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1.
Am J Epidemiol ; 2020 Oct 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33034339

RESUMO

Depression is a leading cause of disability in the United States, but its impact on mortality among racially diverse, low-socioeconomic populations is largely unknown. Using data from the Southern Community Cohort Study, 2002-2015, we prospectively evaluated the associations of depressive symptoms with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in 67,781 black (72.3%) and white (27.7%) adults, predominantly with a low-socioeconomic status. Baseline depressive symptoms were assessed using the ten-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. The median follow-up time was 10.0 years. Multivariate Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for mortality in association with depressive symptoms. Mild/moderate/severe depressive symptoms were associated with increased all-cause (HR=1.12, 95%CI: 1.03-1.22; HR=1.17, 95%CI: 1.06-1.29; HR=1.15, 95%CI: 1.03-1.28, respectively) and cardiovascular disease mortality (HR=1.23, 95%CI: 1.05-1.44; HR=1.18, 95%CI: 0.98-1.42; HR=1.43, 95%CI: 1.17-1.75, respectively) in whites but not in blacks (Pinteraction< 0.001, for both). Mild/moderate/severe depressive symptoms were associated with increased external cause mortality in both races (HR=1.24, 95%CI: 1.05-1.46; HR=1.31, 95%CI: 1.06-1.61; HR=1.42, 95%CI: 1.11-1.81, respectively; for all subjects, Pinteraction=0.48). No association was observed for cancer mortality. Our study showed that depression-mortality associations differed by race and cause of death in individuals with a low-socioeconomic status.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32915323

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Diets with a high glycemic load (GL) or glycemic index (GI) may increase cancer risk. Findings from prior studies on the relationship between GL, GI, and lung cancer risk are inconsistent. We investigated this relationship in a large prospective cohort. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Southern Community Cohort Study, a prospective cohort that includes diverse racial groups predominantly low-income adults aged 40-79 in 12 southeastern states of the USA. We estimated dietary GL and GI values using data collected from food frequency questionnaires at baseline. Dietary GL and GI were energy adjusted by residual method and categorized into sex-specific quintiles. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to assess the associations between dietary GL, GI, and lung cancer risk. We further performed stratified analyses by various factors. RESULTS: Intakes of individual food items or food groups that commonly contribute to GL were similar between blacks and whites in the cohort. After excluding the first two years of follow-up, 947 incident lung cancers were ascertained among 55,068 participants. Neither dietary GL nor GI was significantly associated with incident lung cancer risk in the overall population (GL: Q5 vs. Q1, HR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.72-1.07, ptrend = 0.29; GI: Q5 vs. Q1, HR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.86-1.30, ptrend = 0.71), nor in subgroups of populations (ptrend > 0.05), in multivariable-adjusted analyses. CONCLUSION: Dietary GL and GI were not independently associated with incident lung cancer risk in a large understudied population.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32958499

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer. No studies yet have attempted to replicate these SNPs in US minority populations. We aimed to replicate the associations of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs with pancreatic cancer and build and test a polygenic risk score (PRS) for pancreatic cancer in an ethnically diverse population. METHODS: We evaluated 31 risk variants in the Multiethnic Cohort and the Southern Community Cohort Study. We included 691 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cases and 13,778 controls from African-American, Japanese-American, Latino, Native Hawaiian, and white participants. We tested the association between each SNP and PDAC, established a PRS using the 31 SNPs, and tested the association between the score and PDAC risk. RESULTS: Eleven of the 31 SNPs were replicated in the multiethnic sample. The PRS was associated with PDAC risk [OR top vs. middle quintile = 2.25 (95% confidence interval, 1.73-2.92)]. Notably, the PRS was associated with PDAC risk in all ethnic groups except Native Hawaiian (OR per risk allele ranged from 1.33 in Native Hawaiians to 1.91 in African Americans; P heterogeneity = 0.12). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to replicate 11 of the 31 GWAS-identified risk variants for pancreatic cancer in multiethnic populations, including African Americans, Japanese Americans, and Latinos. Our results also suggest a potential utility of PRS with GWAS-identified risk variants for the identification of individuals at increased risk for PDAC across multiple ethnic groups. IMPACT: PRS can potentially be used to stratify pancreatic cancer risk across multiple ethnic groups.

4.
BMC Cancer ; 20(1): 880, 2020 Sep 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32928150

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoking is associated with a unique mutational signature in the human cancer genome. It is unclear whether tobacco smoking-altered DNA methylations and gene expressions affect smoking-related mutational signature. METHODS: We systematically analyzed the smoking-related DNA methylation sites reported from five previous casecontrol studies in peripheral blood cells to identify possible target genes. Using the mediation analysis approach, we evaluated whether the association of tobacco smoking with mutational signature is mediated through altered DNA methylation and expression of these target genes in lung adenocarcinoma tumor tissues. RESULTS: Based on data obtained from 21,108 blood samples, we identified 374 smoking-related DNA methylation sites, annotated to 248 target genes. Using data from DNA methylations, gene expressions and smoking-related mutational signature generated from ~ 7700 tumor tissue samples across 26 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we found 11 of the 248 target genes whose expressions were associated with smoking-related mutational signature at a Bonferroni-correction P < 0.001. This included four for head and neck cancer, and seven for lung adenocarcinoma. In lung adenocarcinoma, our results showed that smoking increased the expression of three genes, AHRR, GPR15, and HDGF, and decreased the expression of two genes, CAPN8, and RPS6KA1, which were consequently associated with increased smoking-related mutational signature. Additional evidence showed that the elevated expression of AHRR and GPR15 were associated with smoking-altered hypomethylations at cg14817490 and cg19859270, respectively, in lung adenocarcinoma tumor tissues. Lastly, we showed that decreased expression of RPS6KA1, were associated with poor survival of lung cancer patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide novel insight into the contributions of tobacco smoking to carcinogenesis through the underlying mechanisms of the elevated mutational signature by altered DNA methylations and gene expressions.

5.
Cancer ; 2020 Sep 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32895938

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although racial disparities in prostate cancer survival are well documented, the relative importance of contributing factors remains unclear. Few studies have examined the disparity between Whites and Hispanics or between Whites and Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). METHODS: Using data from the National Cancer Database for 526,690 patients with prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy between 2004 and 2014, this study systematically evaluated the impact of clinical characteristics and factors related to access to care on survival by race. Included in the analysis were 432,640 White patients (82.1%), 63,602 Black patients (12.1%), 8990 AAPI patients (1.7%), and 21,458 Hispanic patients (4.1%). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals to measure racial survival disparities. Inverse probability weighting was used to adjust for imbalances of prognostic factors. RESULTS: When adjustments were made for age and year of diagnosis only, Blacks had 51% higher mortality, AAPIs had 22% lower mortality, and Hispanics had 6% lower mortality than Whites. Overall, with adjustments for all clinical factors and nonclinical factors, the Black-White survival disparity narrowed to 20%, whereas the AAPI-White disparity increased to 35%. Among the controlled-for factors, education, median household income, and insurance status contributed the most to the racial disparity. CONCLUSIONS: The overall survival disparity among men undergoing radical prostatectomy was significantly decreased, but not eliminated, for Blacks and significantly increased for AAPIs in comparison with Whites after adjustments for a number of clinical factors and factors related to access to care.

6.
Surg Obes Relat Dis ; 2020 Jun 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32747219

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Evidence from longitudinal patient studies regarding gut microbial changes after bariatric surgery is limited. OBJECTIVE: To examine intraindividual changes in fecal microbiome and metabolites among patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or vertical sleeve gastrectomy. SETTING: Observational study. METHODS: Twenty patients were enrolled and provided stool samples before and 1 week, 1 month, and/or 3 months after surgery. Shallow shotgun metagenomics and untargeted fecal metabolomics were performed. Zero-inflated generalized additive models and linear mixed models were applied to identify fecal microbiome and metabolites changes, with adjustment for potential confounders and correction for multiple testing. RESULTS: We enrolled 16 women and 4 men, including 16 white and 4 black participants (median age = 45 years; presurgery body mass index = 47.7 kg/m2). Ten patients had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 10 had vertical sleeve gastrectomy, and 14 patients provided postsurgery stool samples. Of 47 samples, median sequencing depth was 6.3 million reads and 1073 metabolites were identified. Microbiome alpha-diversity increased after surgery, especially at 3 months. Significant genus-level changes included increases in Odoribacter, Streptococcus, Anaerotruncus, Alistipes, Klebsiella, and Bifidobacterium, while decreases in Bacteroides, Coprocosccus, Dorea, and Faecalibacterium. Large increases in Streptococcus, Akkermansia, and Prevotella were observed at 3 months. Beta-diversity and fecal metabolites were also changed, including reduced caffeine metabolites, indoles, and butyrate. CONCLUSIONS: Despite small sample size and missing repeated samples in some participants, our pilot study showed significant postsurgery changes in fecal microbiome and metabolites among bariatric surgery patients. Future large-scale, longitudinal studies are warranted to investigate gut microbial changes and their associations with metabolic outcomes after bariatric surgery.

7.
Int J Cancer ; 2020 Aug 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32838477

RESUMO

Considerable controversies exist regarding whether elderly patients with early-stage breast cancer receiving breast-conserving surgery (BCS) should forgo radiotherapy. We utilized the National Cancer Database to analyze data of 115 516 women aged ≥70 years, treated with BCS for T1-2N0-1M0 breast cancer between 2004 and 2014. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for mortality 3, 5 and 10 years after 90 days of BCS associated with radiotherapy. Patients who received no radiotherapy had a higher mortality rate than those who received radiotherapy (5-year survival rate: 71.2% vs 83.8%), with multivariable-adjusted HRs of 1.65 (95% CI: 1.57-1.72) for 3-year mortality, 1.53 (1.47-1.58) for 5-year mortality and 1.43 (1.39-1.48) for 10-year mortality. The association held even for patients ≥90 years. This association was observed in all strata by reasons for radiotherapy omission, receipt of endocrine therapy or chemotherapy, calendar period and other clinical characteristics, with 40% to 65% increased 5-year mortality for patients without radiotherapy. This positive association persisted when analyses were restricted to patients with T1N0 and estrogen-receptor-positive disease who had received endocrine therapy (5-year mortality: HR 1.47 [1.39-1.57]) and in propensity score weighted analyses. Our study shows, in routine practice, elderly patients who received no post-BCS radiotherapy had higher total mortality than those who received radiotherapy. These findings suggest that the current recommendation of omission of post-BCS radiotherapy for elderly women with early-stage breast cancer may need to be reconsidered, particularly for those without contraindication.

8.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3905, 2020 08 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32764609

RESUMO

It remains elusive whether some of the associations identified in genome-wide association studies of prostate cancer (PrCa) may be due to regulatory effects of genetic variants on CpG sites, which may further influence expression of PrCa target genes. To search for CpG sites associated with PrCa risk, here we establish genetic models to predict methylation (N = 1,595) and conduct association analyses with PrCa risk (79,194 cases and 61,112 controls). We identify 759 CpG sites showing an association, including 15 located at novel loci. Among those 759 CpG sites, methylation of 42 is associated with expression of 28 adjacent genes. Among 22 genes, 18 show an association with PrCa risk. Overall, 25 CpG sites show consistent association directions for the methylation-gene expression-PrCa pathway. We identify DNA methylation biomarkers associated with PrCa, and our findings suggest that specific CpG sites may influence PrCa via regulating expression of candidate PrCa target genes.


Assuntos
Biomarcadores Tumorais/genética , Metilação de DNA/genética , Neoplasias da Próstata/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Ilhas de CpG , Estudos de Associação Genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Genéticos , Fatores de Risco
9.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3833, 2020 07 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32737321

RESUMO

Polygenic risk scores (PRS) have been shown to predict breast cancer risk in European women, but their utility in Asian women is unclear. Here we evaluate the best performing PRSs for European-ancestry women using data from 17,262 breast cancer cases and 17,695 controls of Asian ancestry from 13 case-control studies, and 10,255 Chinese women from a prospective cohort (413 incident breast cancers). Compared to women in the middle quintile of the risk distribution, women in the highest 1% of PRS distribution have a ~2.7-fold risk and women in the lowest 1% of PRS distribution has ~0.4-fold risk of developing breast cancer. There is no evidence of heterogeneity in PRS performance in Chinese, Malay and Indian women. A PRS developed for European-ancestry women is also predictive of breast cancer risk in Asian women and can help in developing risk-stratified screening programmes in Asia.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/diagnóstico , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Herança Multifatorial , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Adulto , Idoso , Ásia/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/etnologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Razão de Chances , Prognóstico , Risco
10.
J Nutr ; 150(9): 2442-2450, 2020 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32692347

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Soy is commonly consumed in east Asian countries and is suggested to reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. However, results from epidemiologic studies are inconsistent, despite the anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative properties of soy isoflavones and soy protein. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the association between soy isoflavones and soy protein and CRC risk using 4 prospective cohort studies from China and Japan. METHODS: Data were pooled from the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS), Shanghai Men's Health Study (SMHS), Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study Cohort 1 (JPHC1), and Cohort 2 (JPHC2). Cox proportional hazards models estimated HRs and corresponding 95% CIs for the association of soy protein and isoflavone intake with CRC risk. The study included 205,060 individuals, among whom 2971 were diagnosed with incident CRC over an average follow-up of 12.7 y. RESULTS: No statistically significant associations with CRC risk were observed for soy protein or isoflavone intake. No association was observed among ever smokers consuming higher isoflavones (HRisoflavones: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.68, 1.00) and soy protein (HRsoy protein: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.39, 1.10). However, risk reductions were observed among premenopausal women with a body mass index [BMI (kg/m2)] <23.0 at baseline for higher isoflavone (HRisoflavones: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.34, 0.98). CONCLUSIONS: No evidence for an overall reduction in CRC risk by increasing soy food intake (i.e., protein or isoflavones) was observed. However, the association between soy and CRC risk may vary by BMI, smoking, and menopausal status among women. Future investigations are needed to further understand the biologic mechanisms observed.

11.
Int J Cancer ; 2020 Jul 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32638381

RESUMO

Evidence from animal models suggests that dietary fatty acids have both anticancer and tumor-promoting effects. Whether dietary fatty acids are associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in humans remains inconclusive. We investigated associations between dietary fatty acids and risk of CRC among 59 986 men who participated in the Shanghai Men's Health Study (SMHS), an ongoing population-based prospective cohort study. We identified 876 incident CRC cases in the SMHS during a mean follow-up of 9.8 years. Associations between dietary fatty acid intake and CRC risk were evaluated by Cox proportional hazard regression analyses. Consumption of saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was not significantly associated with CRC risk. Multivariate hazard ratios (HRs) and respective 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for Quartile 4 vs Quartile 1 were 0.92 (0.74-1.14; Ptrend = 0.47) for SFA, 0.95 (0.79-1.16; Ptrend = 0.74) for MUFA and 1.18 (0.95-1.46; Ptrend = 0.21) for PUFA. No significant associations were found for total n-6 PUFA or total n-3 PUFA. Additionally, we performed a meta-analysis to summarize results from the present study and 28 reports from 26 additional cohorts, which supported the overall null association between dietary fatty acid intake and CRC risk among men. Docosahexanoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid were associated with 11% to 12% reduced risk, and linoleic acid a 19% increased risk, of CRC in the meta-analysis of combined sexes. In conclusion, this population-based prospective study and meta-analysis of cohort studies found little evidence that dietary fatty acid intake was associated with risk of CRC in men.

12.
Cancer Res ; 80(18): 4004-4013, 2020 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32641412

RESUMO

Registry-based epidemiologic studies suggest associations between chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). As genetic susceptibility contributes to a large proportion of chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases, we hypothesize that the genomic regions surrounding established genome-wide associated variants for these chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with PDAC. We examined the association between PDAC and genomic regions (±500 kb) surrounding established common susceptibility variants for ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, chronic pancreatitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. We analyzed summary statistics from genome-wide association studies data for 8,384 cases and 11,955 controls of European descent from two large consortium studies using the summary data-based adaptive rank truncated product method to examine the overall association of combined genomic regions for each inflammatory disease group. Combined genomic susceptibility regions for ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and chronic pancreatitis were associated with PDAC at P values < 0.05 (0.0040, 0.0057, 0.011, and 3.4 × 10-6, respectively). After excluding the 20 PDAC susceptibility regions (±500 kb) previously identified by GWAS, the genomic regions for ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, and inflammatory bowel disease remained associated with PDAC (P = 0.0029, 0.0057, and 0.0098, respectively). Genomic regions for celiac disease (P = 0.22) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (P = 0.078) were not associated with PDAC. Our results support the hypothesis that genomic regions surrounding variants associated with inflammatory intestinal diseases, particularly, ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and chronic pancreatitis are associated with PDAC. SIGNIFICANCE: The joint effects of common variants in genomic regions containing susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease and chronic pancreatitis are associated with PDAC and may provide insights to understanding pancreatic cancer etiology.

13.
Tob Control ; 2020 Jun 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32546664

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the health harms associated with low-intensity smoking in Asians who, on average, smoke fewer cigarettes and start smoking at a later age than their Western counterparts. METHODS: In this pooled analysis of 738 013 Asians from 16 prospective cohorts, we quantified the associations of low-intensity (<5 cigarettes/day) and late initiation (≥35 years) of smoking with mortality outcomes. HRs and 95% CIs were estimated for each cohort by Cox regression. Cohort-specific HRs were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. FINDINGS: During a mean follow-up of 11.3 years, 92 068 deaths were ascertained. Compared with never smokers, current smokers who consumed <5 cigarettes/day or started smoking after age 35 years had a 16%-41% increased risk of all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), respiratory disease mortality and a >twofold risk of lung cancer mortality. Furthermore, current smokers who started smoking after age 35 and smoked <5 cigarettes/day had significantly elevated risks of all-cause (HRs (95% CIs)=1.14 (1.05 to 1.23)), CVD (1.27 (1.08 to 1.49)) and respiratory disease (1.54 (1.17 to 2.01)) mortality. Even smokers who smoked <5 cigarettes/day but quit smoking before the age of 45 years had a 16% elevated risk of all-cause mortality; however, the risk declined further with increasing duration of abstinence. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that smokers who smoked a small number of cigarettes or started smoking later in life also experienced significantly elevated all-cause and major cause-specific mortality but benefited from cessation. There is no safe way to smoke-not smoking is always the best choice.

15.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(9): 1784-1791, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32546605

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Obesity and diabetes are major modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Interactions between genetic variants and diabetes/obesity have not previously been comprehensively investigated in pancreatic cancer at the genome-wide level. METHODS: We conducted a gene-environment interaction (GxE) analysis including 8,255 cases and 11,900 controls from four pancreatic cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets (Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium I-III and Pancreatic Cancer Case Control Consortium). Obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) and diabetes (duration ≥3 years) were the environmental variables of interest. Approximately 870,000 SNPs (minor allele frequency ≥0.005, genotyped in at least one dataset) were analyzed. Case-control (CC), case-only (CO), and joint-effect test methods were used for SNP-level GxE analysis. As a complementary approach, gene-based GxE analysis was also performed. Age, sex, study site, and principal components accounting for population substructure were included as covariates. Meta-analysis was applied to combine individual GWAS summary statistics. RESULTS: No genome-wide significant interactions (departures from a log-additive odds model) with diabetes or obesity were detected at the SNP level by the CC or CO approaches. The joint-effect test detected numerous genome-wide significant GxE signals in the GWAS main effects top hit regions, but the significance diminished after adjusting for the GWAS top hits. In the gene-based analysis, a significant interaction of diabetes with variants in the FAM63A (family with sequence similarity 63 member A) gene (significance threshold P < 1.25 × 10-6) was observed in the meta-analysis (P GxE = 1.2 ×10-6, P Joint = 4.2 ×10-7). CONCLUSIONS: This analysis did not find significant GxE interactions at the SNP level but found one significant interaction with diabetes at the gene level. A larger sample size might unveil additional genetic factors via GxE scans. IMPACT: This study may contribute to discovering the mechanism of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer.

16.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(7): 1501-1508, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32439797

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal malignancies, with few known risk factors and biomarkers. Several blood protein biomarkers have been linked to PDAC in previous studies, but these studies have assessed only a limited number of biomarkers, usually in small samples. In this study, we evaluated associations of circulating protein levels and PDAC risk using genetic instruments. METHODS: To identify novel circulating protein biomarkers of PDAC, we studied 8,280 cases and 6,728 controls of European descent from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, using genetic instruments of protein quantitative trait loci. RESULTS: We observed associations between predicted concentrations of 38 proteins and PDAC risk at an FDR of < 0.05, including 23 of those proteins that showed an association even after Bonferroni correction. These include the protein encoded by ABO, which has been implicated as a potential target gene of PDAC risk variant. Eight of the identified proteins (LMA2L, TM11D, IP-10, ADH1B, STOM, TENC1, DOCK9, and CRBB2) were associated with PDAC risk after adjusting for previously reported PDAC risk variants (OR ranged from 0.79 to 1.52). Pathway enrichment analysis showed that the encoding genes for implicated proteins were significantly enriched in cancer-related pathways, such as STAT3 and IL15 production. CONCLUSIONS: We identified 38 candidates of protein biomarkers for PDAC risk. IMPACT: This study identifies novel protein biomarker candidates for PDAC, which if validated by additional studies, may contribute to the etiologic understanding of PDAC development.

17.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 181(2): 465-473, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32318955

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Limited studies have been conducted to evaluate pathogenetic mutations in breast cancer predisposition genes among Chinese women. To fully characterize germline mutations of these genes in this population, we used the whole-exome sequencing data in a population-based case-control study conducted in Shanghai, China. METHODS: We evaluated exonic, splicing, and copy number variants in 11 established and 14 candidate breast cancer predisposition genes in 831 invasive breast cancer cases and 839 controls. We identified 55 pathogenic variants, including 15 newly identified in this study. RESULTS: Approximately 8% of the cases and 0.6% of the cancer-free controls carried these pathogenetic variants (P = 3.05 × 10-15). Among cases, 3.7% had a BRCA2 pathogenic variant and 1.6% had a BRCA1 pathogenic variant, while 2.5% had a pathogenic variant in other genes including ATM, CHEK2, NBN, NF1, CDH1, PALB2, PTEN, TP53 as well as BARD1, BRIP, and RAD51D. Patients with BRCA1/2 pathogenic variants were more likely to have a family history of breast cancer and hormone receptor negative tumors compared with patients without pathogenic variants. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlighted the importance of hereditary breast cancer genes in the breast cancer etiology in this understudied population. Together with previous studies in East Asian women, this study suggested a relatively more prominent role of BRCA2 compared to BRCA1. This study also provides additional evidence to design cost-efficient genetic testing among Chinese women for risk assessment and early detection of breast cancer.

18.
Carcinogenesis ; 41(7): 887-893, 2020 Jul 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32267939

RESUMO

African American (AA) women have an excess breast cancer mortality than European American (EA) women. To investigate the contribution of tumor biology to this survival health disparity, we compared gene expression profiles in breast tumors using RNA sequencing data derived from 260 AA and 155 EA women who were prospectively enrolled in the Southern Community Cohort Study (SCCS) and developed breast cancer during follow-up. We identified 59 genes (54 protein-coding genes and 5 long intergenic non-coding RNAs) that were expressed differently between EA and AA at a stringent false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.01. A gene signature was derived with these 59 genes and externally validated using the publicly available Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data from180 AA and 838 EA breast cancer patients. Applying C-statistics, we found that this 59-gene signature has a high discriminative ability in distinguishing AA and EA breast cancer patients in the TCGA dataset (C-index = 0.81). These findings may provide new insight into tumor biological differences and the causes of the survival disparity between AA and EA breast cancer patients.

20.
Genet Med ; 22(6): 1088-1093, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32066870

RESUMO

PURPOSE: All women diagnosed with breast cancer (BC) ≤age 50 should be referred for genetic counseling (GC) and testing. We sought to compare differences in provider practices and access across a racially and ethnically diverse population of young BC survivors. METHODS: A registry-based sample of women diagnosed with invasive BC ≤age 50 from 2009 to 2012 was recruited through the Florida Cancer Registry, and completed a questionnaire and medical record release. Differences were compared across those tested with or without the involvement of a board-certified or credentialed genetics health professional (GHP) in (1) clinical and demographic variables and (2) pretest GC elements. RESULTS: Of 1622 participants, there were 440 Blacks, 285 Hispanics, and 897 Non-Hispanic Whites. Of 831 participants with medical record verification of testing provider, 170 (20%) had documentation of GHP involvement. Among the 613 who recalled a pretest discussion and had GC elements collected, those with GHP involvement were significantly more likely to recall the seven recognized GC elements. CONCLUSION: GHP involvement was associated with adherence to nationally recommended best practices. With the expanding importance of identifying inherited cancers, it is critical to ensure equitable access to best practices across all populations.

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