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1.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 2021 Feb 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33605029

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate anakinra efficacy and safety compared to triamcinolone in the treatment of gout flares. METHODS: Patients unsuitable for NSAIDs and colchicine were enrolled in this multi-center, randomized, double-blind study lasting for up to 2 years (NCT03002974). The design was to show superiority of anakinra (100 or 200 mg/day for 5 days) over triamcinolone (40 mg single injection) for primary endpoint of changed patient-assessed pain intensity from baseline to 24-72 hours in the most affected joint measured on visual analogue scale (0-100). Secondary outcomes included: safety, immunogenicity, and patient's and physician's global response assessments. RESULTS: 165 patients were randomized (110 to anakinra, 55 to triamcinolone). Median age was 55 (range 25-83) years, 87% were men, mean disease duration was 8.7 years, and mean number of self-reported flares during prior year was 4.5. In total, 301 flares were treated (214 anakinra; 87 triamcinolone). Both anakinra doses and triamcinolone provided clinically meaningful reduction in patient-assessed pain intensity in the 1st and subsequent flares. For the 1st flare, the mean pain intensity decline from baseline to 24-72 hours for total anakinra and triamcinolone was -41.2 and -39.4, respectively (p=0.688). Most secondary endpoints favored anakinra. No unexpected safety findings were identified. Presence of anti-drug antibodies was not associated with adverse events or altered pain reduction. CONCLUSIONS: Anakinra was not superior to triamcinolone for the primary endpoint, but had comparable efficacy in pain reduction, and was favored for most secondary endpoints. Anakinra is an effective option for gout flares when conventional therapy is unsuitable.

2.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 2020 Dec 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33277981

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance to rheumatology providers on the management of adult rheumatic disease in the context of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: A task force, including 10 rheumatologists and 4 infectious disease specialists from North America, was convened. Clinical questions were collated, and an evidence report was rapidly generated and disseminated. Questions and drafted statements were reviewed and assessed using a modified Delphi process. This included asynchronous anonymous voting by email and webinars with the entire panel. Task force members voted on agreement with draft statements using a 1-9-point numerical scoring system, and consensus was determined to be low, moderate, or high based on the dispersion of votes. For approval, median votes were required to meet predefined levels of agreement (median values of 7-9, 4-6, and 1-3 defined as agreement, uncertainty, or disagreement, respectively) with either moderate or high levels of consensus. RESULTS: Draft guidance statements approved by the task force have been combined to form final guidance. CONCLUSION: These guidance statements are provided to promote optimal care during the current pandemic. However, given the low level of available evidence and the rapidly evolving literature, this guidance is presented as a "living document," and future updates are anticipated.

4.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 2020 Nov 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33142024

RESUMO

We appreciate the thoughtful suggestions provided by Bansal and colleagues regarding the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Guidance for the Management of Rheumatic Disease in Adult Patients During the COVID-19 Pandemic [1]. While there are noteworthy strengths to the ACR-led effort, we recognize that the guidance generated is not comprehensive, as it does not address all of the potential scenarios or treatments relevant to the day-to-day management of rheumatic disease (RD) patients.

5.
J Clin Transl Sci ; 4(4): 345-353, 2020 Apr 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33244416

RESUMO

Introduction: The updated common rule, for human subjects research, requires that consents "begin with a 'concise and focused' presentation of the key information that will most likely help someone make a decision about whether to participate in a study" (Menikoff, Kaneshiro, Pritchard. The New England Journal of Medicine. 2017; 376(7): 613-615.). We utilized a community-engaged technology development approach to inform feature options within the REDCap software platform centered around collection and storage of electronic consent (eConsent) to address issues of transparency, clinical trial efficiency, and regulatory compliance for informed consent (Harris, et al. Journal of Biomedical Informatics 2009; 42(2): 377-381.). eConsent may also improve recruitment and retention in clinical research studies by addressing: (1) barriers for accessing rural populations by facilitating remote consent and (2) cultural and literacy barriers by including optional explanatory material (e.g., defining terms by hovering over them with the cursor) or the choice of displaying different videos/images based on participant's race, ethnicity, or educational level (Phillippi, et al. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing. 2018; 47(4): 529-534.). Methods: We developed and pilot tested our eConsent framework to provide a personalized consent experience whereby users are guided through a consent document that utilizes avatars, contextual glossary information supplements, and videos, to facilitate communication of information. Results: The eConsent framework includes a portfolio of eight features, reviewed by community stakeholders, and tested at two academic medical centers. Conclusions: Early adoption and utilization of this eConsent framework have demonstrated acceptability. Next steps will emphasize testing efficacy of features to improve participant engagement with the consent process.

6.
Res Social Adm Pharm ; 2020 Sep 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33011082

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Osteoporosis medication use is suboptimal. Simple interventions personalized to a patients' stage of readiness are needed to encourage osteoporosis medication use. OBJECTIVES: To estimate interrelationships of sociodemographic factors, perceived fracture risk, health literacy, receipt of medication information, medication trust and readiness to use osteoporosis medication; and apply observed relationships to inform design specifications for a clinical decision support application that can be used for personalized patient counseling. METHODS: Data from a national sample of older women (n = 1759) with self-reported history of fractures and no current use of osteoporosis medication treatment were used to estimate an acceptable path model that describes associations among key sociodemographic characteristics, health literacy, perceived fracture risk, receipt of osteoporosis medication information within the past year, trust in osteoporosis medications, and readiness to use osteoporosis medication. Path model results were used to inform an application for personalized patient counseling that can be easily integrated into clinical decision support systems. RESULTS: Increased age (ß = 0.13), trust for medications (ß = 0.12), higher perceived fracture risk (ß = 0.21), and having received medication information within the past year (ß = 0.21) were all positively associated with readiness to use osteoporosis medication (p < 0.0001). Whereas, health literacy (ß = -0.09) was inversely associated with readiness to use osteoporosis medication (p < 0.0001). Using these results, a brief 6-item question set was constructed for simple integration into clinical decision support applications. Patient responses were used to inform a provider dashboard that integrates a patient's stage of readiness for osteoporosis medication use, predictors of readiness, and personalized counseling points appropriate to their stage of readiness. CONCLUSION: Content of counseling strategies must be aligned with a patient's stage of readiness to use treatment. Path modeling can be effectively used to identify factors for inclusion in an evidenced-based clinical decision support application designed to assist providers with personalized patient counseling and osteoporosis medication use decisions.

7.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 72(9): e1-e12, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32734689

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance to rheumatology providers on the management of adult rheumatic disease in the context of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: A task force, including 10 rheumatologists and 4 infectious disease specialists from North America, was convened. Clinical questions were collated, and an evidence report was rapidly generated and disseminated. Questions and drafted statements were reviewed and assessed using a modified Delphi process. This included asynchronous anonymous voting by e-mail and webinars with the entire panel. Task force members voted on agreement with draft statements using a 1-9-point numerical scoring system, and consensus was determined to be low, moderate, or high based on the dispersion of votes. For approval, median votes were required to meet predefined levels of agreement (median values of 7-9, 4-6, and 1-3 defined as agreement, uncertainty, or disagreement, respectively) with either moderate or high levels of consensus. RESULTS: To date, the task force has approved 80 guidance statements: 36 with moderate and 44 with high consensus. These were combined, resulting in 27 final guidance statements. CONCLUSION: These guidance statements are provided to promote optimal care during the current pandemic. However, given the low level of available evidence and the rapidly evolving literature, this guidance is presented as a "living document," and future updates are anticipated.

8.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32793971

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the factors associated with discordance between patient and physician on the presence of a gout flare. METHODS: Patients' self-reports of current gout flares were assessed with the question, 'Are you having a gout flare today?' which was then compared with a concurrent, blinded, physician's assessment. Based on agreement or disagreement with physicians on the presence of a gout flare, flares were divided into concordant and discordant groups, respectively. Within the discordant group, two subgroups-patient-reported flare but the physician disagreed and physician-reported flare but the patient disagreed-were identified. The factors associated with discordance were analysed with multivariable logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Of 268 gout flares, 81 (30.2%) flares were discordant, with either patient or physician disagreeing on the presence of a flare. Of the discordant flares, in 57 (70.4%) the patient reported a flare but the physician disagreed. In multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for demographics, disagreement among patients and physicians on the presence of a gout flare was associated with lower pain scores at rest [odds ratio (OR) for each point increase on 0-10 point pain scale 0.81 (95% Wald CI 0.73, 0.90), P < 0.0001] and less presence of joint swelling [OR 0.24 (95% CI 0.10, 0.61), P = 0.003] or joint warmth [OR 0.39 (95% CI 0.20, 0.75), P = 0.005]. CONCLUSION: Although patients and physicians generally agree about the presence of gout flare, discordance may occur in the setting of low pain scores and in the absence of swollen or warm joints.

10.
Expert Opin Drug Saf ; 19(9): 1143-1154, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32731769

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Uric acid is the final byproduct of purine metabolism. The loss of the enzyme that hydrolyzes uric acid to allantoin was lost, leading to a decrease in uric acid excretion and its further accumulation. The buildup of uric acid leads to damage in different organ systems, including the cardiovascular system. With the increasing burden of cardiovascular disease worldwide, a growing body of evidence has addressed the relationship between urate, cardiovascular outcomes, and gout medication cardiovascular safety. Areas covered: We discuss the most common gout therapies used for the reduction of serum urate and management of gout flares in different observational and clinical trials and their effects on different aspects of cardiovascular disease. We selected the most representative clinical studies that evaluated cardiovascular outcomes with each gout therapy as well as recommendation given by the most representative guidelines from Rheumatology societies for the management of gout. EXPERT OPINION: The treatment of gout reduces joint damage and it can also lessen CV morbidity. Allopurinol shows CV safety profile when compared to other ULTs. Evidence supporting CV safety with the use of colchicine and IL-1 agents is promising and research needs to be conducted to further assess this outcome.

11.
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant ; 26(10): 1784-1802, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32653624

RESUMO

Bone health disturbances commonly occur after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with loss of bone mineral density (BMD) and avascular necrosis (AVN) foremost among them. BMD loss is related to pretransplantation chemotherapy and radiation exposure and immunosuppressive therapy for graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) and results from deficiencies in growth or gonadal hormones, disturbances in calcium and vitamin D homeostasis, as well as osteoblast and osteoclast dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of AVN remains unclear, high-dose glucocorticoid exposure is the most frequent association. Various societal treatment guidelines for osteoporosis exist, but the focus is mainly on menopausal-associated osteoporosis. HCT survivors comprise a distinct population with unique comorbidities, making general approaches to bone health management inappropriate in some cases. To address a core set of 16 frequently asked questions (FAQs) relevant to bone health in HCT, the American Society of Transplant and Cellular Therapy Committee on Practice Guidelines convened a panel of experts in HCT, adult and pediatric endocrinology, orthopedics, and oral medicine. Owing to a lack of relevant prospective controlled clinical trials that specifically address bone health in HCT, the answers to the FAQs rely on evidence derived from retrospective HCT studies, results extrapolated from prospective studies in non-HCT settings, relevant societal guidelines, and expert panel opinion. Given the heterogenous comorbidities and needs of individual HCT recipients, answers to FAQs in this article should be considered general recommendations, with good medical practice and judgment ultimately dictating care of individual patients. Readers are referred to the Supplementary Material for answers to additional FAQs that did not make the core set.

12.
Clin Ther ; 42(6): 1099-1107.e1, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32513495

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Current treatment guidelines recommend treatment for postmenopausal women with a T score <2.5 regardless of age. This subgroup analysis evaluated the efficacy and safety of abaloparatide in younger postmenopausal women considered to be at high risk for fracture. METHODS: Subgroup analysis of women in the Abaloparatide Comparator Trial in Vertebral Endpoints (ACTIVE) trial who were <65 years old and met modified utilization management criteria (baseline T score ≤-2.5 [any site] and ≥1 prevalent vertebral and/or ≥1 prior clinical fracture within 5 years of randomization). FINDINGS: A total of 296 women (age range, 49-64 years) were included. Significant increases in bone mineral density from baseline were observed for abaloparatide versus placebo at all 3 sites at 6 months (p < 0.01 for total hip and femoral neck; p < 0.0001 for lumbar spine), 12 months (p < 0.0001 at all 3 sites), and 18 months (p < 0.0001 at all 3 sites). Fracture rates were numerically lower for abaloparatide versus placebo, consistent with the overall trial results, although the differences were not statistically significant. The number needed to treat to prevent 1 additional vertebral fracture after 18 months of treatment versus placebo was 18 for abaloparatide and 21 for teriparatide. The number needed to treat had nonsignificant trends toward lower values with abaloparatide versus teriparatide for nonvertebral fractures (23 vs 40) and clinical fractures (16 vs 73) and similar for major osteoporotic fractures (24 vs 27). The safety profile was consistent with the overall ACTIVE population. IMPLICATIONS: Findings of this subgroup (post hoc) analysis are consistent with the overall ACTIVE population. Abaloparatide appears to be effective and well tolerated in this subgroup of younger postmenopausal women. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01343004.

14.
J Rheumatol ; 2020 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32358154

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between gout flare rate and self-categorization into remission, low disease activity (LDA), and patient acceptable symptom state (PASS). METHODS: Patients with gout self-categorized as remission, LDA, and PASS, and reported number of flares over the preceding 6 and 12 months. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the association between being in each disease state (LDA and PASS were combined) and flare count, and self-reported current flare. A distribution-based approach and extended Youden index identified possible flare count thresholds for each state. RESULTS: Investigators from 17 countries recruited 512 participants. Remission was associated with a median recalled flare count of zero over both 6 and 12 months. Each recalled flare reduced the likelihood of self-perceived remission compared with being in higher disease activity than LDA/PASS, by 52% for 6 months and 23% for 12 months, and the likelihood of self-perceived LDA/PASS by 15% and 5% for 6 and 12 months, respectively. A threshold of 0 flares in preceding 6 and 12 months was associated with correct classification of self-perceived remission in 58% and 56% of cases, respectively. CONCLUSION: Flares are significantly associated with perceptions of disease activity in gout, and no flares over the prior 6 or 12 months is necessary for most people to self-categorize as being in remission. However, recalled flare counts alone do not correctly classify all patients into self-categorized disease activity states, suggesting that other factors may also contribute to self-perceived gout disease activity.

15.
J Clin Rheumatol ; 26(4): 147-156, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32453288

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to conduct a 9-month pilot Internet randomized controlled trial (RCT) of cherry extract and diet modification in gout to assess the feasibility of an Internet study and obtain effect estimates. METHODS: After providing online informed consent in response to Internet advertisements and social media or clinic flyers, 84 people with physician-confirmed gout were randomized to either cherry extract 3,600 mg/d (n = 41) or dietitian-assisted diet modification for gout (n = 43). All study outcomes were collected via Internet and phone calls. The primary objective was the feasibility of an Internet study, and secondary objectives were to obtain effect estimates for gout flares, functional ability assessed with the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and adverse events (AEs) for future trials. RESULTS: Of the 84 people randomized, overall completion rates were more than 80% for most study procedures up to 6 months and similar for the 2 active comparators. Improvements were seen in gout flares and HAQ scores in cherry extract and diet modification groups at 9 months compared with baseline: gout flares per month, 0.22 versus 0.36 (p = 0.049) and 0.28 versus 0.31 (p = 0.76); proportion with any gout flare, 56% versus 98% (p < 0.0001) and 65% versus 98% (p = 0.0002); and mean ± standard deviation HAQ score, 0.28 ± 0.54 versus 0.55 ± 0.68 (p = 0.001) and 0.23 ± 0.40 versus 0.48 ± 0.61 (p = 0.06), respectively. Any AEs and gastrointestinal symptoms/AEs at 9 months in cherry extract and diet modification groups were 3% versus 0% and 28% versus 27%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: An Internet gout RCT is feasible for nonpharmacological gout treatments. A hypothesis-testing, large Internet RCT of cherry extract versus placebo is needed.

17.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 22(1): 86, 2020 04 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32299504

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Gout has been associated with a higher risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in some prior studies. Few studies have assessed the association of gout with incident heart failure (HF). METHODS: We analyzed data from 5713 black and white men and women ≥ 65.5 years of age in the population-based REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study who had Medicare coverage without a history of HF, CHD, or stroke at baseline between 2003 and 2007. Gout was defined by ≥ 1 hospitalization or ≥ 2 outpatient visits with a diagnosis code for gout in Medicare claims prior to each participant's baseline study examination. REGARDS study participants were followed for HF hospitalization, CHD, stroke, and all-cause mortality as separate outcomes through December 31, 2016. Analyses were replicated in a random sample of 839,059 patients ≥ 65.5 years of age with Medicare coverage between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2015, who were followed through December 31, 2017. RESULTS: Among REGARDS study participants included in the current analysis, the mean age at baseline was 72.6 years, 44.9% were men, 31.4% were black, and 3.3% had gout. Over a median follow-up of 10.0 years, incidence rates per 1000 person-years among participants with and without gout were 13.1 and 4.4 for HF hospitalization, 16.0 and 9.3 for CHD, 9.3 and 8.2 for stroke, and 55.0 and 37.1 for all-cause mortality, respectively. After multivariable adjustment for sociodemographic variables and cardiovascular risk factors, hazard ratios (95% CI) comparing participants with versus without gout were 1.97 (1.22, 3.19) for HF hospitalization, 1.21 (0.79, 1.84) for CHD, 0.83 (0.48, 1.43) for stroke, and 1.08 (0.86, 1.35) for all-cause mortality. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio for HF hospitalization with reduced and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction among participants with versus without gout was 1.77 (95% CI 0.83, 3.79) and 2.32 (95% CI 1.12, 4.79), respectively. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio for heart failure hospitalization associated with gout among the 839,059 Medicare beneficiaries was 1.32 (95% CI 1.25, 1.39). CONCLUSION: Among older adults, gout was associated with an increased risk for incident HF but not for incident CHD, incident stroke, or all-cause mortality.

18.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 68(8): 1803-1810, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32337717

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Fractures associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) are associated with pain, disability, and increased mortality. A recent, nationwide evaluation of racial difference in outcomes after fracture has not been performed. OBJECTIVE: To determine if 1-year death, debility, and destitution rates differ by race. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: US Medicare data from 2010 to 2016. PARTICIPANTS: Non-Hispanic black and white women with PMO who have sustained a fragility fracture of interest: hip, pelvis, femur, radius, ulna, humerus, and clinical vertebral. MEASUREMENTS: Outcomes included 1-year: (1) mortality, identified by date of death in Medicare vital status information, (2) debility, identified as new placement in long-term nursing facilities, and (3) destitution, identified as becoming newly eligible for Medicaid. RESULTS: Among black and white women with PMO (n = 4,523,112), we identified 399,000 (8.8%) women who sustained a major fragility fracture. Black women had a higher prevalence of femur (9.0% vs 3.9%; P < .001) and hip (30.7% vs 28.0%; P < .001) fractures and lower prevalence of radius/ulna (14.7% vs 17.0%; P < .001) and clinical vertebral fractures (28.8% vs 33.5%; P < .001) compared with white women. We observed racial differences in the incidence of 1-year outcomes after fracture. After adjusting for age, black women had significantly higher risk of mortality 1 year after femur, hip, humerus, and radius/ulna fractures; significantly higher risk of debility 1 year after femur and hip fractures; and significantly higher risk of destitution for all fractures types. CONCLUSIONS: In a sample of Medicare data from 2010 to 2016, black women with PMO had significantly higher rates of mortality, debility, and destitution after fracture than white women. These findings are a first step toward understanding and reducing disparities in PMO management, fracture prevention, and clinical outcomes after fracture. J Am Geriatr Soc 68:1803-1810, 2020.

19.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 72(8): 1241-1251, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32349183

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance to rheumatology providers on the management of adult rheumatic disease in the context of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: A task force, including 10 rheumatologists and 4 infectious disease specialists from North America, was convened. Clinical questions were collated, and an evidence report was rapidly generated and disseminated. Questions and drafted statements were reviewed and assessed using a modified Delphi process. This included 2 rounds of asynchronous anonymous voting by e-mail and 3 webinars with the entire panel. Task force members voted on agreement with draft statements using a 1-9-point numerical scoring system, and consensus was determined to be low, moderate, or high based on the dispersion of votes. For approval, median votes were required to meet predefined levels of agreement (median values of 7-9, 4-6, and 1-3 defined as agreement, uncertainty, or disagreement, respectively) with either moderate or high levels of consensus. RESULTS: The task force approved 77 initial guidance statements: 36 with moderate and 41 with high consensus. These were combined, resulting in 25 final guidance statements. CONCLUSION: These guidance statements are provided to promote optimal care during the current pandemic. However, given the low level of available evidence and the rapidly evolving literature, this guidance is presented as a "living document," and future updates are anticipated.


Assuntos
Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Glucocorticoides/uso terapêutico , Imunossupressores/uso terapêutico , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Doenças Reumáticas/tratamento farmacológico , Adulto , Comitês Consultivos , Antagonistas de Receptores de Angiotensina/uso terapêutico , Inibidores da Enzima Conversora de Angiotensina/uso terapêutico , Anti-Inflamatórios não Esteroides/uso terapêutico , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Assistência à Saúde , Técnica Delfos , Desprescrições , Humanos , Hidroxicloroquina/uso terapêutico , Controle de Infecções , Inibidores de Janus Quinases/uso terapêutico , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Doenças Reumáticas/complicações , Reumatologia , Inibidores do Fator de Necrose Tumoral/uso terapêutico
20.
Arch Osteoporos ; 15(1): 32, 2020 02 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32112196

RESUMO

We performed a prospective study using both FRAX and computed tomography to screen for osteoporosis in men undergoing radiation for prostate cancer. We found that implementing routine computed tomography (CT)-based screening was feasible in the setting of a prospective study, but the yield of osteoporosis identification was low in this population. PURPOSE: Men with prostate cancer (PCa) are at increased risk of hip fracture for multiple reasons. Estimation of hip fracture risk with the FRAX tool is currently recommended, but FRAX alone may not identify a portion of men with osteoporosis. We hypothesized that adding bone mineral density (BMD) screening using CT to FRAX is feasible and would identify more men with osteoporosis. METHODS: Men with PCa scheduled to undergo CT simulation for radiation treatment were enrolled in a single-arm prospective study. The mean attenuation of the mid-L5 vertebral body trabecular bone (L5CT) was calculated on a single slice using the radiation simulation CT scan. The 10-year risk of hip fracture was calculated using the FRAX tool. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed for men whose L5CT measurement was less than 130 Hounsfield units (HU). RESULTS: A total of 98 eligible men were enrolled and underwent FRAX and CT screening. The median 10-year risk of hip fracture was 1.1% and exceeded 3% in 16 cases; the median L5CT was 162.28 HU (range 55.6-526.1 HU). DXA scan was completed in 15 men who had L5CT < 130 HU but 10-year calculated hip fracture risk < 3%, 1 of whom was found to have osteoporosis (T-score ≤ -2.5). CONCLUSIONS: Implementing CT-based BMD screening was feasible in the setting of a prospective study for men receiving radiation for PCa, but fewer cases than anticipated of osteoporosis were identified.


Assuntos
Programas de Rastreamento/métodos , Osteoporose/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias da Próstata/radioterapia , Lesões por Radiação/diagnóstico por imagem , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X/métodos , Absorciometria de Fóton/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Algoritmos , Densidade Óssea , Osso Esponjoso/diagnóstico por imagem , Estudos de Viabilidade , Fraturas do Quadril/diagnóstico por imagem , Fraturas do Quadril/etiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Osteoporose/etiologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Neoplasias da Próstata/fisiopatologia , Lesões por Radiação/etiologia , Medição de Risco
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