Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 60
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 17(1): 83, 2019 Dec 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31856854

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate relations between psychosocial factors, signs and symptoms of orofacial pain and jaw dysfunction in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: Forty-five patients with JIA (median age 12 years) and 16 healthy matched controls (median age 13 years) were examined according to the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC/TMD). The subjects answered the DC/TMD questionnaires regarding psychosocial factors (pain intensity, pain-related disability, depression, stress, catastrophizing, pain locations and jaw function). RESULTS: JIA patients with orofacial pain had higher degree of stress, depression, catastrophizing and jaw dysfunction compared to subjects without. In turn, these factors were associated with orofacial pain intensity. Also, patients with orofacial pain had higher systemic inflammatory activity. CONCLUSIONS: Orofacial pain in patients with JIA is associated with stress, psychological distress, jaw dysfunction and loss of daily living activities. Pain intensity seems to be the major pain aspect related to these factors. In addition, systemic inflammatory activity appears to be an important factor contributing to orofacial pain in JIA.

2.
Clin Exp Immunol ; 2019 Nov 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31778219

RESUMO

Serum-IgG anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) detected by indirect immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy remain a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Since it is controversial whether or not IF-ANA status varies over time, we designed a prospective study with longitudinal follow-up of patients with recent-onset SLE. The study population consisted of 54 recently diagnosed SLE cases, all meeting the 1982 ACR and/or the 2012 SLICC criteria. Clinical follow-up data, including disease activity, organ damage, and sera were collected from clinical onset of SLE and onwards, in most cases yearly (0-96 months). IF-ANA on HEp-2 cells was analysed and categorized regarding staining patterns. Using an addressable laser bead assay (FIDIS™ Connective profile), we measured IgG-ANA fine specificities against Ro52/SSA, Ro60/SSA, La/SSB, Sm, Sm/RNP, U1RNP, dsDNA, ribosomal-P protein and histone. At baseline, all patients were judged ANA-positive at an abnormal titre corresponding to the 95th percentile of healthy blood donors, but 7 of 54 patients (13%) lost ANA-positivity over time. Homogenous (AC-1; 46%) and speckled (AC-4 or 5; 31%) were the most frequently observed patterns at inclusion, whereas 7% switched pattern at least once during follow-up. Established associations between ANA fine specificities and clinical data were confirmed. Levels of anti-Sm/RNP, but not of anti-dsDNA, correlated with clinical disease activity (mSLEDAI-2K). Our data indicate that a considerable proportion of Swedish patients with SLE lose ANA-positivity over time, whereas consistent staining patterns were frequent. The clinical and mechanistic relevance of ANA seroconversion remains uncertain. Further prospective evaluations in larger SLE populations with more diverse ethnicities are warranted.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31504962

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: A 'mucosal connection' in RA presently attracts increasing attention. We recently described the occurrence of secretory antibodies to citrullinated protein (SC-ACPA) in sera from patients with recent-onset RA. The current study was performed to evaluate possible associations between serum levels of secretory ACPA and signs of lung involvement in patients with early, untreated RA. METHODS: One hundred and forty-two RA patients were included as part of the 'LUng Investigation in newly diagnosed RA' study. One hundred and six patients were examined with high-resolution CT (HRCT) and 20 patients underwent bronchoscopy, where bronchial biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples were obtained. SC-ACPA in serum and BALF were detected by an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Antibody levels were related to smoking history, pulmonary function, HRCT, BALF cell counts and findings in bronchial biopsies. RESULTS: SC-ACPA occurred in 16% of the serum samples and in 35% of the BALF samples. SC-ACPA levels in serum correlated with SC-ACPA levels in BALF (σ = 0.50, P = 0.027) and were higher among patients with HRCT parenchymal lung abnormalities (P = 0.022) or bronchiectasis (P = 0.042). Also, ever smoking was more frequent among serum SC-ACPA-positive patients (91% vs 67%, P = 0.023), and the SC-ACPA levels correlated with the number of pack-years (σ=0.20, P = 0.020). CONCLUSION: In early, untreated RA, serum levels of SC-ACPA reflect lung involvement in terms of local ACPA levels, smoking and lung abnormalities on HRCT. These findings strengthen the link between mucosal ACPA responses and the lungs in RA.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31504979

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Considering growing evidence of mucosal involvement in RA induction, this study investigated circulating free secretory component (SC) in patients with either recent-onset RA or with ACPA and musculoskeletal pain. METHODS: Two prospective cohorts were studied: TIRA-2 comprising 452 recent-onset RA patients with 3 years of clinical and radiological follow-up, and TIRx patients (n = 104) with ACPA IgG and musculoskeletal pain followed for 290 weeks (median). Blood donors and three different chronic inflammatory diseases served as controls. Free SC was analysed by sandwich ELISA. RESULTS: Serum levels of free SC were significantly higher in TIRA-2 patients compared with TIRx and all control groups (P < 0.01). Among TIRx patients who subsequently developed arthritis, free SC levels were higher compared with all control groups (P < 0.05) except ankylosing spondylitis (P = 0.74). In TIRA-2, patients with ACPA had higher baseline levels of free SC compared with ACPA negative patients (P < 0.001). Free SC status at baseline did not predict radiographic joint damage or disease activity over time. In TIRx, elevated free SC at baseline trendwise associated with arthritis development during follow-up (P = 0.066) but this disappeared when adjusting for confounders (P = 0.72). Cigarette smoking was associated with higher levels of free SC in both cohorts. CONCLUSION: Serum free SC levels are increased in recent-onset RA compared with other inflammatory diseases, and associate with ACPA and smoking. Free SC is elevated before arthritis development among ACPA positive patients with musculoskeletal pain, but does not predict arthritis development. These findings support mucosal engagement in RA development.

5.
J Rheumatol ; 46(5): 492-500, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30647177

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: In cross-sectional studies, elevated osteopontin (OPN) levels have been proposed to reflect, and/or precede, progressive organ damage and disease severity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed, in a cohort of patients with recent-onset SLE, to determine whether raised serum OPN levels precede damage and/or are associated with disease activity or certain disease phenotypes. METHODS: We included 344 patients from the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) Inception Cohort who had 5 years of followup data available. All patients fulfilled the 1997 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. Baseline sera from patients and from age- and sex-matched population-based controls were analyzed for OPN using ELISA. Disease activity and damage were assessed at each annual followup visit using the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and the SLICC/ACR damage index (SDI), respectively. RESULTS: Compared to controls, baseline OPN was raised 4-fold in SLE cases (p < 0.0001). After relevant adjustments in a binary logistic regression model, OPN levels failed to significantly predict global damage accrual defined as SDI ≥ 1 at 5 years. However, baseline OPN correlated with SLEDAI-2K at enrollment into the cohort (r = 0.27, p < 0.0001), and patients with high disease activity (SLEDAI-2K ≥ 5) had raised serum OPN (p < 0.0001). In addition, higher OPN levels were found in patients with persistent disease activity (p = 0.0006), in cases with renal involvement (p < 0.0001) and impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: The performance of OPN to predict development of organ damage was not impressive. However, OPN associated significantly with lupus nephritis and with raised disease activity at enrollment, as well as over time.

6.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 71(2): 210-221, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30152126

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) develop many years before the clinical onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was undertaken to address the molecular basis of the specificity and cross-reactivity of ACPAs from patients with RA. METHODS: Antibodies isolated from RA patients were expressed as monoclonal chimeric antibodies with mouse Fc. These antibodies were characterized for glycosylation using mass spectrometry, and their cross-reactivity was assessed using Biacore and Luminex immunoassays. The crystal structures of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of the monoclonal ACPA E4 in complex with 3 different citrullinated peptides were determined using x-ray crystallography. The prevalence of autoantibodies reactive against 3 of the citrullinated peptides that also interacted with E4 was investigated by Luminex immunoassay in 2 Swedish cohorts of RA patients. RESULTS: Analysis of the crystal structures of a monoclonal ACPA from human RA serum in complex with citrullinated peptides revealed key residues of several complementarity-determining regions that recognized the citrulline as well as the neighboring peptide backbone, but with limited contact with the side chains of the peptides. The same citrullinated peptides were recognized by high titers of serum autoantibodies in 2 large cohorts of RA patients. CONCLUSION: These data show, for the first time, how ACPAs derived from human RA serum recognize citrulline. The specific citrulline recognition and backbone-mediated interactions provide a structural explanation for the promiscuous recognition of citrullinated peptides by RA-specific ACPAs.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Anti-Proteína Citrulinada/imunologia , Artrite Reumatoide/imunologia , Reações Cruzadas/imunologia , Animais , Anticorpos Anti-Proteína Citrulinada/ultraestrutura , Complexo Antígeno-Anticorpo/ultraestrutura , Estudos de Coortes , Cristalografia por Raios X , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Camundongos , Receptores de Antígenos Quiméricos
7.
Lupus Sci Med ; 4(1): e000225, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29188073

RESUMO

Objective: The variety of disease phenotypes among patients with SLE challenges the identification of new biomarkers reflecting disease activity and/or organ damage. Osteopontin (OPN) is an extracellular matrix protein with immunomodulating properties. Although raised levels have been reported, the pathogenic implications and clinical utility of OPN as a biomarker in SLE are far from clear. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterise OPN in SLE. Methods: Sera from 240 well-characterised adult SLE cases classified according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and/or the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria, and 240 population-based controls were immunoassayed for OPN. The SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) was used to evaluate disease activity and the SLICC/ACR Damage Index (SDI) to detect damage accrual. Results: Serum OPN levels were in average raised fourfold in SLE cases compared with the controls (p<0.0001). OPN correlated with SLEDAI-2K, especially in patients with a disease duration of <12 months (r=0.666, p=0.028). OPN was highly associated with SDI (p<0.0001), especially in the renal (p<0.0001), cardiovascular (p<0.0001) and malignancy (p=0.012) domains. Finally, OPN associated with coherent antiphospholipid syndrome (APS; p=0.009), and both clinical and laboratory criteria of APS had significant positive impact on OPN levels. Conclusions: In this cross-sectional study, circulating OPN correlates with disease activity in recent-onset SLE, reflects global organ damage and associates with APS. Longitudinal studies to dissect whether serum OPN also precedes and predicts future organ damage are most warranted.

8.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 19(1): 195, 2017 09 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28865482

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Periarticular osteopenia is an early sign of incipient joint injury in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but cannot be accurately quantified using conventional radiography. Digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) is a computerized technique to estimate bone mineral density (BMD) from hand radiographs. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether decrease in BMD of the hands (BMD loss), as determined by DXR 3 months after diagnosis, predicts radiographic joint damage after 1 and 2 years in patients with early RA. METHODS: Patients (n = 176) with early RA (<12 months after onset of symptoms) from three different Swedish rheumatology centers were consecutively included in the study, and 167 of these patients were included in the analysis. Medication was given in accordance with Swedish guidelines, and the patients were followed for 2 years. Rheumatoid factor and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) were measured at baseline, and 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) was assessed at each visit. Radiographs of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline, 3 months (hands only) and 1 and 2 years. Baseline and 1-year and 2-year radiographs were evaluated by the Larsen score. Radiographic progression was defined as a difference in Larsen score above the smallest detectable change. DXR-BMD was measured at baseline and after 3 months. BMD loss was defined as moderate when the decrease in BMD was between 0.25 and 2.5 mg/cm2/month and as severe when the decrease was greater than 2.5 mg/cm2/month. Multivariate regression was applied to test the association between DXR-BMD loss and radiographic damage, including adjustments for possible confounders. RESULTS: DXR-BMD loss during the initial 3 months occurred in 59% of the patients (44% moderate, 15% severe): 32 patients (19%) had radiographic progression at 1 year and 45 (35%) at 2 years. In multiple regression analyses, the magnitude of DXR-BMD loss was significantly associated with increase in Larsen score between baseline and 1 year (p = 0.033, adjusted R-squared = 0.069). CONCLUSION: DXR-BMD loss during the initial 3 months independently predicted radiographic joint damage at 1 year in patients with early RA. Thus, DXR-BMD may be a useful tool to detect ongoing joint damage and thereby to improve individualization of therapy in early RA.


Assuntos
Artrite Reumatoide/diagnóstico por imagem , Densidade Óssea/fisiologia , Progressão da Doença , Articulação da Mão/diagnóstico por imagem , Intensificação de Imagem Radiográfica/tendências , Adulto , Idoso , Antirreumáticos/farmacologia , Artrite Reumatoide/tratamento farmacológico , Artrite Reumatoide/epidemiologia , Densidade Óssea/efeitos dos fármacos , Diagnóstico Precoce , Feminino , Seguimentos , Articulação da Mão/efeitos dos fármacos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Suécia/epidemiologia
9.
JCI Insight ; 2(13)2017 Jul 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28679953

RESUMO

Today, it is known that autoimmune diseases start a long time before clinical symptoms appear. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) appear many years before the clinical onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is still unclear if and how ACPAs are arthritogenic. To better understand the molecular basis of pathogenicity of ACPAs, we investigated autoantibodies reactive against the C1 epitope of collagen type II (CII) and its citrullinated variants. We found that these antibodies are commonly occurring in RA. A mAb (ACC1) against citrullinated C1 was found to cross-react with several noncitrullinated epitopes on native CII, causing proteoglycan depletion of cartilage and severe arthritis in mice. Structural studies by X-ray crystallography showed that such recognition is governed by a shared structural motif "RG-TG" within all the epitopes, including electrostatic potential-controlled citrulline specificity. Overall, we have demonstrated a molecular mechanism that explains how ACPAs trigger arthritis.

10.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 18(1): 289, 2016 12 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27912793

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Articular manifestations are common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) whereas erosive disease is not. Antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) are citrulline-dependent in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), whereas the opposite is suggested in SLE, as reactivity with cyclic arginine peptide (CAP) is typically present. Antibodies targeting carbamylated proteins (anti-CarP) may occur in anti-CCP/rheumatoid factor (RF)-negative cases long before clinical onset of RA. We analysed these antibody specificities in sera from European patients with SLE in relation to phenotypes, smoking habits and imaging data. METHODS: Cases of SLE (n = 441) from Linköping, Sweden, and Leiden, the Netherlands, were classified according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and/or Systemic Lupus Erythematosus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria. IgG anti-CCP, anti-CAP and anti-CarP were analysed by immunoassays. Radiographic data from 102 Swedish patients were available. RESULTS: There were 16 Linköping (6.8%) and 11 Leiden patients (5.4%) who were anti-CCP-positive, of whom approximately one third were citrulline-dependent: 40/441 (9.1%) were anti-CarP-positive, and 33% of the anti-CarP-positive patients were identified as anti-CCP-positive. No associations were found comparing anti-CCP or anti-CarP with ACR-defined phenotypes, immunologic abnormalities or smoking habits. Radiographically confirmed erosions were found in 10 patients, and were significantly associated with anti-CCP, anti-CarP and RF. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography scores were higher in anti-CCP-positive compared to anti-CCP-negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: In the hitherto largest anti-CarP study in SLE, we demonstrate that anti-CarP is more prevalent than anti-CCP and that the overlap is limited. We obtained some evidence that both autoantibodies seem to be associated with erosivity. Similar pathogenetic mechanisms to those seen in RA may be relevant in a subgroup of SLE cases with a phenotype dominated by arthritis.


Assuntos
Autoanticorpos/imunologia , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/imunologia , Peptídeos Cíclicos/imunologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Autoanticorpos/sangue , Autoantígenos/imunologia , Estudos de Coortes , Europa (Continente) , Feminino , Humanos , Imunoensaio , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/sangue , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/patologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteínas , Adulto Jovem
11.
Cell Rep ; 16(11): 2928-2939, 2016 09 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27626663

RESUMO

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS and has a varying disease course as well as variable response to treatment. Biomarkers may therefore aid personalized treatment. We tested whether in vitro activation of MS patient-derived CD4+ T cells could reveal potential biomarkers. The dynamic gene expression response to activation was dysregulated in patient-derived CD4+ T cells. By integrating our findings with genome-wide association studies, we constructed a highly connected MS gene module, disclosing cell activation and chemotaxis as central components. Changes in several module genes were associated with differences in protein levels, which were measurable in cerebrospinal fluid and were used to classify patients from control individuals. In addition, these measurements could predict disease activity after 2 years and distinguish low and high responders to treatment in two additional, independent cohorts. While further validation is needed in larger cohorts prior to clinical implementation, we have uncovered a set of potentially promising biomarkers.


Assuntos
Linfócitos T CD4-Positivos/metabolismo , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Esclerose Múltipla/genética , Esclerose Múltipla/imunologia , Mapas de Interação de Proteínas/genética , Adulto , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Proteínas do Líquido Cefalorraquidiano/metabolismo , Quimiotaxia/genética , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Ativação Linfocitária/genética , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Esclerose Múltipla/líquido cefalorraquidiano , Esclerose Múltipla/patologia , Prognóstico , Adulto Jovem
12.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 18(1): 119, 2016 05 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27215344

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A possible association between mucosal immunization and inflammation, as well as the initiation and propagation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), is attracting renewed interest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible occurrence and clinical correlations of circulating secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) antibodies against the second-generation cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCP) among patients with recent-onset RA followed prospectively over 3 years. METHODS: Baseline serum samples from 636 patients with recent-onset RA were analyzed for SIgA anti-CCP antibodies by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with a secondary antibody directed against secretory component. SIgA anti-CCP status at baseline was analyzed in relation to smoking, HLA-DRB1/shared epitope (SE), and the disease course over 3 years. Significant findings were evaluated in regression analysis that included age, sex, smoking, and SE. RESULTS: Seventeen percent of the patients tested positive for circulating SIgA anti-CCP, and the occurrence was confirmed by detection of secretory component in an affinity-purified IgA anti-CCP fraction. SIgA anti-CCP positivity at baseline was associated with slightly higher baseline erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (mean 38 vs. 31 mm/first hour, p = 0.004) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (mean 30 vs. 23 mg/L, p = 0.047). During follow-up, SIgA anti-CCP-positive patients had a higher mean AUC regarding ESR (adjusted p = 0.003), although there were no significant differences regarding CRP, tender and swollen joint counts, or radiological joint damage (median Larsen progression 1.0 vs. 1.0, p = 0.22). SIgA anti-CCP was associated significantly with smoking (79 % ever smokers among SIgA anti-CCP-positive patients vs. 59 % in SIgA anti-CCP-negative patients, adjusted OR 2.19, 95 % CI 1.01-4.37, p = 0.027) but not with carriage of the SE (80 % vs. 73 %, p = 0.62). CONCLUSIONS: Circulating SIgA anti-CCP, which is present in a subgroup of patients with early RA, is not related to SE, but it is environmentally linked to cigarette smoking. This finding strengthens the hypothesis that immunization against citrullinated peptides and/or proteins may occur at mucosal surfaces of the airways. Analysis of SIgA antibodies in serum may be a convenient and more versatile means to investigate the "mucosal connection" in RA compared with analyses in mucosal fluid samples.


Assuntos
Artrite Reumatoide/imunologia , Autoanticorpos/imunologia , Imunoglobulina A Secretora/imunologia , Fumar/efeitos adversos , Adulto , Idoso , Western Blotting , Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática , Feminino , Cadeias HLA-DRB1/genética , Humanos , Inflamação/etiologia , Inflamação/imunologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Peptídeos Cíclicos/imunologia
13.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 17: 338, 2015 Nov 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26596890

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The non-histone nuclear protein high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1) is typically associated with nucleosomes, but may shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and under some conditions also be released extracellularly and participate in systemic inflammation. Monoclonal HMGB1-targeting antibodies can ameliorate murine polyarthritis and lupus-like disease. Interestingly, autoantibodies against HMGB1 have also been described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but their clinical implications remain elusive. The main aims of this study were to detect serum anti-HMGB1 antibodies in patients with SLE and relate them to other types of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), and to disease activity. METHODS: 188 Swedish SLE patients meeting the 1982 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria and/or the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria participated in the study. Anti-HMGB1 antibody levels were analysed in patient and control (n = 112) sera by an in-house ELISA using recombinant histidine-tagged HMGB1. SLE sera were also analysed for ANA by immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy (IF-ANA) using fixed HEp-2 cells, and by a line-blot assay for antigen fine-specificities. To quantify antibodies to double-stranded DNA, a fluoroenzyme-immunoassay was employed. RESULTS: At inclusion, 23 % of the SLE patients were anti-HMGB1 antibody positive compared to 5 % of the controls. Anti-HMGB1 antibodies occurred in 49 % of the IF-ANA positive SLE patients, and in 34 % of IF-ANA negative cases (p = 0.004). Levels of anti-HMGB1 antibodies correlated with anti-dsDNA antibody levels (r = 0.49; p < 0.001). Significant, but less pronounced correlations were found regarding anti-HMGB1 and SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI-2K: r = 0.15; p = 0.04), classical complement function (r = -0.24; p = 0.002) and complement protein C4 (r = -0.23; p = 0.002). Average anti-HMGB1 antibody levels were significantly higher among patients with homogenous ± other IF-ANA staining patterns (median 180 AU) compared to IF-ANA negative cases (median 83 AU) (p = 0.004). Rabbit anti-HMGB1 antibodies gave rise to cytoplasmic, but not nuclear, staining of HEp-2 cells. CONCLUSIONS: We confirm that anti-HMGB1 antibodies are common in SLE and correlate with disease activity variables. Although anti-HMGB1 antibodies measured by ELISA often coincide with nuclear IF-ANA staining, our results indicate that anti-HMGB1 antibodies do not give rise to nuclear staining of the predominantly used commercial HEp-2 cell slides.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Antinucleares/imunologia , Especificidade de Anticorpos/imunologia , Proteína HMGB1/imunologia , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/imunologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Anticorpos Antinucleares/sangue , Autoantígenos/imunologia , Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática , Feminino , Proteína HMGB1/sangue , Humanos , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/sangue , Masculino , Microscopia de Fluorescência , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
14.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) ; 67(12): 1679-85, 2015 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26097219

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The prescription of biologic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients has varied considerably across different regions. Previous studies have shown physician preferences to be an important determinant in the decision to select biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) rather than nonbiologic, synthetic DMARDs (sDMARDs) alone. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that physician preferences are an important determinant for prescribing bDMARDs for RA patients in Sweden. METHODS: Using data from the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register, we identified 4,010 RA patients who were not prescribed bDMARDs during the period 2008-2012, but who, on at least 1 occasion, had an sDMARD prescription and changed treatment for the first time to either a new sDMARD or a bDMARD. Physician preference for the use of bDMARDs was calculated using data on each physician's prescriptions during the study period. The relationship between prescription of a bDMARD and physician preference, controlling for patient characteristics, disease activity, and the physician's local context was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: When adjusting for patient characteristics, disease activity, and the physician's local context, physician preference was an important predictor for prescription of bDMARDs. Compared with patients of a physician in the lowest preference tertile, patients of physicians in the highest and middle tertiles had an odds ratio for receiving bDMARDs of 2.8 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.13-3.68) and 1.28 (95% CI 1.05-1.57), respectively. CONCLUSION: Physician preference is an important determinant for prescribing bDMARDs.


Assuntos
Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Artrite Reumatoide/tratamento farmacológico , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Produtos Biológicos/uso terapêutico , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Padrões de Prática Médica/tendências , Artrite Reumatoide/diagnóstico , Artrite Reumatoide/epidemiologia , Prescrições de Medicamentos , Revisão de Uso de Medicamentos , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise Multivariada , Razão de Chances , Sistema de Registros , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Suécia/epidemiologia , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento
15.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 67(8): 2032-7, 2015 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25916813

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Smoking and HLA-DRB1/shared epitope (SE) alleles are risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) characterized by seropositivity for antibodies targeting citrullinated proteins (ACPAs)/cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP). Previously, mainly IgG-class antibodies have been studied. IgA-class antibodies are to a great extent related to mucosal immunity. The aim of this study was to explore interrelations between cigarette smoking, presence of SE, and seropositivity for circulating IgA and/or IgG anti-CCP antibodies among patients with early RA, to determine whether ACPAs of the IgA subclass are regulated by different mechanisms than those of the IgG subclass. METHODS: Two cohorts of patients with early RA, from the first Epidemiological Investigations of RA trial (n = 1,663) and the second Early Intervention in RA trial (n = 199), were grouped into 4 subsets based on anti-CCP subclass status (IgG-/IgA-, IgG-/IgA+, IgG+/IgA-, and IgG+/IgA+), and each subset was compared with regard to associations with smoking (current and former) and presence of SE. Interaction between smoking and SE was calculated using the attributable proportion (AP) due to interaction (assessing deviation from additivity of effects). RESULTS: Smoking was overrepresented among IgA anti-CCP-positive RA patients, regardless of whether IgG anti-CCP were present, whereas in patients with IgG anti-CCP alone, no association with smoking was found. SE alleles were overrepresented among IgG anti-CCP-positive patients, regardless of IgA anti-CCP status, and was not seen in patients with IgA anti-CCP alone. An interaction between ever smoking and SE was found with regard to the risk of IgG+/IgA+ RA (AP 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.4, 0.6). No significant interaction was observed with regard to the risk of IgG-/IgA+ RA or IgG+/IgA- RA. CONCLUSION: In patients with RA, a history of ever smoking was associated with seropositivity for IgA anti-CCP antibodies, whereas presence of SE was associated with seropositivity for IgG anti-CCP antibodies. An interaction between ever smoking and the SE was limited to the RA subset characterized by seropositivity for both IgG and IgA anti-CCP. These findings provide novel evidence that anti-CCP-positive RA can be divided into at least 3 serologically distinct subsets associated with different risk factors, indicating different modes of pathogenesis in RA.


Assuntos
Artrite Reumatoide/imunologia , Autoanticorpos/imunologia , Imunoglobulina A/imunologia , Imunoglobulina G/imunologia , Peptídeos Cíclicos/imunologia , Fumar/imunologia , Artrite Reumatoide/genética , Estudos de Coortes , Epitopos/imunologia , Feminino , Genótipo , Cadeias HLA-DRB1/genética , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fumar/genética
16.
J Rheumatol ; 42(5): 817-25, 2015 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25684763

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Analysis of antibodies against dsDNA is an important diagnostic tool for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and changes in anti-dsDNA antibody levels are also used to assess disease activity. Herein, 4 assays were compared with regard to SLE specificity, sensitivity, and association with disease activity variables. METHODS: Cross-sectional sera from 178 patients with SLE, of which 11 were followed consecutively, from a regional Swedish SLE register were analyzed for immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-dsDNA by bead-based multiplex assay (FIDIS; Theradig), fluoroenzyme-immunoassay (EliA; Phadia/Thermo Fisher Scientific), Crithidia luciliae immunofluorescence test (CLIFT; ImmunoConcepts), and line blot (EUROLINE; Euroimmun). All patients with SLE fulfilled the 1982 American College of Rheumatology and/or the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC-12) classification criteria. Healthy individuals (n = 100), patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 95), and patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (n = 54) served as controls. RESULTS: CLIFT had the highest SLE specificity (98%) whereas EliA had the highest sensitivity (35%). When cutoff levels for FIDIS, EliA, and EUROLINE were adjusted according to SLICC-12 (i.e., double the reference limit when using ELISA), the specificity and sensitivity of FIDIS was comparable to CLIFT. FIDIS and CLIFT also showed the highest concordance (84%). FIDIS performed best regarding association with disease activity in cross-sectional and consecutive samples. Fisher's exact test revealed striking differences between methods regarding associations with certain disease phenotypes. CONCLUSION: CLIFT remains a good choice for diagnostic purposes, but FIDIS performs equally well when the cutoff is adjusted according to SLICC-12. Based on results from cross-sectional and consecutive analyses, FIDIS can also be recommended to monitor disease activity.


Assuntos
DNA/imunologia , Imunoensaio/métodos , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/diagnóstico , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/imunologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Adulto Jovem
17.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 17: 3, 2015 Jan 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25575961

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: In 2012, the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) network presented a new set of criteria (SLICC-12) to classify systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study is the first to evaluate the performance of SLICC-12 in an adult European study population. Thus, SLICC-12 criteria were applied to confirmed SLE cases in our regional SLE register as well as to individuals with a fair suspicion of systemic autoimmune disease who were referred to rheumatology specialists at our unit. METHODS: We included 243 confirmed SLE patients who met the 1982 American College of Rheumatology (ACR-82) classification criteria and/or the Fries 'diagnostic principle' (presence of antinuclear antibodies on at least one occasion plus involvement of at least two defined organ systems) and 55 controls with possible systemic autoimmune disease, including the presence of any SLE-related autoantibody. RESULTS: SLICC-12 showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 94% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.90 to 0.96) compared with 90% (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.93) for the updated set of ACR criteria from 1997 (ACR-97), whereas ACR-82 failed to identify every fifth true SLE case. However, the disease specificity of SLICC-12 reached only 74% (95% CI, 0.60 to 0.84) and did not change much when involvement of at least two different organs was required as an indicator of systemic disease. In addition, SLICC-12 misclassified more of the controls compared to ACR-82, ACR-97 and Fries. CONCLUSIONS: Establishing a standard definition of SLE continues to challenge lupus researchers and clinicians. We confirm that SLICC-12 has advantages with regard to diagnostic sensitivity, whereas we found the diagnostic specificity to be surprisingly low. To accomplish increased sensitivity and specificity figures, a combination of criteria sets for clinical SLE studies should be considered.


Assuntos
Internacionalidade , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/classificação , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/epidemiologia , Sistema de Registros , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/diagnóstico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Suécia/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
18.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 66(6): 1568-73, 2014 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24574329

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The type I interferon (IFN) system is important in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We previously demonstrated an inhibitory effect of IFNα on interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced C-reactive protein (CRP) in vitro, hypothetically explaining the poor correlation between disease activity and CRP levels in SLE. This study was undertaken to investigate disease activity, IL-6 levels, and CRP levels in relation to a CRP gene polymorphism and IFNα. METHODS: Sera from 155 SLE patients and 100 controls were analyzed for CRP. Patients were genotyped for a CRP single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs1205) associated with low CRP levels. Serum IFNα and IL-6 levels were quantified by immunoassays. Clinical disease activity was assessed using the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K). RESULTS: CRP levels were increased in SLE patients compared to controls, but were not associated with SLEDAI-2K or IL-6 levels. However, exclusion of patients carrying at least one rs1205 minor allele revealed an association between disease activity and CRP levels (P = 0.005). We found a strong association between disease activity and CRP levels (P < 0.0005) when patients with measurable IFNα levels as well as the minor allele of rs1205 were excluded from the analysis. Similarly, when patients with elevated IFNα levels and/or the rs1205 polymorphism were excluded, IL-6 levels were associated with CRP levels. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates that the serum IFNα level as well as the CRP genotype affect the CRP response in SLE patients. Lack of correlation between serum levels of CRP and disease activity could therefore be explained by activation of the type I IFN system and polymorphisms in the CRP gene.


Assuntos
Proteína C-Reativa/genética , Proteína C-Reativa/metabolismo , Interferon-alfa/sangue , Interferon-alfa/genética , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/sangue , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/genética , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Alelos , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Variação Genética/genética , Genótipo , Humanos , Interleucina-6/sangue , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Adulto Jovem
19.
BMJ Open ; 3(10): e003608, 2013 Oct 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24163206

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Antinuclear antibody (ANA) analysis by immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy remains a diagnostic hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The clinical relevance of ANA fine-specificities in SLE has been addressed repeatedly, whereas studies on IF-ANA staining patterns in relation to disease manifestations are very scarce. This study was performed to elucidate whether different staining patterns associate with distinct SLE phenotypes. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: One university hospital rheumatology unit in Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: The study population consisted of 222 cases (89% women; 93% Caucasians), where of 178 met ≥4/11 of the 1982 American College of Rheumatology (ACR-82) criteria. The remaining 20% had an SLE diagnosis based on positive IF-ANA (HEp-2 cells) and ≥2 typical organ manifestations at the time of diagnosis (Fries' criteria). OUTCOME MEASURES: The IF-ANA staining patterns homogenous (H-ANA), speckled (S-ANA), combined homogenous and speckled (HS-ANA), centromeric (C-ANA), nucleolar (N-ANA)±other patterns and other nuclear patterns (oANA) were related to disease manifestations and laboratory measures. Antigen-specificities were also considered regarding double-stranded DNA (Crithidia luciliae) and the following extractable nuclear antigens: Ro/SSA, La/SSB, Smith antigen (Sm), small nuclear RNP (snRNP), Scl-70 and Jo-1 (immunodiffusion and/or line-blot technique). RESULTS: 54% of the patients with SLE displayed H-ANA, 22% S-ANA, 11% HS-ANA, 9% N-ANA, 1% C-ANA, 2% oANA and 1% were never IF-ANA positive. Staining patterns among patients meeting Fries' criteria alone did not differ from those fulfilling ACR-82. H-ANA was significantly associated with the 10th criterion according to ACR-82 ('immunological disorder'). S-ANA was inversely associated with arthritis, 'immunological disorder' and signs of organ damage. CONCLUSIONS: H-ANA is the dominant IF-ANA pattern among Swedish patients with SLE, and was found to associate with 'immunological disorder' according to ACR-82. The second most common pattern, S-ANA, associated negatively with arthritis and organ damage.

20.
Transl Res ; 162(5): 287-96, 2013 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23916811

RESUMO

Assessments of disease activity and organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remain challenging because of the lack of reliable biomarkers and disease heterogeneity. Ongoing inflammation can be difficult to distinguish from permanent organ damage caused by previous flare-ups or medication side effects. Circulating soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) has emerged as a potential marker of inflammation and disease severity, and an outcome predictor in several disparate conditions. This study was done to evaluate suPAR as a marker of disease activity and organ damage in SLE. Sera from 100 healthy donors and 198 patients with SLE fulfilling the 1982 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria and/or the Fries criteria were analyzed for suPAR by enzyme immunoassay. Eighteen patients with varying degree of disease activity were monitored longitudinally. Disease activity was assessed by the SLE disease activity index 2000 and the physician's global assessment. Organ damage was evaluated by the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology damage index (SDI). Compared with healthy control subjects, serum suPAR levels were elevated significantly in patients with SLE. No association was recorded regarding suPAR levels and SLE disease activity in cross-sectional or consecutive samples. However, a strong association was observed between suPAR and SDI (P < 0.0005). Considering distinct SDI domains, renal, neuropsychiatric, ocular, skin, and peripheral vascular damage had a significant effect on suPAR levels. This study is the first to demonstrate an association between serum suPAR and irreversible organ damage in SLE. Further studies are warranted to evaluate suPAR and other biomarkers as predictors of evolving organ damage.


Assuntos
Biomarcadores/sangue , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/diagnóstico , Receptores de Ativador de Plasminogênio Tipo Uroquinase/sangue , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Biomarcadores/química , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Inflamação , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/imunologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Receptores de Ativador de Plasminogênio Tipo Uroquinase/imunologia , Solubilidade , Ativador de Plasminogênio Tipo Uroquinase/imunologia
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA