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2.
Am J Public Health ; : e1-e5, 2021 Jan 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33507805

RESUMO

The acute stress of the COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare a series of long-term weaknesses in the US public health system, including the fragility of our supply of essential medications.1 The virus produced unprecedented shifts in demand for old as well as new drugs, while simultaneously introducing new uncertainties about the production and distribution of pharmaceutical products. COVID-19-related shortages extended beyond antivirals to include a range of drugs broadly used in intensive care and in general hospital management (Table 1). These shortages point to serious vulnerabilities in the pharmaceutical supply chain that compromise readiness for new waves of the current pandemic and crises that are yet to come. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print January 28, 2021: e1-e5. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.306138).

4.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 40(2): 226-234, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33476189

RESUMO

Even with great advances in behavioral health policy in the last decade, the problems of mental illness and addiction persist in the United States-so more needs to be done. In this article, which is part of the National Academy of Medicine's Vital Directions for Health and Health Care: Priorities for 2021 initiative, we describe the steps needed to improve outcomes, focusing on three strategies. We argue for transforming the behavioral health system to meet people where they are, decriminalizing mental illness and substance use disorders to facilitate recovery, and raising awareness of social context and social needs as essential to effective care. We call for supporting structures in the workforce and structures of accountability, outcome measurement, and more generous financing of behavioral health care. These steps have costs, but the enormous benefits of a major transformation in behavioral health policy far outweigh the expenses.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33176564

RESUMO

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention define community engagement as "the process of working collaboratively with and through groups of people" in order to improve their health and well-being. Central to the field of public health, community engagement should also be at the core of the work of schools and programs of public health. This article reviews best practices and emerging innovations in community engagement for education, for research, and for practice, including critical service-learning, community-based participatory research, and collective impact. Leadership, infrastructure, and culture are key institutional facilitators of successful academic efforts. Major challenges to overcome include mistrust by community members, imbalance of power, and unequal sharing of credit. Success in this work will advance equity and improve health in communities all around the world. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Public Health, Volume 42 is April 1, 2021. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

8.
Epidemiol Rev ; 2020 Sep 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32975288

RESUMO

The National Institutes of Health is investing hundreds of millions of dollars into new research on opioids. As these studies yield insights and results, their results will have to change policy and practice before they can bend the curve of the epidemic. However, the US does not have a strong track record of translating evidence on drug policy into action. Three reasons for the translation gap are the historical legacy of drugs in the US, vested interests, and politics. Researchers can become engaged in policy and political processes to strengthen the US response.

19.
JAMA ; 323(2): 123-124, 2020 01 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31935012
20.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 68(3): 637-640, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31825528

RESUMO

Opioid use disorder (OUD) among older adults has been increasing, yet evidence still remains scarce for age-specific treatment. We discuss the three US Food and Drug Administration-approved medications used to treat OUD (methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone) and consider evidence gaps in OUD treatment in older adults. Legislation passed in 2018 (the Substance Use Disorder Prevention That Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act [also known as the SUPPORT Act]) expanded Medicare coverage to include bundled payment for OUD treatment through opioid treatment programs, permitting coverage of methadone treatment for the first time. Since the policy change will take effect in January 2020, healthcare providers need to be aware of new opportunities for treatment when caring for older adult patients with OUD. J Am Geriatr Soc 68:637-640, 2020.

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