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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31507092

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To study growth and puberty in a multi-national longitudinal prospective cohort of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). METHODS: Children with JDM ≤18 years in active phase from 31 countries were studied, analyzing height, weight and pubertal development in children with available anthropometric data and follow-up visits over two years. RESULTS: A total of 196/275 (71%) children were included. We found a significant reduction in parent-adjusted height z score over time in females (p<0.0001) and males (p=0.001), but with catch-up growth at the final study visit. Median BMI z score peaked at 6 months (p<0.0001) and was still significantly above baseline at the final study visit at a median of 26 months (p=0.007) after baseline with no gender difference. Females with a disease duration ≥12 months after onset had significantly lower parent-adjusted height z score (p=0.002) and no 2-year catch-up growth. Growth failure was seen in 20 (21%) of the females and 11 (15%) of the males, at the final study visit. Height deflection (∆height z-score <-0.25/year) was observed in 29 (25%) of the females and 25 (31%) of the males. Delayed puberty was seen in 20/55 (36.4%) of the females and in 11/31 (35.5%) of the males. Children in early pubertal stage at baseline had the highest risk of growth failure. CONCLUSIONS: JDM and/or its treatment has a significant impact on growth and puberty in the active phase in affected children. Children with recent onset of puberty or previous growth failure, have the highest risk of delayed pubertal development and further growth retardation.

2.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 17(1): 64, 2019 Sep 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31500631

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In adult patients with arthritis, use of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor etanercept (ETN) is often associated with a reduction in the utilization of co-medications, particularly steroids. Comparatively little is known about the utilization of co-medications when ETN is initiated in pediatric patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: This study analyzed Canadian longitudinal claims level data spanning January 2007 to April 2017. Data were collated from the IQVIA Private Drug Plan, Ontario Public Drug Plan, and the Quebec Public Drug Plan (Régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec) databases. Patients < 18 years of age were indexed when filling a prescription for ETN between January 2008 and January 2016. Those who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were assessed for methotrexate (MTX), and prednisone (PRD) use in the 6 months prior to and 12 months following initiation of ETN. RESULTS: Longitudinal claims data for 330 biologic-naive pediatric patients initiating ETN therapy were included. The majority of patients were female (67%), aged 10-17 years (64%), and with a drug history consistent with JIA (96%). Most patients were from Quebec (36%) or Ontario (33%). Dosing of ETN was weight-based with a mean dosage over the first year of 31 mg per week. ETN dosing was relatively consistent over the first year. In total, 222 (67%) patients did not use MTX and 223 (68%) did not use PRD before or after starting ETN. A total of 17% (18/103) of MTX-treated and 50% (46/92) of PRD-treated patients discontinued use of those medications upon initiation of ETN treatment. In patients continuing MTX or PRD, significant reductions in the weekly dosage from 14.3 to 6.8 mg per week for MTX and from 56 to 23 mg per week for PRD were observed (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: This study of Canadian claims-level data is the first large prespecified analysis of co-medication utilization following the initiation of ETN therapy in pediatric patients. A decline in both MTX and PRD use and dosage was observed and may be associated with benefits related to safety, tolerability, and overall healthcare costs.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31421019

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate safety and effectiveness of adalimumab (ADA) in polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pcJIA) in the STRIVE registry (NCT00783510). METHODS: STRIVE enrolled patients with pcJIA into 2 arms based on treatment with methotrexate (MTX) alone or ADA with/without MTX (ADA±MTX). Adverse events (AEs) per 100 patient-years (PY) of observation time were analyzed by registry arm. Patients who entered the registry within 4 weeks of starting MTX or ADA±MTX, defined as new users, were evaluated for change in disease activity assessed by the C-reactive protein-based 27-joint Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS27CRP ). RESULTS: At the 7-year cut-off date (June 1, 2016), data from 838 patients were available (MTX-arm, N=301; ADA±MTX-arm, N=537). The most common AEs were nausea (10.3%), sinusitis (4.7%), and vomiting (4.3%) in the MTX-arm and arthritis (3.9%), upper respiratory tract infection (3.5%), sinusitis, tonsillitis, and injection site pain (3.0% each) in the ADA±MTX-arm. Rates of serious infection were 1.5 events/100 PY in the MTX-arm and 2.0 events/100 PY in the ADA±MTX-arm. AE and serious AE rates were similar in patients receiving ADA with versus without MTX. No deaths or malignancies were reported. New users in the ADA±MTX-arm showed a trend toward lower mean JADAS27CRP compared with new users in the MTX-arm in the first year of STRIVE. CONCLUSIONS: The STRIVE registry 7-year interim results support that ADA±MTX is well tolerated by most children. Registry median (interquartile range) ADA exposure was 2.47 (1.0-3.6) years, with 42% of patients continuing ADA at the 7-year cut-off date.

4.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 78(10): 1405-1411, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31278138

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical characteristics, treatment response and genetic findings in a large cohort of patients with undefined systemic autoinflammatory diseases (SAIDs). METHODS: Clinical and genetic data from patients with undefined SAIDs were extracted from the Eurofever registry, an international web-based registry that retrospectively collects clinical information on patients with autoinflammatory diseases. RESULTS: This study included 187 patients. Seven patients had a chronic disease course, 180 patients had a recurrent disease course. The median age at disease onset was 4.3 years. Patients had a median of 12 episodes per year, with a median duration of 4 days. Most commonly reported symptoms were arthralgia (n=113), myalgia (n=86), abdominal pain (n=89), fatigue (n=111), malaise (n=104) and mucocutaneous manifestations (n=128). In 24 patients, relatives were affected as well. In 15 patients, genetic variants were found in autoinflammatory genes. Patients with genetic variants more often had affected relatives compared with patients without genetic variants (p=0.005). Most patients responded well to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, colchicine and anakinra. Complete remission was rarely achieved with NSAIDs alone. Notable patterns were found in patients with distinctive symptoms. Patients with pericarditis (n=11) were older at disease onset (33.8 years) and had fewer episodes per year (3.0/year) compared with other patients. Patients with an intellectual impairment (n=8) were younger at disease onset (2.2 years) and often had relatives affected (28.6%). CONCLUSION: This study describes the clinical characteristics of a large cohort of patients with undefined SAIDs. Among these, patients with pericarditis and intellectual impairment appear to comprise distinct subsets.

5.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 78(10): 1357-1362, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31296501

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate a diagnostic score that aids in identifying macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). METHODS: The clinical and laboratory features of 362 patients with sJIA-associated MAS and 404 patients with active sJIA without evidence of MAS were collected in a multinational collaborative project. Eighty percent of the study population was used to develop the score and the remaining 20% constituted the validation sample. A Bayesian Model Averaging approach was used to assess the role of each clinical and laboratory variables in the diagnosis of MAS and to obtain the coefficients of selected variables. The final score, named MAS/sJIA (MS) score, resulted from the linear combination of these coefficients multiplied by the values of each variable. The cut-off that best discriminated MAS from active sJIA was calculated by means of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Score performance was evaluated in both developmental and validation samples. RESULTS: The MS score ranges from -8.4 to 41.8 and comprises seven variables: central nervous system dysfunction, haemorrhagic manifestations, active arthritis, platelet count, fibrinogen, lactate dehydrogenase and ferritin. A cut-off value ≥-2.1 revealed the best performance in discriminating MAS from active sJIA, with a sensitivity of 0.85, a specificity of 0.95 and a kappa value of 0.80. The good performance of the MS score was confirmed in the validation sample. CONCLUSION: The MS score is a powerful and feasible tool that may assist practitioners in making a timely diagnosis of MAS in patients with sJIA.

6.
Curr Opin Rheumatol ; 31(5): 428-435, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31169547

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review highlights the advances in disease outcome achieved with currently available biologic medications and future perspectives for JIA management. RECENT FINDINGS: In the last two decades, the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has been revolutionized by appropriate legislative initiatives, the existence of very large collaborative networks and the increased availability of the novel biologic medications. SUMMARY: A more rational approach to the management of JIA is being fostered by the recent publication of therapeutic recommendations, consensus treatment plans and for a treat-to-target strategy.

7.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 17(1): 24, 2019 May 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31118099

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prednisone (PDN) in juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), alone or in association with other immunosuppressive drugs, namely methotrexate (MTX) and cyclosporine (CSA), represents the first-line treatment option for new onset JDM patients. No clear evidence based guidelines are actually available to standardize the tapering and discontinuation of glucocorticoids (GC) in JDM. Aim of our study was to provide an evidence-based proposal for GC tapering/discontinuation in new onset juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), and to identify predictors of clinical remission and GC discontinuation. METHODS: New onset JDM children were randomized to receive either PDN alone or in combination with methotrexate (MTX) or cyclosporine (CSA). In order to derive steroid tapering indications, PRINTO/ACR/EULAR JDM core set measures (CSM) and their median absolute and relative percent changes over time were compared in 3 groups. Group 1 included those in clinical remission who discontinued PDN, with no major therapeutic changes (MTC) (reference group) and was compared with those who did not achieve clinical remission, without or with MTC (Group 2 and 3, respectively). A logistic regression model identified predictors of clinical remission with PDN discontinuation. RESULTS: Based on the median change in the CSM of 30/139 children in Group 1, after 3 pulses of methyl-prednisolone, GC could be tapered from 2 to 1 mg/kg/day in the first two months from onset if any of the CSM decreased by 50-94%, and from 1 to 0.2 mg/kg/day in the following 4 months if any CSM further decreased by 8-68%, followed by discontinuation in the ensuing 18 months. The achievement of PRINTO JDM 50-70-90 response after 2 months of treatment (ORs range 4.5-6.9), an age at onset > 9 years (OR 4.6) and the combination therapy PDN + MTX (OR 3.6) increase the probability of achieving clinical remission (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first evidence-based proposal for glucocorticoid tapering/discontinuation based on the change in JDM CSM of disease activity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Trial full title: Five-Year Single-Blind, Phase III Effectiveness Randomized Actively Controlled Clinical Trial in New Onset Juvenile Dermatomyositis: Prednisone versus Prednisone plus Cyclosporine A versus Prednisone plus Methotrexate. EUDRACT registration number: 2005-003956-37 . CLINICAL TRIAL: gov is NCT00323960 . Registered on 17 August 2005.

8.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 21(1): 125, 2019 May 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31122296

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To describe the 6-year safety and efficacy of etanercept (ETN) in children with extended oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (eoJIA), enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) METHODS: Patients who completed the 2-year, open-label, phase III CLinical Study In Pediatric Patients of Etanercept for Treatment of ERA, PsA, and Extended Oligoarthritis (CLIPPER) were allowed to enroll in its 8-year long-term extension (CLIPPER2). Children received ETN at a once-weekly dose of 0.8 mg/kg, up to a maximum dose of 50 mg/week. Efficacy assessments included the JIA core set of outcomes, the JIA American College of Rheumatology response criteria (JIA-ACR), and the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS). Efficacy data are reported as responder analyses using a hybrid method for missing data imputation and as observed cases. Safety assessments included treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs). RESULTS: Out of 127 patients originally enrolled in CLIPPER, 109 (86%) entered CLIPPER2. After 6 years of trial participation (2 years in CLIPPER and 4 years in CLIPPER2), 41 (32%) patients were still taking ETN, 13 (11%) entered the treatment withdrawal phase after achieving low/inactive disease (of whom 7 had to restart ETN), 36 (28%) discontinued treatment for other reasons but are still being observed, and 37 (29%) discontinued treatment permanently. According to the hybrid imputation analysis, proportions of patients achieving JIA ACR90, JIA ACR100, and JADAS inactive disease after the initial 2 years of treatment were 58%, 48%, and 32%, respectively. After the additional 4 years, those proportions in patients who remained in the trial were 46%, 35%, and 24%. Most frequently reported TEAEs [n (%), events per 100 patient-years] were headache [28 (22%), 5.3], arthralgia [24 (19%), 4.6], and pyrexia [20 (16%), 3.8]. Number and frequency of TEAEs, excluding infections and injection site reactions, decreased over the 6-year period from 193 and 173.8, respectively, during year 1 to 37 and 61.3 during year 6. A single case of malignancy (Hodgkin's lymphoma) and no cases of active tuberculosis, demyelinating disorders, or deaths were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Open-label etanercept treatment for up to 6 years was safe, well tolerated, and effective in patients with eoJIA, ERA, and PsA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: CLIPPER, NCT00962741 , registered 20 August, 2009, CLIPPER2, NCT01421069 , registered 22 August, 2011.

9.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 78(8): 1025-1032, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31018962

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Different diagnostic and classification criteria are available for hereditary recurrent fevers (HRF)-familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS)-and for the non-hereditary, periodic fever, aphthosis, pharyngitis and adenitis (PFAPA). We aimed to develop and validate new evidence-based classification criteria for HRF/PFAPA. METHODS: Step 1: selection of clinical, laboratory and genetic candidate variables; step 2: classification of 360 random patients from the Eurofever Registry by a panel of 25 clinicians and 8 geneticists blinded to patients' diagnosis (consensus ≥80%); step 3: statistical analysis for the selection of the best candidate classification criteria; step 4: nominal group technique consensus conference with 33 panellists for the discussion and selection of the final classification criteria; step 5: cross-sectional validation of the novel criteria. RESULTS: The panellists achieved consensus to classify 281 of 360 (78%) patients (32 CAPS, 36 FMF, 56 MKD, 37 PFAPA, 39 TRAPS, 81 undefined recurrent fever). Consensus was reached for two sets of criteria for each HRF, one including genetic and clinical variables, the other with clinical variables only, plus new criteria for PFAPA. The four HRF criteria demonstrated sensitivity of 0.94-1 and specificity of 0.95-1; for PFAPA, criteria sensitivity and specificity were 0.97 and 0.93, respectively. Validation of these criteria in an independent data set of 1018 patients shows a high accuracy (from 0.81 to 0.98). CONCLUSION: Eurofever proposes a novel set of validated classification criteria for HRF and PFAPA with high sensitivity and specificity.

10.
J Rheumatol ; 46(9): 1117-1126, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30824645

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether neutropenia is associated with increased risk for infection in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) and polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pcJIA) treated with tocilizumab (TCZ). METHODS: Data up to Week 104 from 2 phase III trials of intravenous TCZ in sJIA (n = 112; ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00642460) and pcJIA (n = 188; ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00988221) were pooled. Worst common toxicity criteria grade and lowest observed absolute neutrophil count (ANC) were identified for each patient. Associations between patient characteristics and lowest observed ANC were tested using univariate regression analysis. Infection and serious infection rates per 100 patient-years (PY) in periods associated with grades 1/2 and 3/4 neutrophil counts were compared with rates associated with normal neutrophil counts. RESULTS: ANC decreased to grade ≥ 3 in 25.0% and 5.9% of sJIA and pcJIA patients, respectively, and decreases were transient. Young age (p = 0.047) and methotrexate use (p = 0.012) were positively associated with neutropenia in patients with sJIA but not in patients with pcJIA. The rate of serious infections in patients with sJIA (10.9/100 PY; 95% CI 6.8-16.5) tended to be higher than in patients with pcJIA (5.2/100 PY; 95% CI 3-8.5). No increase in rates of serious or nonserious infections was observed during periods of neutropenia in either trial. CONCLUSION: Patients with JIA treated with TCZ experienced transient neutropenia that was not associated with an increased number of infections.

11.
Lancet Child Adolesc Health ; 3(4): 255-263, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30819662

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To our knowledge, the characteristics and burden of childhood arthritis have never been studied on a worldwide basis. We aimed to investigate, with a cross-sectional study, the prevalence of disease categories, treatment methods, and disease status in patients from across different geographical areas and from countries with diverse wealth status. METHODS: In this multinational, cross-sectional, observational cohort study, we asked international paediatric rheumatologists from specialised centres to enrol children with a diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, according to International League of Associations for Rheumatology criteria, who were seen consecutively for a period of 6 months. Each patient underwent retrospective and cross-sectional assessments, including measures of disease activity and damage and questionnaires on the wellbeing and quality of life of the children. We qualitatively compared the collected data across eight geographical areas, and we explored an association between disease activity and damage and a country's gross domestic product (GDP) with a multiple logistic regression analysis. FINDINGS: Between April 4, 2011, and Nov 21, 2016, 9081 patients were enrolled at 130 centres in 49 countries, grouped into eight geographical areas. Systemic arthritis (125 [33·0%] of 379 patients) and enthesitis-related arthritis (113 [29·8%] of 379) were more common in southeast Asia, whereas oligoarthritis was more prevalent in southern Europe (1360 [56·7%] of 2400) and rheumatoid factor-negative polyarthritis was more frequent in North America (165 [31·5%] of 523) than in the other areas. Prevalence of uveitis was highest in northern Europe (161 [19·1%] of 845 patients) and southern Europe (450 [18·8%] of 2400) and lowest in Latin America (54 [6·4%] of 849), Africa and Middle East (71 [5·9%] of 1209), and southeast Asia (19 [5·0%] of 379). Median age at disease onset was lower in southern Europe (3·5 years, IQR 1·9-7·3) than in other regions. Biological, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were prescribed more frequently in northern Europe and North America than in other geographical settings. Patients living in countries with lower GDP had greater disease activity and damage than those living in wealthier countries. Damage was associated with referral delay. INTERPRETATION: Our study documents a variability in prevalence of disease phenotypes and disparities in therapeutic choices and outcomes across geographical areas and wealth status of countries. The greater disease burden in lower-resource settings highlights the need for public health efforts aimed at improving equity in access to effective treatments and care for juvenile idiopathic arthritis. FUNDING: IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini.

12.
J Rheumatol ; 46(8): 1006-1013, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30770499

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The current Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Core Set used in randomized controlled trials (RCT) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS) was developed without the input of patients/parents. At the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 2016, a special interest group voted to reconsider the core set, incorporating broader input. We describe subsequent work culminating in an OMERACT 2018 plenary and consensus voting. METHODS: Candidate domains were identified through literature review, qualitative surveys, and online discussion boards (ODB) held with patients with JIA and parents in Australia, Italy, and the United States. A Delphi process with parents, patients, healthcare providers, researchers, and regulators served to edit the domain list and prioritize candidate domains. After the presentation of results, OMERACT workshop participants voted, with consensus set at > 70%. RESULTS: Participants in ODB were 53 patients with JIA (ages 15-24 yrs) and 55 parents. Three rounds of Delphi considering 27 domains were completed by 190 (response rate 85%), 201 (84%), and 182 (77%) people, respectively, from 50 countries. There was discordance noted between domains prioritized by patients/parents compared to others. OMERACT conference voting approved domains for JIA RCT and LOS with 83% endorsement. Mandatory domains are pain, joint inflammatory signs, activity limitation/physical function, patient's perception of disease activity (overall well-being), and adverse events. Mandatory in specific circumstances: inflammation/other features relevant to specific JIA categories. CONCLUSION: Following the OMERACT methodology, we developed an updated JIA Core Domain Set. Next steps are to identify and systematically evaluate best outcome measures for these domains.

13.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) ; 71(5): 579-590, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30680946

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To develop a Childhood Lupus Improvement Index (CHILI) as a tool to measure response to therapy in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE), with a focus on clinically relevant improvement (CRIc SLE ). METHODS: Pediatric nephrology and rheumatology subspecialists (n = 213) experienced in cSLE management were invited to define CRIc SLE and rate a total of 433 unique patient profiles for the presence/absence of CRIc SLE . Patient profiles included the following cSLE core response variables (CRVs): global assessment of patient well-being (patient-global), physician assessment of cSLE activity (MD-global), disease activity index score (here, we used the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index), urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and Child Health Questionnaire physical summary score. Percentage and absolute changes in these cSLE-CRVs (baseline versus follow-up) were considered in order to develop candidate algorithms and validate their performance (sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC]; range 0-1). RESULTS: During an international consensus conference, unanimous agreement on a definition of CRIc SLE was achieved; cSLE experts (n = 13) concurred (100%) that the preferred CHILI algorithm considers absolute changes in the cSLE-CRVs. After transformation to a range of 0-100, a CHILI score of ≥54 had outstanding accuracy for identifying CRIc SLE (AUC 0.93, sensitivity 81.1%, and specificity 84.2%). CHILI scores also reflect minor, moderate, and major improvement for values exceeding 15, 68, and 92, respectively (all AUC ≥0.92, sensitivity ≥93.1%, and specificity ≥73.4%). CONCLUSION: The CHILI is a new, seemingly highly accurate index for measuring CRI in cSLE over time. This index is useful to categorize the degree of response to therapy in children and adolescents with cSLE.

14.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 58(7): 1196-1205, 2019 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30690571

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To develop a composite DAS for JDM and provide preliminary evidence of its validity. METHODS: The Juvenile DermatoMyositis Activity Index (JDMAI) is composed of four items: physician's global assessment of overall disease activity; parent's/child's global assessment of child's wellbeing; measurement of muscle strength; and assessment of skin disease activity. The score of the JDMAI is the arithmetic sum of the scores of each individual component. Six versions of the JDMAI were tested, which differed in the tools used to assess the third and fourth items. Validation procedures were conducted using three large multinational patient samples including a total of 627 patients. RESULTS: The JDMAI was found to possess face and content validity, good construct validity, satisfactory internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.58-0.89), fair responsiveness to clinically important change (standardized response mean = 0.82-3.12 among patients improved) and strong capacity to discriminate patients judged as being in the state of inactive disease or low, moderate or high disease activity by the physician (P < 0.001) or whose parents were satisfied or not satisfied with the course of their child's illness (P < 0.001). Overall, the six versions of the JDMAI showed similar metrological performances in validation analyses. CONCLUSION: The JDMAI was found to possess good measurement properties in a large population of patients with a wide range of disease activity, and is, therefore, suitable for use in both clinical and research settings. The final version of the JDMAI will be selected after its prospective validation.

15.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 20(1): 285, 2018 12 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30587248

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The availability of methotrexate and the introduction of multiple biological agents have revolutionized the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Several international and national drug registries have been implemented to accurately monitor the long-term safety/efficacy of these agents. This report aims to present the combined data coming from Pharmachild/PRINTO registry and the national registries from Germany (BiKeR) and Sweden. METHODS: Descriptive statistics was used for demographic, clinical data, drug exposure, adverse events (AEs) and events of special interest (ESIs). For the Swedish register, AE data were not available. RESULTS: Data from a total of 15,284 patients were reported: 8274 (54%) from the Pharmachild registry and 3990 (26%) and 3020 (20%) from the German and the Swedish registries, respectively. Pharmachild children showed a younger age (median of 5.4 versus 7.6 years) at JIA onset and shorter disease duration at last available visit (5.3 versus 6.1-6.8) when compared with the other registries. The most frequent JIA category was the rheumatoid factor-negative polyarthritis (range of 24.6-29.9%). Methotrexate (61-84%) and etanercept (24%-61.8%) were the most frequently used synthetic and biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), respectively. There was a wide variability in glucocorticoid use (16.7-42.1%). Serious AEs were present in 572 (6.9%) patients in Pharmachild versus 297 (7.4%) in BiKeR. Infection and infestations were the most frequent AEs (29.4-30.1%) followed by gastrointestinal disorders (11.5-19.6%). The most frequent ESIs were infections (75.3-89%). CONCLUSIONS: This article is the first attempt to present a very large sample of data on JIA patients from different national and international registries and represents the first proposal for data merging as the most powerful tool for future analysis of safety and effectiveness of immunosuppressive therapies in JIA. REGISTRY REGISTRATION: The Pharmachild registry is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT01399281 ) and at the European Network of Centres for Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacovigilance (ENCePP) ( http://www.encepp.eu/encepp/viewResource.htm?id=19362 ). The BiKeR registry is registered at ENCePP ( http://www.encepp.eu/encepp/viewResource.htm?id=20591 ).


Assuntos
Artrite Juvenil/tratamento farmacológico , Produtos Biológicos/uso terapêutico , Farmacovigilância , Sistema de Registros/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicamentos Sintéticos/uso terapêutico , Adolescente , Antirreumáticos/efeitos adversos , Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Artrite Juvenil/diagnóstico , Produtos Biológicos/efeitos adversos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Monitoramento de Medicamentos , Etanercepte/efeitos adversos , Etanercepte/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Metotrexato/efeitos adversos , Metotrexato/uso terapêutico , Estudos Prospectivos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Medicamentos Sintéticos/efeitos adversos , Resultado do Tratamento
16.
J Rheumatol ; 2018 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30385706

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Provisional evidence-based classification criteria for hereditary periodic fever (HPF) have been recently developed. However, no consensus on how to combine clinical criteria, laboratory tests, and results of molecular analysis has been reached. The objective of this study is to understand which variables physicians consider important for the classification of patients with HPF. METHODS: Two Delphi surveys were sent to health professionals in the field of autoinflammation. In the first open survey, 124 researchers could list all the variables they consider useful for the diagnosis of each monogenic periodic fever. The variables could be of any type and each researcher could complete the survey for 1 or more diseases. In the second survey, 162 researchers were asked to select, from a list of items coming from the first survey, the 10 top variables and to rank them by assigning a score from 10 to 1. RESULTS: The response rates to the Delphi surveys were 85% for the first session and 87% for the second. The variables selected for each disease (corresponding to the third quartile, considering the total score obtained by the variables after the second Delphi survey) were 21 for mevalonate kinase deficiency, 22 for cryopyrinopathies, 18 for familial Mediterranean fever, and 20 for tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome. A positive genetic test reached the top rank in all the HPF. CONCLUSION: Our process led to the identification of those features considered the most important as candidate variables to be included in a new set of evidence-based classification criteria for HPF.

17.
J Rheumatol ; 2018 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30275259

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To revise the current juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) classification criteria with an evidence-based approach, using clinical and routine laboratory measures available worldwide, to identify homogeneous clinical groups and to distinguish those forms of chronic arthritis typically seen only in children from the childhood counterpart of adult diseases. METHODS: The overall project consists of 4 steps. This work represents Step 1, a Delphi Web-based consensus and Step 2, an international nominal group technique (NGT) consensus conference for the new provisional Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organization JIA classification criteria. A future large data collection of at least 1000 new-onset JIA patients (Step 3) followed by analysis and NGT consensus (Step 4) will provide data for the evidence-based validation of the JIA classification criteria. RESULTS: In Step 1, three Delphi rounds of interactions were implemented to revise the 7 ILAR JIA categories. In Step 2, forty-seven questions with electronic voting were implemented to derive the new proposed criteria. Four disorders were proposed: (a) systemic JIA; (b) rheumatoid factor-positive JIA; (c) enthesitis/spondylitis-related JIA; and (d) early-onset antinuclear antibody-positive JIA. The other forms were gathered under the term "others." These will be analyzed during the prospective data collection using a list of descriptors to see whether the clustering of some of them could identify homogeneous entities. CONCLUSION: An international consensus was reached to identify different proposed homogeneous chronic disorders that fall under the historical term JIA. These preliminary criteria will be formally validated with a dedicated project.

18.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 77(12): 1710-1719, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30269054

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of canakinumab in patients with active systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: Patients (2-19 years) entered two phase III studies and continued in the long-term extension (LTE) study. Efficacy assessments were performed every 3 months, including adapted JIA American College of Rheumatology (aJIA-ACR) criteria, Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS) and ACR clinical remission on medication criteria (CRACR). Efficacy analyses are reported as per the intent-to-treat population. RESULTS: 144 of the 177 patients (81%) enrolled in the core study entered the LTE. Overall, 75 patients (42%) completed and 102 (58%) discontinued mainly for inefficacy (63/102, 62%), with higher discontinuation rates noted in the late responders group (n=25/31, 81%) versus early responders (n=11/38, 29%). At 2 years, aJIA-ACR 50/70/90 response rates were 62%, 61% and 54%, respectively. CRACR was achieved by 20% of patients at month 6; 32% at 2 years. A JADAS low disease activity score was achieved by 49% of patients at 2 years. Efficacy results were maintained up to 5 years. Of the 128/177 (72.3%) patients on glucocorticoids, 20 (15.6%) discontinued and 28 (22%) tapered to 0.150 mg/kg/day. Seven patients discontinued canakinumab due to CR. There were 13 macrophage activation syndrome (three previously reported) and no additional deaths (three previously reported). No new safety findings were observed. CONCLUSION: Response to canakinumab treatment was sustained and associated with substantial glucocorticoid dose reduction or discontinuation and a relatively low retention-on-treatment rate. No new safety findings were observed on long-term use of canakinumab. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBERS: NCT00886769, NCT00889863, NCT00426218 and NCT00891046.

19.
Clin Rheumatol ; 2018 Sep 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30267356

RESUMO

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most prevalent chronic rheumatic disease in children and young people (CYP) and a major cause of pain and disability. The vast majority of the world's children and their families live in less resourced countries (LRCs) and face significant socioeconomic and healthcare challenges. Current recommendations for standards of care and treatment for children with JIA do not consider children living in less resourced countries. In order to develop appropriate recommendations for the care of CYP with JIA in less resourced countries a meeting of experienced pediatric rheumatologists from less resourced countries was convened with additional input from a steering group of international pediatric rheumatologists with experience in developing recommendations and standards of care for JIA. Following a needs assessment survey of healthcare workers caring for CYP with JIA in LRC, a literature review was carried out and management recommendations formulated using Delphi technique and a final consensus conference. Responses from the needs assessment were received from 121/483 (25%) practitioners from 25/49 (51%) less resourced countries. From these responses, the initial 84 recommendations were refined and expanded through a series of 3 online Delphi rounds. A final list of 90 recommendations was proposed for evaluation. Evidence for each statement was reviewed, graded, and presented to the consensus group. The degree of consensus, level of agreement, and level of evidence for these recommendations are reported. Recommendations arrived at by consensus for CYP with JIA in less resourced countries cover 5 themes: (1) diagnosis, (2) referral and monitoring, (3) education and training, (4) advocacy and networks, and (5) research. Thirty-five statements were drafted. All but one statement achieved 100% consensus. The body of published evidence was small and the quality of evidence available for critical appraisal was low. Our recommendations offer novel insights and present consensus-based strategies for the management of JIA in less resourced countries. The emphasis on communicable and endemic diseases influencing the diagnosis and treatment of JIA serves as a valuable addition to existing JIA guidelines. With increasing globalization, these recommendations as a whole provide educational and clinical utility for clinicians worldwide. The low evidence base for our recommendations reflects a shortage of research specific to less resourced countries and serves as an impetus for further inquiry towards optimizing care for children with JIA around the world.

20.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 2018 Sep 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30232192

RESUMO

Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is rare in many regions of the world, including Europe. Access to approved medications for cSLE is currently limited, among others, due to a lack of high-quality evidence from clinical trials. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the current regulatory framework regarding medication approvals, delineate barriers to clinical trial conduct, and strategies to improve access to new medications for cSLE. Relevant methodological and regulatory aspects, epidemiological data, study designs and outcome measures are reviewed, and the results of a survey among Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation/Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group investigators are presented. Laws and regulations in the USA and Europe necessitate that novel medicines are studied in paediatric populations, if similar or the same diseases in adults have been found to benefit from them. Regulatory agencies consider cSLE the paediatric form of SLE in adults. For medicines that have been found safe and effective in adult SLE, paediatric extrapolation strategies can limit the number and complexity of studies needed to support the labelling of these medicines for use in cSLE. In this setting, specialised research networks, validated outcome measures, stakeholder input, study designs as well as statistical methods successfully used in other uncommon diseases will help improve study efficiency in an effort to enhance the speed with which new drugs for cSLE can be studied. Open-label pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies are preferred by paediatric rheumatologists over double-blind parallel designs for cSLE trials. Appropriate infrastructure, outcome measures and sufficient numbers of patients are available for the testing of new medicines for children with cSLE.

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