight. Tumor growth curve measurements were compared using repeated-measures two-way analyses of variance. RESULTS: Retroviral gene transfer resulted in cell membrane expression of aIL-12 by transduced T cells. In each of two transgenic murine tumor models, tumor-specific T cells constitutively expressing aIL-12 demonstrated increased antitumor efficacy, low circulating IL-12 and interferon-γ, and no weight loss. Expression of aIL-12 via a NFAT-inducible promoter resulted in coordinate expression of aIL-12 with T cell activation. In an OT-I TCR transgenic murine tumor model, the NFAT-inducible aIL-12 molecule improved tumor treatment and did not result in detectable levels of IL-12 in serum or in weight loss. In a human tumor xenograft model, the NFAT-inducible aIL-12 molecule improved antitumor responses by human T cells coexpressing a tumor-specific engineered TCR. Serum IL-12 levels were undetectable with the NFAT-inducible construct in both models. CONCLUSION: Expression of aIL-12 by tumor-targeting therapeutic T cells demonstrated low systemic exposure and improved efficacy. This treatment strategy may have broad applications to cellular therapy with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, chimeric antigen receptor T cells, and TCR T cells.

3.
Clin Cancer Res ; 26(6): 1267-1276, 2020 Mar 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31996390

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate antigen experienced T cells in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) for responses to p53 neoantigens. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: PBLs from patients with a mutated TP53 tumor were sorted for antigen-experienced T cells and in vitro stimulation (IVS) was performed with p53 neoantigens. The IVS cultures were stimulated with antigen-presenting cells expressing p53 neoantigens, enriched for 41BB/OX40 and grown with rapid expansion protocol. RESULTS: T-cell responses were not observed in the PBLs of 4 patients who did not have tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) responses to mutated TP53. In contrast, 5 patients with TIL responses to mutated TP53 also had similar T-cell responses in their PBLs, indicating that the PBLs and TILs were congruent in p53 neoantigen reactivity. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were specific for p53R175H, p53Y220C, or p53R248W neoantigens, including a 78% reactive T-cell culture against p53R175H and HLA-A*02:01. Tracking TCRB clonotypes (clonality, top ranked, and TP53 mutation-specific) supported the enrichment of p53 neoantigen-reactive T cells from PBLs. The same T-cell receptor (TCR) from the TIL was found in the IVS cultures in three cases and multiple unique TCRs were found in another patient. TP53 mutation-specific T cells also recognized tumor cell lines bearing the appropriate human leukocyte antigen restriction element and TP53 mutation, indicating these T cells could recognize processed and presented p53 neoantigens. CONCLUSIONS: PBL was a noninvasive source of T cells targeting TP53 mutations for cell therapy and can provide a window into intratumoral p53 neoantigen immune responses.See related commentary by Olivera et al., p. 1203.

4.
Nat Med ; 26(2): 270-280, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31959992

RESUMO

Anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells are an effective treatment for B-cell lymphoma, but often cause neurologic toxicity. We treated 20 patients with B-cell lymphoma on a phase I, first-in-human clinical trial of T cells expressing the new anti-CD19 CAR Hu19-CD828Z (NCT02659943). The primary objective was to assess safety and feasibility of Hu19-CD828Z T-cell therapy. Secondary objectives included assessments of blood levels of CAR T cells, anti-lymphoma activity, second infusions and immunogenicity. All objectives were met. Fifty-five percent of patients who received Hu19-CD828Z T cells obtained complete remission. Hu19-CD828Z T cells had clinical anti-lymphoma activity similar to that of T cells expressing FMC63-28Z, an anti-CD19 CAR tested previously by our group, which contains murine binding domains and is used in axicabtagene ciloleucel. However, severe neurologic toxicity occurred in only 5% of patients who received Hu19-CD828Z T cells, whereas 50% of patients who received FMC63-28Z T cells experienced this degree of toxicity (P = 0.0017). T cells expressing Hu19-CD828Z released lower levels of cytokines than T cells expressing FMC63-28Z. Lower levels of cytokines were detected in blood from patients who received Hu19-CD828Z T cells than in blood from those who received FMC63-28Z T cells, which could explain the lower level of neurologic toxicity associated with Hu19-CD828Z. Levels of cytokines released by CAR-expressing T cells particularly depended on the hinge and transmembrane domains included in the CAR design.

5.
J Clin Invest ; 129(11): 4992-5004, 2019 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31609250

RESUMO

Tumor-resident lymphocytes can mount a response against neoantigens expressed in microsatellite-stable gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, and adoptive transfer of neoantigen-specific lymphocytes has demonstrated antitumor activity in selected patients. However, whether peripheral blood could be used as an alternative minimally invasive source to identify lymphocytes targeting neoantigens in patients with GI cancer with relatively low mutation burden is unclear. We used a personalized high-throughput screening strategy to investigate whether PD-1 expression in peripheral blood could be used to identify CD8+ or CD4+ lymphocytes recognizing neoantigens identified by whole-exome sequencing in 7 patients with GI cancer. We found that neoantigen-specific lymphocytes were preferentially enriched in the CD8+PD-1+/hi or CD4+PD-1+/hi subsets, but not in the corresponding bulk or PD-1- fractions. In 6 of 7 individuals analyzed we identified circulating CD8+ and CD4+ lymphocytes targeting 6 and 4 neoantigens, respectively. Moreover, neoantigen-reactive T cells and a T cell receptor (TCR) isolated from the CD8+PD-1+ subsets recognized autologous tumor, albeit at reduced levels, in 2 patients with available cell lines. These data demonstrate the existence of circulating T cells targeting neoantigens in GI cancer patients and provide an approach to generate enriched populations of personalized neoantigen-specific lymphocytes and isolate TCRs that could be exploited therapeutically to treat cancer.

6.
Cancer Immunol Res ; 7(11): 1824-1836, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31484655

RESUMO

Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) can mediate responses in some patients with metastatic epithelial cancer. Identifying gene signatures associated with successful ACT might enable the development of improved therapeutic approaches. The persistence of transferred T cells in the peripheral blood is one indication of clinical effectiveness, but many T-cell and host factors may influence T-cell persistence. To limit these variables, we previously studied a patient with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with polyclonal TILs targeting the KRAS(G12D) hotspot mutation, who experienced a partial response for 9 months. Three dominant clonotypes specifically recognizing KRAS(G12D) epitopes were identified, but we found that only two clonotypes persisted 40 days after ACT. Because of these findings, in this study, we performed the single-cell transcriptome analysis of the infused TILs. The analysis revealed a total of 472 genes that were differentially expressed between clonotypes 9.1-NP and 9.2-P single cells, and 528 genes between 9.1-NP and 10-P. Following these clonotypes in the peripheral blood after ACT, the gene expression patterns changed, but IL7R, ITGB1, KLF2, and ZNF683 remained expressed in the persistent 9.2-P and 10-P cells, compared with the nonpersistent 9.1-NP cells. In addition, four autologous TILs, which were used for treatment but persisted poorly 1 month after ACT, did not express the gene profiles associated with persistence. These results suggest that certain TIL populations possess a unique gene expression profile that can lead to the persistence of T cells. Thus, this single-patient study provides insight into how to improve ACT for solid cancer.

7.
J Clin Oncol ; 37(30): 2759-2768, 2019 Oct 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31408414

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Genetically engineered T-cell therapy is an emerging treatment of hematologic cancers with potential utility in epithelial cancers. We investigated T-cell therapy for the treatment of metastatic human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated epithelial cancers. METHODS: This phase I/II, single-center trial enrolled patients with metastatic HPV16-positive cancer from any primary tumor site who had received prior platinum-based therapy. Treatment consisted of autologous genetically engineered T cells expressing a T-cell receptor directed against HPV16 E6 (E6 T-cell receptor T cells), a conditioning regimen, and systemic aldesleukin. RESULTS: Twelve patients were treated in the study. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed in the phase I portion. Two patients, both in the highest-dose cohort, experienced objective tumor responses. A patient with three lung metastases experienced complete regression of one tumor and partial regression of two tumors, which were subsequently resected; she has no evidence of disease 3 years after treatment. All patients demonstrated high levels of peripheral blood engraftment with E6 T-cell receptor T cells 1 month after treatment (median, 30%; range, 4% to 53%). One patient's resistant tumor demonstrated a frameshift deletion in interferon gamma receptor 1, which mediates response to interferon gamma, an essential molecule for T-cell-mediated antitumor activity. Another patient's resistant tumor demonstrated loss of HLA-A*02:01, the antigen presentation molecule required for this therapy. A tumor from a patient who responded to treatment did not demonstrate genetic defects in interferon gamma response or antigen presentation. CONCLUSION: Engineered T cells can induce regression of epithelial cancer. Tumor resistance was observed in the context of T-cell programmed death-1 expression and defects in interferon gamma and antigen presentation pathway components. These findings have important implications for development of cellular therapy in epithelial cancers.

8.
Cancer Discov ; 9(8): 1022-1035, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31164343

RESUMO

Immunotherapies can mediate regression of human tumors with high mutation rates, but responses are rarely observed in patients with common epithelial cancers. This raises the question of whether patients with these common cancers harbor T lymphocytes that recognize mutant proteins expressed by autologous tumors that may represent ideal targets for immunotherapy. Using high-throughput immunologic screening of mutant gene products identified via whole-exome sequencing, we identified neoantigen-reactive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) from 62 of 75 (83%) patients with common gastrointestinal cancers. In total, 124 neoantigen-reactive TIL populations were identified, and all but one of the neoantigenic determinants were unique. The results of in vitro T-cell recognition assays demonstrated that 1.6% of the gene products encoded by somatic nonsynonymous mutations were immunogenic. These findings demonstrate that the majority of common epithelial cancers elicit immune recognition and open possibilities for cell-based immunotherapies for patients bearing these cancers. SIGNIFICANCE: TILs cultured from 62 of 75 (83%) patients with gastrointestinal cancers recognized neoantigens encoded by 1.6% of somatic mutations expressed by autologous tumor cells, and 99% of the neoantigenic determinants appeared to be unique and not shared between patients.This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 983.

9.
J Immunol ; 202(12): 3458-3467, 2019 06 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31036766

RESUMO

Immune checkpoint inhibitors are effective in treating a variety of malignancies, including metastatic bladder cancer. A generally accepted hypothesis suggests that immune checkpoint inhibitors induce tumor regressions by reactivating a population of endogenous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) that recognize cancer neoantigens. Although previous studies have identified neoantigen-reactive TILs from several types of cancer, no study to date has shown whether neoantigen-reactive TILs can be found in bladder tumors. To address this, we generated TIL cultures from patients with primary bladder cancer and tested their ability to recognize tumor-specific mutations. We found that CD4+ TILs from one patient recognized mutated C-terminal binding protein 1 in an MHC class II-restricted manner. This finding suggests that neoantigen-reactive TILs reside in bladder cancer, which may help explain the effectiveness of immune checkpoint blockade in this disease and also provides a rationale for the future use of adoptive T cell therapy targeting neoantigens in bladder cancer.

11.
J Immunother ; 42(4): 126-135, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30882547

RESUMO

A deletion variant of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) is a known driver mutation in a subset of primary and secondary glioblastoma multiforme. Adoptive transfer of genetically modified chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) lymphocytes has demonstrated efficacy in hematologic malignancies but is still early in development for solid cancers. The surface expression of the truncated extracellular ligand domain created by EGFRvIII makes it an attractive target for a CAR-based cancer treatment. Patients with recurrent glioblastoma expressing EGFRvIII were enrolled in a dose escalation phase I trial, using a third-generation CAR construct derived from a human antibody. Transduced cells were administered after lymphodepleting chemotherapy and supported posttransfer with intravenous interleukin-2. The dose escalation proceeded at half-log increments from 10 to >10 cells. Primary endpoints were safety and progression-free survival. Eighteen patients were treated with final infusion products ranging from 6.3×10 to 2.6×10 anti-EGFRvIII CAR T cells. Median progression-free survival was 1.3 months (interquartile range: 1.1-1.9), with a single outlier of 12.5 months. Two patients experienced severe hypoxia, including one treatment-related mortality after cell administration at the highest dose level. All patients developed expected transient hematologic toxicities from preparative chemotherapy. Median overall survival was 6.9 months (interquartile range: 2.8-10). Two patients survived over 1 year, and a third patient was alive at 59 months. Persistence of CAR cells correlated with cell dose, but there were no objective responses. Administration of anti-EGFRvIII CAR-transduced T cells did not demonstrate clinically meaningful effect in patients with glioblastoma multiforme in this phase I pilot trial.

12.
Clin Cancer Res ; 25(9): 2682-2684, 2019 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30824585

RESUMO

The concept of treatment-refractory disease has evolved as checkpoint modulation has changed the therapeutic landscape for patients with metastatic melanoma. Developing meaningful salvage strategies will involve the exploration of combination therapies and new immunotherapeutics, including adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes or other T-cell-based therapy.See related article by Atay et al., p. 2783.


Assuntos
Melanoma , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas B-raf , Terapia Baseada em Transplante de Células e Tecidos , Terapia Combinada , Humanos , Linfócitos do Interstício Tumoral
13.
J Invest Dermatol ; 139(9): 1985-1992.e10, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30905807

RESUMO

ABCB5 is an ABC transporter that was shown to confer low-level multidrug resistance in cancer. In this study, we show that ABCB5 was mutated in 13.75% of the 640 melanoma samples analyzed. Besides nonsense mutations, two mutation hotspots were found in the ABCB5 protein, in the drug-binding pocket and the nucleotide-binding domains. Four mutations, which are representative of the mutation pattern, were selected. ATPase assays showed that these mutations resulted in a decrease in basal ATP hydrolysis by ABCB5. To select informative melanoma cell lines, mutational profiles of the clinical samples were further analyzed. This study showed mutations in the tumor suppressor CDKN2A gene and the NRAS oncogene in 62.5% and 75%, respectively of the samples that had mutations in the ABCB5 gene. No mutation was found in the tumor suppressor PTEN gene, whereas the activating V600E mutation in the BRAF oncogene was found in 25% of the samples with a mutated ABCB5 gene. Studies in four melanoma cell lines with various genetic backgrounds showed an increase in the proliferation and migration capacity of mutant ABCB5-expressing cells, suggesting that ABCB5 plays a role in the development of melanoma as a tumor suppressor gene.

15.
Cancer Immunol Res ; 7(4): 534-543, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30709841

RESUMO

Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) with T cells targeting neoantigens can mediate durable responses in patients with metastatic cancer. Cell therapies targeting common shared antigens for epithelial cancers are not yet broadly available. Here, we report the identification and characterization in one patient of T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognizing mutated p53 p.R175H, which is shared among a subset of patients with cancer. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes were screened for recognition of mutated neoantigens in a patient with metastatic colorectal cancer. HLA-A*0201-restricted recognition of mutated p53 p.R175H was identified, and the minimal peptide epitope was HMTEVVRHC. Reactive T cells were isolated by tetramer sorting, and three TCRs were identified. These TCRs mediated recognition of commercially available ovarian cancer, uterine carcinoma, and myeloma cell lines, as well as an NIH patient-derived esophageal adenocarcinoma line that endogenously expressed p53 p.R175H and HLA-A*0201. They also mediated recognition of p53 p.R175H+ colon, breast, and leukemia cell lines after transduction with a retrovirus encoding HLA-A*0201. This work demonstrates that common shared mutated epitopes such as those found in p53 can elicit immunogenic responses and that the application of ACT may be extended to patients with any cancer histology that expresses both HLA-A*0201 and the p53 p.R175H mutation.

16.
Sci Immunol ; 4(31)2019 01 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30635355

RESUMO

CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells have an essential function in maintaining self-tolerance; however, they may also play a detrimental role in antitumor immune responses. The presence of elevated frequencies of Treg cells in tumors correlates with disease progression and poor survival in patients with cancer. The antigen specificity of Treg cells that have expanded in the tumor microenvironment is poorly understood; answering this question may provide important insights for immunotherapeutic approaches. To address this, we used a novel combinatorial approach to characterizing the T cell receptor (TCR) profiles of intratumoral Treg cells from patients with metastatic melanoma, gastrointestinal, and ovarian cancers and elucidated their antigen specificities. The TCR repertoires of tumor-resident Treg cells were diverse yet displayed significant overlap with circulating Treg cells but not with conventional T cells in tumor or blood. TCRs isolated from Treg cells displayed specific reactivity against autologous tumors and mutated neoantigens, suggesting that intratumoral Treg cells act in a tumor antigen-selective manner leading to their activation and clonal expansion in the tumor microenvironment. Tumor antigen-specific Treg-derived TCRs resided in the tumor and in the circulation, suggesting that both Treg cell compartments may serve as a source for tumor-specific TCRs. These findings provide insights into the TCR specificity of tumor-infiltrating human Treg cells that may have potential implications for cancer immunotherapy.

17.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 449, 2019 01 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30683863

RESUMO

T cells targeting shared oncogenic mutations can induce durable tumor regression in epithelial cancer patients. Such T cells can be detected in tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, but whether such cells can be detected in the peripheral blood of patients with the common metastatic epithelial cancer patients is unknown. Using a highly sensitive in vitro stimulation and cell enrichment of peripheral memory T cells from six metastatic cancer patients, we identified and isolated CD4+, and CD8+ memory T cells targeting the mutated KRASG12D and KRASG12V variants, respectively, in three patients. In an additional two metastatic colon cancer patients, we detected CD8+ neoantigen-specific cells targeting the mutated SMAD5 and MUC4 proteins. Therefore, memory T cells targeting unique as well as shared somatic mutations can be detected in the peripheral blood of epithelial cancer patients and can potentially be used for the development of effective personalized T cell-based cancer immunotherapy across multiple patients.


Assuntos
Linfócitos T CD4-Positivos/imunologia , Linfócitos T CD8-Positivos/imunologia , Neoplasias do Colo/imunologia , Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica , Mucina-4/imunologia , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas p21(ras)/imunologia , Proteína Smad5/imunologia , Apresentação do Antígeno , Linfócitos T CD4-Positivos/patologia , Linfócitos T CD8-Positivos/patologia , Separação Celular/métodos , Técnicas de Cocultura , Neoplasias do Colo/genética , Neoplasias do Colo/patologia , Células Dendríticas/citologia , Células Dendríticas/imunologia , Humanos , Memória Imunológica , Metástase Linfática , Ativação Linfocitária , Linfócitos do Interstício Tumoral/imunologia , Linfócitos do Interstício Tumoral/patologia , Terapia de Alvo Molecular , Mucina-4/genética , Mutação , Células Neoplásicas Circulantes/imunologia , Células Neoplásicas Circulantes/patologia , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas p21(ras)/genética , Receptores de Antígenos de Linfócitos T/genética , Receptores de Antígenos de Linfócitos T/imunologia , Transdução de Sinais , Proteína Smad5/genética , Transdução Genética
18.
J Autism Dev Disord ; 49(5): 1749-1762, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30604350

RESUMO

The majority of studies of temperament in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) use scales normed on typical populations. The present study examined a widely used measure of temperament, the Behavioral Style Questionnaire (McDevitt and Carey in Behavioral Styles Questionnaire, Behavioral-Developmental Initiatives Scottsdale, AZ, 1975) to determine whether it contains the temperament traits theorized by its creators. Neither confirmatory nor exploratory factor analysis, using a sample of children with ASD and a population comparison group, identified the theorized nine temperament factors; many items did not strongly load on any of the original factors. A 10 factor solution best described the ASD data and a 9 factor solution best described the typical group's data. There were substantial similarities in the 9 factor solutions, but groups differed from one another enough to question construct similarity for several factors. These results highlight that more basic psychometric research is needed to better understand the BSQ in children with ASD.


Assuntos
Transtorno do Espectro Autista/psicologia , Comportamento Infantil , Temperamento , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Psicometria , Inquéritos e Questionários
19.
Clin Cancer Res ; 25(5): 1486-1493, 2019 03 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30518633

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Cellular therapy is an emerging cancer treatment modality, but its application to epithelial cancers has been limited. This clinical trial evaluated tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy for the treatment of patients with metastatic human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated carcinomas. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The trial was a phase II design with two cohorts, cervical cancers and noncervical cancers. Cell infusion was preceded by a lymphocyte-depleting conditioning regimen and followed by systemic high-dose aldesleukin. RESULTS: Objective tumor responses occurred in 5 of 18 (28%) patients in the cervical cancer cohort and 2 of 11 (18%) patients in the noncervical cancer cohort. Two of the responses in cervical cancer were complete and are ongoing 67 and 53 months after treatment. Responses in the noncervical cancer cohort were in anal cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The HPV reactivity of the infused T cells correlated with clinical response. Peripheral blood repopulation with HPV-reactive T cells also correlated with clinical response. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the concept that cellular therapy can mediate the regression of epithelial cancers, and they suggest the importance of predictive biomarkers and novel treatment platforms for more effective therapies.

20.
JCI Insight ; 3(19)2018 10 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30282837

RESUMO

Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) targeting neoantigens can mediate tumor regression in selected patients with metastatic epithelial cancer. However, effectively identifying and harnessing neoantigen-reactive T cells for patient treatment remains a challenge and it is unknown whether current methods to detect neoantigen-reactive T cells are missing potentially clinically relevant neoantigen reactivities. We thus investigated whether the detection of neoantigen-reactive TILs could be enhanced by enriching T cells that express PD-1 and/or T cell activation markers followed by microwell culturing to avoid overgrowth of nonreactive T cells. In 6 patients with metastatic epithelial cancer, this method led to the detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells targeting 18 and 1 neoantigens, respectively, compared with 6 and 2 neoantigens recognized by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively, when using our standard TIL fragment screening approach. In 2 patients, no recognition of mutated peptides was observed using our conventional screen, while our high-throughput approach led to the identification of 5 neoantigen-reactive T cell receptors (TCRs) against 5 different mutations from one patient and a highly potent MHC class II-restricted KRASG12V-reactive TCR from a second patient. In addition, in a metastatic tumor sample from a patient with serous ovarian cancer, we isolated 3 MHC class II-restricted TCRs targeting the TP53G245S hot-spot mutation. In conclusion, this approach provides a highly sensitive platform to isolate clinically relevant neoantigen-reactive T cells or their TCRs for cancer treatment.


Assuntos
Separação Celular/métodos , Citometria de Fluxo/métodos , Imunoterapia Adotiva/métodos , Linfócitos do Interstício Tumoral/transplante , Neoplasias/terapia , Adulto , Idoso , Antígenos de Neoplasias/genética , Antígenos de Neoplasias/imunologia , Linfócitos T CD4-Positivos/imunologia , Linfócitos T CD4-Positivos/metabolismo , Linfócitos T CD8-Positivos/imunologia , Linfócitos T CD8-Positivos/metabolismo , Carcinogênese/genética , Feminino , Humanos , Linfócitos do Interstício Tumoral/imunologia , Linfócitos do Interstício Tumoral/metabolismo , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mutação , Neoplasias/genética , Neoplasias/imunologia , Oncogenes/genética , Oncogenes/imunologia , Receptor de Morte Celular Programada 1/imunologia , Receptor de Morte Celular Programada 1/metabolismo , Receptores de Antígenos de Linfócitos T/imunologia , Receptores de Antígenos de Linfócitos T/metabolismo , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Células Tumorais Cultivadas
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA