Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 306
Filtrar
2.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 23(1): 105, 2021 04 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33832530

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The dietary inflammatory index (DII®), a quantitative measure of the inflammatory potential of daily food and nutrient intake, and associations between a variety of health outcomes have been reported. However, the association between DII score and disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unclear. Therefore, this study was designed to test whether higher DII score contributes to disease activity and as a corollary, whether reducing DII score helps to achieve or maintain low disease activity or remission in patients with RA. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis using 6 years of data (from 2011 to 2017) in TOMORROW, a cohort study consisting of 208 RA patients and 205 gender- and age-matched controls started in 2010. Disease activity of RA patients was assessed annually using DAS28-ESR (disease activity score 28 joints and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate) as a composite measure based on arthritic symptoms in 28 joints plus global health assessment and ESR. Dietary data were collected in 2011 and 2017 using the brief-type self-administered diet history questionnaire (BDHQ). Energy-adjusted DII (E-DII™) score was calculated using 26 nutrients derived from the BDHQ. Data were analyzed with two-group comparisons, correlation analysis, and multivariable logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy-seven RA patients and 183 controls, for whom clinical and dietary survey data were available, were analyzed. RA patients had significantly higher E-DII (pro-inflammatory) score compared to controls both in 2011 and 2017 (p < 0.05). In RA patients, E-DII score was not a factor associated with significant change in disease activity. However, anti-inflammatory change in E-DII score was associated maintaining low disease activity (DAS28-ESR ≤ 3.2) or less for 6 years (OR 3.46, 95% CI 0.33-8.98, p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: The diets of RA patients had a higher inflammatory potential than controls. Although E-DII score was not a factor associated with significant disease activity change, anti-inflammatory change in E-DII score appeared to be associated with maintaining low disease activity in patients with RA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN Clinical Trials Registry, UMIN000003876 . Registered 7 Aug 2010-retrospectively registered.

3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 7515, 2021 Apr 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33824355

RESUMO

Inflammation is considered a key mechanism leading to obesity. Dietary patterns and certain food items influence inflammation. Few studies have investigated the contribution of major dietary patterns to biological measures of inflammation. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the associations of different dietary patterns with dietary inflammatory index (DII), systemic inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR) in the apparently healthy obese. In this cross-sectional study, 151 abdominally obese subjects were recruited from the Northwest of Iran. Dietary intake, demographic data, anthropometric indices, and physical activity (PA) was assessed. DII scores were calculated based on a validated 168-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Three dietary patterns were identified, using principal component analysis. Basal blood samples were collected to determine biochemical parameters. Linear regression test with adjusted beta estimates was applied for data analysis. Three dietary patterns were extracted as Healthy, Western, and Traditional. Body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.01) and fat mass (p < 0.001) were directly associated with the Western dietary pattern. Conversely, serum lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) (b = - 0.1, p < 0.04) was negatively associated with Healthy dietary pattern, after controlling for confounders. The Traditional pattern was found to be inversely related to DII (b = - 0.3, p < 0.001). The association was also reveresed between Traditional pattern and IR (Odds Ratio: 0.3 (95% Confidence Interval 0.1-0.9)). The results suggested that the Western dietary pattern was related to higher BMI and fat mass. In addition, the Healthy pattern was associated with decreased levels of LBP. Adherence to the Traditional dietary pattern was inversely related to DII as well as IR.

4.
BMC Med ; 19(1): 64, 2021 Mar 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33722232

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Beyond intakes of total energy and individual nutrient, eating patterns may influence health, and thereby the risk of adverse outcomes. How different diet measures relate to frailty-a general measure of increased vulnerability to unfavorable health outcomes-and mortality risk, and how this might vary across the life course, is not known. We investigated the associations of five dietary indices (Nutrition Index (NI), the energy-density Dietary Inflammatory Index (E-DII™), Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015), Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS), and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)) with frailty and mortality. METHODS: We included 15,249 participants aged ≥ 20 years from the 2007-2012 cohorts of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The NI combined 31 nutrition-related deficits. The E-DII is a literature-derived dietary index associated with inflammation. The HEI-2015 assesses adherence to the Dietary Guidelines of Americans. The MDS represents adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet. DASH combines macronutrients and micronutrients to prevent hypertension. Frailty was evaluated using a 36-item frailty index. Mortality status was ascertained up to December 31, 2015. RESULTS: Participants' mean age was 47.2 ± 16.7 years and 51.7% were women. After adjusting for age, sex, race, educational level, marital and employment status, smoking, BMI, and study cohort, higher NI and E-DII scores and lower HEI-2015, MDS, and DASH scores were individually significantly associated with frailty. All dietary scores were significantly associated with 8-year mortality risk after adjusting for basic covariates and frailty: NI (hazard ratio per 0.1 point, 1.15, 95%CI 1.10-1.21), E-DII (per 1 point, 1.05, 1.01-1.08), HEI-2015 (per 10 points, 0.93, 0.89-0.97), MDS (per 1 point, 0.94, 0.90-0.97), and DASH (per 1 point, 0.96, 0.93-0.99). The associations of E-DII, HEI-2015, and MDS scores with 8-year mortality risk persisted after additionally adjusting for NI. CONCLUSIONS: NI, E-DII, HEI-2015, MDS, and DASH scores are associated with frailty and 8-year mortality risk in adults across all ages. Nevertheless, their mechanisms and sensitivity to predict health outcomes may differ. Nutrition scores have the potential to include measures of both consumption and laboratory and physical measures of exposure.

5.
Clin Nutr ESPEN ; 42: 221-226, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33745583

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Obesity/overweight is a public health problem globally. Dietary induced inflammation is among the most critical risk factors modulating overweight/obesity. Some people genetically are at higher risk for obesity/overweight. The first gene contributing to conventional forms of human obesity is the FTO gene. The associations between genes like the FTO, inflammation, and obesity/overweight have been investigated in limited studies. We aimed to investigate the association between the dietary inflammatory index (DII) and odds of obesity/overweight in adults with rs9939609 polymorphism of the FTO gene. METHODS: A valid 168-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake. To investigate the role of diet in the development of inflammation, we used the DII, which is predictive of serum inflammatory markers' levels. The Inclusion criteria were defined as body mass index (BMI) from 24.9 to 29.9 kg/m2, age from 20 to 45 years, not participating in a weight management program during two past months, and no weight loss greater than 5%. We determined the genotypes of FTO rs9939609 polymorphism via amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) in a retrospective chart review. RESULTS: Results obtained from modeling the DII as a continuous variable and odds of obesity/overweight showed a significant association after multivariate adjustment for sex, height, fat mass, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and total energy intake (OR = 2.83 CI = 1.16-6.91). In addition, logistic regression models with the DII as a dichotomous variable adjusting for sex, height, fat mass, SBP, and total energy intake showed subjects with the DII score<0.49 were at 2.5 times higher odds of having overweight compared to subjects with the DII ≥0.49 (ORDII<0.49/≥0.49 = 2.44 CI = 1.12-5.32). CONCLUSION: Dietary induced inflammation significantly is related to odds of overweight in adults with rs9939609 polymorphism of the FTO gene. Suggesting an anti-inflammatory diet containing vitamins and minerals such as vitamin A, thiamine, niacin, and zinc, manganese, and selenium and recommending a reduction in the most inflammatory factors of diet, including saturated and trans fatty acids, could be a new strategy in the treatment and or controlling of obesity/overweight as a public health problem.

6.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 113(4): 895-904, 2021 04 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33721014

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Nutrition in pregnancy and accelerated childhood growth are important predictors of obesity risk. Yet, it is unknown which dietary patterns in pregnancy are associated with accelerated growth and whether there are specific periods from birth to adolescence that are most sensitive to these associations. OBJECTIVES: To examine the extent to which 3 dietary indices in pregnancy [Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII), Alternate Healthy Eating Index for Pregnancy (AHEI-P), and Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS)] are associated with child BMI z-score (BMI-z) trajectories from birth to adolescence. METHODS: We examined 1459 mother-child dyads from Project Viva that had FFQ data in pregnancy and ≥3 child BMI-z measurements between birth and adolescence. We used linear spline mixed-effects models to examine whether BMI-z growth rates and BMI z-scores differed by quartile of each dietary index from birth to 1 mo, 1-6 mo, 6 mo to 3 y, 3-10 y, and >10 y. RESULTS: The means ± SDs for DII (range, -9 to +8 units), AHEI-P (range, 0-90 points), and MDS (range, 0-9 points) were -2.6 ± 1.4 units, 61 ± 10 points, and 4.6 ± 2.0 points, respectively. In adjusted models, children of women in the highest (vs. lowest) DII quartile had higher BMI-z growth rates between 3-10 y (ß, 0.03 SD units/y; 95% CI: 0.00-0.06) and higher BMI z-scores from 7 y through 10 y. Children of women with low adherence to a Mediterranean diet had higher BMI z-scores from 3 y through 15 y. Associations of AHEI-P with growth rates and BMI z-scores from birth through adolescence were null. CONCLUSIONS: A higher DII and a lower MDS in pregnancy, but not AHEI-P results, are associated with higher BMI-z trajectories during distinct growth periods from birth through adolescence. Identifying the specific dietary patterns in pregnancy associated with rapid weight gain in children could inform strategies to reduce child obesity.

7.
Int J Cancer ; 2021 Mar 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33783833

RESUMO

Diet, inflammation, and oxidative stress may be important in breast carcinogenesis, but evidence on the role of the inflammatory and pro-oxidative potential of dietary patterns is limited. Energy adjusted-Dietary Inflammatory Index (E-DII TM ) and dietary oxidative balance score (D-OBS) were calculated for 43,563 Sister Study cohort participants who completed a Block 1998 food frequency questionnaire at enrollment in 2003-2009 and satisfied eligibility criteria. D-OBS was validated using measured F2 -isoprostanes and metabolites. High E-DII score and low D-OBS represent a more pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant diet, respectively, and associations of quartiles of each index with breast cancer (BC) risk were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. There were 2,619 BCs diagnosed at least 1 year after enrollment (mean follow-up 8.4 years). There was no overall association between E-DII and BC risk, whereas there was a suggestive inverse association for the highest versus lowest quartile of D-OBS (HR 0.92 [95% CI, 0.81-1.03]). The highest quartile of E-DII was associated with risk of triple-negative BC (HR 1.53 [95% CI, 0.99-2.35]). When the two indices were combined, a pro-inflammatory/pro-oxidant diet (highest tertile of E-DII and lowest tertile of D-OBS) was associated with increased risk for all BC (HR 1.13 [95% CI, 1.00-1.27]) and for triple-negative BC (1.72 [95% CI, 1.10-2.70]), compared with an anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant diet (lowest tertile of E-DII and highest tertile of D-OBS). Diets with increased inflammatory potential and reduced oxidative balance were positively associated with overall and triple-negative BC.

8.
Public Health Nutr ; : 1-21, 2021 Mar 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33722328

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Many arthritic patients have the belief that dietary habits can worsen or ameliorate their symptoms. Whether diet quality can modify the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an issue of continued scientific debate and interest. Therefore, we aimed to examine the association between both overall diet quality and the overall diet inflammatory potential on the risk of RA. DESIGN: Overall diet quality and the overall inflammatory potential of the diet were evaluated with the use of Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) and the Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2015, respectively. Both DII and HEI-2015 scores were calculated based on a validated semi-quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Multivariable-adjusted odds of RA were calculated across tertiles of HEI, and Energy-adjusted DII (E-DII) scores using binary logistic regression. SETTING: Mashhad, Iran. PARTICIPANTS: 50 newly diagnosed RA cases and 100 well-matched healthy people controls. RESULTS: Individuals in the highest tertile of DII scores, indicating the most pro-inflammatory diet, were about three times more likely to have RA than those in the lowest tertile (Odds Ratio: 2.99; 95%CI: 1.08 to 8.24; P-trend:0.037), whereas individuals in the highest tertile of HEI scores, indicating more top dietary quality, had a significantly lower odds of RA than those in the lowest tertile (Odds Ratio: 0.33; 95%CI: 0.12 to 0.87; P-trend:0.024). CONCLUSION: Our findings show that E-DII and HEI-2015 are positively and negatively associated, respectively, with the odds of RA in a convenience sample of Iranians. These results highlight the importance of overall diet quality in modulating the risk of RA.

9.
Eur J Nutr ; 2021 Mar 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33738534

RESUMO

PURPOSE: We investigated the association between the inflammatory potential of the diet and hearing loss in the context of aging. METHODS: We studied 3435 French adults enrolled in the SU.VI.MAX 2 (2007-2009) cohort. The inflammatory potential of the diet was estimated by the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®) using ≥ 3 baseline 24-h dietary records. Subjective hearing loss was assessed after a mean of 12.5 ± 0.7 years by 3 individual items (ability to carry a conversation in a noisy setting, frequently asking for repetition, and need to increase the television/radio volume) and by a composite score, dichotomized for analyses. We fit sex-specific multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: Compared with males, females had higher DII scores (i.e., more pro-inflammatory diet) and less subjective hearing loss. Among males, a significant positive association between DII (continuous scale) and inability to carry a conversation in a noisy setting was found (OR = 1.10; 95% CI 1.02, 1.18), while the opposite was seen among females (OR = 0.92; 95% CI 0.87, 0.98). Regarding the need to turn up the television/radio volume, a significant positive association with DII (continuous scale) was found only among males (OR = 1.09; 95% CI 1.01, 1.18). A significant association with the subjective hearing loss composite score was found among females (ORQ3 vs Q1 = 0.74; 95% CI 0.57, 0.97). CONCLUSION: The findings among males supported the hypothesis that a pro-inflammatory diet could increase risk of hearing loss, whereas the findings among females were unexpected. This study could provide impetus for future research in sensory disability and aging. TRIAL REGISTRATION: www.clinicaltrials.gov # NCT00272428.

10.
Eur J Nutr ; 2021 Feb 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33575861

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To investigate the relationship of Children's Dietary Inflammatory Index (C-DII™) scores with body fat distribution and serum adipokines in Brazilian schoolchildren. METHODS: This population-based cross-sectional study enrolled 378 schoolchildren aged 8 and 9 years from Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Food consumption was assessed using three 24-h dietary recalls from which C-DII scores were calculated. Serum adipokines [adiponectin, leptin, retinal-binding protein 4 (RBP4), and chemerin] were analyzed in blood samples. Sociodemographic characteristics and sedentary behavior were assessed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Total, truncal, android and gynoid body fat were evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We compared the distributions of adiposity measures and serum adipokines by C-DII categories with linear regression, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: The mean sample C-DII was 0.59 ± 0.94 and ranged from - 2.16 to + 2.75. The C-DII was not associated with central and total body fat. However, the C-DII was modestly inversely associated with adiponectin and RBP4, and modestly directly associated with chemerin. These results remained significant after adjusting for body fat. Every 1 SD of C-DII was related, respectively, to a - 0.8 (- 1.5, - 0.03) and to a - 0.1 (- 0.2, - 0.05) units lower mean of adiponectin and RBP4, and to 7.2 (0.3, 14.1) units higher of chemerin. CONCLUSION: Higher C-DII score was modestly inversely and directly associated with anti- and pro-inflammatory adipokines, respectively, in Brazilian children. The development of public health policies is needed to promote healthy eating habits during childhood to prevent the early onset of systemic inflammation and ill health effects later in life.

11.
Int J Clin Pract ; : e14061, 2021 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33523533

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Overweight, obesity and lack of sleep quality as inflammatory states are the common problems amongst college students and the Association of Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) with these problems amongst this population is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of the DII with obesity and sleep quality amongst Iranian female students. METHODS: The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 249 female college students. The Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) was calculated using a valid and reliable 147-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). To assess sleep quality, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used. Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) were estimated for anthropometric indices and sleep quality according to the DII score. Linear regression was used to estimate the relationship between DII score with sleep and anthropometric indices. RESULTS: There was a significant association evident between DII and sleep quality (>5 is considered as poor quality of sleep); ie, the odds ratios between DII quartile 2 vs 1 (unadjusted model: OR = 0.33 (CI: 0.14-0.74), P for trend = .002; model 1: the fully adjusted OR = 0.31(CI: 0.12-0.78), P for trend = .005; model 2:OR = 0.30 (CI: 0.12-0.78), P for trend = .005) to quartile 4(unadjusted model: OR = 1.13(CI: 0.45-2.80); model 1: OR = 1.11(CI: 0.44-2.79); model 2:OR = 1.13(CI: 0.44-2.87), P for trend = .005). Also, odds ratios increased significantly from quartile 2 to quartile 4 in all models for DII and sleep quality. According to the continuous score of DII, there was a significant positive association between DII and sleep quality in all three models: unadjusted, model 1, and model 2 (OR = 1.21 (CI: 1.05-1.40), OR = 1.21 (CI: 1.03-1.43), and OR = 1.22 (CI: 1.03-1.44), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, after removing the effect of confounding factors, participants in the highest quartile of DII score had significantly higher PSQI global score.

12.
Urol Oncol ; 2021 Feb 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33563536

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Several biologic mechanisms, including inflammation and immune changes, have been proposed to explain the role of obesity in prostate cancer (CaP) progression. Compared to men of a healthy weight, overweight and obese men are more likely to have CaP recurrence post-prostatectomy. Obesity is related to inflammation and immune dysregulation; thus, weight loss may be an avenue to reduce inflammation and reverse these immune processes. OBJECTIVES: This study explores the reversibility of the biological mechanisms through intentional weight loss using a comprehensive weight management program in men undergoing prostatectomy. Outcomes include blood and tissue biomarkers, microtumor environment gene expression, inflammation markers and Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) scores. METHODS: Twenty overweight men undergoing prostatectomy participated in this study. Fifteen men chose the intervention and 5 men chose the nonintervention group. The intervention consisted of a comprehensive weight loss program prior to prostatectomy and a weight maintenance program following surgery. Prostate tissue samples were obtained from diagnostic biopsies before the intervention and prostatectomy samples after weight loss. Blood samples and diet records were collected at baseline, pre-surgery after weight loss and at study end after weight maintenance. Immunohistochemistry and NanoString analysis were used to analyze the tissue samples. Flow cytometry was used to assess circulating immune markers. Inflammation markers were measured using Luminex panels. RESULTS: The intervention group lost >5% body weight prior to surgery. DII scores improved during the weight loss intervention from baseline to pre-surgery (P = 0.002); and between group differences were significant (P = 0.02). DII scores were not associated with IL-6 nor hsCRP. In the intervention, CXCL12, CXCR7, and CXCR4 (C-X-C motif chemokine ligand/receptor) and Ki67 expression decreased in the prostate tissue from biopsy to surgery (P = 0.06), yet plasma CXCL12 increased during the same timeframe (P = 0.009). The downregulation of several genes (FDR<0.001) was observed in the intervention compared to the non-intervention. Changes in immune cells were not significant in either group. CONCLUSION: This feasibility study demonstrates that in overweight men with localized CaP, weight loss alters blood, and tissue biomarkers, as well as tumor gene expression. More research is needed to determine the biological and clinical significance of these findings.

13.
BMC Med ; 19(1): 33, 2021 Feb 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33612114

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mounting evidence suggests that maternal diet influences pregnancy and birth outcomes, but its contribution to the global epidemic of childhood obesity has not as yet been definitively characterized. We investigated whether maternal whole diet quality and inflammatory potential influence childhood adiposity. METHODS: We harmonized and pooled individual participant data from 16,295 mother-child pairs in seven European birth cohorts. Maternal pre-, early-, late-, and whole-pregnancy (any time during pregnancy) dietary quality and inflammatory potential assessed with the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score and the energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index (E-DII™) score, respectively. Primary outcome was childhood overweight and obesity (OWOB) (age-and-sex-specific BMI z-score > 85th percentile). Secondary outcomes were sum of skinfold thickness (SST), fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI). We used multivariable regression analyses (adjusting for maternal lifestyle and sociodemographic factors) to assess the associations of maternal DASH and E-DII scores with offspring adiposity outcomes in cohort-specific analyses, with subsequent random-effect meta-analyses. RESULTS: The study mothers had a mean (SD) age of 30.2 (4.6) years and a mean BMI of 23.4 (4.2) kg/m2. Higher early-pregnancy E-DII scores (more pro-inflammatory diet) tended to be associated with a higher odds of late-childhood [10.6 (1.2) years] OWOB [OR (95% CI) 1.09 (1.00, 1.19) per 1-SD E-DII score increase], whereas an inverse association was observed for late-pregnancy E-DII score and early-childhood [2.8 (0.3) years] OWOB [0.91 (0.83, 1.00)]. Higher maternal whole pregnancy DASH score (higher dietary quality) was associated with a lower odds of late-childhood OWOB [OR (95% CI) 0.92 (0.87, 0.98) per 1-SD DASH score increase]; associations were of similar magnitude for early and late-pregnancy [0.86 (0.72, 1.04) and 0.91 (0.85, 0.98), respectively]. These associations were robust in several sensitivity analyses and further adjustment for birth weight and childhood diet did not meaningfully alter the associations and conclusions. In two cohorts with available data, a higher whole pregnancy E-DII and lower DASH scores were associated with a lower late-childhood FFMI in males and a higher mid-childhood FMI in females (P interactions < 0.10). CONCLUSIONS: A pro-inflammatory, low-quality maternal antenatal diet may adversely influence offspring body composition and OWOB risk, especially during late-childhood. Promoting an overall healthy and anti-inflammatory maternal dietary pattern may contribute to the prevention of childhood obesity, a complex health issue requiring multifaceted strategy.

14.
Int J Vitam Nutr Res ; : 1-9, 2021 Feb 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33593088

RESUMO

Chronic, systemic inflammation, which is associated with obesity and numerous other diseases, impairs iron status by increasing hepcidin concentration. Inflammation also decreases the concentration of transferrin, the main iron transport protein and a negative acute phase protein, which is indirectly assessed by measuring total iron binding capacity (TIBC). However, the contribution of diet-induced inflammation has not been studied. Data from two studies, namely Diet and Inflammation and Selenium and Inflammation Studies (total n=98) were used to assess the associations among Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®) scores derived from three-day dietary records, body mass index (BMI=weight[kg]/height[m]2), inflammatory and hematological markers among young adults with normal-weight, overweight or obesity. Subjects' diets were also categorized as less inflammatory diets (LID) and inflammatory diets (ID) using cluster analysis. Independent t-test and regression analyses were used to assess associations in the data. Intakes of iron, proteins, fat, fiber, and calories were higher in the LID group compared to the ID group (p<0.05). Demographic characteristics and concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and iron status biomarkers did not differ significantly between the two groups (p>0.05). Higher DII score was associated with increasing CRP (ß+SE=0.23+0.07, p=0.002) and lower TIBC (ß+SE=-8.46+3.44, p=0.02), independent of BMI category. The LID diet was associated with higher TIBC (ß+SE=29.87+10.75, p=0.007) compared to the ID diet. In conclusion, inflammatory diets may impair iron status by reducing the iron binding capacity of transferrin.

15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33398651

RESUMO

Inflammation provides a substrate for mechanisms that underlie the association of maternal diet during pregnancy with Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms in childhood. However, no previous study has quantified the proinflammatory potential of maternal diet as a risk factor for ADHD. Thus, we evaluated the association of maternal dietary inflammatory index (DII®) scores during pregnancy with ADHD symptoms in 4-year-old children born in two Mediterranean regions. We analyzed data from two population-based birth cohort studies-INMA (Environment and Childhood) four subcohorts in Spain (N = 2097), and RHEA study in Crete (Greece) (N = 444). The DII score of maternal diet was calculated based on validated food frequency questionnaires completed during pregnancy (12th and/or 32nd week of gestation). ADHD symptoms were assessed by ADHD-DSM-IV in INMA cohort and by ADHDT test in RHEA cohort, with questionnaires filled-out by teachers and parents, respectively. The associations between maternal DII and ADHD symptoms were analysed using multivariable-adjusted zero-inflated negative binomial regression models in each cohort study separately. Meta-analysis was conducted to combine data across the cohorts for fitting within one model. The DII was significantly higher in RHEA (RHEA = 2.09 [1.94, 2.24]) in comparison to INMA subcohorts (Asturias = - 1.52 [- 1.67, - 1.38]; Gipuzkoa = - 1.48 [- 1.64, - 1.33]; Sabadell = - 0.95 [- 1.07, - 0.83]; Valencia = - 0.76 [- 0.90, - 0.62]). Statistically significant reduced risk of inattention symptomatology (OR = 0.86; CI 95% = 0.77-0.96), hyperactivity symptomatology (OR = 0.82; CI 95% = 0.72-0.92) and total ADHD symptomatology (OR = 0.82; CI 95% = - 0.72 to 0.93) were observed with increased maternal DII in boys. No statistically significant associations were observed in girls between maternal DII and inattention, hyperactivity and total ADHD symptomatology. We found reduced risk of ADHD symptomatology with increased DII only in boys. This relationship requires further exploration in other settings.

16.
Biol Res Nurs ; : 1099800420985615, 2021 Jan 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33511855

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Inflammation is a common factor in adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs). Behavioral factors influence inflammatory markers and APOs but rarely have been investigated simultaneously in pregnancy. Our purpose was to determine how diet, physical activity, and obesity are associated with interleukin (IL)-6 in early and late pregnancy. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of 49 overweight/obese pregnant women. Health behavior data, including diet quality using the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®); physical activity (Leisure Time Physical Activity scale); body mass index (BMI); and plasma IL-6 concentrations were collected at 13-16 weeks (early pregnancy) and 34-36 weeks (late pregnancy) gestation. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to determine the amount of variance explained in early and late pregnancy IL-6 concentrations by early and late pregnancy diet, physical activity, and BMI. RESULTS: Early diet and early BMI were the strongest predictors of early IL-6 concentrations (R2 = 0.43; p < .001) and late IL-6 concentrations (R2 = 0.30; p < .001). Late BMI predicted late IL-6 (R2 = .11; p = .02). Change in diet over pregnancy predicted late IL-6 (R2 = 0.17; p = .03). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that maternal diet and BMI in early pregnancy, which likely reflects prepregnancy status, may have a greater impact on inflammatory processes than factors later in pregnancy. Future work should assess if behavioral factors before pregnancy produce similar relationships to those reported here, which may clarify the timing and type of lifestyle interventions to effectively reduce APOs.

17.
PLoS Med ; 18(1): e1003491, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33476335

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Adverse birth outcomes are major causes of morbidity and mortality during childhood and associate with a higher risk of noncommunicable diseases in adult life. Maternal periconception and antenatal nutrition, mostly focusing on single nutrients or foods, has been shown to influence infant birth outcomes. However, evidence on whole diet that considers complex nutrient and food interaction is rare and conflicting. We aim to elucidate the influence of whole-diet maternal dietary inflammatory potential and quality during periconceptional and antenatal periods on birth outcomes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We harmonized and pooled individual participant data (IPD) from up to 24,861 mother-child pairs in 7 European mother-offspring cohorts [cohort name, country (recruitment dates): ALSPAC, UK (1 April 1991 to 31 December 1992); EDEN, France (27 January 2003 to 6 March 2006); Generation R, the Netherlands (1 April 2002 to 31 January 2006); Lifeways, Ireland (2 October 2001 to 4 April 2003); REPRO_PL, Poland (18 September 2007 to 16 December 2011); ROLO, Ireland (1 January 2007 to 1 January 2011); SWS, United Kingdom (6 April 1998 to 17 December 2002)]. Maternal diets were assessed preconceptionally (n = 2 cohorts) and antenatally (n = 7 cohorts). Maternal dietary inflammatory potential and quality were ranked using the energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index (E-DII) and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) index, respectively. Primary outcomes were birth weight and gestational age at birth. Adverse birth outcomes, i.e., low birth weight (LBW), macrosomia, small-for-gestational-age (SGA), large-for-gestational-age (LGA), preterm and postterm births were defined according to standard clinical cutoffs. Associations of maternal E-DII and DASH scores with infant birth outcomes were assessed using cohort-specific multivariable regression analyses (adjusted for confounders including maternal education, ethnicity, prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), maternal height, parity, cigarettes smoking, and alcohol consumption), with subsequent random-effects meta-analyses. Overall, the study mothers had a mean ± SD age of 29.5 ± 4.9 y at delivery and a mean BMI of 23.3 ± 4.2 kg/m2. Higher pregnancy DASH score (higher dietary quality) was associated with higher birth weight [ß(95% CI) = 18.5(5.7, 31.3) g per 1-SD higher DASH score; P value = 0.005] and head circumference [0.03(0.01, 0.06) cm; P value = 0.004], longer birth length [0.05(0.01, 0.10) cm; P value = 0.010], and lower risk of delivering LBW [odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) = 0.89(0.82, 0.95); P value = 0.001] and SGA [0.87(0.82, 0.94); P value < 0.001] infants. Higher maternal prepregnancy E-DII score (more pro-inflammatory diet) was associated with lower birth weight [ß(95% CI) = -18.7(-34.8, -2.6) g per 1-SD higher E-DII score; P value = 0.023] and shorter birth length [-0.07(-0.14, -0.01) cm; P value = 0.031], whereas higher pregnancy E-DII score was associated with a shorter birth length [-0.06(-0.10, -0.01) cm; P value = 0.026] and higher risk of SGA [OR(95% CI) = 1.18(1.11, 1.26); P value < 0.001]. In male, but not female, infants higher maternal prepregnancy E-DII was associated with lower birth weight and head circumference, shorter birth length, and higher risk of SGA (P-for-sex-interaction = 0.029, 0.059, 0.104, and 0.075, respectively). No consistent associations were observed for maternal E-DII and DASH scores with gestational age, preterm and postterm birth, or macrosomia and LGA. Limitations of this study were that self-reported dietary data might have increased nondifferential measurement error and that causality cannot be claimed definitely with observational design. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort study, we observed that maternal diet that is of low quality and high inflammatory potential is associated with lower offspring birth size and higher risk of offspring being born SGA in this multicenter meta-analysis using harmonized IPD. Improving overall maternal dietary pattern based on predefined criteria may optimize fetal growth and avert substantial healthcare burden associated with adverse birth outcomes.

18.
Biol Psychiatry ; 89(6): 550-559, 2021 Mar 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33358009

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The impact of maternal diet during pregnancy on child neurodevelopment is of public health and clinical relevance. We evaluated the associations of dietary quality based on the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score and dietary inflammatory potential based on the energy-adjusted Dietary Inflammatory Index (E-DII) score during pregnancy with emotional and behavioral symptoms of offspring at 7 to 10 years of age. METHODS: Individual participant data for 11,870 mother-child pairs from four European cohorts participating in the ALPHABET project were analyzed. Maternal antenatal DASH and E-DII scores were generated from self-completed food frequency questionnaires. Symptoms of depression and anxiety, aggressive behavior, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children were assessed using mother-reported tests and classified within the normal or borderline/clinical ranges using validated cutoffs. Adjusted odds ratios were determined by multivariable logistic regression models and aggregated by the two-level individual participant data meta-analysis method. RESULTS: Higher maternal DASH scores (indicating better dietary quality) were associated with lower risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms, aggressive behavior symptoms, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms within the borderline/clinical ranges: odds ratio [OR] 0.97, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.95-0.99; OR 0.97, 95% CI, 0.94-0.99; OR 0.97, 95% CI, 0.95-0.98, per one-unit DASH score increase, respectively. For depression and anxiety, aggressive behavior, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms, a one-unit increase in E-DII scores (a more proinflammatory diet) was associated with a 7% increased risk of all three analyzed emotional and behavioral symptoms: OR 1.07, 95% CI, 1.03-1.11; OR 1.07, 95% CI, 1.02-1.13; OR 1.07, 95% CI, 1.01-1.13, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a maternal low-quality and proinflammatory diet may increase the risk of emotional and behavioral symptoms in children.

19.
Nutrients ; 12(12)2020 Nov 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33261143

RESUMO

There is limited evidence about the inflammatory potential of diet in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the Children's Dietary Inflammatory Index (C-DII) from 5 to 11 years with adiposity and inflammatory biomarkers in Mexican children. We analyzed 726 children from a birth cohort study with complete dietary information and measurements to evaluate adiposity at 5, 7 and 11 y and 286 children with IL-6, hsCRP, leptin and adiponectin information at 11 y. C-DII trajectories were estimated using latent class linear mixed models. We used linear mixed models for adiposity and logistic and multinomial regression for biomarkers. In girls, each one-point increase in C-DII score was associated with greater adiposity (abdominal-circumference 0.41%, p = 0.03; skinfold-sum 1.76%, p = 0.01; and BMI Z-score 0.05, p = 0.01). At 11 y the C-DII was associated with greater leptin (34% ≥ 13.0 ng/mL, p = 0.03) and hsCRP concentrations (29% ≥ 3.00 mg/L, p = 0.06) and lower adiponectin/leptin ratio (75% < 2.45, p = 0.02). C-DII trajectory 3 in boys was associated with a 75.2% (p < 0.01) increase in leptin concentrations and a 37.9% decrease (p = 0.02) in the adiponectin/leptin ratio. This study suggests that the inflammatory potential of diet may influence adiposity in girls and the homeostasis of adipose tissue and chronic subclinical inflammation in 11-year-old children.

20.
Cancer Control ; 27(1): 1073274820977203, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33269602

RESUMO

The association between inflammatory properties of diet and ovarian cancer risk has been investigated in some Western populations. However, little evidence is available from Asian women whose ovarian cancer incidence rates are low and dietary and lifestyle patterns are very different from their Western counterparts. We aimed to examine whether more pro-inflammatory diets, as indicated by higher dietary inflammatory index (DII®) scores, are associated with increased odds of epithelial ovarian cancer in southern China. A case-control study was conducted during 2006-2008 in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province. Energy-adjusted DII (E-DII) scores were calculated based on dietary intake assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire administered to 500 incident epithelial ovarian cancer patients and 500 hospital-based controls. Logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship between E-DII scores and odds of ovarian cancer. Positive associations were observed between higher E-DII scores and ovarian cancer odds, using both continuous DII scores (odds ratio (OR) 1.87; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.65, 2.13) and by DII tertiles (ORtertile3vs1 7.04, 95% CI: 4.70, 10.54, p for trend < 0.001). Likewise, a more pro-inflammatory diet was associated with a higher chance of serous and mucinous ovarian tumors. Our results suggest that a pro-inflammatory diet was associated with increased odds of developing epithelial ovarian cancer in southern Chinese women. The findings add to epidemiological evidence for the role of dietary inflammatory potential in ovarian cancer development.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...