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1.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(5): 925-935, 2019 May 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30982609

RESUMO

Colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) plays key roles in regulating development and function of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, including microglia and osteoclasts. Mono-allelic mutations of CSF1R are known to cause hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), an adult-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Here, we report seven affected individuals from three unrelated families who had bi-allelic CSF1R mutations. In addition to early-onset HDLS-like neurological disorders, they had brain malformations and skeletal dysplasia compatible to dysosteosclerosis (DOS) or Pyle disease. We identified five CSF1R mutations that were homozygous or compound heterozygous in these affected individuals. Two of them were deep intronic mutations resulting in abnormal inclusion of intron sequences in the mRNA. Compared with Csf1r-null mice, the skeletal and neural phenotypes of the affected individuals appeared milder and variable, suggesting that at least one of the mutations in each affected individual is hypomorphic. Our results characterized a unique human skeletal phenotype caused by CSF1R deficiency and implied that bi-allelic CSF1R mutations cause a spectrum of neurological and skeletal disorders, probably depending on the residual CSF1R function.

2.
Foot Ankle Int ; 39(11): 1360-1369, 2018 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30052059

RESUMO

BACKGROUND:: Anatomical knowledge of the tarsal canal and sinus is still unclear owing to the complexity of the ligamentous structures within them, particularly the relationship with the capsules of the subtalar joints. The aim of this study was to examine the anatomical relationship between the fibrous tissues of the tarsal canal and sinus and the articular capsules of the subtalar joint. METHODS:: We conducted a descriptive anatomical study of 21 embalmed cadaveric ankles. For a macroscopic overview of the subtalar joint, we removed the talus in 18 ankles and separated the fibrous tissues from the surrounding connective tissues to analyze the layered relationship between the inferior extensor retinaculum (IER) and the subtalar joint capsule. Additionally, we histologically analyzed the tarsal canal and the medial and lateral sides of the tarsal sinus using Masson's trichrome staining in 3 ankles. RESULTS:: The medial and intermediate roots of the IER and interosseous talocalcaneal ligament (ITCL) were located in the same layer and were connected to each other, between the capsules of the posterior talocalcaneal and talocalcaneonavicular joints. The intermediate root of the IER and the cervical ligament (CL) had adjacent attachments on the tarsal sinus, and synovial tissues originating from the joint capsules filled the remaining area in the tarsal canal and sinus. CONCLUSION:: We determined that the tarsal canal and sinus tarsi contained 3 layered structures: the anterior capsule of the posterior talocalcaneal joint, including the anterior capsule ligament; the layer of ITCL and IER; and the posterior capsule of the talocalcaneonavicular joint, including the CL. CLINICAL RELEVANCE:: The results of this study may help with the understanding of the pathomechanism of subtalar instability and sinus tarsi syndrome, resulting in better treatment.

3.
J Pediatr Orthop ; 38(6): 312-319, 2018 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27442215

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The concept of containment as an effective approach to reduce the risk of femoral head deformity has been questioned because modest results have been achieved after nonoperative and operative treatments for severely involved Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. Several reports have shown the limited effectiveness of some conventional single procedures. However, there is limited data on the effectiveness of combined procedures. METHODS: The surgical group comprised 77 patients (mean age 8.3 y) and involved 79 hips. The average follow-up term was 9.5 years. Sixty-five patients were unilaterally involved and 12 patients were bilaterally involved (although 10 of the latter patients only received surgery on 1 hip). Among patients, 28 hips were classified as Herring class B/C border (>8 y old) and 51 hips were Herring class C. The 79 hips were divided into 2 treatment groups for further analysis: group 1, single procedures (femoral varus osteotomy) (n=47); group 2, combined procedures [femoral varus osteotomy+Dega (Pemberton) osteotomy] (n=32). RESULTS: Using Stulberg classification I and II (acceptable outcome), the final outcome was statistically significant for group 2 (21 hips, 65.6%) compared with group 1 (18 hips, 38.3%) (P=0.031). The average remodeling efficacy, defined as the change in caput index between preoperation and postoperation, was better in group 2 (12.7%) than in group 1 (3.9%) (P=0.005). The acetabulum-head index and α-angle were also statistically significant in group 2 than in group 1 at the last follow-up. Clinical evaluations were statistically significant in group 2 compared with group 1. CONCLUSIONS: Both clinically and radiologically, the combined procedure group demonstrated significantly better outcomes with accelerated remodeling in both the severely affected femoral heads and the acetabula compared with the single procedure group. With this procedure, we anticipate the increased likelihood of preventing or delaying coxarthroses in adulthood. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III-therapeutic study.


Assuntos
Acetábulo/cirurgia , Fêmur/cirurgia , Doença de Legg-Calve-Perthes/cirurgia , Osteoartrite do Quadril/prevenção & controle , Osteotomia/métodos , Criança , Feminino , Cabeça do Fêmur , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Período Pós-Operatório , Radiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento
4.
J Pediatr Orthop ; 33(3): 262-8, 2013 Apr-May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23482261

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Cystic mass lesions in the popliteal area, called popliteal cysts or Baker's cysts, are usually minimally symptomatic and not related to intra-articular morbidity in the pediatric population. Although multiple studies have described cases of spontaneous resolution over a period of several months to a few years, others still consider surgical treatment necessary. Furthermore, no previous studies have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the disappearance of popliteal cysts. In this retrospective study, we reviewed records of patients with popliteal cysts to investigate the natural history of this disease. METHODS: The medical records of patients with popliteal cysts followed for at least 12 months were retrospectively reviewed. The patient set comprised of 17 knees in 15 males and 3 knees in 2 females. Mean age was 5.6±2.0 years (range, 1.8 to 11.4 y) at their initial visit to the clinic, and mean follow-up period was 53.1±31.6 months (range, 12.6 to 147.8 mo). MRI findings were reviewed for the 16 knees in 13 patients who had undergone MRI. Symptoms and clinical course were extracted from the medical records of all the study subjects and analyzed. RESULTS: Although 6 knees (30%) had histories of pain in the popliteal area, no patient complained of pain at their initial visit. Seventeen cysts (85%) naturally decreased in size or disappeared on clinical examination and/or ultrasound. Cysts confined to either the gastrocnemio-semimembranosus bursa or the subgastrocnemius bursa according to the MRI findings were classified as type I, and cysts which occupied both bursae were classified as type II. Eight knees received MRI examination more than once, and complete disappearance was confirmed in 5 of these knees. All type II cysts converted to type I, and all cysts which completely disappeared were type I before disappearance. CONCLUSIONS: The MRI findings in our study population confirmed that popliteal cysts in pediatric populations can be expected to completely resolve in due course without treatment. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic study Level IV (Case series).


Assuntos
Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Cisto Popliteal/diagnóstico , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Progressão da Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos
5.
Clin Orthop Relat Res ; 471(7): 2183-91, 2013 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23397313

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) may develop cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Early management of FAI has been advocated for patients with symptomatic FAI. The various treatment options, including reorientation surgeries, realignment procedures, and osteoplasty, remain controversial. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: We asked whether an intertrochanteric flexion osteotomy improved the clinical symptoms of FAI in patients with SCFE and confirmed whether the radiographic signs were compatible with the clinical signs of FAI. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 32 symptomatic patients who underwent 32 intertrochanteric flexion osteotomies for severe SCFE. FAI was diagnosed clinically with a positive impingement sign. The osteotomies were designed preoperatively using CT. Cam-type FAI was evaluated with the modified α angle (ß angle) on a Lauenstein view, measured between the proximal femoral shaft axis and the line from the center of the femoral head to the anterior point where the distance of the head center exceeded the femoral head radius. The minimum followup was 2 years (mean, 5 years; range, 2-9 years). RESULTS: At last followup, only two patients complained of pain or inconvenience in daily life; the impingement sign was negative in 24 hips (75%). The ß angles at last followup were reduced on average by 39°. The postoperative ß angle was higher in hips with positive clinical signs of FAI than in those with negative signs. CONCLUSIONS: Intertrochanteric flexion osteotomy for SCFE improved the clinical and radiographic signs of FAI. The ß angle and clinical findings showed compatible improvement. We believe our intertrochanteric flexion osteotomy is a viable option for treating severe SCFE. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Assuntos
Impacto Femoroacetabular/cirurgia , Fêmur/cirurgia , Articulação do Quadril/cirurgia , Osteotomia/métodos , Escorregamento das Epífises Proximais do Fêmur/cirurgia , Adolescente , Criança , Feminino , Impacto Femoroacetabular/diagnóstico por imagem , Impacto Femoroacetabular/etiologia , Impacto Femoroacetabular/fisiopatologia , Articulação do Quadril/diagnóstico por imagem , Articulação do Quadril/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Masculino , Recuperação de Função Fisiológica , Estudos Retrospectivos , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Escorregamento das Epífises Proximais do Fêmur/complicações , Escorregamento das Epífises Proximais do Fêmur/diagnóstico por imagem , Escorregamento das Epífises Proximais do Fêmur/fisiopatologia , Fatores de Tempo , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X , Resultado do Tratamento
6.
J Orthop Sci ; 17(6): 763-9, 2012 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22961425

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to reconsider the factors influencing the remodeling effects in diaphyseal femoral fractures in children based on radiological results. PATIENTS AND METHOD: We reviewed 39 patients with more than a 5° residual angulation deformity at the fracture site on anteroposterior and/or lateral views at the primary healing stage. The average follow-up period was 30.4 months. Angulation deformity was measured on plain radiographs both at the primary healing stage and the final follow-up. The correction rate (A - B/A × 100, A angulation deformities at the primary healing, B the angulation at the final follow-up) between at the primary healing stage and final follow-up was analyzed in terms of age at injury (0-5, 6-9, and ≥10 years), fracture site (proximal one third, middle one third, and distal one third) and direction of the deformities (coronal and sagittal planes). RESULT: The remodeling effect significantly appeared on the coronal plane (correction rate 66.7 %) rather than on the sagittal plane (correction rate 31.6 %) in the 0- to 5-year age group (P < 0.05). There was a statistically significant difference in the correction rate between the 0- to 5-year age group (66.7 %) and the 6- to 9-year group (30.6 %) on the coronal plane (P < 0.05), with no significance between any other two groups on both planes. No statistical difference of remodeling effect appeared among the three fracture sites. The average leg-length discrepancy was 4.7 mm longer. CONCLUSION: We suggest that a patient ≤5 years at injury could expect more sufficient remodeling on the coronal plane compared with the other age groups on both planes. However, a patient >5 years at injury should be encouraged to undergo the maximum possible correction of the angulation deformity at the initial treatment. Surgical intervention might be considered for that purpose.


Assuntos
Remodelação Óssea/fisiologia , Fraturas do Fêmur/fisiopatologia , Fraturas do Fêmur/terapia , Consolidação da Fratura/fisiologia , Fatores Etários , Pesos e Medidas Corporais , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Diáfises/lesões , Feminino , Fraturas do Fêmur/diagnóstico por imagem , Fraturas Mal-Unidas/diagnóstico por imagem , Fraturas Mal-Unidas/etiologia , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Radiografia , Fatores de Risco
7.
J Pediatr Orthop ; 31(8): 853-7, 2011 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22101663

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Drehmann sign is a characteristic clinical feature in slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). The presence of SCFE indicates an anatomic change of the proximal femur, which induces obligatory hip external rotation with hip flexion. In contrast, a cam-type femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI) is well known as sequelae of SCFE. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between Drehmann sign and radiologic FAI. METHODS: We studied 92 hips of 80 SCFE patients who had been treated with in situ fixation. The occurrence rate of Drehmann sign was analyzed according to the degree of remodeling (the Jones classification) and the radiologic α-angle measured in each class at the final follow-up. At a mean 12.2 years after the final follow-up, the patients' present condition was clinically investigated with a questionnaire using a part of the Harris Hip Rating Scale (HHRS). In addition, 3-dimensional computed tomography analysis was performed to clarify the anatomic relationship between the femoral head and the acetabulum during testing for Drehmann sign. RESULTS: Among the 92 hips in the study, 60 were well remodeled (Jones type A), 24 were type B, and 8 were type C, with 6.5 years of mean follow-up. The mean of the modified α-angles for the 3 groups (A, B, and C) were 61.8, 84.7, and 119.4, respectively (P < 0.05); 25%, 75%, and 100% of the hips in the 3 groups, respectively, exhibited Drehmann sign. The set of hips (n = 41) with a positive Drehmann sign had a mean α-angle of 85.6 versus 63.0 degrees for the set of hips (n = 51) with a negative Drehmann sign (P < 0.05). Seven (13.5%) of 52 patients responding to the questionnaire reported hip pain and/or limp in the positive Drehmann sign group, but no patient in the negative sign group complained of either. Three-dimensional computed tomography delineated FAI at 2 different positions during testing for Drehmann sign. CONCLUSIONS: Drehmann sign is highly valuable for clinically evaluating the existence of FAI and for following up with observation or realignment to prevent early osteoarthritis.


Assuntos
Acetábulo/diagnóstico por imagem , Cabeça do Fêmur/diagnóstico por imagem , Osteoartrite do Quadril/diagnóstico por imagem , Escorregamento das Epífises Proximais do Fêmur/diagnóstico por imagem , Escorregamento das Epífises Proximais do Fêmur/fisiopatologia , Acetábulo/fisiopatologia , Acetábulo/cirurgia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Cabeça do Fêmur/fisiopatologia , Cabeça do Fêmur/cirurgia , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Medição da Dor , Amplitude de Movimento Articular , Escorregamento das Epífises Proximais do Fêmur/cirurgia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X
8.
Clin Calcium ; 21(6): 879-89, 2011 Jun.
Artigo em Japonês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21628803

RESUMO

Cell transplantation has shown to be a promising strategy to repair cartilage defects. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovium have been shown to be a superior cell source for cartilage regeneration to those from other mesenchymal tissues due to their higher rates of colony formation, proliferation potential with autologous serum, and in vitro/vivo chondrogenic potentials. We have found that approximately 60% of synovial mesenchymal stem cells placed on cartilage defects adhered to the defect within 10 min, and the addition of magnesium enhanced this percentage further, which resulted in better cartilage regeneration. Based upon several basic research studies performed in our lab, we have begun the transplantation of synovial stem cells arthroscopically in a clinical study for the treatment of cartilage defects. To date, no adverse events have been reported in the study. Regeneration of cartilage, reduction in defect size and an improvement of symptoms have been obtained in most patients over the last 3 years.


Assuntos
Cartilagem Articular/fisiologia , Transplante de Células-Tronco Mesenquimais , Células-Tronco Mesenquimais , Regeneração , Medicina Regenerativa/métodos , Membrana Sinovial/citologia , Engenharia Tecidual/métodos , Animais , Cartilagem Articular/citologia , Adesão Celular/efeitos dos fármacos , Diferenciação Celular , Células Cultivadas , Humanos , Magnésio/farmacologia , Coelhos , Soro/fisiologia , Estimulação Química
9.
Lab Invest ; 90(2): 210-21, 2010 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20010853

RESUMO

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from a variety of mesenchymal tissue contain common features, but distinguishing properties dependent on their origin are emerging. We investigated morphological differences of human bone marrow-MSCs, synovium-MSCs, and chondrocytes during in vitro chondrogenesis. Two hundred thousands cells were pelleted after centrifugation and cultured in chondrogenic media that contained BMP-2, TGF-beta3, and dexamethasone. The pellets were analyzed histologically, immunohistologically, and electron microscopically. Before chondrogenic induction, trypsinized MSCs and chondrocytes looked similar. At day 1, the structure of the three masses was divided into two layers, and the most obvious differences in the three populations were observed in the deep zone. In bone marrow-MSCs, round cells accumulated without intercellular space, and the cells were mainly connected through intermediate junctions. In synovium-MSCs, elongated cells accumulated with small desmosomes and intercellular spaces could occasionally be seen. In chondrocytes, separated oval and polygonal cells connected only in a narrow spotty area through a small desmosome. At day 7, the structure of the three masses was divided into three layers, and the most obvious differences in the three populations were observed in the middle zone. In bone marrow-MSCs, the middle zone consisted of dense smaller cells and apoptotic cells. In synovium-MSCs, the middle zone consisted of dense arrayed wider cells and apoptotic cells. In chondrocytes, the middle zone was acellular without apoptotic cells. At day 21, the morphology of cells and extracellular space became similar in that each cell was located separately with abundant extracellular matrix. The superficial zone was still obvious in bone marrow-MSCs, but hardly seen both in synovium-MSCs and chondrocytes. In this study, we revealed morphological differences of bone marrow-MSCs, synovium-MSCs, and chondrocytes during in vitro chondrogenesis. The most obvious differences in the three populations were observed at day 1 in the deep zone.


Assuntos
Células da Medula Óssea/ultraestrutura , Diferenciação Celular , Condrócitos/ultraestrutura , Condrogênese , Células-Tronco Mesenquimais/ultraestrutura , Membrana Sinovial/citologia , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Marcação In Situ das Extremidades Cortadas , Técnicas In Vitro , Articulação do Joelho , Microscopia Eletrônica de Transmissão
10.
J Orthop Res ; 27(4): 435-41, 2009 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-18973232

RESUMO

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be obtained from various tissues, and contain common features. However, an increasing number of reports have described variant properties dependent of cell sources. We examined (1) whether MSCs existed in several intraarticular tissues, (2) whether gene expression profiles in intraarticular tissue MSCs closely resembled each other, and (3) whether identified genes were specific to intraarticular tissue MSCs. Human synovium, meniscus, intraarticular ligament, muscle, adipose tissue, and bone marrow were harvested, and colony-forming cells were analyzed. All these cells showed multipotentiality and surface markers typical of MSCs. Gene profiles of intraarticular tissue MSCs and chondrocytes were closer to each other than those of extraarticular tissues MSCs. Among three characteristic genes specific for intraarticular tissue MSCs, we focused on proline arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP). Higher expression of PRELP was confirmed in chondrocytes and intraarticular tissue MSCs among three elderly and three young donors. Synovium MSCs stably expressed PRELP, contrarily, bone marrow MSCs increased PRELP expression during in vitro chondrogenesis. In conclusion, MSCs could be isolated from various intraarticular tissues including meniscus and ligament, gene expression profiles of intraarticular tissue MSCs closely resembled each other, and the higher expression of PRELP was characteristic of intraarticular tissue MSCs.


Assuntos
Ligamento Cruzado Anterior/citologia , Condrócitos/citologia , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Meniscos Tibiais/citologia , Células-Tronco Mesenquimais/metabolismo , Membrana Sinovial/citologia , Idoso , Diferenciação Celular , Proteínas da Matriz Extracelular/genética , Feminino , Glicoproteínas/genética , Humanos
11.
J Med Microbiol ; 56(Pt 3): 398-406, 2007 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-17314373

RESUMO

A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed to detect Vero toxin (VT)-producing Escherichia coli rapidly (within 60 min). The 24 strains of VT-producing E. coli were successfully amplified, but 6 strains of non-VT-producing E. coli and 46 bacterial species other than E. coli were not. The sensitivity of the LAMP assay was found to be >0.7 c.f.u. per test using serogroups O157, O26 and O111 of VT-producing E. coli; this sensitivity is greater than that obtained by PCR assay. Furthermore, the LAMP assay was examined for its ability to detect VT-producing E. coli in food because of the difficulty of detection in food samples. The recovery of VT-producing E. coli by LAMP assay from beef and radish sprouts inoculated with the pathogen was high, similar to that obtained using culture methods with direct plating and/or plating after immunomagnetic separation. Although PCR assay was unable to recover VT-producing E. coli from half of the radish samples, LAMP assay was successful in most samples. In addition, VT-producing E. coli was successfully detected in cultures of the beef samples by LAMP assay, but not by the culture method. The LAMP products in naturally contaminated beef samples were analysed to confirm the specific amplification of the VT-encoding gene, and were found to show a specific ladder band pattern on agarose gel after electrophoresis. Additionally the sequences of the LAMP products coincided well with the expected sequences of the VT-encoding gene. These results indicate that the proposed LAMP assay is a rapid, specific and sensitive method of detecting the VT-producing E. coli.


Assuntos
DNA Bacteriano/análise , Proteínas de Escherichia coli/genética , Escherichia coli/isolamento & purificação , Microbiologia de Alimentos , Técnicas de Amplificação de Ácido Nucleico/métodos , Toxinas Shiga/genética , Primers do DNA/genética , DNA Bacteriano/genética , Escherichia coli/genética , Escherichia coli/metabolismo , Proteínas de Escherichia coli/biossíntese , Carne/microbiologia , Raphanus/microbiologia , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Toxinas Shiga/biossíntese
12.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 103(32): 12021-6, 2006 Aug 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-16873552

RESUMO

The Src family of tyrosine kinases play pivotal roles in regulating cellular functions characteristic of multicellular animals, including cell-cell interactions, cell-substrate adhesion, and cell migration. To investigate the functional alteration of Src kinases during evolution from a unicellular ancestor to multicellular animals, we characterized Src orthologs from the unicellular choanoflagellate Monosiga ovata and the primitive multicellular sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis. Here, we show that the src gene family and its C-terminal Src kinase (Csk)-mediated regulatory system already were established in the unicellular M. ovata and that unicellular Src has unique features relative to multicellular Src: It can be phosphorylated by Csk at the negative regulatory site but still exhibits substantial activity even in the phosphorylated form. Analyses of chimera molecules between M. ovata and E. fluviatilis Src orthologs reveal that structural alterations in the kinase domain are responsible for the unstable negative regulation of M. ovata Src. When expressed in vertebrate fibroblasts, M. ovata Src can induce cell transformation irrespective of the presence of Csk. These findings suggest that a structure of Src required for the stable Csk-mediated negative regulation still is immature in the unicellular M. ovata and that the development of stable negative regulation of Src may correlate with the evolution of multicellularity in animals.


Assuntos
Evolução Molecular , Quinases da Família src/fisiologia , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Animais , Adesão Celular , Clonagem Molecular , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Humanos , Dados de Sequência Molecular , Fosforilação , Poríferos , Estrutura Terciária de Proteína , Proteínas Recombinantes de Fusão/química , Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Quinases da Família src/genética
13.
Chemosphere ; 62(1): 149-54, 2006 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-16325650

RESUMO

A fine porcelain open-cell photo-catalytic filter with titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) was evaluated for sterilization and sanitation of bio-polluted industrial water. In simulated seawater industrial effluent samples, the populations of Escherichia coli and Vibrio parahaemolyticus quickly decreased and reached non-detectable level within 10min. In seawater effluents from a seaweed processing plant, the bacterial populations in two samples quickly decreased by more than 10(3). In another two samples the decreases were slow and lowered by less than 10(2). Using fluorescence microscopy, it was indicated that the bacterial cells treated with photo-catalytic TiO(2) were damaged. In addition, the protein concentration in simulated seawater effluent slowly decreased using the photo-catalytic TiO(2) reaction; and reached similar concentrations as seawater near cultured seaweed beds. These results indicate that using a reactor with a TiO(2) photo-catalyst filter was effective for the sanitation of seawater effluents.


Assuntos
Indústria de Processamento de Alimentos , Água do Mar , Alga Marinha , Titânio/química , Poluentes da Água/análise , Purificação da Água/métodos , Catálise , Filtração/instrumentação , Oxirredução , Água do Mar/química , Água do Mar/microbiologia , Raios Ultravioleta
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