Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 110
Filtrar
1.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257270, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34529705

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The prominence of telemental health, including providing care by video call and telephone, has greatly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there are clear variations in uptake and acceptability, and concerns that digital exclusion may exacerbate previous inequalities in access to good quality care. Greater understanding is needed of how service users experience telemental health, and what determines whether they engage and find it acceptable. METHODS: We conducted a collaborative framework analysis of data from semi-structured interviews with a sample of people already experiencing mental health problems prior to the pandemic. Data relevant to participants' experiences and views regarding telemental health during the pandemic were identified and extracted. Data collection and analysis used a participatory, coproduction approach where researchers with relevant lived experience, contributed to all stages of data collection, analysis and interpretation of findings alongside clinical and academic researchers. FINDINGS: The experiences and preferences regarding telemental health care of the forty-four participants were dynamic and varied across time and settings, as well as between individuals. Participants' preferences were shaped by reasons for contacting services, their relationship with care providers, and both parties' access to technology and their individual preferences. While face-to-face care tended to be the preferred option, participants identified benefits of remote care including making care more accessible for some populations and improved efficiency for functional appointments such as prescription reviews. Participants highlighted important challenges related to safety and privacy in online settings, and gave examples of good remote care strategies they had experienced, including services scheduling regular phone calls and developing guidelines about how to access remote care tools. DISCUSSION: Participants in our study have highlighted advantages of telemental health care, as well as significant limitations that risk hindering mental health support and exacerbate inequalities in access to services. Some of these limitations are seen as potentially removable, for example through staff training or better digital access for staff or service users. Others indicate a need to maintain traditional face-to-face contact at least for some appointments. There is a clear need for care to be flexible and individualised to service user circumstances and preferences. Further research is needed on ways of minimising digital exclusion and of supporting staff in making effective and collaborative use of relevant technologies.


Assuntos
COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Atenção à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Serviços de Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Telemedicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/virologia , Atenção à Saúde/métodos , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental/normas , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde/normas , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , SARS-CoV-2/fisiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários/estatística & dados numéricos , Telemedicina/métodos , Adulto Jovem
2.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e050773, 2021 08 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34452966

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To implement and evaluate co-designed interventions to improve communication of positive newborn bloodspot screening results and make recommendations for future research and practice. DESIGN: A process evaluation underpinned by Normalisation Process Theory. SETTING: Three National Health Service provider organisations in England. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-four healthcare professionals (7 newborn screening laboratory staff and 24 clinicians) and 18 parents were interviewed. INTERVENTIONS: Three co-designed interventions were implemented in practice: standardised laboratory proformas, communication checklists and an email/letter template. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Acceptability and feasibility of the co-designed interventions. RESULTS: Auditing the implementation of these interventions revealed between 58%-76% of the items on the laboratory proforma and 43%-80% of items on the communication checklists were completed. Interviews with healthcare professionals who had used the interventions in practice provided positive feedback in relation to the purpose of the interventions and the ease of completion both of which were viewed as enhancing communication of positive newborn bloodspot screening results. Interviews with parents highlighted the perceived benefit of the co-designed interventions in terms of consistency, pacing and tailoring of information as well as providing reliable information to families following communication of the positive newborn bloodspot screening result. The process evaluation illuminated organisational and contextual barriers during implementation of the co-designed interventions in practice. CONCLUSION: Variations in communication practices for positive newborn bloodspot screening results continue to exist. The co-designed interventions could help to standardise communication of positive newborn screening results from laboratories to clinicians and from clinicians to parents which in turn could improve parents' experience of receiving a positive newborn bloodspot screening result. Implementation highlighted some organisational and contextual barriers to effective adoption of the co-designed interventions in practice. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN15330120.


Assuntos
Triagem Neonatal , Medicina Estatal , Comunicação , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Pais
3.
Health Expect ; 24(5): 1859-1867, 2021 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34382300

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In many jurisdictions worldwide, individuals with a mental illness may be forced to receive care and treatment in the community. In Australia, legislation states that such care should be driven by a care plan that is recovery-focussed. Key components in the care planning process include engagement and decision-making about a person's support needs and care options, with trust being an essential component of care planning relationships. OBJECTIVE: This study examines how these components were enacted during service care contacts for individuals on community treatment orders. METHODS: The study was located at two community mental health teams in South Australia. Ethnographic observations of care planning discussions between consumers, their carers and clinicians, and interviews with individuals from these groups, were conducted over 18 months. Carspecken's critical ethnography provided a rigorous means for examining the data to identify underlying cultural themes that were informing day-to-day care interactions. RESULTS: Care planning was not occurring as it was intended, with service culture and structures impeding the development of trusting relationships. Clinicians striving to work collaboratively with consumers had to navigate a service bias and culture that emphasized a hierarchy of 'knowing', with consumers assumed to have less knowledge than clinicians. CONCLUSIONS: Services and clinicians can challenge prejudicial ethical injustice and counter this through testimonial justice and implementation of tools and approaches that support genuine shared decision-making. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: This study included individuals with lived experience of mental illness, their carers and clinicians as participants and researchers.

4.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e047994, 2021 08 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34341046

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate systematically the fidelity of a peer-befriending intervention for people with aphasia. DESIGN: SUpporting wellbeing through Peer-befriending (SUPERB) was a feasibility randomised controlled trial comparing usual care to usual care +peer-befriending. This paper reports on the fidelity of all intervention aspects (training and supervision of providers/befrienders; intervention visits) which was evaluated across all areas of the Behaviour Change Consortium framework. SETTING: Community. PARTICIPANTS: People with aphasia early poststroke and low levels of distress, randomised to the intervention arm of the trial (n=28); 10 peer-befrienders at least 1-year poststroke. INTERVENTION: Peer-befrienders were trained (4-6 hours); and received regular supervision (monthly group while actively befriending, and one-to-one as and when needed) in order to provide six 1-hour peer-befriending visits over 3 months. MAIN MEASURES: Metrics included number and length of training, supervision sessions and visits. All training and supervision sessions and one (of six) visits per pair were rated against fidelity checklists and evaluated for inter-rater and intrarater reliability (Gwets AC1 agreement coefficient). Per-cent adherence to protocol was evaluated. RESULTS: All peer-befrienders received 4-6 hours training over 2-3 days as intended. There were 25 group supervision sessions with a median number attended of 14 (IQR=8-18). Twenty-six participants agreed (92.8%) to the intervention and 21 (80.8%) received all six visits (median visit length 60 min). Adherence was high for training (91.7%-100%) and supervision (83%-100%) and moderate-to-high for befriending visits (66.7%-100%). Where calculable, inter-rater and intrarater reliability was high for training and supervision (Gwets AC1 >0.90) and moderate-to-high for intervention visits (Gwets AC1 0.44-1.0). CONCLUSION: Planning of fidelity processes at the outset of the trial and monitoring throughout was feasible and ensured good-to-high fidelity for this peer-befriending intervention. The results permit confidence in other findings from the SUPERB trial. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02947776.


Assuntos
Afasia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Humanos , Grupo Associado , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
5.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e050308, 2021 08 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34408055

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The Solution Focused Brief Therapy in Post-Stroke Aphasia feasibility trial had four primary aims: to assess (1) acceptability of the intervention to people with aphasia, including severe aphasia, (2) feasibility of recruitment and retention, (3) acceptability of research procedures and outcome measures, and (4) feasibility of delivering the intervention by speech and language therapists. DESIGN: Two-group randomised controlled feasibility trial with wait-list design, blinded outcome assessors and nested qualitative research. SETTING: Participants identified via two community NHS Speech and Language Therapy London services and through community routes (eg, voluntary-sector stroke groups). PARTICIPANTS: People with aphasia at least 6 months post stroke. INTERVENTION: Solution-focused brief therapy, a psychological intervention, adapted to be linguistically accessible. Participants offered up to six sessions over 3 months, either immediately postrandomisation or after a delay of 6 months. OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary endpoints related to feasibility and acceptability. Clinical outcomes were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months postrandomisation, and at 9 months (wait-list group only). The candidate primary outcome measure was the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale. Participants and therapists also took part in in-depth interviews. RESULTS: Thirty-two participants were recruited, including 43.8% with severe aphasia. Acceptability endpoints: therapy was perceived as valuable and acceptable by both participants (n=30 interviews) and therapists (n=3 interviews); 93.8% of participants had ≥2 therapy sessions (90.6% had 6/6 sessions). Feasibility endpoints: recruitment target was reached within the prespecified 13-month recruitment window; 82.1% of eligible participants consented; 96.9% were followed up at 6 months; missing data <0.01%. All five prespecified feasibility progression criteria were met. CONCLUSION: The high retention and adherence rates, alongside the qualitative data, suggest the study design was feasible and therapy approach acceptable even to people with severe aphasia. These results indicate a definitive randomised controlled trial of the intervention would be feasible. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03245060.


Assuntos
Afasia , Psicoterapia Breve , Acidente Vascular Cerebral , Afasia/etiologia , Afasia/terapia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Humanos , Londres , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações
6.
BMC Res Notes ; 14(1): 320, 2021 Aug 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34419155

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Peer support is rapidly being introduced into mental health services internationally, yet peer support interventions are often poorly described, limiting the usefulness of research in informing policy and practice. This paper reports the development of a peer support intervention that aims to improve outcomes of discharge from inpatient to community mental health care. People with experiential knowledge of using mental health services-peer workers and service user researchers-were involved in all stages of developing the intervention: generating intervention components; producing the intervention handbook; piloting the intervention. RESULTS: Systematic review and expert panels, including our Lived Experience Advisory Panel, identified 66 candidate intervention components in five domains: Recruitment and Role Description of Peer Workers; Training for Peer Workers; Delivery of Peer Support; Supervision and Support for Peer Workers; Organisation and Team. A series of Local Advisory Groups were used to prioritise components and explore implementation issues using consensus methods, refining an intervention blueprint. A peer support handbook and peer worker training programme were produced by the study team and piloted in two study sites. Feedback workshops were held with peer workers and their supervisors to produce a final handbook and training programme. The ENRICH trial is registered with the ISRCTN clinical trial register, number ISRCTN 10043328, and was overseen by an independent steering committee and a data monitoring committee.


Assuntos
Transtornos Mentais , Serviços de Saúde Mental , Aconselhamento , Humanos , Pacientes Internados , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Saúde Mental , Revisões Sistemáticas como Assunto
7.
Qual Health Res ; : 10497323211020290, 2021 Jun 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34130554

RESUMO

Aphasia, a language disability, can profoundly affect a person's mood and identity. The experiences of participants who received Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, a psychological intervention, were explored in the Solution-Focused brief therapy In poststroke Aphasia (SOFIA) Trial. Thirty participants with chronic aphasia, 14 with severe aphasia, participated in in-depth interviews that were analyzed using framework analysis. Two overarching themes emerged: valued therapy components (exploring hopes, noticing achievements, companionship, sharing feelings, and relationship with therapist) and perceptions of progress (mood, identity, communication, relationships, and independence). Participants were categorized into four groups: (a) "changed," where therapy had a meaningful impact on a person's life; (b) "connected," where therapy was valued primarily for companionship; (c) "complemental," where therapy complemented a participant's upward trajectory; and (d) "discordant," where therapy misaligned with participants' preference for impairment-based language work. This study suggests that it is feasible to adapt a psychological therapy for people with aphasia, who perceive it as valuable.

8.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e047114, 2021 05 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33986066

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Our objectives were threefold: (1) describe a collaborative, theoretically driven approach to co-designing complex interventions; (2) demonstrate the implementation of this approach to share learning with others; and (3) develop a toolkit to enhance therapeutic engagement on acute mental health wards. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: We describe a theory-driven approach to co-designing an intervention by adapting and integrating Experience-based Co-design (EBCD) with the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW). Our case study was informed by the results of a systematic integrative review and guided by this integrated approach. We undertook 80 hours of non-participant observations, and semistructured interviews with 14 service users (7 of which were filmed), 2 carers and 12 clinicians from the same acute ward. The facilitated intervention co-design process involved two feedback workshops, one joint co-design workshop and seven small co-design team meetings. Data analysis comprised the identification of touchpoints and use of the BCW and behaviour change technique taxonomy to inform intervention development. SETTING: This study was conducted over 12 months at an acute mental health organisation in England. RESULTS: The co-designed Let's Talk toolkit addressed four joint service user/clinician priorities for change: (1) improve communication with withdrawn people; (2) nurses to help service users help themselves; (3) nurses to feel confident when engaging with service users; (4) improving team relations and ward culture. Intervention functions included training, education, enablement, coercion and persuasion; 14 behaviour change techniques supported these functions. We detail how we implemented our integrated co-design-behaviour change approach with service users, carers and clinicians to develop a toolkit to improve nurse-patient therapeutic engagement. CONCLUSIONS: Our theory-driven approach enhanced both EBCD and the BCW. It introduces a robust theoretical approach to guide intervention development within the co-design process and sets out how to meaningfully involve service users and other stakeholders when designing and implementing complex interventions.


Assuntos
Hospitais , Saúde Mental , Terapia Comportamental , Comunicação , Inglaterra , Humanos
10.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 30(5): 1248-1262, 2021 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33960100

RESUMO

Community treatment orders (CTOs) require individuals with a mental illness to accept treatment from mental health services. CTO legislation in South Australia states that treatment and care should be recovery-focused, although justification for use is predominantly risk-based, and care often coercive. Although CTOs are contested, individuals, families, and clinicians frequently engage in care planning within this context. This paper examines how the concepts of risk and risk management impact care planning from the perspectives of individuals on CTOs, their families, and clinicians. Ethnographic methods of observation and interview provided a detailed account of the perspectives of each group over an 18-month period from two community mental health teams in South Australia. Findings show that care planning occurred within a culture of practice dominated by risk. Risk, however, was understood differently by each participant group, with the dominant narrative informed by biogenetic understandings of mental illness. This dominance impacted on the positioning of participant groups in care planning, focus of care contacts, and care options available. To improve care experiences and outcomes for individuals on CTOs, narrow conceptualizations of risk and recovery need to broaden to include an understanding of personal and social adversities individuals face. A broader understanding should reposition participants in the care planning context and rebalance care discussions, from a focus on clinical recovery to recovering citizenship.


Assuntos
Serviços Comunitários de Saúde Mental , Transtornos Mentais , Serviços de Saúde Mental , Coerção , Humanos , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Austrália do Sul
11.
Int J Lang Commun Disord ; 56(3): 594-608, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33826205

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Stroke and aphasia can have a profound impact on people's lives, and depression is a common, frequently persistent consequence. Social networks also suffer, with poor social support associated with worse recovery. It is essential to support psychosocial well-being post-stroke, and examine which factors facilitate successful adjustment to living with aphasia. AIMS: In the context of a feasibility randomized controlled trial of peer-befriending (SUPERB), this qualitative study explores adjustment for people with aphasia in the post-acute phase of recovery, a phase often neglected in previous research. METHODS & PROCEDURES: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 people with aphasia and 10 significant others, who were purposively sampled from the wider group of 56 people with aphasia and 48 significant others. Interviews took place in participants' homes; they were analysed using framework analysis. OUTCOMES & RESULTS: Participants with aphasia were 10 women and 10 men; their median (interquartile range-IQR) age was 70 (57.5-77.0) years. Twelve participants had mild aphasia, eight moderate-severe aphasia. Significant others were six women and four men with a median (IQR) age of 70.5 (43-79) years. They identified a range of factors that influenced adjustment to aphasia post-stroke. Some were personal resources, including mood and emotions; identity/sense of self; attitude and outlook; faith and spirituality; and moving forward. Significant others also talked about the impact of becoming carers. Other factors were external sources of support, including familial and other relationships; doctors, nurses and hospital communication; life on the ward; therapies and therapists; psychological support, stroke groups; and community and socializing. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: To promote adjustment in the acute phase, hospital staff should prioritize the humanizing aspects of care provision. In the post-acute phase, clinicians play an integral role in supporting adjustment and can help by focusing on relationship-centred care, monitoring mental health, promoting quality improvement across the continuum of care and supporting advocacy. What this paper adds What is already known on the subject Anxiety and depression are common consequences of stroke, with depression rates high at 33% at 1 year post-onset. There is evidence that the psychological needs of people with aphasia are even greater than those of the general stroke population. Social support and social networks are also negatively impacted. Few studies have examined adjustment when people are still in hospital or in the early stages of post-stroke life in the community (< 6 months). Further, many stroke studies exclude people with aphasia. What this paper adds to existing knowledge Adjustment to living with stroke and aphasia begins in the early stages of recovery. While this partly depends on personal resources, many factors depend on external sources of help and support. These include doctors, nurses and hospital communication, their experience of life on the ward, and their therapists' person-centred care. What are the potential or actual clinical implications of this work? Clinicians play an integral role in facilitating people with aphasia to utilize their personal resources and support systems to adjust to life after stroke. They can help by focusing on relationship-centred care, monitoring mental health, promoting quality improvement across the continuum of care and supporting advocacy.

13.
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol ; 56(8): 1447-1457, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33665680

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Research is beginning to quantify the impact of COVID-19 on people with pre-existing mental health conditions. Our paper addresses a lack of in-depth qualitative research exploring their experiences and perceptions of how life has changed at this time. METHODS: We used qualitative interviews (N = 49) to explore experiences of the pandemic for people with pre-existing mental health conditions. In a participatory, coproduced approach, researchers with lived experiences of mental health conditions conducted interviews and analysed data as part of a multi-disciplinary research team. RESULTS: Existing mental health difficulties were exacerbated for many people. People experienced specific psychological impacts of the pandemic, struggles with social connectedness, and inadequate access to mental health services, while some found new ways to cope and connect to the community. New remote ways to access mental health care, including digital solutions, provided continuity of care for some but presented substantial barriers for others. People from black and ethnic minority (BAME) communities experienced heightened anxiety, stigma and racism associated with the pandemic, further impacting their mental health. CONCLUSION: There is a need for evidence-based solutions to achieve accessible and effective mental health care in response to the pandemic, especially remote approaches to care. Further research should explore the long-term impacts of COVID-19 on people with pre-existing mental health conditions. Particular attention should be paid to understanding inequalities of impact on mental health, especially for people from BAME communities.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Pandemias , Grupos Étnicos , Humanos , Saúde Mental , Grupos Minoritários , Pesquisa Qualitativa , SARS-CoV-2 , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
14.
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs ; 28(2): 126-137, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33608956

RESUMO

WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: During the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been research considering the impact on medical healthcare professionals and the mental health needs of the general population. However, limited focus has been placed on mental health services or mental health staff providing care in the community and in hospitals. While nurses make up the largest section of the mental health workforce in the UK, the impact that this pandemic has had on their work has been largely ignored. WHAT THE PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This paper provides a unique insight into the experiences and impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on mental health nurses across a range of community and inpatient settings to understand what has changed in their work and the care they can and do provide during this crisis. This includes exploring how services have changed, the move to remote working, the impact of the protective equipment crisis on nurses and the difficult working conditions facing those in inpatient settings where there is minimal guidance provided. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: By understanding the impact the pandemic has had on mental health nursing care, we can understand the gaps in guidance that exist, the challenges being faced and the impact the crisis has had on care for mental health service users. By doing so, we can plan for the ongoing nature of this pandemic and the aftermath that the crisis may leave for our service users and workforce alike. ABSTRACT: Introduction While evidence has emerged concerning the impact of COVID-19 on the general population and the challenges facing health services, much less is known regarding how the pandemic has directly affected the delivery of mental health nursing care. Aim This paper aimed to explore how COVID-19 has affected the ability of mental health nurses to deliver care in community and inpatient mental health services in the UK. Method We investigated staff reports regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental healthcare and mental health service users in the UK, using a mixed-methods online survey. A total of 897 nurses across a range of inpatient and community settings participated. Discussion Key themes within the data explore the following: new ways of working; remote working; risks of infection/infection control challenges; and the impact on service users. Targeted guidelines are required to support mental health nurses providing care and support during a pandemic to people in severe mental distress, often in unsuitable environments. Implications for Practice Service developments need to occur alongside tailored guidance and support for staff welfare supported by clear leadership. These findings identify areas requiring attention and investment to prepare for future crises and the consequences of the pandemic.


Assuntos
COVID-19/psicologia , Atenção à Saúde/métodos , Serviços de Saúde Mental , Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros/psicologia , Enfermagem Psiquiátrica/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , SARS-CoV-2 , Inquéritos e Questionários , Reino Unido , Adulto Jovem
15.
Clin Rehabil ; 35(8): 1151-1163, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33624514

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility and acceptability of peer-befriending, for people with aphasia. DESIGN: Single-blind, parallel-group feasibility randomised controlled trial comparing usual care to usual care + peer-befriending. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: People with aphasia post-stroke and low levels of distress, recruited from 5 NHS Hospitals and linked community services; their significant others; and 10 befrienders recruited from community. INTERVENTION: Six 1-hour peer-befriending visits over three months. MAIN MEASURES: Feasibility parameters included proportion eligible of those screened; proportion consented; missing data; consent and attrition rates. Acceptability was explored through qualitative interviews. Outcomes for participants and significant others were measured at baseline, 4- and 10-months; for peer-befrienders before training and after one/two cycles of befriending. RESULTS: Of 738 patients identified, 75 were eligible of 89 fully screened (84%), 62 consented (83% of eligible) and 56 randomised. Attrition was 16%. Adherence was high (93% attended ⩾2 sessions, 81% all six). The difference at 10 months on the GHQ-12 was 1.23 points on average lower/better in the intervention arm (95% CI 0.17, -2.63). There was an 88% decrease in the odds of GHQ-12 caseness (95% CI 0.01, 1.01). Fourty-eight significant others and 10 peer-befrienders took part. Procedures and outcome measures were acceptable. Serious adverse events were few (n = 10, none for significant others and peer-befrienders) and unrelated. CONCLUSIONS: SUPERB peer-befriending for people with aphasia post-stroke experiencing low levels of distress was feasible. There was preliminary evidence of benefit in terms of depression. Peer-befriending is a suitable intervention to explore further in a definitive trial.Clinical trial registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT02947776Subject terms: Translational research, mental health, rehabilitation, quality and outcomes, stroke.


Assuntos
Afasia/etiologia , Afasia/reabilitação , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Atenção à Saúde , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Grupo Associado , Método Simples-Cego , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/psicologia
16.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 30(3): 703-714, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33459482

RESUMO

Nurse-patient therapeutic engagement on acute mental health wards is beneficial to service users' outcomes and nurses' job satisfaction. However, engagement is not always fulfilled in practice and interventions to improve engagement are sparse and ineffective. We explored the experiences of service users, carers, and clinicians drawing from 80 hours of non-participant observations in an acute mental health ward and semi-structured interviews with 14 service users, two carers, and 12 clinicians. Analysis of these data resulted in 28 touchpoints (emotionally significant moments) and eight overarching themes. Service users, carers, and clinicians identified a lack of high-quality, person-centred, collaborative engagement and recognized and supported efforts to improve engagement in practice. Potential solutions to inform future intervention development were identified. Our findings align with previous research highlighting negative experiences and support the need to develop multicomponent interventions through participatory methods.


Assuntos
Cuidadores , Serviços de Saúde Mental , Humanos , Saúde Mental , Relações Enfermeiro-Paciente , Pesquisa Qualitativa
17.
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol ; 56(1): 13-24, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32804258

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has many potential impacts on people with mental health conditions and on mental health care, including direct consequences of infection, effects of infection control measures and subsequent societal changes. We aimed to map early impacts of the pandemic on people with pre-existing mental health conditions and services they use, and to identify individual and service-level strategies adopted to manage these. METHODS: We searched for relevant material in the public domain published before 30 April 2020, including papers in scientific and professional journals, published first person accounts, media articles, and publications by governments, charities and professional associations. Search languages were English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Mandarin Chinese. Relevant content was retrieved and summarised via a rapid qualitative framework synthesis approach. RESULTS: We found 872 eligible sources from 28 countries. Most documented observations and experiences rather than reporting research data. We found many reports of deteriorations in symptoms, and of impacts of loneliness and social isolation and of lack of access to services and resources, but sometimes also of resilience, effective self-management and peer support. Immediate service challenges related to controlling infection, especially in inpatient and residential settings, and establishing remote working, especially in the community. We summarise reports of swiftly implemented adaptations and innovations, but also of pressing ethical challenges and concerns for the future. CONCLUSION: Our analysis captures the range of stakeholder perspectives and experiences publicly reported in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in several countries. We identify potential foci for service planning and research.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Transtornos Mentais , Humanos , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Saúde Mental , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol ; 56(1): 25-37, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32857218

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has potential to disrupt and burden the mental health care system, and to magnify inequalities experienced by mental health service users. METHODS: We investigated staff reports regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in its early weeks on mental health care and mental health service users in the UK using a mixed methods online survey. Recruitment channels included professional associations and networks, charities, and social media. Quantitative findings were reported with descriptive statistics, and content analysis conducted for qualitative data. RESULTS: 2,180 staff from a range of sectors, professions, and specialties participated. Immediate infection control concerns were highly salient for inpatient staff, new ways of working for community staff. Multiple rapid adaptations and innovations in response to the crisis were described, especially remote working. This was cautiously welcomed but found successful in only some clinical situations. Staff had specific concerns about many groups of service users, including people whose conditions are exacerbated by pandemic anxieties and social disruptions; people experiencing loneliness, domestic abuse and family conflict; those unable to understand and follow social distancing requirements; and those who cannot engage with remote care. CONCLUSION: This overview of staff concerns and experiences in the early COVID-19 pandemic suggests directions for further research and service development: we suggest that how to combine infection control and a therapeutic environment in hospital, and how to achieve effective and targeted tele-health implementation in the community, should be priorities. The limitations of our convenience sample must be noted.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Serviços de Saúde Mental , Humanos , Saúde Mental , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
19.
BMJ Open ; 10(12): e044755, 2020 12 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33310815

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To explore current communication practices for positive newborn screening results from the newborn bloodspot screening (NBS) laboratory to clinicians to highlight differences, understand how the pathways are implemented in practice, identify barriers and facilitators and make recommendations for future practice and research. DESIGN: A qualitative exploratory design was employed using semi-structured interviews. SETTING: Thirteen NBS laboratories in England. PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-one clinicians; 22 NBS laboratory staff across 13 laboratories and 49 members of relevant clinical teams were interviewed. RESULTS: Assurance of quality and consistency was a priority for all NBS laboratories. Findings indicated variation in approaches to communicating positive NBS results from laboratories to clinical teams. This was particularly evident for congenital hypothyroidism and was largely influenced by local arrangements, resources and the fact individual laboratories had detailed standard operating procedures for how they work. Obtaining feedback from clinical teams to the laboratory after the child had been seen could be challenging and time-consuming for those involved. Pathways for communicating carrier results for cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease could be ambiguous and inconsistent which in turn could hamper the laboratories efforts to obtain timely feedback regarding whether or not the result had been communicated to the family. Communication pathways for positive NBS results between laboratories and clinical teams could therefore be time-consuming and resource-intensive. CONCLUSION: The importance placed on ensuring positive NBS results were communicated effectively and in a timely fashion from the laboratory to the clinical team was evident from all participants. However, variation existed in terms of the processes used to report positive NBS results to clinical teams and the people involved. Variant practice identified may reflect local needs, but more often reflected local resources and a more consistent 'best practice' approach is required, not just in the UK but perhaps globally. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN15330120.


Assuntos
Anemia Falciforme , Fibrose Cística , Triagem Neonatal , Anemia Falciforme/diagnóstico , Comunicação , Fibrose Cística/diagnóstico , Inglaterra , Estudos de Avaliação como Assunto , Humanos , Recém-Nascido
20.
BMJ Open ; 10(10): e037081, 2020 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33004391

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To explore health professionals' experiences of communicating positive newborn bloodspot screening (NBS) results, highlight differences, share good practice and make recommendations for future research. DESIGN: Qualitative exploratory design was employed using semi-structured interviews SETTING: Three National Health Service provider organisations in England PARTICIPANTS: Seventeen health professionals involved in communicating positive newborn bloodspot screening results to parents for all nine conditions currently included in the newborn bloodspot screening programme in England. RESULTS: Findings indicated variation in approaches to communicating positive newborn bloodspot screening results to parents, largely influenced by resources available and the lack of clear guidance. Health professionals emphasised the importance of communicating results to families in a way that is sensitive to their needs. However, many challenges hindered communication including logistical considerations; difficulty contacting the family and other health professionals; language barriers; parental reactions; resource considerations; lack of training; and insufficient time. CONCLUSION: Health professionals invest a lot of time and energy trying to ensure communication of positive newborn bloodspot screening results to families is done well. However, there continues to be great variation in the way these results are communicated to parents and this is largely influenced by resources available but also the lack of concrete guidance. How best to support health professionals undertaking this challenging and emotive task requires further exploration. We recommend evaluation of a more cohesive approach that meets the needs of parents and staff while being sensitive to the subtleties of each condition. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN15330120.


Assuntos
Triagem Neonatal , Medicina Estatal , Inglaterra , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Pais
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...