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1.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 2021 Jan 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33439215

RESUMO

Importance: Combining information on polygenic risk scores (PRSs) with other known risk factors could potentially improve the identification of risk of depression in the general population. However, to our knowledge, no study has estimated the association of PRS with the absolute risk of depression, and few have examined combinations of the PRS and other important risk factors, including parental history of psychiatric disorders and socioeconomic status (SES), in the identification of depression risk. Objective: To assess the individual and joint associations of PRS, parental history, and SES with relative and absolute risk of early-onset depression. Design, Setting, and Participants: This case-cohort study included participants from the iPSYCH2012 sample, a case-cohort sample of all singletons born in Denmark between May 1, 1981, and December 31, 2005. Hazard ratios (HRs) and absolute risks were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression for case-cohort designs. Exposures: The PRS for depression; SES measured using maternal educational level, maternal marital status, and paternal employment; and parental history of psychiatric disorders (major depression, bipolar disorder, other mood or psychotic disorders, and other psychiatric diagnoses). Main Outcomes and Measures: Hospital-based diagnosis of depression from inpatient, outpatient, or emergency settings. Results: Participants included 17 098 patients with depression (11 748 [68.7%] female) and 18 582 (9429 [50.7%] male) individuals randomly selected from the base population. The PRS, parental history, and lower SES were all significantly associated with increased risk of depression, with HRs ranging from 1.32 (95% CI, 1.29-1.35) per 1-SD increase in PRS to 2.23 (95% CI, 1.81-2.64) for maternal history of mood or psychotic disorders. Fully adjusted models had similar effect sizes, suggesting that these risk factors do not confound one another. Absolute risk of depression by the age of 30 years differed substantially, depending on an individual's combination of risk factors, ranging from 1.0% (95% CI, 0.1%-2.0%) among men with high SES in the bottom 2% of the PRS distribution to 23.7% (95% CI, 16.6%-30.2%) among women in the top 2% of PRS distribution with a parental history of psychiatric disorders. Conclusions and Relevance: This study suggests that current PRSs for depression are not more likely to be associated with major depressive disorder than are other known risk factors; however, they may be useful for the identification of risk in conjunction with other risk factors.

2.
Nat Hum Behav ; 2020 Nov 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33168953

RESUMO

Although the genetic influence on voter turnout is substantial (typically 40-50%), the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Across the social sciences, research suggests that 'resources for politics' (as indexed notably by educational attainment and intelligence test performance) constitute a central cluster of factors that predict electoral participation. Educational attainment and intelligence test performance are heritable. This suggests that the genotypes that enhance these phenotypes could positively predict turnout. To test this, we conduct a genome-wide complex trait analysis of individual-level turnout. We use two samples from the Danish iPSYCH case-cohort study, including a nationally representative sample as well as a sample of individuals who are particularly vulnerable to political alienation due to psychiatric conditions (n = 13,884 and n = 33,062, respectively). Using validated individual-level turnout data from the administrative records at the polling station, genetic correlations and Mendelian randomization, we show that there is a substantial genetic overlap between voter turnout and both educational attainment and intelligence test performance.

3.
Brain Behav Immun ; 2020 Jun 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32534018

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have indicated the bidirectionality between autoimmune and mental disorders. However, genetic studies underpinning the co-occurrence of the two disorders have been lacking. In this study, we examined the potential genetic contribution to the association between autoimmune and mental disorders and investigated the genetic basis of overall autoimmune disease. METHODS: We used diagnostic information from patients with seven autoimmune diseases and six mental disorders from the Danish population-based case-cohort sample (iPSYCH2012). We explored the epidemiological association using survival analysis and modelled the effect of polygenic risk scores (PRSs) on autoimmune and mental diseases. Genetic factors were investigated using GWAS and imputed HLA alleles in the iPSYCH cohort. RESULTS: Of 64,039 individuals, a total of 43,902 (68.6%) were diagnosed with mental disorders and 1383 (2.2%) with autoimmune diseases. There was a significant comorbidity between the two disease classes (P = 2.67 × 10-7, OR = 1.38, 95%CI = 1.22-1.56), with an overall bidirectional association, wherein individuals with autoimmune diseases had an increased risk of subsequent mental disorders (HR = 1.13, 95%CI: 1.07-1.21, P = 7.95 × 10-5) and vice versa (HR = 1.27, 95%CI = 1.16-1.39, P = 8.77 × 10-15). Adding PRSs to these adjustment models did not have an impact on the associations. PRSs for autoimmune diseases were only slightly associated with increased risk of mental disorders (HR = 1.01, 95%CI: 1.00-1.02, p = 0.038), whereas PRSs for mental disorders were not associated with autoimmune diseases overall. Our GWAS highlighted 12 loci on chromosome 6 (minimum P = 2.74 × 10-36, OR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.64-1.96), which were implicated in gene regulation through bioinformatic functional analyses, thereby identifying new candidate genes for overall autoimmune disease. Moreover, we observed 20 human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles strongly associated, either positively or negatively, with overall autoimmune disease, but we did not find significant evidence of their associations with overall mental disorders. A GWAS of a comorbid diagnosis of an autoimmune disease and a mental disorder identified a genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 7 as well (P = 1.43 × 10-8, OR = 10.65, 95%CI = 3.21-35.36). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings confirm the overall comorbidity and bidirectionality between autoimmune diseases and mental disorders and identify HLA genes which are significantly associated with overall autoimmune disease. Additionally, we identified several new candidate genes for overall autoimmune disease and ranked them based on their association with the investigated diseases.

4.
N Engl J Med ; 382(18): 1721-1731, 2020 04 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32348643

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Persons with mental disorders are at a higher risk than the general population for the subsequent development of certain medical conditions. METHODS: We used a population-based cohort from Danish national registries that included data on more than 5.9 million persons born in Denmark from 1900 through 2015 and followed them from 2000 through 2016, for a total of 83.9 million person-years. We assessed 10 broad types of mental disorders and 9 broad categories of medical conditions (which encompassed 31 specific conditions). We used Cox regression models to calculate overall hazard ratios and time-dependent hazard ratios for pairs of mental disorders and medical conditions, after adjustment for age, sex, calendar time, and previous mental disorders. Absolute risks were estimated with the use of competing-risks survival analyses. RESULTS: A total of 698,874 of 5,940,299 persons (11.8%) were identified as having a mental disorder. The median age of the total population was 32.1 years at entry into the cohort and 48.7 years at the time of the last follow-up. Persons with a mental disorder had a higher risk than those without such disorders with respect to 76 of 90 pairs of mental disorders and medical conditions. The median hazard ratio for an association between a mental disorder and a medical condition was 1.37. The lowest hazard ratio was 0.82 for organic mental disorders and the broad category of cancer (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 0.84), and the highest was 3.62 for eating disorders and urogenital conditions (95% CI, 3.11 to 4.22). Several specific pairs showed a reduced risk (e.g., schizophrenia and musculoskeletal conditions). Risks varied according to the time since the diagnosis of a mental disorder. The absolute risk of a medical condition within 15 years after a mental disorder was diagnosed varied from 0.6% for a urogenital condition among persons with a developmental disorder to 54.1% for a circulatory disorder among those with an organic mental disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Most mental disorders were associated with an increased risk of a subsequent medical condition; hazard ratios ranged from 0.82 to 3.62 and varied according to the time since the diagnosis of the mental disorder. (Funded by the Danish National Research Foundation and others; COMO-GMC ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT03847753.).


Assuntos
Doença/etiologia , Transtornos Mentais/complicações , Adulto , Doenças Cardiovasculares/etiologia , Estudos de Coortes , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Feminino , Doenças Urogenitais Femininas/etiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Doenças Urogenitais Masculinas/etiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas/etiologia , Neoplasias/etiologia , Risco , Esquizofrenia/complicações , Fatores Sexuais
5.
Hum Genet ; 139(5): 593-604, 2020 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32152699

RESUMO

Gastrointestinal infections can be life threatening, but not much is known about the host's genetic contribution to susceptibility to gastrointestinal infections or the latter's association with psychiatric disorders. We utilized iPSYCH, a genotyped population-based sample of individuals born between 1981 and 2005 comprising 65,534 unrelated Danish individuals (45,889 diagnosed with mental disorders and 19,645 controls from a random population sample) in which all individuals were linked utilizing nationwide population-based registers to estimate the genetic contribution to susceptibility to gastrointestinal infections, identify genetic variants associated with gastrointestinal infections, and examine the link between gastrointestinal infections and psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. The SNP heritability of susceptibility to gastrointestinal infections ranged from 3.7% to 6.4% on the liability scale. Significant correlations were found between gastrointestinal infections and the combined group of mental disorders (OR = 2.09; 95% CI: 1.82-2.4, P = 1.87 × 10-25). Correlations with autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and depression were also significant. We identified a genome-wide significant locus associated with susceptibility to gastrointestinal infections (OR = 1.13; 95% CI: 1.08-1.18, P = 2.9 × 10-8), where the top SNP was an eQTL for the ABO gene. The risk allele was associated with reduced ABO expression, providing, for the first time, genetic evidence to support previous studies linking the O blood group to gastrointestinal infections. This study also highlights the importance of integrative work in genetics, psychiatry, infection, and epidemiology on the road to translational medicine.


Assuntos
Gastroenteropatias/epidemiologia , Marcadores Genéticos , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Transtornos Mentais/fisiopatologia , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/fisiopatologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Estudos de Coortes , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Feminino , Gastroenteropatias/genética , Gastroenteropatias/microbiologia , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Locos de Características Quantitativas
7.
Transl Psychiatry ; 9(1): 283, 2019 11 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31712607

RESUMO

Infections and mental disorders are two of the major global disease burdens. While correlations between mental disorders and infections have been reported, the possible genetic links between them have not been assessed in large-scale studies. Moreover, the genetic basis of susceptibility to infection is largely unknown, as large-scale genome-wide association studies of susceptibility to infection have been lacking. We utilized a large Danish population-based sample (N = 65,534) linked to nationwide population-based registers to investigate the genetic architecture of susceptibility to infection (heritability estimation, polygenic risk analysis, and a genome-wide association study (GWAS)) and examined its association with mental disorders (comorbidity analysis and genetic correlation). We found strong links between having at least one psychiatric diagnosis and the occurrence of infection (P = 2.16 × 10-208, OR = 1.72). The SNP heritability of susceptibility to infection ranged from ~2 to ~7% in samples of differing psychiatric diagnosis statuses (suggesting the environment as a major contributor to susceptibility), and polygenic risk scores moderately but significantly explained infection status in an independent sample. We observed a genetic correlation of 0.496 (P = 2.17 × 10-17) between a diagnosis of infection and a psychiatric diagnosis. While our GWAS did not identify genome-wide significant associations, we found 90 suggestive (P ≤ 10-5) associations for susceptibility to infection. Our findings suggest a genetic component in susceptibility to infection and indicate that the occurrence of infections in individuals with mental illness may be in part genetically driven.


Assuntos
Marcadores Genéticos , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Infecções/epidemiologia , Infecções/genética , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Incidência , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Herança Multifatorial , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Sistema de Registros
8.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 3927, 2019 09 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31477735

RESUMO

The duration of pregnancy is influenced by fetal and maternal genetic and non-genetic factors. Here we report a fetal genome-wide association meta-analysis of gestational duration, and early preterm, preterm, and postterm birth in 84,689 infants. One locus on chromosome 2q13 is associated with gestational duration; the association is replicated in 9,291 additional infants (combined P = 3.96 × 10-14). Analysis of 15,588 mother-child pairs shows that the association is driven by fetal rather than maternal genotype. Functional experiments show that the lead SNP, rs7594852, alters the binding of the HIC1 transcriptional repressor. Genes at the locus include several interleukin 1 family members with roles in pro-inflammatory pathways that are central to the process of parturition. Further understanding of the underlying mechanisms will be of great public health importance, since giving birth either before or after the window of term gestation is associated with increased morbidity and mortality.


Assuntos
Cromossomos Humanos Par 2/genética , Citocinas/genética , Feto/metabolismo , Genoma Humano/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Idade Gestacional , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Gravidez , Nascimento Prematuro/genética
9.
Nat Rev Genet ; 20(10): 567-581, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31171865

RESUMO

The genetic correlation describes the genetic relationship between two traits and can contribute to a better understanding of the shared biological pathways and/or the causality relationships between them. The rarity of large family cohorts with recorded instances of two traits, particularly disease traits, has made it difficult to estimate genetic correlations using traditional epidemiological approaches. However, advances in genomic methodologies, such as genome-wide association studies, and widespread sharing of data now allow genetic correlations to be estimated for virtually any trait pair. Here, we review the definition, estimation, interpretation and uses of genetic correlations, with a focus on applications to human disease.


Assuntos
Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Modelos Genéticos , Herança Multifatorial , Fenótipo
10.
Cell ; 177(1): 115-131, 2019 03 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30901534

RESUMO

Identifying the causes of similarities and differences in genetic disease prevalence among humans is central to understanding disease etiology. While present-day humans are not strongly differentiated, vast amounts of genomic data now make it possible to study subtle patterns of genetic variation. This allows us to trace our genomic history thousands of years into the past and its implications for the distribution of disease-associated variants today. Genomic analyses have shown that demographic processes shaped the distribution and frequency of disease-associated variants over time. Furthermore, local adaptation to new environmental conditions-including pathogens-has generated strong patterns of differentiation at particular loci. Researchers are also beginning to uncover the genetic architecture of complex diseases, affected by many variants of small effect. The field of population genomics thus holds great potential for providing further insights into the evolution of human disease.


Assuntos
Doenças Genéticas Inatas/epidemiologia , Doenças Genéticas Inatas/etiologia , Metagenômica/métodos , Adaptação Fisiológica/genética , Alelos , Evolução Molecular , Frequência do Gene/genética , Deriva Genética , Variação Genética/genética , Genética Populacional/métodos , Genômica/métodos , Humanos , Metagenômica/tendências , Modelos Genéticos , Filogenia
11.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 5055, 2019 03 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30911067

RESUMO

The intra-renal dopamine (DA) system is highly expressed in the proximal tubule and contributes to Na+ and blood pressure homeostasis, as well as to the development of nephropathy. In the kidney, the enzyme DOPA Decarboxylase (DDC) originating from the circulation. We used a twin/family study design, followed by polymorphism association analysis at DDC locus to elucidate heritable influences on renal DA production. Dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping across the DDC locus on chromosome 7p12 was analyzed by re-sequencing guided by trait-associated genetic markers to discover the responsible genetic variation. We also characterized kinetics of the expressed DDC mutant enzyme. Systematic polymorphism screening across the 15-Exon DDC locus revealed a single coding variant in Exon-14 that was associated with DA excretion and multiple other renal traits indicating pleiotropy. When expressed and characterized in eukaryotic cells, the 462Gln variant displayed lower Vmax (maximal rate of product formation by an enzyme) (21.3 versus 44.9 nmol/min/mg) and lower Km (substrate concentration at which half-maximal product formation is achieved by an enzyme.)(36.2 versus 46.8 µM) than the wild-type (Arg462) allele. The highly heritable DA excretion trait is substantially influenced by a previously uncharacterized common coding variant (Arg462Gln) at the DDC gene that affects multiple renal tubular and glomerular traits, and predicts accelerated functional decline in chronic kidney disease.

12.
Nat Neurosci ; 22(3): 353-361, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30692689

RESUMO

There is mounting evidence that seemingly diverse psychiatric disorders share genetic etiology, but the biological substrates mediating this overlap are not well characterized. Here we leverage the unique Integrative Psychiatric Research Consortium (iPSYCH) study, a nationally representative cohort ascertained through clinical psychiatric diagnoses indicated in Danish national health registers. We confirm previous reports of individual and cross-disorder single-nucleotide polymorphism heritability for major psychiatric disorders and perform a cross-disorder genome-wide association study. We identify four novel genome-wide significant loci encompassing variants predicted to regulate genes expressed in radial glia and interneurons in the developing neocortex during mid-gestation. This epoch is supported by partitioning cross-disorder single-nucleotide polymorphism heritability, which is enriched at regulatory chromatin active during fetal neurodevelopment. These findings suggest that dysregulation of genes that direct neurodevelopment by common genetic variants may result in general liability for many later psychiatric outcomes.


Assuntos
Encéfalo/embriologia , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Transtornos Mentais/genética , Encéfalo/metabolismo , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Loci Gênicos , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Risco
13.
Focus (Am Psychiatr Publ) ; 17(1): 66-72, 2019 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32015716

RESUMO

(Gandal et al., "Shared molecular neuropathology across major psychiatric disorders parallels polygenic overlap" Science 09 Feb 2018:Vol. 359, Issue 6376, pp. 693-697 (DOI: 10.1126/science.aad6469). Reprinted with permission from AAAS).

14.
Nat Commun ; 9(1): 5296, 2018 12 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30546018

RESUMO

Spatial mapping is a promising strategy to investigate the mechanisms underlying the incidence of psychosis. We analyzed a case-cohort study (n = 24,028), drawn from the 1.47 million Danish persons born between 1981 and 2005, using a novel framework for decomposing the geospatial risk for schizophrenia based on locale of upbringing and polygenic scores. Upbringing in a high environmental risk locale increases the risk for schizophrenia by 122%. Individuals living in a high gene-by-environmental risk locale have a 78% increased risk compared to those who have the same genetic liability but live in a low-risk locale. Effects of specific locales vary substantially within the most densely populated city of Denmark, with hazard ratios ranging from 0.26 to 9.26 for environment and from 0.20 to 5.95 for gene-by-environment. These findings indicate the critical synergism of gene and environment on the etiology of schizophrenia and demonstrate the potential of incorporating geolocation in genetic studies.


Assuntos
Meio Ambiente , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Geografia , Esquizofrenia/epidemiologia , Esquizofrenia/genética , Mapeamento Cromossômico/métodos , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Humanos , Estudo de Prova de Conceito , Fatores de Risco
15.
Nat Genet ; 50(9): 1210-1211, 2018 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30158681
16.
Sci Rep ; 8(1): 12585, 2018 08 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30135563

RESUMO

Higher cognitive functions are regarded as one of the main distinctive traits of humans. Evidence for the cognitive evolution of human beings is mainly based on fossil records of an expanding cranium and an increasing complexity of material culture artefacts. However, the molecular genetic factors involved in the evolution are still relatively unexplored. Here, we investigated whether genomic regions that underwent positive selection in humans after divergence from Neanderthals are enriched for genetic association with phenotypes related to cognitive functions. We used genome wide association data from a study of college completion (N = 111,114), one of educational attainment (N = 293,623) and two different studies of general cognitive ability (N = 269,867 and 53,949). We found nominally significant polygenic enrichment of associations with college completion (p = 0.025), educational attainment (p = 0.043) and general cognitive ability (p = 0.015 and 0.025, respectively), suggesting that variants influencing these phenotypes are more prevalent in evolutionarily salient regions. The enrichment remained significant after controlling for other known genetic enrichment factors, and for affiliation to genes highly expressed in the brain. These findings support the notion that phenotypes related to higher order cognitive skills typical of humans have a recent genetic component that originated after the separation of the human and Neanderthal lineages.


Assuntos
Evolução Biológica , Inteligência/genética , Encéfalo/metabolismo , Cognição/fisiologia , Escolaridade , Feminino , Marcadores Genéticos/genética , Genoma/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino , Herança Multifatorial/genética , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética
17.
Transl Psychiatry ; 8(1): 114, 2018 06 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29884845

RESUMO

Despite great interest in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for studying the effects of genes on brain structure in humans, current approaches have focused almost entirely on predefined regions of interest and had limited success. Here, we used multivariate methods to define a single neuroanatomical score of how William's Syndrome (WS) brains deviate structurally from controls. The score is trained and validated on measures of T1 structural brain imaging in two WS cohorts (training, n = 38; validating, n = 60). We then associated this score with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the WS hemi-deleted region in five cohorts of neurologically and psychiatrically typical individuals (healthy European descendants, n = 1863). Among 110 SNPs within the 7q11.23 WS chromosomal region, we found one associated locus (p = 5e-5) located at GTF2IRD1, which has been implicated in animal models of WS. Furthermore, the genetic signals of neuroanatomical scores are highly enriched locally in the 7q11.23 compared with summary statistics based on regions of interest, such as hippocampal volumes (n = 12,596), and also globally (SNP-heritability = 0.82, se = 0.25, p = 5e-4). The role of genetic variability in GTF2IRD1 during neurodevelopment extends to healthy subjects. Our approach of learning MRI-derived phenotypes from clinical populations with well-established brain abnormalities characterized by known genetic lesions may be a powerful alternative to traditional region of interest-based studies for identifying genetic variants regulating typical brain development.


Assuntos
Hipocampo/patologia , Proteínas Musculares/genética , Proteínas Nucleares/genética , Transativadores/genética , Síndrome de Williams/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Endofenótipos , Europa (Continente) , Feminino , Humanos , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise Multivariada , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Estudo de Prova de Conceito , Adulto Jovem
18.
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet ; 177(4): 454-467, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29704319

RESUMO

Traditional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully detected genetic variants associated with schizophrenia. However, only a small fraction of heritability can be explained. Gene-set/pathway-based methods can overcome limitations arising from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based analysis, but most of them place constraints on size which may exclude highly specific and functional sets, like macromolecules. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav ) channels, belonging to macromolecules, are composed of several subunits whose encoding genes are located far away or even on different chromosomes. We combined information about such molecules with GWAS data to investigate how functional channels associated with schizophrenia. We defined a biologically meaningful SNP-set based on channel structure and performed an association study by using a validated method: SNP-set (sequence) kernel association test. We identified eight subtypes of Cav channels significantly associated with schizophrenia from a subsample of published data (N = 56,605), including the L-type channels (Cav 1.1, Cav 1.2, Cav 1.3), P-/Q-type Cav 2.1, N-type Cav 2.2, R-type Cav 2.3, T-type Cav 3.1, and Cav 3.3. Only genes from Cav 1.2 and Cav 3.3 have been implicated by the largest GWAS (N = 82,315). Each subtype of Cav channels showed relatively high chip heritability, proportional to the size of its constituent gene regions. The results suggest that abnormalities of Cav channels may play an important role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and these channels may represent appropriate drug targets for therapeutics. Analyzing subunit-encoding genes of a macromolecule in aggregate is a complementary way to identify more genetic variants of polygenic diseases. This study offers the potential of power for discovery the biological mechanisms of schizophrenia.


Assuntos
Canais de Cálcio/genética , Esquizofrenia/genética , Esquizofrenia/fisiopatologia , Cálcio/metabolismo , Canais de Cálcio/fisiologia , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Humanos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética
19.
Hum Mol Genet ; 27(R1): R22-R28, 2018 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29522091

RESUMO

Structural neuroimaging measures based on magnetic resonance imaging have been at the forefront of imaging genetics. Global efforts to ensure homogeneity of measurements across study sites have enabled large-scale imaging genetic projects, accumulating nearly 50K samples for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, not many novel genetic variants have been identified by these GWAS, despite the high heritability of structural neuroimaging measures. Here, we discuss the limitations of using heritability as a guidance for assessing statistical power of GWAS, and highlight the importance of discoverability-which is the power to detect genetic variants for a given phenotype depending on its unique genomic architecture and GWAS sample size. Further, we present newly developed methods that boost genetic discovery in imaging genetics. By redefining imaging measures independent of traditional anatomical conventions, it is possible to improve discoverability, enabling identification of more genetic effects. Moreover, by leveraging enrichment priors from genomic annotations and independent GWAS of pleiotropic traits, we can better characterize effect size distributions, and identify reliable and replicable loci associated with structural neuroimaging measures. Statistical tools leveraging novel insights into the genetic discoverability of human traits, promises to accelerate the identification of genetic underpinnings underlying brain structural variation.


Assuntos
Encéfalo/anatomia & histologia , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Neuroimagem/tendências , Encéfalo/diagnóstico por imagem , Pleiotropia Genética/genética , Humanos , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Tamanho da Amostra
20.
Science ; 359(6376): 693-697, 2018 02 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29439242

RESUMO

The predisposition to neuropsychiatric disease involves a complex, polygenic, and pleiotropic genetic architecture. However, little is known about how genetic variants impart brain dysfunction or pathology. We used transcriptomic profiling as a quantitative readout of molecular brain-based phenotypes across five major psychiatric disorders-autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and alcoholism-compared with matched controls. We identified patterns of shared and distinct gene-expression perturbations across these conditions. The degree of sharing of transcriptional dysregulation is related to polygenic (single-nucleotide polymorphism-based) overlap across disorders, suggesting a substantial causal genetic component. This comprehensive systems-level view of the neurobiological architecture of major neuropsychiatric illness demonstrates pathways of molecular convergence and specificity.


Assuntos
Predisposição Genética para Doença , Transtornos Mentais/genética , Herança Multifatorial , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso/genética , Córtex Cerebral/metabolismo , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Humanos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Transcrição Genética
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