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1.
Hum Mutat ; 2019 Nov 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31696996

RESUMO

Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a group of disorders with predominant symptoms of lower-extremity weakness and spasticity. Despite the delineation of numerous genetic causes of HSP, a significant portion of individuals with HSP remain molecularly undiagnosed. Through exome sequencing, we identified five unrelated families with childhood-onset nonsyndromic HSP, all presenting with progressive spastic gait, leg clonus, and toe walking starting from 7 to 8 years old. A recurrent two-base pair deletion (c.426_427delGA, p.K143Sfs*15) in the UBAP1 gene was found in four families, and a similar variant (c.475_476delTT, p.F159*) was detected in a fifth family. The variant was confirmed to be de novo in two families and inherited from an affected parent in two other families. RNA studies performed in lymphocytes from one patient with the de novo c.426_427delGA variant demonstrated escape of nonsense-mediated decay of the UBAP1 mutant transcript, suggesting the generation of a truncated protein. Both variants identified in this study are predicted to result in truncated proteins losing the capacity of binding to ubiquitinated proteins, hence appearing to exhibit a dominant-negative effect on the normal function of the endosome-specific endosomal sorting complexes required for the transport-I complex.

2.
Mol Autism ; 10: 35, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31649809

RESUMO

Background: PHF21A has been associated with intellectual disability and craniofacial anomalies based on its deletion in the Potocki-Shaffer syndrome region at 11p11.2 and its disruption in three patients with balanced translocations. In addition, three patients with de novo truncating mutations in PHF21A were reported recently. Here, we analyze genomic data from seven unrelated individuals with mutations in PHF21A and provide detailed clinical descriptions, further expanding the phenotype associated with PHF21A haploinsufficiency. Methods: Diagnostic trio whole exome sequencing, Sanger sequencing, use of GeneMatcher, targeted gene panel sequencing, and MiSeq sequencing techniques were used to identify and confirm variants. RT-qPCR was used to measure the normal expression pattern of PHF21A in multiple human tissues including 13 different brain tissues. Protein-DNA modeling was performed to substantiate the pathogenicity of the missense mutation. Results: We have identified seven heterozygous coding mutations, among which six are de novo (not maternal in one). Mutations include four frameshifts, one nonsense mutation in two patients, and one heterozygous missense mutation in the AT Hook domain, predicted to be deleterious and likely to cause loss of PHF21A function. We also found a new C-terminal domain composed of an intrinsically disordered region. This domain is truncated in six patients and thus likely to play an important role in the function of PHF21A, suggesting that haploinsufficiency is the likely underlying mechanism in the phenotype of seven patients. Our results extend the phenotypic spectrum of PHF21A mutations by adding autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, hypotonia, and neurobehavioral problems. Furthermore, PHF21A is highly expressed in the human fetal brain, which is consistent with the neurodevelopmental phenotype. Conclusion: Deleterious nonsense, frameshift, and missense mutations disrupting the AT Hook domain and/or an intrinsically disordered region in PHF21A were found to be associated with autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, hypotonia, neurobehavioral problems, tapering fingers, clinodactyly, and syndactyly, in addition to intellectual disability and craniofacial anomalies. This suggests that PHF21A is involved in autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, and its haploinsufficiency causes a diverse neurological phenotype.

3.
Mol Genet Genomic Med ; : e973, 2019 Sep 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31568715

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The nuclear encoded gene RMND1 (Required for Meiotic Nuclear Division 1 homolog) has recently been linked to RMND1-related mitochondrial disease (RRMD). This autosomal recessive condition characteristically presents with an infantile-onset multisystem disease characterized by severe hypotonia, global developmental delay, failure to thrive, sensorineural hearing loss, and lactic acidosis. Renal disease, however, appears to be one of the more prominent features of RRMD, affecting patients at significantly higher numbers compared to other mitochondrial diseases. We report the clinical, histological, and molecular findings of four RRMD patients across three academic institutions with a focus on the renal manifestations. METHODS: Four patients were identified for the purpose of this study, all of whom had molecular confirmation at the time of inclusion, which included the common pathogenic variant c.713A>G (p.N238S) as well as the three rare variants: c.485delC (p.P162fs), c.533C>T (p.T178M), and c.1317 + 1G>C splice donor variant. Medical history and laboratory findings were collected from the medical records and medical providers. RESULTS: In this study, all four patients developed renal disease characterized as tubulopathy (3/4), renal tubular acidosis (2/4), interstitial nephritis (1/4), and/or end-stage renal disease (4/4) necessitating renal transplantation (2/4). Histological evaluation of renal biopsy specimens revealed generalized tubular atrophy and on electron microscopy, abundant mitochondria with pleomorphism and abnormal cristae. CONCLUSION: Our experience with RRMD demonstrates a specific pattern of renal disease manifestations and clinical course. Patients are unlikely to respond to traditional chronic kidney disease (CKD) treatments, making early diagnosis and consideration of renal transplantation paramount to the management of RRMD.

4.
Am J Hum Genet ; 105(5): 1005-1015, 2019 Nov 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31630790

RESUMO

Lissencephaly comprises a spectrum of malformations of cortical development. This spectrum includes agyria, pachygyria, and subcortical band heterotopia; each represents anatomical malformations of brain cortical development caused by neuronal migration defects. The molecular etiologies of neuronal migration anomalies are highly enriched for genes encoding microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins, and this enrichment highlights the critical role for these genes in cortical growth and gyrification. Using exome sequencing and family based rare variant analyses, we identified a homozygous variant (c.997C>T [p.Arg333Cys]) in TUBGCP2, encoding gamma-tubulin complex protein 2 (GCP2), in two individuals from a consanguineous family; both individuals presented with microcephaly and developmental delay. GCP2 forms the multiprotein γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC) together with γ-tubulin and other GCPs to regulate the assembly of microtubules. By querying clinical exome sequencing cases and through GeneMatcher-facilitated collaborations, we found three additional families with bi-allelic variation and similarly affected phenotypes including a homozygous variant (c.1843G>C [p.Ala615Pro]) in two families and compound heterozygous variants consisting of one missense variant (c.889C>T [p.Arg297Cys]) and one splice variant (c.2025-2A>G) in another family. Brain imaging from all five affected individuals revealed varying degrees of cortical malformations including pachygyria and subcortical band heterotopia, presumably caused by disruption of neuronal migration. Our data demonstrate that pathogenic variants in TUBGCP2 cause an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental trait consisting of a neuronal migration disorder, and our data implicate GCP2 as a core component of γ-TuRC in neuronal migrating cells.

5.
J Genet Couns ; 2019 Sep 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31478310

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite growing evidence of diagnostic yield and clinical utility of whole exome sequencing (WES) in patients with undiagnosed diseases, there remain significant cost and reimbursement barriers limiting access to such testing. The diagnostic yield and resulting clinical actions of WES for patients who previously faced insurance coverage barriers have not yet been explored. METHODS: We performed a retrospective descriptive analysis of clinical WES outcomes for patients facing insurance coverage barriers prior to clinical WES and who subsequently enrolled in the Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN). Clinical WES was completed as a result of participation in the UDN. Payer type, molecular diagnostic yield, and resulting clinical actions were evaluated. RESULTS: Sixty-six patients in the UDN faced insurance coverage barriers to WES at the time of enrollment (67% public payer, 26% private payer). Forty-two of 66 (64%) received insurance denial for clinician-ordered WES, 19/66 (29%) had health insurance through a payer known not to cover WES, and 5/66 (8%) had previous payer denial of other genetic tests. Clinical WES results yielded a molecular diagnosis in 23 of 66 patients (35% [78% pediatric, 65% neurologic indication]). Molecular diagnosis resulted in clinical actions in 14 of 23 patients (61%). CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that a substantial proportion of patients who encountered insurance coverage barriers to WES had a clinically actionable molecular diagnosis, supporting the notion that WES has value as a covered benefit for patients who remain undiagnosed despite objective clinical findings.

6.
Nat Genet ; 51(9): 1308-1314, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31406347

RESUMO

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer with limited treatment options1. Approximately 10% of cases exhibit familial predisposition, but causative genes are not known in most families2. We perform whole-genome sequence analysis in a family with multiple cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and identify a germline truncating mutation in the member of the RAS oncogene family-like 3 (RABL3) gene. Heterozygous rabl3 mutant zebrafish show increased susceptibility to cancer formation. Transcriptomic and mass spectrometry approaches implicate RABL3 in RAS pathway regulation and identify an interaction with RAP1GDS1 (SmgGDS), a chaperone regulating prenylation of RAS GTPases3. Indeed, the truncated mutant RABL3 protein accelerates KRAS prenylation and requires RAS proteins to promote cell proliferation. Finally, evidence in patient cohorts with developmental disorders implicates germline RABL3 mutations in RASopathy syndromes. Our studies identify RABL3 mutations as a target for genetic testing in cancer families and uncover a mechanism for dysregulated RAS activity in development and cancer.

7.
Genet Med ; 2019 Jul 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31263215

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Haploinsufficiency of DYRK1A causes a recognizable clinical syndrome. The goal of this paper is to investigate congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and genital defects (GD) in patients with DYRK1A variants. METHODS: A large database of clinical exome sequencing (ES) was queried for de novo DYRK1A variants and CAKUT/GD phenotypes were characterized. Xenopus laevis (frog) was chosen as a model organism to assess Dyrk1a's role in renal development. RESULTS: Phenotypic details and variants of 19 patients were compiled after an initial observation that one patient with a de novo pathogenic variant in DYRK1A had GD. CAKUT/GD data were available from 15 patients, 11 of whom presented with CAKUT/GD. Studies in Xenopus embryos demonstrated that knockdown of Dyrk1a, which is expressed in forming nephrons, disrupts the development of segments of embryonic nephrons, which ultimately give rise to the entire genitourinary (GU) tract. These defects could be rescued by coinjecting wild-type human DYRK1A RNA, but not with DYRK1AR205* or DYRK1AL245R RNA. CONCLUSION: Evidence supports routine GU screening of all individuals with de novo DYRK1A pathogenic variants to ensure optimized clinical management. Collectively, the reported clinical data and loss-of-function studies in Xenopus substantiate a novel role for DYRK1A in GU development.

8.
Am J Hum Genet ; 105(2): 384-394, 2019 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31256876

RESUMO

Proteins anchored to the cell surface via glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) play various key roles in the human body, particularly in development and neurogenesis. As such, many developmental disorders are caused by mutations in genes involved in the GPI biosynthesis and remodeling pathway. We describe ten unrelated families with bi-allelic mutations in PIGB, a gene that encodes phosphatidylinositol glycan class B, which transfers the third mannose to the GPI. Ten different PIGB variants were found in these individuals. Flow cytometric analysis of blood cells and fibroblasts from the affected individuals showed decreased cell surface presence of GPI-anchored proteins. Most of the affected individuals have global developmental and/or intellectual delay, all had seizures, two had polymicrogyria, and four had a peripheral neuropathy. Eight children passed away before four years old. Two of them had a clinical diagnosis of DOORS syndrome (deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures), a condition that includes sensorineural deafness, shortened terminal phalanges with small finger and toenails, intellectual disability, and seizures; this condition overlaps with the severe phenotypes associated with inherited GPI deficiency. Most individuals tested showed elevated alkaline phosphatase, which is a characteristic of the inherited GPI deficiency but not DOORS syndrome. It is notable that two severely affected individuals showed 2-oxoglutaric aciduria, which can be seen in DOORS syndrome, suggesting that severe cases of inherited GPI deficiency and DOORS syndrome might share some molecular pathway disruptions.

9.
Genet Med ; 21(11): 2663, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31267042

RESUMO

In the Acknowledgements section of the paper the authors neglected to mention that the study was supported by a grant from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) UM1HG007301 (S.H., M.L.T.). In addition, the award of MD was associated with the authors Michelle L. Thompson and Susan Hiatt instead of PhD. The PDF and HTML versions of the Article have been modified accordingly.

10.
Genet Med ; 2019 Jun 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31155615

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Mediator is a multiprotein complex that allows the transfer of genetic information from DNA binding proteins to the RNA polymerase II during transcription initiation. MED12L is a subunit of the kinase module, which is one of the four subcomplexes of the mediator complex. Other subunits of the kinase module have been already implicated in intellectual disability, namely MED12, MED13L, MED13, and CDK19. METHODS: We describe an international cohort of seven affected individuals harboring variants involving MED12L identified by array CGH, exome or genome sequencing. RESULTS: All affected individuals presented with intellectual disability and/or developmental delay, including speech impairment. Other features included autism spectrum disorder, aggressive behavior, corpus callosum abnormality, and mild facial morphological features. Three individuals had a MED12L deletion or duplication. The other four individuals harbored single-nucleotide variants (one nonsense, one frameshift, and two splicing variants). Functional analysis confirmed a moderate and significant alteration of RNA synthesis in two individuals. CONCLUSION: Overall data suggest that MED12L haploinsufficiency is responsible for intellectual disability and transcriptional defect. Our findings confirm that the integrity of this kinase module is a critical factor for neurological development.

11.
Am J Med Genet A ; 179(7): 1376-1382, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31069960

RESUMO

The myelin regulatory factor gene (MYRF) encodes a transcription factor that is widely expressed. There is increasing evidence that heterozygous loss-of-function variants in MYRF can lead to abnormal development of the heart, genitourinary tract, diaphragm, and lungs. Here, we searched a clinical database containing the results of 12,000 exome sequencing studies. We identified three previously unreported males with putatively deleterious variants in MYRF: one with a point mutation predicted to affect splicing and two with frameshift variants. In all cases where parental DNA was available, these variants were found to have arisen de novo. The phenotypes identified in these subjects included a variety of congenital heart defects (CHD) (hypoplastic left heart syndrome, scimitar syndrome, septal defects, and valvular anomalies), genitourinary anomalies (ambiguous genitalia, hypospadias, and cryptorchidism), congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. The phenotypes seen in our subjects overlap those described in individuals diagnosed with PAGOD syndrome [MIM# 202660], a clinically defined syndrome characterized by pulmonary artery and lung hypoplasia, agonadism, omphalocele, and diaphragmatic defects that can also be associated with hypoplastic left heart and scimitar syndrome. These cases provide additional evidence that haploinsufficiency of MYRF causes a genetic syndrome whose cardinal features include CHD, urogenital anomalies, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. We also conclude that consideration should be given to screening individuals with PAGOD for pathogenic variants in MYRF, and that individuals with MYRF deficiency who survive the neonatal period should be monitored closely for developmental delay and intellectual disability.

13.
Mol Genet Genomic Med ; 7(6): e593, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30985088

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: With expanding use of clinical whole exome sequencing (WES), genetic variants of uncertain significance are increasingly identified. As pathologic mutations in genes associated with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) carry a risk of sudden death, determining the diagnostic relevance of incidentally identified variants associated with these genes is critical. METHODS: WES variants from a large, predominantly pediatric cohort (N = 7,066 probands) were obtained for nine ARVC-associated genes (Baylor Miraca). For comparison, a control cohort was derived from the gnomAD database and an ARVC case cohort (N = 1,379 probands) was established from ARVC cases in the literature. Topologic mapping was performed and signal-to-noise analysis was conducted normalizing WES, or case variants, against control variant frequencies. Retrospective chart review was performed of WES cases evaluated clinically (Texas Children's Hospital). RESULTS: Incidentally identified variants occurred in 14% of WES referrals and localized to genes which were rare among ARVC cases yet similar to controls. Amino acid-level signal-to-noise analysis of cases demonstrated "pathologic hotspots" localizing to critical domains of PKP2 and DSG2 while WES variants did not. PKP2 ARM7 and ARM8 domains and DSG2 N-terminal cadherin-repeat domains demonstrated high pathogenicity while normalized WES variant frequency was low. Review of clinical data available on WES referrals demonstrated none with evidence of ARVC among variant-positive individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Incidentally identified variants are common among pediatric WES testing with gene frequencies similar to "background" variants. Incidentally identified variants are unlikely to be pathologic.

14.
Genome Med ; 11(1): 12, 2019 02 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30819258

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Neurodevelopmental disorders are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous encompassing developmental delay (DD), intellectual disability (ID), autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), structural brain abnormalities, and neurological manifestations with variants in a large number of genes (hundreds) associated. To date, a few de novo mutations potentially disrupting TCF20 function in patients with ID, ASD, and hypotonia have been reported. TCF20 encodes a transcriptional co-regulator structurally related to RAI1, the dosage-sensitive gene responsible for Smith-Magenis syndrome (deletion/haploinsufficiency) and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (duplication/triplosensitivity). METHODS: Genome-wide analyses by exome sequencing (ES) and chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) identified individuals with heterozygous, likely damaging, loss-of-function alleles in TCF20. We implemented further molecular and clinical analyses to determine the inheritance of the pathogenic variant alleles and studied the spectrum of phenotypes. RESULTS: We report 25 unique inactivating single nucleotide variants/indels (1 missense, 1 canonical splice-site variant, 18 frameshift, and 5 nonsense) and 4 deletions of TCF20. The pathogenic variants were detected in 32 patients and 4 affected parents from 31 unrelated families. Among cases with available parental samples, the variants were de novo in 20 instances and inherited from 4 symptomatic parents in 5, including in one set of monozygotic twins. Two pathogenic loss-of-function variants were recurrent in unrelated families. Patients presented with a phenotype characterized by developmental delay, intellectual disability, hypotonia, variable dysmorphic features, movement disorders, and sleep disturbances. CONCLUSIONS: TCF20 pathogenic variants are associated with a novel syndrome manifesting clinical characteristics similar to those observed in Smith-Magenis syndrome. Together with previously described cases, the clinical entity of TCF20-associated neurodevelopmental disorders (TAND) emerges from a genotype-driven perspective.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Craniofaciais/genética , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Mutação INDEL , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Hipotonia Muscular/genética , Síndrome de Smith-Magenis/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Anormalidades Craniofaciais/patologia , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Deficiência Intelectual/patologia , Masculino , Hipotonia Muscular/patologia , Síndrome de Smith-Magenis/patologia , Fatores de Transcrição/metabolismo , Adulto Jovem
15.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(3): 542-552, 2019 Mar 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30827498

RESUMO

Polyglutamine expansions in the transcriptional co-repressor Atrophin-1, encoded by ATN1, cause the neurodegenerative condition dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) via a proposed novel toxic gain of function. We present detailed phenotypic information on eight unrelated individuals who have de novo missense and insertion variants within a conserved 16-amino-acid "HX repeat" motif of ATN1. Each of the affected individuals has severe cognitive impairment and hypotonia, a recognizable facial gestalt, and variable congenital anomalies. However, they lack the progressive symptoms typical of DRPLA neurodegeneration. To distinguish this subset of affected individuals from the DRPLA diagnosis, we suggest using the term CHEDDA (congenital hypotonia, epilepsy, developmental delay, digit abnormalities) to classify the condition. CHEDDA-related variants alter the particular structural features of the HX repeat motif, suggesting that CHEDDA results from perturbation of the structural and functional integrity of the HX repeat. We found several non-homologous human genes containing similar motifs of eight to 10 HX repeat sequences, including RERE, where disruptive variants in this motif have also been linked to a separate condition that causes neurocognitive and congenital anomalies. These findings suggest that perturbation of the HX motif might explain other Mendelian human conditions.

17.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(3): 422-438, 2019 Mar 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30773277

RESUMO

SPONASTRIME dysplasia is an autosomal-recessive spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia characterized by spine (spondylar) abnormalities, midface hypoplasia with a depressed nasal bridge, metaphyseal striations, and disproportionate short stature. Scoliosis, coxa vara, childhood cataracts, short dental roots, and hypogammaglobulinemia have also been reported in this disorder. Although an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been hypothesized, pathogenic variants in a specific gene have not been discovered in individuals with SPONASTRIME dysplasia. Here, we identified bi-allelic variants in TONSL, which encodes the Tonsoku-like DNA repair protein, in nine subjects (from eight families) with SPONASTRIME dysplasia, and four subjects (from three families) with short stature of varied severity and spondylometaphyseal dysplasia with or without immunologic and hematologic abnormalities, but no definitive metaphyseal striations at diagnosis. The finding of early embryonic lethality in a Tonsl-/- murine model and the discovery of reduced length, spinal abnormalities, reduced numbers of neutrophils, and early lethality in a tonsl-/- zebrafish model both support the hypomorphic nature of the identified TONSL variants. Moreover, functional studies revealed increased amounts of spontaneous replication fork stalling and chromosomal aberrations, as well as fewer camptothecin (CPT)-induced RAD51 foci in subject-derived cell lines. Importantly, these cellular defects were rescued upon re-expression of wild-type (WT) TONSL; this rescue is consistent with the hypothesis that hypomorphic TONSL variants are pathogenic. Overall, our studies in humans, mice, zebrafish, and subject-derived cell lines confirm that pathogenic variants in TONSL impair DNA replication and homologous recombination-dependent repair processes, and they lead to a spectrum of skeletal dysplasia phenotypes with numerous extra-skeletal manifestations.

18.
Genet Med ; 21(4): 798-812, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30655598

RESUMO

Identifying genes and variants contributing to rare disease phenotypes and Mendelian conditions informs biology and medicine, yet potential phenotypic consequences for variation of >75% of the ~20,000 annotated genes in the human genome are lacking. Technical advances to assess rare variation genome-wide, particularly exome sequencing (ES), enabled establishment in the United States of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-supported Centers for Mendelian Genomics (CMGs) and have facilitated collaborative studies resulting in novel "disease gene" discoveries. Pedigree-based genomic studies and rare variant analyses in families with suspected Mendelian conditions have led to the elucidation of hundreds of novel disease genes and highlighted the impact of de novo mutational events, somatic variation underlying nononcologic traits, incompletely penetrant alleles, phenotypes with high locus heterogeneity, and multilocus pathogenic variation. Herein, we highlight CMG collaborative discoveries that have contributed to understanding both rare and common diseases and discuss opportunities for future discovery in single-locus Mendelian disorder genomics. Phenotypic annotation of all human genes; development of bioinformatic tools and analytic methods; exploration of non-Mendelian modes of inheritance including reduced penetrance, multilocus variation, and oligogenic inheritance; construction of allelic series at a locus; enhanced data sharing worldwide; and integration with clinical genomics are explored. Realizing the full contribution of rare disease research to functional annotation of the human genome, and further illuminating human biology and health, will lay the foundation for the Precision Medicine Initiative.


Assuntos
Doenças Genéticas Inatas/genética , Heterogeneidade Genética , Genoma Humano/genética , Genômica/tendências , Bases de Dados Genéticas , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , National Institutes of Health (U.S.) , Linhagem , Estados Unidos , Sequenciamento Completo do Exoma/métodos
19.
Genet Med ; 21(8): 1797-1807, 2019 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30679821

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Haploinsufficiency of USP7, located at chromosome 16p13.2, has recently been reported in seven individuals with neurodevelopmental phenotypes, including developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), seizures, and hypogonadism. Further, USP7 was identified to critically incorporate into the MAGEL2-USP7-TRIM27 (MUST), such that pathogenic variants in USP7 lead to altered endosomal F-actin polymerization and dysregulated protein recycling. METHODS: We report 16 newly identified individuals with heterozygous USP7 variants, identified by genome or exome sequencing or by chromosome microarray analysis. Clinical features were evaluated by review of medical records. Additional clinical information was obtained on the seven previously reported individuals to fully elucidate the phenotypic expression associated with USP7 haploinsufficiency. RESULTS: The clinical manifestations of these 23 individuals suggest a syndrome characterized by DD/ID, hypotonia, eye anomalies,feeding difficulties, GERD, behavioral anomalies, and ASD, and more specific phenotypes of speech delays including a nonverbal phenotype and abnormal brain magnetic resonance image findings including white matter changes based on neuroradiologic examination. CONCLUSION: The consistency of clinical features among all individuals presented regardless of de novo USP7 variant type supports haploinsufficiency as a mechanism for pathogenesis and refines the clinical impact faced by affected individuals and caregivers.

20.
Genet Med ; 21(7): 1652-1656, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30568308

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Brain malformations caused by 17p13.3 deletions include lissencephaly with deletions of the larger Miller-Dieker syndrome region or smaller deletions of only PAFAH1B1, white matter changes, and a distinct syndrome due to deletions including YWHAE and CRK but sparing PAFAH1B1. We sought to understand the significance of 17p13.3 deletions between the YWHAE/CRK and PAFAH1B1 loci. METHODS: We analyzed the clinical features of six individuals from five families with 17p13.3 deletions between and not including YWHAE/CRK and PAFAH1B1 identified among individuals undergoing clinical chromosomal microarray testing or research genome sequencing. RESULTS: Five individuals from four families had multifocal white matter lesions while a sixth had a normal magnetic resonance image. A combination of our individuals and a review of those in the literature with white matter changes and deletions in this chromosomal region narrows the overlapping region for this brain phenotype to ~345 kb, including 11 RefSeq genes, with RTN4RL1 haploinsufficiency as the best candidate for causing this phenotype. CONCLUSION: While previous literature has hypothesized dysmorphic features and white matter changes related to YWHAE, our cohort contributes evidence to the presence of additional genetic changes within 17p13.3 required for proper brain development.

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