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1.
LGBT Health ; 7(2): 90-100, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32053046

RESUMO

Purpose: Sexual minority youth (SMY) are at increased risk of poor health, but it remains unclear whether this phenomenon is universal. In this study, nationally representative samples of 15-year olds from eight European countries and regions were investigated to test if adolescents who have been in love with same- or both-gender partners report poorer health than those exclusively in love with opposite-gender partners or who have never been in love. Methods: A subsample of 13,674 adolescents participating in the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study was used. We conducted binary logistic regression, adjusted for gender, region, and relative family affluence, to analyze associations between self-reported romantic love, multiple psychosomatic symptoms, and poor self-rated health. Results: Adolescents reporting same-gender love (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.50, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11-2.02) and both-gender love (aOR = 3.57, 95% CI: 2.65-4.83) had significantly higher odds for multiple psychosomatic symptoms than those who reported opposite-gender love. Similarly, both SMY groups had higher odds of poor self-rated health (aOR = 2.95, 95% CI: 1.64-5.31 and aOR = 3.08, 95% CI: 1.79-5.31, respectively). Those who reported that they have never been in love had significantly lower odds for multiple symptoms. Adjustment for sociodemographic variables and stratifying by gender did not substantially change the odds ratios. Conclusion: Adolescents in love with same- and both-gender partners reported poorer subjective health outcomes than those in love with opposite-gender partners or who reported never being in love, suggesting that SMY health inequalities are found across various European countries and regions.

2.
LGBT Health ; 7(2): 82-89, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31985327

RESUMO

Purpose: Using representative school-based data and community-level primary data, we investigated how environmental factors (e.g., school and community climate) might be protective against substance use behaviors among a vulnerable population of adolescents. Methods: We analyzed a sample of 2678 sexual minority adolescents using a combination of student-level data (British Columbia Adolescent Health Survey) and primary community-level data (assessing lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer [LGBTQ]-specific community and school environments). Using multilevel logistic regression models, we examined associations between lifetime substance use (alcohol, illegal drugs, marijuana, nonmedical use of prescription drugs, and smoking) and community-level predictors (community and school LGBTQ supportiveness). Results: Above and beyond student characteristics (e.g., age and years living in Canada), sexual minority adolescents residing in communities with more LGBTQ supports (i.e., more supportive climates) had lower odds of lifetime illegal drug use (for boys and girls), marijuana use (for girls), and smoking (for girls). Specifically, in communities with more frequent LGBTQ events (such as Pride events), the odds of substance use among sexual minority adolescents living in those communities was lower compared with their counterparts living in communities with fewer LGBTQ supports. Conclusions: The availability of LGBTQ community-level organizations, events, and programs may serve as protective factors for substance use among sexual minority adolescents. In particular, LGBTQ-supportive community factors were negatively associated with substance use, which has important implications for our investment in community programs, laws, and organizations that advance the visibility and rights of LGBTQ people.

3.
J Adolesc ; 79: 136-147, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31972534

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: This study explored how transgender (trans) youth and parents of trans youth made decisions around hormone therapy initiation as well as trans youth experiences of barriers to care. METHODS: Participants included 21 trans youth (ages 14-18) and 15 parents of trans youth who resided in British Columbia, Canada. Data for this grounded theory research consisted of transcripts and lifeline drawings collected through semi-structured interviews conducted August 2016 through February 2017. RESULTS: The decision-making processes of youth and of parents are illustrated in three-phase temporal models, starting with discovery, leading to (inter)action while seeking care, and reflection after hormone therapy initiation. Youth who sought hormone therapy were clear about their decision to access this care. Throughout these processes, youth experienced numerous parent- and system-related barriers to care. Youth with the lowest levels of parent support experienced more system barriers, with non-binary/genderfluid youth experiencing greater barriers and less support for hormone therapy than youth with binary genders. A new barrier identified in this study was health care provider imposed requirements for parental involvement and/or approval, which rendered some youth unable access to hormone therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Health care providers should be aware of the deliberation and information-seeking in which youth engage prior to seeking care as well as the temporally misaligned decision-making processes of youth and parents. Understanding the challenges trans youth experience due to insufficient parental support and system barriers can provide important context for health care providers striving to provide accessible, gender-affirming care and decision-making support for trans youth.

4.
J Rural Health ; 36(1): 65-76, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31411774

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study explores the relationship between rural residency, selected protective factors (family and school connectedness along with prosocial peer attitudes), and health-compromising behaviors (alcohol and tobacco use and nonuse of seatbelt) among adolescents. METHODS: A subsample of adolescents residing in remote areas was extracted from a province-wide, school-based survey in British Columbia (BC), Canada (weighted N = 2,999). We employed χ2 statistic to test rural-urban differences separately by gender. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between protective factors and behaviors compromising health. FINDINGS: In boys, rural residency was associated with multiple problem behaviors (binge drinking, smokeless tobacco use, and nonuse of seatbelt), whereas for girls it was linked to riding without a seatbelt. The final logistic regression models confirmed that rural environment was a significant risk factor for not wearing a seatbelt among both boys and girls, and smokeless tobacco among boys (adjusted odds ratio between 1.44 and 3.05). Rurality, on the other hand, did not predict binge drinking. Logistic regression analyses also revealed that both school connectedness and prosocial peer attitude protected boys against binge drinking and smokeless tobacco, but the results were not as robust for girls. CONCLUSIONS: These findings could provide information for location-based intervention efforts promoting adolescent health, highlighting the protective role of the school atmosphere and prosocial peer relationships, especially among boys.

5.
J Youth Adolesc ; 2019 Aug 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31446582

RESUMO

Research has indicated that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer/questioning (LGBQ) adolescents have disproportionately high rates of substance use compared to heterosexual peers; yet certain features of schools and communities have been associated with lower substance use rates in this population. To advance this field, research examining multiple levels of influence using measures developed with youth input is needed. With community, school, and student data, this study tested hypotheses that LGBQ students attending high schools and living in communities with more LGBQ-supportive environments (assessed with a novel inventory tool) have lower odds of substance use behaviors (cigarette smoking, alcohol use, marijuana use, prescription drug misuse, and other drug use) than their peers in less supportive LGBQ environments. Multilevel models using data from 2454 LGBQ students (54.0% female, 63.9% non-Hispanic white) in 81 communities and adjusting for student and school covariates found that LGBQ adolescents who lived in areas with more community support had lower odds of frequent substance use, particularly among females. Expanding and strengthening community resources (e.g., LGBQ youth-serving organizations, LGBQ events such as a Pride parade, and LGBQ-friendly services) is recommended to further support LGBQ adolescents and reduce substance use disparities.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31450730

RESUMO

Sexual minority youth are at higher risk of substance use than heterosexual youth. However, most evidence in this area is from North America, and it is unclear whether the findings can be generalized to other cultures and countries. In this investigation, we used data from the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study to compare substance use in same- and both-gender attracted 15-year-old adolescents from eight European countries (n = 14,545) to that of their peers who reported opposite-gender attraction or have not been romantically attracted to anyone. Both-gender attracted, and to a lesser extent, same-gender attracted adolescents were significantly more likely to smoke cigarettes, consume alcohol, get drunk and use cannabis, or be involved in multiple substance use in the last 30 days compared to their opposite-gender attracted peers. Those adolescents who have not been in love had significantly lower odds for substance use than all other youth. The pattern of results remained the same after adjusting for country, gender and family affluence. These findings are compatible with the minority stress and romantic stress theories. They suggest that sexual minority stigma (and love on its own) may contribute to higher substance use among adolescents in European countries.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Fumar Maconha/epidemiologia , Comportamento Sexual/psicologia , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero/psicologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/psicologia , Adolescente , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/psicologia , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Amor , Masculino , Fumar Maconha/psicologia , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero/estatística & dados numéricos , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia
7.
J Gay Lesbian Soc Serv ; 31(3): 314-331, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31327914

RESUMO

The social environment in which lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth live influences health and wellbeing. We describe the development of the LGBTQ Supportive Environments Inventory (LGBTQ SEI), designed to quantify the LGBTQ-inclusiveness of social environments in the US and Canada. We quantify aspects of the social environment: 1) Presence/quality of LGBTQ youth-serving organizations; 2) LGBTQ-inclusive Community Resources; 3) Socioeconomic and Political environment. Using GIS tools, we aggregated data to buffers around 397 schools in 3 regions. The LGBTQ SEI can be used to assess the role of the social environment in reducing health disparities for LGBTQ youth.

8.
J Sch Nurs ; : 1059840519863094, 2019 Jul 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31337243

RESUMO

Research on enacted stigma, or stigma- and bias-based victimization, including bullying and harassment, among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth often focuses on one context (e.g., school) or one form (e.g., bullying or microaggressions), which limits our understanding of these experiences. We conducted qualitative go-along interviews with 66 LGBTQ adolescents (14-19 years) in urban, suburban, town, and rural locations in the United States and Canada identified through purposive and snowball sampling. Forty-six participants (70%) described at least one instance of enacted stigma. Three primary themes emerged: (1) enacted stigma occurred in many contexts; (2) enacted stigma restricted movement; and (3) second-hand accounts of enacted stigma shaped perceptions of safety. Efforts to improve well-being among LGBTQ youth must address the diverse forms and contexts of enacted stigma that youth experience, which limit freedom of movement and potential access to opportunities that encourage positive youth development. School nurses can play a critical role in reducing enacted stigma in schools and in collaboration with community partners.

9.
J Adolesc Health ; 65(3): 378-383, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31277994

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Runaway adolescents often have strained relationships with their parents. Given parental support is an important protective resource for traumatized young people, understanding differences in support within parent-adolescent relationships could aid in designing more effective interventions. We hypothesized (1) runaway adolescents seen at a Child Advocacy Center (CAC) would have poorer parental relationships than adolescents without a history of running away and (2) severity of diagnosed sexual violence would be associated with lower parental connectedness. METHODS: Data were from 2,042 adolescents aged 10-19 years and their parents evaluated for any reason at our hospital-based CAC from 2008 to 2017. Parent-adolescent relationship scales were completed by adolescents and at least one parent/guardian (usually mothers). Sexual abuse was stratified at four levels, higher levels indicating increasingly severe forms of abuse. T-tests and analyses of variance to tested relationships between supportive and controlling parental behaviors by runaway status, and, among runaways, by the severity of sexual abuse. RESULTS: Runaway adolescents comprised 58.3% of adolescents seen at the CAC; runaways reported lower parental support and higher parental controlling than patients without a history of running away. Those with the most severe forms of sexual abuse (including sexual exploitation and gang rape) reported the least supportive and most controlling relationships with parents, as did their parents. CONCLUSIONS: Findings support our clinical observations that polyvictimization of adolescents who have spent significant time as runaways may further strain parent-adolescent relationships. Future clinical research should focus on developing interventions to promote parental connectedness after a runaway episode.

10.
Prev Med Rep ; 15: 100905, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31193847

RESUMO

Research at the intersection of substance use and protective factors among transgender youth is scarce; emerging evidence suggests high risk for substance use for transgender youth. We analyzed data from 323 transgender youth aged 14-18 (M age = 16.67) to investigate the extent that risk (enacted stigma) and protective factors (support from family, school, friends) were related to substance use (i.e., cannabis and tobacco use, binge drinking). Enacted stigma was linked to higher odds of substance use behaviors, family connectedness was related to lower levels of tobacco and cannabis use, and more than one protective factor significantly lowered the probability of engaging in substance use behaviors. Support from multiple sources may be differentially protective against substance use for transgender youth.

11.
SSM Popul Health ; 7: 100350, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30723767

RESUMO

There is limited research on evaluating nonrandomized population health interventions. We aimed to introduce a new approach for assessing site-level longitudinal effects of population health interventions (SLEPHI) by innovatively applying multiple group multilevel (MG-ML) modeling to repeated cycles of cross-sectional data collected from different individuals of the same sites at different times, a design commonly employed in public health research. For illustration, we used this SLEPHI method to examine the influence of Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) on school-level perceived safety among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) and heterosexual (HET) adolescents. Individual-level data of perceived school safety came from 1625 LGB students (67.4% female; mean age, 15.7 years) and 37,597 HET students (50.2% female; mean age, 15.4 years) attending Grades 7-12 in 135 schools, which participated in 3 British Columbia Adolescent Health Surveys (BCAHS: 2003, 2008, 2013) in Canada. School-level data of GSA length since established were collected by telephone in 2008 and 2014. Nested MG-ML models suggested that after accounting for secular trend, cohort effects, measurement error, measurement equivalence, and student age, GSA length linearly related to increased school-level perceived safety among LGB students (b = 1.57, SE = 0.21, p < .001, ß = 0.32) and also among HET students (ß = 0.34 in 2003 & 2013, ß = 0.32 in 2008) although statistical differences between years for HET youth were likely due to the large sample size. By conducting MG-ML analysis on repeated cross-sectional surveys, this SLEPHI method accounted for many confounding factors and followed schools for a longer period than most longitudinal designs can follow individuals. Therefore, we drew a stronger conclusion than previous observational research about GSAs and LGB students' well-being. The SLEPHI method can be widely applied to other repeated cycles of cross-sectional data in public health research.

13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30400236

RESUMO

School interventions to address sexual orientation discrimination can be important tools for fostering inclusive school climate, and improving student wellbeing. In this study, we empirically evaluated a film-based intervention, Out in Schools, designed to reduce sexual orientation prejudice and foster inclusive school attitudes. Our evaluation mapped data about Out in Schools presentations onto student data from the random cluster-stratified, province-wide 2013 British Columbia Adolescent Health Survey (BCAHS) as well as potential confounding variables of Gay-Straight Alliance clubs (GSAs) and inclusive school policies. Outcome measures included past year sexual orientation discrimination, bullying, suicidal ideation, and school connectedness among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) and heterosexual (HET) students in grades 8 through 12 (ages 13 to 18; unweighted N = 21,075, weighted/scaled N = 184,821). Analyses used complex samples logistic regression, adjusted for sample design, conducted separately by gender and orientation. We found Out in Schools presentations were associated with reduced odds of LGB students experiencing discrimination, and both LGB and HET girl students being bullied or considering suicide, and increased levels of school connectedness, even after controlling for GSAs and policies. Out in Schools appears to have an additive contribution to reducing orientation prejudice and improving LGB and heterosexual student wellbeing within schools.


Assuntos
Bullying , Saúde Mental , Preconceito/prevenção & controle , Instituições Acadêmicas , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero/psicologia , Discriminação Social/prevenção & controle , Estudantes/psicologia , Adolescente , Colúmbia Britânica , Bullying/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Ideação Suicida , Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários
14.
CMAJ ; 190(41): E1221-E1226, 2018 10 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30322986

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is delivered widely through school-based immunization programs. Some groups have expressed concern that HPV vaccination programs will result in an increase in sexual risk-taking behaviours among adolescents. We aimed to evaluate population-level changes in sexual behaviours before and after implementation of the school-based HPV vaccination program in British Columbia. METHODS: In 2008, a school-based HPV vaccination program for girls was introduced in British Columbia. Using data from the BC Adolescent Health Survey - a longitudinal provincial survey administered in schools to capture adolescent physical and emotional health indicators, we conducted a linear trend analysis on sexual health behaviours and risk factors in adolescent girls before and after the implementation of vaccination for HPV (2003, 2008 and 2013). RESULTS: We analyzed data for 298 265 girls who self-identified as heterosexual. The proportion of girls reporting ever having sexual intercourse decreased from 21.3% (2003) to 18.3% (2013; adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.79). Self-report of sexual intercourse before the age of 14 years decreased significantly from 2008 to 2013 (adjusted OR 0.76), as did reported substance use before intercourse (adjusted OR for 2003-2013 0.69). There was no significant change in the number of sexual partners reported (2003-2013). Between 2003 and 2013, girls' reported use of contraception and condoms increased, while pregnancy rates decreased. INTERPRETATION: Since the implementation of school-based HPV vaccination program in BC, sexual risk behaviours reported by adolescent girls either reduced or stayed the same. These findings contribute evidence against any association between HPV vaccination and risky sexual behaviours.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente , Vacinas contra Papillomavirus/uso terapêutico , Comportamento Sexual/estatística & dados numéricos , Mulheres , Adolescente , Fatores Etários , Colúmbia Britânica , Coito , Preservativos/tendências , Comportamento Contraceptivo/tendências , Feminino , Humanos , Programas de Imunização , Razão de Chances , Crescimento Demográfico , Gravidez , Gravidez na Adolescência/estatística & dados numéricos , Assunção de Riscos , Serviços de Saúde Escolar , Autorrelato , Parceiros Sexuais
15.
J Interpers Violence ; : 886260518788367, 2018 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30019602

RESUMO

Physical dating violence (PDV) victimization among adolescents is a serious global problem. Although knowledge of trends in PDV victimization can help guide programming and health policies, little research has examined whether the prevalence of PDV victimization has increased, decreased, or remained stable over time among non-U.S.-based samples of youth. In addition, few studies have directly tested whether disparities in PDV victimization between boys and girls have narrowed, widened, or remained unchanged in recent years. To address these gaps, we used school-based data from the British Columbia Adolescent Health Survey (BC AHS) of 2003, 2008, and 2013 ( n boys = 18,441 and n girls = 17,459) to examine 10-year trends in PDV victimization. We also tested whether trends differed across self-reported sex. Data from the 2003 to 2013 BC AHS revealed that recent PDV victimization rates had significantly decreased among youth overall (5.9%-5.0%) and boys (8.0%-5.8%), but not girls (5.3%-4.2%). Although boys had steeper declines than girls in PDV victimization rates, year-by-sex interactions indicate that the sex gap in PDV victimization had not significantly narrowed. Moreover, rates of PDV victimization over the 10-year period indicated significantly higher rates of PDV victimization among boys compared with girls. Despite positive declines in recent rates of PDV victimization among youth, important differences in rates of PDV victimization between boys and girls remain. These findings underscore the need for greater attention to sex differences in research and programming and health policies to reduce PDV victimization and the sex disparities therein.

16.
J Adolesc ; 67: 1-11, 2018 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29859474

RESUMO

Mental health challenges are the leading health issue facing youth globally. To better respond to this health challenge, experts advocate for a population health approach inclusive of mental health promotion; yet this area remains underdeveloped. Further, while there is growing emphasis on youth-engaged research and intervention design, evidence of the outcomes and impacts are lacking. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to addressing these gaps, presenting findings from the Social Networking Action for Resilience (SONAR) study, an exploration of youth-driven mental health promotion in a rural community in British Columbia, Canada. Mixed methods including pre- and post-intervention surveys (n = 175) and qualitative interviews (n = 10) captured the outcomes and impacts of the intervention on indicators of mental health, the relationship between level of engagement and benefit, and community perceptions of impact. Findings demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of youth engaged research and intervention at an individual and community-level.


Assuntos
Promoção da Saúde/métodos , Saúde Mental , Resiliência Psicológica , Adolescente , Colúmbia Britânica , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pesquisa Qualitativa , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , Rede Social , Inquéritos e Questionários
17.
J Res Adolesc ; 28(4): 772-778, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29658169

RESUMO

Sexual orientation is a multidimensional phenomenon, which includes identity, behavior, and attraction. The attraction component, however, is less studied than the other two. In this article, we present the development of a two-item measure to identify adolescents who prefer same- and both-gender partners for love and dating. The questions were administered to nationally representative samples of 15-year-old adolescents in eight European countries and regions participating in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) cross-national study. The distribution of attraction, as operationalized by preference for the gender of love and dating partners, was similar across countries. These questions offer an alternative or supplementary approach to identify same- and both-gender attracted youth, without administering questions related to sexual identity.


Assuntos
Bissexualidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Homossexualidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Amor , Adolescente , Comportamento do Adolescente , Criança , Comportamento Infantil , Estudos Transversais , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Projetos Piloto , Prevalência , Inquéritos e Questionários
18.
J Homosex ; 65(8): 969-989, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28820667

RESUMO

LGBTQ youth are at increased risk of poor health outcomes. This qualitative study gathered data from LGBTQ adolescents regarding their communities and describes the resources they draw on for support. We conducted 66 go-along interviews with diverse LGBTQ adolescents (mean age = 16.6) in Minnesota, Massachusetts, and British Columbia in 2014-2015, in which interviewers accompanied participants in their communities to better understand those contexts. Their responses were systematically organized and coded for common themes, reflecting levels of the social ecological model. Participants described resources at each level, emphasizing organizational, community, and social factors such as LGBTQ youth organizations and events, media presence, and visibility of LGBTQ adults. Numerous resources were identified, and representative themes were highly consistent across locations, genders, orientations, racial/ethnic groups, and city size. Findings suggest new avenues for research with LGBTQ youth and many opportunities for communities to create and expand resources and supports for this population.


Assuntos
Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Apoio Social , Adolescente , Colúmbia Britânica , Redes Comunitárias , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Massachusetts , Minnesota , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Adulto Jovem
19.
Transgend Health ; 2(1): 207-216, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29279875

RESUMO

Purpose: We aimed to assess the Minority Stress Model which proposes that the stress of experiencing stigma leads to adverse mental health outcomes, but social supports (e.g., school and family connectedness) will reduce this negative effect. Methods: We measured stigma-related experiences, social supports, and mental health (self-injury, suicide, depression, and anxiety) among a sample of 923 Canadian transgender 14- to 25-year-old adolescents and young adults using a bilingual online survey. Logistic regression models were conducted to analyze the relationship between these risk and protective factors and dichotomous mental health outcomes among two separate age groups, 14- to 18-year-old and 19- to 25-year-old participants. Results: Experiences of discrimination, harassment, and violence (enacted stigma) were positively related to mental health problems and social support was negatively associated with mental health problems in all models among both age groups. Among 14-18 year olds, we examined school connectedness, family connectedness, and perception of friends caring separately, and family connectedness was always the strongest protective predictor in multivariate models. In all the mental health outcomes we examined, transgender youth reporting low levels of enacted stigma experiences and high levels of protective factors tended to report favorable mental health outcomes. Conversely, the majority of participants reporting high levels of enacted stigma and low levels of protective factors reported adverse mental health outcomes. Conclusion: While these findings are limited by nonprobability sampling procedures and potential additional unmeasured risk and protective factors, the results provide positive evidence for the Minority Stress Model in this population and affirm the need for policies and programs to support schools and families to support transgender youth.

20.
J LGBT Youth ; 14(1): 1-15, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28943992

RESUMO

Go-along interviews, which are interviews conducted whilst being in and moving within participant selected spaces, were conducted with 66 LGBTQ adolescents (14-19 years old) in their self-identified communities to explore perceived community attributes, including safe spaces, resources, and supports; this paper highlights methodological lessons learned. Successful recruitment in two countries and varied community settings required partnership with local LGBTQ supporting agencies, including school-based Gay Straight Alliances. Youth chose to walk, use public transportation, and drive to community locations, identifying numerous formal and informal resources in their communities. Participant reflections highlighted that go-along interviews can be conducted in safe ways that encourage LGBTQ youth to express themselves about communities in which they live, study, work, play, and relax.

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