Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 76
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
Am J Hum Genet ; 105(4): 854-868, 2019 Oct 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31585109

RESUMO

Cadherins constitute a family of transmembrane proteins that mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion. The extracellular domain of cadherins consists of extracellular cadherin (EC) domains, separated by calcium binding sites. The EC interacts with other cadherin molecules in cis and in trans to mechanically hold apposing cell surfaces together. CDH2 encodes N-cadherin, whose essential roles in neural development include neuronal migration and axon pathfinding. However, CDH2 has not yet been linked to a Mendelian neurodevelopmental disorder. Here, we report de novo heterozygous pathogenic variants (seven missense, two frameshift) in CDH2 in nine individuals with a syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay and/or intellectual disability, variable axon pathfinding defects (corpus callosum agenesis or hypoplasia, mirror movements, Duane anomaly), and ocular, cardiac, and genital anomalies. All seven missense variants (c.1057G>A [p.Asp353Asn]; c.1789G>A [p.Asp597Asn]; c.1789G>T [p.Asp597Tyr]; c.1802A>C [p.Asn601Thr]; c.1839C>G [p.Cys613Trp]; c.1880A>G [p.Asp627Gly]; c.2027A>G [p.Tyr676Cys]) result in substitution of highly conserved residues, and six of seven cluster within EC domains 4 and 5. Four of the substitutions affect the calcium-binding site in the EC4-EC5 interdomain. We show that cells expressing these variants in the EC4-EC5 domains have a defect in cell-cell adhesion; this defect includes impaired binding in trans with N-cadherin-WT expressed on apposing cells. The two frameshift variants (c.2563_2564delCT [p.Leu855Valfs∗4]; c.2564_2567dupTGTT [p.Leu856Phefs∗5]) are predicted to lead to a truncated cytoplasmic domain. Our study demonstrates that de novo heterozygous variants in CDH2 impair the adhesive activity of N-cadherin, resulting in a multisystemic developmental disorder, that could be named ACOG syndrome (agenesis of corpus callosum, axon pathfinding, cardiac, ocular, and genital defects).

2.
J Neurosci ; 39(37): 7321-7331, 2019 Sep 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31270155

RESUMO

Sensorimotor deficits are prevalent in many neurodevelopmental disorders like autism, including one of its common genetic etiologies, a 600 kb reciprocal deletion/duplication at 16p11.2. We have previously shown that copy number variations of 16p11.2 impact regional brain volume, white matter integrity, and early sensory responses in auditory cortex. Here, we test the hypothesis that abnormal cortical neurophysiology is present when genes in the 16p11.2 region are haploinsufficient, and in humans that this in turn may account for behavioral deficits specific to deletion carriers. We examine sensorimotor cortical network activity in males and females with 16p11.2 deletions compared with both typically developing individuals, and those with duplications of 16p11.2, using magnetoencephalographic imaging during preparation of overt speech or hand movements in tasks designed to be easy for all participants. In deletion carriers, modulation of beta oscillations (12-30 Hz) were increased during both movement types over effector-specific regions of motor cortices compared with typically developing individuals or duplication carriers, with no task-related performance differences between cohorts, even when corrected for their own cognitive and sensorimotor deficits. Reduced left hemispheric language specialization was observed in deletion carriers but not in duplication carriers. Neural activity over sensorimotor cortices in deletion carriers was linearly related to clinical measures of speech and motor impairment. These findings link insufficient copy number repeats at 16p11.2 to excessive neural activity (e.g., increased beta oscillations) in motor cortical networks for speech and hand motor control. These results have significant implications for understanding the neural basis of autism and related neurodevelopmental disorders.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The recurrent ∼600 kb deletion at 16p11.2 (BP4-BP5) is one of the most common genetic etiologies of ASD and, more generally, of neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we use high-resolution magnetoencephalographic imaging (MEG-I) to define with millisecond precision the underlying neurophysiological signature of motor impairments for individuals with 16p11.2 deletions. We identify significant increases in beta (12-30 Hz) suppression in sensorimotor cortices related to performance during speech and hand movement tasks. These findings not only provide a neurophysiological phenotype for the clinical presentation of this genetic deletion, but also guide our understanding of how genetic variation encodes for neural oscillatory dynamics.

3.
Am J Hum Genet ; 103(5): 752-768, 2018 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30388402

RESUMO

The nuclear factor I (NFI) family of transcription factors play an important role in normal development of multiple organs. Three NFI family members are highly expressed in the brain, and deletions or sequence variants in two of these, NFIA and NFIX, have been associated with intellectual disability (ID) and brain malformations. NFIB, however, has not previously been implicated in human disease. Here, we present a cohort of 18 individuals with mild ID and behavioral issues who are haploinsufficient for NFIB. Ten individuals harbored overlapping microdeletions of the chromosomal 9p23-p22.2 region, ranging in size from 225 kb to 4.3 Mb. Five additional subjects had point sequence variations creating a premature termination codon, and three subjects harbored single-nucleotide variations resulting in an inactive protein as determined using an in vitro reporter assay. All individuals presented with additional variable neurodevelopmental phenotypes, including muscular hypotonia, motor and speech delay, attention deficit disorder, autism spectrum disorder, and behavioral abnormalities. While structural brain anomalies, including dysgenesis of corpus callosum, were variable, individuals most frequently presented with macrocephaly. To determine whether macrocephaly could be a functional consequence of NFIB disruption, we analyzed a cortex-specific Nfib conditional knockout mouse model, which is postnatally viable. Utilizing magnetic resonance imaging and histology, we demonstrate that Nfib conditional knockout mice have enlargement of the cerebral cortex but preservation of overall brain structure and interhemispheric connectivity. Based on our findings, we propose that haploinsufficiency of NFIB causes ID with macrocephaly.

4.
Pediatr Neurol ; 87: 48-56, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30174244

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: No large-scale studies have specifically evaluated the outcomes of infantile spasms (IS) of unknown cause, previously known as cryptogenic or idiopathic. The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project aimed to characterize IS of unknown cause by phenotype and genotype analysis. METHODS: We undertook a retrospective multicenter observational cohort of 133 individuals within the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project database met criteria for IS of unknown cause with at least six months of follow-up data. Clinical medical records, imaging, and electroencephalography were examined. RESULTS: Normal development occurred in only 15% of IS of unknown cause. The majority (85%) had clinically documented developmental delay (15% mild, 20% moderate, and 50% severe) at last assessment (median 2.7 years; interquartile interval 1.71-6.25 years). Predictors of positive developmental outcomes included no delay prior to IS (P < 0.001), older age of IS onset (median six months old), and resolution of IS after initial treatment (P < 0.001). Additional seizures after IS occurred in 67%, with predictors being seizures prior to IS (P = 0.018), earlier age of IS onset (median five months old), and refractory IS (P = 0.008). On a research basis, whole exome sequencing identified 15% with de novo variants in known epilepsy genes. Individuals with a genetic finding were more likely to have poor developmental outcomes (P = 0.035). CONCLUSIONS: The current study highlights the predominately unfavorable developmental outcomes and that subsequent seizures are common in children with IS of unknown cause. Ongoing genetic evaluation of IS of seemingly unknown cause is likely to yield a diagnosis and provide valuable prognostic information.

5.
J Clin Invest ; 128(11): 5150-5162, 2018 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30188326

RESUMO

Hearing loss is a significant public health concern, affecting over 250 million people worldwide. Both genetic and environmental etiologies are linked to hearing loss, but in many cases the underlying cellular pathophysiology is not well understood, highlighting the importance of further discovery. We found that inactivation of the gene Tmtc4 (transmembrane and tetratricopeptide repeat 4), which was broadly expressed in the mouse cochlea, caused acquired hearing loss in mice. Our data showed Tmtc4 enriched in the endoplasmic reticulum, and that it functioned by regulating Ca2+ dynamics and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Given this genetic linkage of the UPR to hearing loss, we demonstrated a direct link between the more common noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and the UPR. These experiments suggested a novel approach to treatment. We demonstrated that the small-molecule UPR and stress response modulator ISRIB (integrated stress response inhibitor), which activates eIF2B, prevented NIHL in a mouse model. Moreover, in an inverse genetic complementation approach, we demonstrated that mice with homozygous inactivation of both Tmtc4 and Chop had less hearing loss than knockout of Tmtc4 alone. This study implicated a novel mechanism for hearing impairment, highlighting a potential treatment approach for a broad range of human hearing loss disorders.

6.
Ann Neurol ; 84(4): 611-615, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30152888

RESUMO

Autism is a brain disorder characterized by social impairments. Progress in understanding autism has been hindered by difficulty in obtaining brain-relevant tissues (eg, cerebrospinal fluid [CSF]) by which to identify markers of disease and targets for treatment. Here, we overcome this barrier by providing evidence that mean CSF concentration of the "social" neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) is lower in children with autism versus controls. CSF AVP concentration also significantly differentiates individual cases from controls and is associated with greater social symptom severity in children with autism. These findings indicate that AVP may be a promising CSF marker of autism's social deficits. Ann Neurol 2018;84:611-615.

7.
Biol Psychiatry ; 84(4): 253-264, 2018 Aug 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29778275

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: 16p11.2 breakpoint 4 to 5 copy number variants (CNVs) increase the risk for developing autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, and language and cognitive impairment. In this multisite study, we aimed to quantify the effect of 16p11.2 CNVs on brain structure. METHODS: Using voxel- and surface-based brain morphometric methods, we analyzed structural magnetic resonance imaging collected at seven sites from 78 individuals with a deletion, 71 individuals with a duplication, and 212 individuals without a CNV. RESULTS: Beyond the 16p11.2-related mirror effect on global brain morphometry, we observe regional mirror differences in the insula (deletion > control > duplication). Other regions are preferentially affected by either the deletion or the duplication: the calcarine cortex and transverse temporal gyrus (deletion > control; Cohen's d > 1), the superior and middle temporal gyri (deletion < control; Cohen's d < -1), and the caudate and hippocampus (control > duplication; -0.5 > Cohen's d > -1). Measures of cognition, language, and social responsiveness and the presence of psychiatric diagnoses do not influence these results. CONCLUSIONS: The global and regional effects on brain morphometry due to 16p11.2 CNVs generalize across site, computational method, age, and sex. Effect sizes on neuroimaging and cognitive traits are comparable. Findings partially overlap with results of meta-analyses performed across psychiatric disorders. However, the lack of correlation between morphometric and clinical measures suggests that CNV-associated brain changes contribute to clinical manifestations but require additional factors for the development of the disorder. These findings highlight the power of genetic risk factors as a complement to studying groups defined by behavioral criteria.

8.
Sci Transl Med ; 10(439)2018 May 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29720452

RESUMO

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by core social impairments. ASD remains poorly understood because of the difficulty in studying disease biology directly in patients and the reliance on mouse models that lack clinically relevant, complex social cognition abilities. We use ethological observations in rhesus macaques to identify male monkeys with naturally occurring low sociality. These monkeys showed differences in specific neuropeptide and kinase signaling pathways compared to socially competent male monkeys. Using a discovery and replication design, we identified arginine vasopressin (AVP) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a key marker of group differences in monkey sociality; we replicated these findings in an independent monkey cohort. We also confirmed in an additional monkey cohort that AVP concentration in CSF is a stable trait-like measure. Next, we showed in a small pediatric cohort that CSF AVP concentrations were lower in male children with ASD compared to age-matched male children without ASD (but with other medical conditions). We demonstrated that CSF AVP concentration was sufficient to accurately distinguish ASD cases from medical controls. These data suggest that AVP and its signaling pathway warrant consideration in future research studies investigating new targets for diagnostics and drug development in ASD.

9.
BMC Med Genomics ; 11(1): 50, 2018 May 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29801487

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In children with sensory processing dysfunction (SPD), who do not meet criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or intellectual disability, the contribution of de novo pathogenic mutation in neurodevelopmental genes is unknown and in need of investigation. We hypothesize that children with SPD may have pathogenic variants in genes that have been identified as causing other neurodevelopmental disorders including ASD. This genetic information may provide important insight into the etiology of sensory processing dysfunction and guide clinical evaluation and care. METHODS: Eleven community-recruited trios (children with isolated SPD and both biological parents) underwent WES to identify candidate de novo variants and inherited rare single nucleotide variants (rSNV) in genes previously associated with ASD. Gene enrichment in these children and their parents for transmitted and non-transmitted mutation burden was calculated. A comparison analysis to assess for enriched rSNV burden was then performed in 2377 children with ASD and their families from the Simons Simplex Collection. RESULTS: Of the children with SPD, 2/11 (18%), were identified as having a de novo loss of function or missense mutation in genes previously reported as causative for neurodevelopmental disorders (MBD5 and FMN2). We also found that the parents of children with SPD have significant enrichment of pathogenic rSNV burden in high-risk ASD candidate genes that are inherited by their affected children. Using the same approach, we confirmed enrichment of rSNV burden in a large cohort of children with autism and their parents but not unaffected siblings. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that SPD, like autism, has a genetic basis that includes both de novo single gene mutations as well as an accumulated burden of rare inherited variants from their parents.

10.
Sci Rep ; 8(1): 1274, 2018 01 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29352208

RESUMO

Speech and motor deficits are highly prevalent (>70%) in individuals with the 600 kb BP4-BP5 16p11.2 deletion; however, the mechanisms that drive these deficits are unclear, limiting our ability to target interventions and advance treatment. This study examined fundamental aspects of speech motor control in participants with the 16p11.2 deletion. To assess capacity for control of voice, we examined how accurately and quickly subjects changed the pitch of their voice within a trial to correct for a transient perturbation of the pitch of their auditory feedback. When compared to controls, 16p11.2 deletion carriers show an over-exaggerated pitch compensation response to unpredictable mid-vocalization pitch perturbations. We also examined sensorimotor adaptation of speech by assessing how subjects learned to adapt their sustained productions of formants (speech spectral peak frequencies important for vowel identity), in response to consistent changes in their auditory feedback during vowel production. Deletion carriers show reduced sensorimotor adaptation to sustained vowel identity changes in auditory feedback. These results together suggest that 16p11.2 deletion carriers have fundamental impairments in the basic mechanisms of speech motor control and these impairments may partially explain the deficits in speech and language in these individuals.

11.
Hum Mutat ; 39(5): 666-675, 2018 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29330883

RESUMO

Heterozygous variants in the arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide repeats gene (RERE) have been shown to cause neurodevelopmental disorder with or without anomalies of the brain, eye, or heart (NEDBEH). Here, we report nine individuals with NEDBEH who carry partial deletions or deleterious sequence variants in RERE. These variants were found to be de novo in all cases in which parental samples were available. An analysis of data from individuals with NEDBEH suggests that point mutations affecting the Atrophin-1 domain of RERE are associated with an increased risk of structural eye defects, congenital heart defects, renal anomalies, and sensorineural hearing loss when compared with loss-of-function variants that are likely to lead to haploinsufficiency. A high percentage of RERE pathogenic variants affect a histidine-rich region in the Atrophin-1 domain. We have also identified a recurrent two-amino-acid duplication in this region that is associated with the development of a CHARGE syndrome-like phenotype. We conclude that mutations affecting RERE result in a spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Genotype-phenotype correlations exist and can be used to guide medical decision making. Consideration should also be given to screening for RERE variants in individuals who fulfill diagnostic criteria for CHARGE syndrome but do not carry pathogenic variants in CHD7.

12.
Radiology ; 286(1): 217-226, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28786752

RESUMO

Purpose To identify developmental neuroradiologic findings in a large cohort of carriers who have deletion and duplication at 16p11.2 (one of the most common genetic causes of autism spectrum disorder [ASD]) and assess how these features are associated with behavioral and cognitive outcomes. Materials and Methods Seventy-nine carriers of a deletion at 16p11.2 (referred to as deletion carriers; age range, 1-48 years; mean age, 12.3 years; 42 male patients), 79 carriers of a duplication at 16p11.2 (referred to as duplication carriers; age range, 1-63 years; mean age, 24.8 years; 43 male patients), 64 unaffected family members (referred to as familial noncarriers; age range, 1-46 years; mean age, 11.7 years; 31 male participants), and 109 population control participants (age range, 6-64 years; mean age, 25.5 years; 64 male participants) were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Participants underwent structural magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and completed cognitive and behavioral tests. MR images were reviewed for development-related abnormalities by neuroradiologists. Differences in frequency were assessed with a Fisher exact test corrected for multiple comparisons. Unsupervised machine learning was used to cluster radiologic features and an association between clusters and cognitive and behavioral scores from IQ testing, and parental measures of development were tested by using analysis of covariance. Volumetric analysis with automated segmentation was used to confirm radiologic interpretation. Results For deletion carriers, the most prominent features were dysmorphic and thicker corpora callosa compared with familial noncarriers and population control participants (16%; P < .001 and P < .001, respectively) and a greater likelihood of cerebellar tonsillar ectopia (30.7%; P < .002 and P < .001, respectively) and Chiari I malformations (9.3%; P < .299 and P < .002, respectively). For duplication carriers, the most salient findings compared with familial noncarriers and population control participants were reciprocally thinner corpora callosa (18.6%; P < .003 and P < .001, respectively), decreased white matter volume (22.9%; P < .001, and P < .001, respectively), and increased ventricular volume (24.3%; P < .001 and P < .001, respectively). By comparing cognitive assessments to imaging findings, the presence of any imaging feature associated with deletion carriers indicated worse daily living, communication, and social skills compared with deletion carriers without any radiologic abnormalities (P < .005, P < .002, and P < .004, respectively). For the duplication carriers, presence of decreased white matter, callosal volume, and/or increased ventricle size was associated with decreased full-scale and verbal IQ scores compared with duplication carriers without these findings (P < .007 and P < .004, respectively). Conclusion In two genetically related cohorts at high risk for ASD, reciprocal neuroanatomic abnormalities were found and determined to be associated with cognitive and behavioral impairments. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.


Assuntos
Transtorno Autístico , Encéfalo/diagnóstico por imagem , Deleção Cromossômica , Transtornos Cromossômicos , Variações do Número de Cópias de DNA/genética , Deficiência Intelectual , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Transtorno Autístico/diagnóstico por imagem , Transtorno Autístico/epidemiologia , Transtorno Autístico/genética , Encéfalo/patologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Transtornos Cromossômicos/diagnóstico por imagem , Transtornos Cromossômicos/epidemiologia , Transtornos Cromossômicos/genética , Cromossomos Humanos Par 16/genética , Análise por Conglomerados , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Deleção de Genes , Duplicação Gênica/genética , Humanos , Lactente , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico por imagem , Deficiência Intelectual/epidemiologia , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
13.
Hum Mutat ; 39(1): 23-39, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29068161

RESUMO

The deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) gene encodes the netrin-1 (NTN1) receptor DCC, a transmembrane protein required for the guidance of commissural axons. Germline DCC mutations disrupt the development of predominantly commissural tracts in the central nervous system (CNS) and cause a spectrum of neurological disorders. Monoallelic, missense, and predicted loss-of-function DCC mutations cause congenital mirror movements, isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC), or both. Biallelic, predicted loss-of-function DCC mutations cause developmental split brain syndrome (DSBS). Although the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to disease remain poorly understood, they are thought to stem from reduced or perturbed NTN1 signaling. Here, we review the 26 reported DCC mutations associated with abnormal CNS development in humans, including 14 missense and 12 predicted loss-of-function mutations, and discuss their associated clinical characteristics and diagnostic features. We provide an update on the observed genotype-phenotype relationships of congenital mirror movements, isolated ACC and DSBS, and correlate this to our current understanding of the biological function of DCC in the development of the CNS. All mutations and their associated phenotypes were deposited into a locus-specific LOVD (https://databases.lovd.nl/shared/genes/DCC).


Assuntos
Anormalidades Múltiplas/diagnóstico , Anormalidades Múltiplas/genética , Genes DCC , Estudos de Associação Genética , Mutação , Fenótipo , Agenesia do Corpo Caloso , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Sítios de Ligação , Sequência Conservada , Bases de Dados Genéticas , Humanos , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Modelos Moleculares , Netrina-1/química , Netrina-1/metabolismo , Ligação Proteica , Conformação Proteica , Domínios Proteicos/genética , Síndrome
15.
Nat Genet ; 49(4): 511-514, 2017 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28250454

RESUMO

Brain malformations involving the corpus callosum are common in children with developmental disabilities. We identified DCC mutations in four families and five sporadic individuals with isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) without intellectual disability. DCC mutations result in variable dominant phenotypes with decreased penetrance, including mirror movements and ACC associated with a favorable developmental prognosis. Possible phenotypic modifiers include the type and location of mutation and the sex of the individual.


Assuntos
Agenesia do Corpo Caloso/genética , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Mutação/genética , Receptores de Superfície Celular/genética , Proteínas Supressoras de Tumor/genética , Anormalidades Múltiplas/genética , Encéfalo/patologia , Corpo Caloso/patologia , Receptor DCC , Família , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Malformações do Sistema Nervoso/genética , Células-Tronco Neurais/patologia , Penetrância , Fenótipo
17.
Cell Rep ; 17(3): 735-747, 2016 10 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27732850

RESUMO

The corpus callosum is the major axon tract that connects and integrates neural activity between the two cerebral hemispheres. Although ∼1:4,000 children are born with developmental absence of the corpus callosum, the primary etiology of this condition remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that midline crossing of callosal axons is dependent upon the prior remodeling and degradation of the intervening interhemispheric fissure. This remodeling event is initiated by astroglia on either side of the interhemispheric fissure, which intercalate with one another and degrade the intervening leptomeninges. Callosal axons then preferentially extend over these specialized astroglial cells to cross the midline. A key regulatory step in interhemispheric remodeling is the differentiation of these astroglia from radial glia, which is initiated by Fgf8 signaling to downstream Nfi transcription factors. Crucially, our findings from human neuroimaging studies reveal that developmental defects in interhemispheric remodeling are likely to be a primary etiology underlying human callosal agenesis.


Assuntos
Astrócitos/metabolismo , Cérebro/embriologia , Corpo Caloso/embriologia , Organogênese , Agenesia do Corpo Caloso/genética , Agenesia do Corpo Caloso/patologia , Animais , Axônios/metabolismo , Diferenciação Celular , Corpo Caloso/metabolismo , Corpo Caloso/patologia , Fator 8 de Crescimento de Fibroblasto/metabolismo , Humanos , Camundongos , Fenótipo , Transdução de Sinais , Fatores de Transcrição/metabolismo
18.
PLoS One ; 11(10): e0165401, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27788195

RESUMO

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by social cognition impairments but its basic disease mechanisms remain poorly understood. Progress has been impeded by the absence of animal models that manifest behavioral phenotypes relevant to ASD. Rhesus monkeys are an ideal model organism to address this barrier to progress. Like humans, rhesus monkeys are highly social, possess complex social cognition abilities, and exhibit pronounced individual differences in social functioning. Moreover, we have previously shown that Low-Social (LS) vs. High-Social (HS) adult male monkeys exhibit lower social motivation and poorer social skills. It is not known, however, when these social deficits first emerge. The goals of this study were to test whether juvenile LS and HS monkeys differed as infants in their ability to process social information, and whether infant social abilities predicted later social classification (i.e., LS vs. HS), in order to facilitate earlier identification of monkeys at risk for poor social outcomes. Social classification was determined for N = 25 LS and N = 25 HS male monkeys that were 1-4 years of age. As part of a colony-wide assessment, these monkeys had previously undergone, as infants, tests of face recognition memory and the ability to respond appropriately to conspecific social signals. Monkeys later identified as LS vs. HS showed impairments in recognizing familiar vs. novel faces and in the species-typical adaptive ability to gaze avert to scenes of conspecific aggression. Additionally, multivariate logistic regression using infant social ability measures perfectly predicted later social classification of all N = 50 monkeys. These findings suggest that an early capacity to process important social information may account for differences in rhesus monkeys' motivation and competence to establish and maintain social relationships later in life. Further development of this model will facilitate identification of novel biological targets for intervention to improve social outcomes in at-risk young monkeys.


Assuntos
Comportamento Social , Animais , Sinais (Psicologia) , Face , Macaca mulatta , Masculino , Memória , Recognição (Psicologia)
19.
Nat Genet ; 48(10): 1185-92, 2016 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27571260

RESUMO

Although ribosomes are ubiquitous and essential for life, recent data indicate that monogenic causes of ribosomal dysfunction can confer a remarkable degree of specificity in terms of human disease phenotype. Box C/D small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved non-protein-coding RNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis. Here we show that biallelic mutations in the gene SNORD118, encoding the box C/D snoRNA U8, cause the cerebral microangiopathy leukoencephalopathy with calcifications and cysts (LCC), presenting at any age from early childhood to late adulthood. These mutations affect U8 expression, processing and protein binding and thus implicate U8 as essential in cerebral vascular homeostasis.


Assuntos
Doenças de Pequenos Vasos Cerebrais/genética , Leucoencefalopatias/genética , Mutação , RNA Nucleolar Pequeno/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Calcinose/genética , Calcinose/patologia , Linhagem Celular , Doenças de Pequenos Vasos Cerebrais/patologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Cromossomos Humanos Par 17 , Estudos de Coortes , Cistos/genética , Cistos/patologia , Exoma , Feminino , Ligação Genética , Genoma Humano , Humanos , Lactente , Leucoencefalopatias/patologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise de Sequência de DNA , Adulto Jovem
20.
Am J Med Genet A ; 170(11): 2943-2955, 2016 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27410714

RESUMO

Chromosome 16p11.2 deletions and duplications are among the most frequent genetic etiologies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other neurodevelopmental disorders, but detailed descriptions of their neurologic phenotypes have not yet been completed. We utilized standardized examination and history methods to characterize a neurologic phenotype in 136 carriers of 16p11.2 deletion and 110 carriers of 16p11.2 duplication-the largest cohort to date of uniformly and comprehensively characterized individuals with the same 16p copy number variants (CNVs). The 16p11.2 deletion neurologic phenotype is characterized by highly prevalent speech articulation abnormalities, limb and trunk hypotonia with hyporeflexia, abnormalities of agility, sacral dimples, seizures/epilepsy, large head size/macrocephaly, and Chiari I/cerebellar tonsillar ectopia. Speech articulation abnormalities, hypotonia, abnormal agility, sacral dimples, and seizures/epilepsy are also seen in duplication carriers, along with more prominent hyperreflexia; less, though still prevalent, hyporeflexia; highly prevalent action tremor; small head size/microcephaly; and cerebral white matter/corpus callosum abnormalities and ventricular enlargement. The neurologic phenotypes of these reciprocal 16p11.2 CNVs include both shared and distinct features. Reciprocal phenotypic characteristics of predominant hypo- versus hyperreflexia and macro- versus microcephaly may reflect opposite neurobiological abnormalities with converging effects causing the functional impairments shared between 16p11.2 deletion and duplication carriers (i.e., abnormal motor agility and articulation). While the phenotypes exhibit overlap with other genetically-caused neurodevelopmental disorders, clinicians should be aware of the more striking features-such as the speech and motor impairments, growth abnormalities, tremor, and sacral dimples-when evaluating individuals with developmental delay, intellectual disability, ASD, and/or language disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Assuntos
Deleção Cromossômica , Transtornos Cromossômicos/diagnóstico , Transtornos Cromossômicos/genética , Duplicação Cromossômica , Cromossomos Humanos Par 16 , Fenótipo , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Eletroencefalografia , Epilepsia/diagnóstico , Epilepsia/genética , Feminino , Genótipo , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA