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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32096616

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Fracture of the distal radius is a common wrist injury. As to its management after orthopedic (conservative or surgical) treatment, there is weak evidence for conventional rehabilitation interventions. Despite the increasing interest for robot-assisted arm therapy as to neurological disabilities and its growing diffusion in rehabilitation facilities, no previous study investigated the feasibility of robotic training on arm orthopedic impairment. AIM: To evaluate the feasibility in terms of efficacy of robot-assisted arm training on upper limb impairment in patients with fracture of the distal radius. DESIGN: Proof-of-concept, pilot, randomized controlled trial. SETTING: University hospital. POPULATION: Twenty adult outpatients with distal radius fracture due to wrist injury. METHODS: All participants underwent ten, 1-hour (40 minutes of arm training + 20 minutes of conventional occupational therapy) training sessions, five days a week for two consecutive weeks. They were randomly assigned to two groups: patients allocated to the Robotic Arm Training group received arm training by means of a robotic device and patients allocated to the Conventional Arm Training group performed arm training following a conventional rehabilitation program. All patients were evaluated before, immediately after treatment and at four weeks of follow-up. The following outcomes were considered at the affected arm: forearm pronation/supination and wrist extension/flexion passive and active range of motion; maximal pinch and grip strength; the Patient-Rated Wrist and Hand Evaluation. RESULTS: No difference was found between groups as to the primary (wrist active and passive range of motion) and secondary (pinch and grip strength; Patient-Rated Wrist and Hand Evaluation score) outcomes at all time points. Within-group comparisons showed similar improvements at all time points as to all outcomes considered in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary findings support the hypothesis that robot-assisted arm training might be a feasible tool for treating upper limb impairment in adult patients with distal radius fracture treated conservatively or surgically. CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: The treatment of arm impairment consequent to distal radius fractures by means of robot-assisted arm training may allow therapists to focus on functional rehabilitation during occupational (individual) therapy and supervise (more than one) patients simultaneously during robotic training sessions.

3.
Front Neurosci ; 13: 1143, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31708735

RESUMO

Background: Postural control disturbances are one of the important causes of disability in stroke patients affecting balance and mobility. The impairment of sensory input integration from visual, somatosensory and vestibular systems contributes to postural control disorders in post-stroke patients. Robot-assisted gait training may be considered a valuable tool in improving gait and postural control abnormalities. Objective: The primary aim of the study was to compare the effects of robot-assisted stair climbing training against sensory integration balance training on static and dynamic balance in chronic stroke patients. The secondary aims were to compare the training effects on sensory integration processes and mobility. Methods: This single-blind, randomized, controlled trial involved 32 chronic stroke outpatients with postural instability. The experimental group (EG, n = 16) received robot-assisted stair climbing training. The control group (n = 16) received sensory integration balance training. Training protocols lasted for 5 weeks (50 min/session, two sessions/week). Before, after, and at 1-month follow-up, a blinded rater evaluated patients using a comprehensive test battery. Primary outcome: Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Secondary outcomes:10-meter walking test, 6-min walking test, Dynamic gait index (DGI), stair climbing test (SCT) up and down, the Time Up and Go, and length of sway and sway area of the Center of Pressure (CoP) assessed using the stabilometric assessment. Results: There was a non-significant main effect of group on primary and secondary outcomes. A significant Time × Group interaction was measured on 6-min walking test (p = 0.013) and on posturographic outcomes (p = 0.005). Post hoc within-group analysis showed only in the EG a significant reduction of sway area and the CoP length on compliant surface in the eyes-closed and dome conditions. Conclusion: Postural control disorders in patients with chronic stroke may be ameliorated by robot-assisted stair climbing training and sensory integration balance training. The robot-assisted stair climbing training contributed to improving sensorimotor integration processes on compliant surfaces. Clinical trial registration (NCT03566901).

5.
J Rehabil Med ; 51(9): 721, 2019 Oct 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31580470
6.
Mov Disord Clin Pract ; 6(7): 576-585, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31538092

RESUMO

Introduction: The overall frequency of postural abnormalities (PA) in Parkinson's disease (PD) is unknown. We evaluated the overall prevalence of PA and assessed the association with demographic and clinical variables. Methods: For this multicenter, cross-sectional study, consecutive PD outpatients attending 7 tertiary Italian centers were enrolled. Patients were evaluated and compared for the presence of isolated PA such as camptocormia, Pisa syndrome, and anterocollis and for combined forms (ie, camptocormia + Pisa syndrome) together with demographic and clinical variables. Results: Of the total 811 PD patients enrolled, 174 (21.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 18.6%-24.3%) presented PA, 144 of which had isolated PA and 30 had combined PA. The prevalence of camptocormia was 11.2% (95% CI, 9%-13.3%), Pisa syndrome 8% (95% CI, 6.2%-9.9%), and anterocollis 6.5% (95% CI, 4.9%-8.3%). Patients with PA were more often male and older with longer disease duration, more advanced disease stage, more severe PD symptoms, a bradykinetic/rigid phenotype, and poorer quality of life. They were initially treated with levodopa, and more likely to be treated with a combination of levodopa and dopamine agonist, took a higher daily levodopa equivalent daily dose, and had more comorbidities. Falls and back pain were more frequent in PD patients with PA than in those without PA. Multiple logistic regression models confirmed an association between PA and male gender, older age, Hoehn and Yahr stage, and total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score. Conclusions: PA are frequent and disabling complications in PD, especially in the advanced disease stages.

7.
Toxins (Basel) ; 11(9)2019 Aug 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31470654

RESUMO

Chronic Migraine (CM) is a disabling neurologic condition with a severe impact on functioning and quality of life. Successful therapeutic management of patients with CM is complex, and differences in therapeutic response could be attributable to genetically determined factors, sensitivity to pharmacological treatment, psychosocial and relational factors affecting the patient's compliance and approach on the therapeutic treatment. The aim of this prospective observational study was to explore self-efficacy, coping strategies, psychological distress and headache-related disability in a cohort of 40 patients with CM (mean age: 46.73; standard deviation 13.75) treated with OnabotulinumtoxinA and the relationship between these clinical and psychological aspects and acute medication consumption during OnabotulinumtoxinA prophylactic treatment. Patients presented an overall significant reduction in the Headache Index (HI) (p < 0.001), HI with severe intensity (p = 0.009), and total analgesic consumption (p = 0.003) after the prophylactic treatment. These results are in line with the literature. Despite this, higher nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs consumption was associated with higher psychological distress, higher HI with severe and moderate intensity, and worse quality of life. Conversely, triptans consumption was correlated with HI of mild intensity, and problem-focused coping strategies. To conclude, the psychological profile, and in particular, the psychological distress and specific coping strategies might influence the self-management of acute medication.

8.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 71(3): 813-823, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31424399

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) affect 60-90% of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). OBJECTIVE: To determine if environmental therapy is an effective strategy to reduce BPSD, we tested 163 patients with AD with Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) before and after 6 months of an indoor therapeutic garden (TG) or standard environment. METHODS: A single-blind randomized controlled trial on AD patients with BPSD. Participants were randomized to an indoor TG (N = 82), or standard environment (control, N = 81) for 6 months. PRIMARY OUTCOME: change in the NPI score from baseline (T0) to end of treatment (T1). SECONDARY OUTCOMES: change in use of quetiapine, cognition, activities of daily living, salivary cortisol, blood pressure from T0 to T1. RESULTS: NPI score significantly ameliorated (TG versus control: -31.8 points), quetiapine dosage (-150 mg), blood pressure (-2.6 mm Hg), and salivary cortisol (-6.4 to -2.1 Nmol/l) were significantly reduced, the Mini-Mental State Examination significantly improved (1.8 points) in the TG versus control arm at T1 (p < 0.001). No adverse events were reported. CONCLUSION: The indoor TG seems safe and may reduce BPSD, medication intake, and cortisol levels in AD.

9.
Parkinsons Dis ; 2019: 9026890, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31428306

RESUMO

Gait impairments and camptocormia (CC) are common and debilitating in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Two types of CC affect patients with PD, but no studies investigated their relative contribution in worsening gait and postural control. Therefore, we investigated spatiotemporal gait parameters, gait variability, and asymmetry and postural control in PD patients (Hoehn & Yahr ≤4) with upper CC and lower CC and patients without CC. This observational cross-sectional study involving patients with PD and upper CC (n=16) and lower CC (n=14) and without CC (n=16). The primary outcome measure was gait speed assessed by the GAITRite System. The secondary outcome measures were other spatiotemporal parameters, gait variability, and asymmetry. Postural control and balance were assessed with posturography and the Mini-BESTest. Patients with lower CC showed a higher H&Y stage (p=0.003), a worse PDQ8 (p=0.042), and a lower Mini-BESTest score (p=0.006) than patients with PD without CC. Patients with lower CC showed a reduced gait speed (p=0.012), stride length, and velocity than patients with PD without CC. Upper CC patients showed a higher stride length than lower CC ones (p=0.007). In the eyes open and closed condition, patients with lower CC showed a higher (worse) velocity of CoP displacement in mediolateral direction and length of CoP than patients with PD without CC. No significant between-group differences were measured in gait variability and asymmetry. In conclusion, lower CC was associated with more severe gait and postural control impairment than patients with upper CC and without CC. Categorizing CC based on the bending fulcrum is compulsory to identify patients with the worst performance and to implement specific rehabilitation programs.

10.
Ann Phys Rehabil Med ; 62(4): 214-219, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31228593

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection is an effective treatment for lower-limb spasticity and should be offered as first-line treatment for focal manifestations. Although its possible role has been hypothesized, the efficacy of electrical stimulation (ES) of antagonists of the injected muscles for improving clinical outcome after BoNT-A injection remains to be established. OBJECTIVES: This randomized single-blind pilot study aimed to investigate the efficacy of ES of antagonist muscles as adjunct treatment after BoNT-A injection to plantar flexor muscles in hemiplegic patients with spastic equinus foot. METHODS: After BoNT-A injection at triceps surae, patients were randomly allocated to 2 groups: group 1, single ES session on injected muscles plus 5 sessions of ES on antagonist muscles, and group 2, single ES session on injected muscles alone. Both groups underwent daily physical therapy for 60min for 2 weeks (5 days/week). Assessments were performed before treatment (T0) and at 10 days (T1), 20 days (T2), and 90 days (T3) after treatment. Our primary outcome was gait velocity at a comfortable speed at T2 (10-m walk test [10MWT]). The following were secondary outcomes: triceps surae spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale), ankle passive range of motion (pROM), strength of tibialis anterior muscle, and 2-min walk test (2MWT). RESULTS: The 30 patients enrolled were randomly allocated to the 2 groups: 15 in group 1 and 15 in group 2. At T1, T2 and T3, both groups showed a significant reduction in muscle tone and an increase in ankle pROM (P<0.05). At T2 and T3, both groups showed a significant increase in 10MWT and 2MWT. The groups did not significantly differ in tibialis anterior strength or primary or secondary outcome measures. CONCLUSIONS: ES of antagonist muscles does not improve clinical outcomes in the post-stroke spastic equinus foot after BoNT-A injection.


Assuntos
Toxinas Botulínicas Tipo A/uso terapêutico , Terapia por Estimulação Elétrica , Pé Equino/terapia , Espasticidade Muscular/terapia , Fármacos Neuromusculares/uso terapêutico , Idoso , Terapia Combinada , Pé Equino/tratamento farmacológico , Pé Equino/etiologia , Feminino , Hemiplegia/tratamento farmacológico , Hemiplegia/etiologia , Hemiplegia/terapia , Humanos , Perna (Membro) , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Espasticidade Muscular/tratamento farmacológico , Espasticidade Muscular/etiologia , Resistência Física , Projetos Piloto , Recuperação de Função Fisiológica , Método Simples-Cego , Acidente Vascular Cerebral , Reabilitação do Acidente Vascular Cerebral , Resultado do Tratamento
11.
Front Physiol ; 10: 503, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31105594

RESUMO

Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and recurrent stroke-like episodes syndrome (MELAS) is a rare degenerative disease. Recent studies have shown that resistant training (RT) can ameliorate muscular force in mitochondrial diseases. However, the effects of RT in MELAS are unknown. The aim of this case report was to investigate the effects of RT on skeletal muscle and mitochondrial function in a 21-years old patient with MELAS. RT included 12 weeks of RT at 85% of 1 repetition maximum. Body composition (DXA), in vivo mitochondrial respiration capacity (mVO2) utilizing Near-infrared spectroscopy on the right plantar-flexor muscles, maximal voluntary torque (MVC), electrically evoked resting twitch (EET) and maximal voluntary activation (VMA) of the right leg extensors (LE) muscles were measured with the interpolated twitch technique. The participant with MELAS exhibited a marked increase in body mass (1.4 kg) and thigh muscle mass (0.3 kg). After the training period MVC (+5.5 Nm), EET (+2.1 N⋅m) and VMA (+13.1%) were ameliorated. Data of mVO2 revealed negligible changes in the end-exercise mVO2 (0.02 mM min-1), Δ mVO2 (0.09 mM min-1), while there was a marked amelioration in the kinetics of mVO2 (τ mVO2; Δ70.2 s). This is the first report of RT-induced ameliorations on skeletal muscle and mitochondrial function in MELAS. This case study suggests a preserved plasticity in the skeletal muscle of a patient with MELAS. RT appears to be an effective method to increase skeletal muscle function, and this effect is mediated by both neuromuscular and mitochondrial adaptations.

13.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 11(10): 3138-3155, 2019 05 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31127076

RESUMO

Cognitive and physical activity treatments (CT and PT) are two non-pharmacological approaches frequently used in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The aim of this study was to compare CT and PT in these diseases. Eighty-seven patients were randomly assigned to CT (n=30), PT (n=27) or control group (CTRL; n=30) for 6 months. The global cognitive function was measured by Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Specific neuropsychological tests explored attention, memory, executive functions, behavioral disorders. Cardiovascular risk factors (CVD) were collected. All measures were performed before (T0), after treatments (T1), and at three-months follow-up (T2). MMSE did not change from T0 to T1 and T2 in patients assigned to PT and CT, while CTRL patients showed a decline MCI: -11.8%, AD: -16.2%). Between group differences (MCI vs AD) were not found at T1 and T2. Significant worsening was found for CTRL in MCI (T0- T1: P=.039; T0-T2: P<.001) and AD (T0-T1: P<.001; T0-T2: P<.001), and amelioration was found for CT in AD (T0-T2: P<.001). Attention, executive functions and behavioral disorders were unaffected by either PT or CT. Memory was increased in patients with MCI assigned to PT (+6.9%) and CT (+8.5%).. CVD were ameliorated in the PT group. CTRL patients of both groups, revealed significant decline in all functions and no between groups differences were detected. PT appear to ameliorate CVD. Although between groups differences were not found, results suggest a major retention in MCI compared with AD, suggesting that the latter might benefit better of constant rather than periodic treatments. This study confirms the positive effects of CT and PT in mitigating the cognitive decline in MCI and AD patients, and it is the first to demonstrate their similar effectiveness on maintaining cognitive function.

14.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 64: 268-274, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31097299

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Pathological forward trunk flexion is a disabling and drug-refractory motor complication of Parkinson's disease (PD) leading to imbalance, pain, and fall-related injuries. Since it might be reversible, early and multidisciplinary management is emphasised. The primary aim was to compare the effects of a four-week trunk-specific rehabilitation program on the severity of the forward trunk flexion. The secondary aim was to compare the training effects on the motor impairments, dynamic and static balance, pain, falls, and quality of life. METHODS: 37 patients with PD (H&Y ≤ 4) and forward trunk flexion were randomized in the experimental (n = 19) or control group (n = 18). The former consisted of active self-correction exercises with visual and proprioceptive feedback, passive and active trunk stabilization exercises and functional tasks. The latter consisted of joint mobilization, muscle strengthening and stretching, gait and balance exercises. Protocols lasted 4 weeks (60 min/day, 5 days/week). Before, after, and at 1-month follow-up, a blinded examiner evaluated patients using primary and secondary outcomes. The primary outcome was the forward trunk flexion severity (degree). Secondary outcomes were the UPDRS III, dynamic and static balance, pain falls, and quality of life assessment. RESULTS: The experimental group reported a significantly greater reduction in forward trunk flexion than the control group from T0 to both T1 (p = 0.003) and T2 (p = 0.004). The improvements in dynamic and static balance were significantly greater for the experimental group than the control group from T0 to T2 (p = 0.017 and 0.004, respectively). Comparable effects were reported on the other outcomes. Pre-treatment forward trunk flexion values were highly correlated to post-treatment trunk deviation changes. CONCLUSION: The four-week trunk-specific rehabilitation training decreased the forward trunk flexion severity and increased postural control in patients with PD. NCT03741959.

15.
Restor Neurol Neurosci ; 37(2): 97-107, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30958319

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The neural organization of locomotion involves motor patterns generated by spinal interneuronal networks and supraspinal structures, which are approachable by noninvasive stimulation techniques. Recent evidences supported the hypothesis that transcranial direct current stimulation (combined with transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation) may actually enhance the effects of robot-assisted gait training in chronic stroke patients. The cerebellum has many connections to interact with neocortical areas and may provide some peculiar plasticity mechanisms. So, it has been proposed as "non-lesioned entry" to the motor or cognitive system for the application of noninvasive stimulation techniques in patients with supratentorial stroke. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of two different protocols of cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation combined with transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation on robotic gait training in patients with chronic supratentorial stroke. METHODS: Forty patients with chronic supratentorial stroke were randomly assigned into two groups. All patients received ten, 20-minute robotic gait training sessions, five days a week, for two consecutive weeks. Group 1 underwent cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the contralesional cerebellar hemisphere + cathodal transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation in combination with robotic training. Group 2 underwent cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the ipsilesional cerebellar hemisphere + cathodal transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation in combination with robotic training. The primary outcome was the 6-minute walk test performed before, after, and at follow-up at 2 and 4 weeks post-treatment. RESULTS: No significant difference in the 6-minute walk test between groups was found at the first post-treatment evaluation (P = 0.976), as well as at the 2-week (P = 0.178) and the 4-week (P = 0.069) follow-up evaluations. Both groups showed significant within-group improvements in the 6-minute walk test at all time points.∥Conclusions: Our findings support the hypothesis that cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the contralesional or ipsilesional cerebellar hemisphere in combination with cathodal transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation may lead to similar effects on robotic gait training in chronic supratentorial stroke patients.


Assuntos
Reabilitação do Acidente Vascular Cerebral , Terapia Assistida por Computador , Estimulação Transcraniana por Corrente Contínua/métodos , Idoso , Cerebelo , Doença Crônica , Feminino , Seguimentos , Marcha , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Robótica , Método Simples-Cego , Medula Espinal , Reabilitação do Acidente Vascular Cerebral/métodos , Terapia Assistida por Computador/métodos , Resultado do Tratamento , Teste de Caminhada
16.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 55(4)2019 Apr 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30999679

RESUMO

Background and objectives: Hemispatial neglect is a common consequence of stroke, with an estimated incidence of 23%. Interventions for treating hemispatial neglect may be categorized as either top-down or bottom-up processing. The aim of top-down approaches is to train the person to voluntarily compensate for their neglect. Such approaches require awareness of the disorder and a high level of active participation by the patient. Differently, bottom-up approaches are based on manipulation of a patient's sensory environment and so require less awareness of behavioral bias. In line with the latter, it is conceivable that elastic therapeutic taping applied to the left neck surface may provide bottom-up inputs that reduce hemispatial neglect symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of therapeutic neck taping on visuo-spatial abilities, neck motion, and kinesthetic sensibility in chronic stroke patients with hemispatial neglect. Materials and Methods: After randomization, 12 chronic stroke patients with hemispatial neglect received 30 consecutive days of real (treatment group) or sham (control group) neck taping. The outcomes were as follows: Stars Cancellation Test; neck active range of motion; Letter Cancellation Test; Comb and Razor Test; Cervical Joint Position Error Test evaluated before and after one month of taping. Results: Between-group comparison showed significant differences only for the Cervical Joint Position Error Test after treatment (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Our preliminary findings support the hypothesis that neck taping might improve cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility in chronic stroke patients with hemispatial neglect. Further studies are needed to strengthen our results and better investigate the effects of elastic therapeutic taping on visuo-spatial abilities in stroke patients with hemispatial neglect.


Assuntos
Fita Atlética , Pescoço/fisiopatologia , Transtornos da Percepção/etiologia , Transtornos da Percepção/terapia , Reabilitação do Acidente Vascular Cerebral/métodos , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações , Idoso , Doença Crônica , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Destreza Motora/fisiologia , Testes Neuropsicológicos , Pacientes Ambulatoriais , Transtornos da Percepção/reabilitação , Projetos Piloto , Método Simples-Cego , Estatísticas não Paramétricas , Resultado do Tratamento
17.
J Rehabil Med ; 51(5): 380-384, 2019 May 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30843081

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To identify the anatomical landmarks of tibial motor nerve branches to the gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis posterior muscles for selective motor nerve blocks in the management of spastic equinovarus foot. DESIGN: Observational study. PATIENTS: Twenty-five chronic stroke patients with spastic equinovarus foot. METHODS: Motor nerve branches to the gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis posterior muscles were tracked in the affected leg, using ultrasonography, and located in the space (vertical, horizontal and deep) according to the position of the fibular head (proximal/distal) and a virtual line from the middle of the popliteal fossa to the Achilles tendon insertion (medial/lateral). RESULTS: Mean coordinates for the gastrocnemius medialis motor branch were: 1.5 cm (standard deviation (SD) 2.7) vertical (proximal), 1.7 cm (SD 1.3) horizontal (medial), 1.1 cm (SD 0.4) deep; for the gastrocnemius lateralis motor branch: 0.9 cm (SD 2.2) vertical (proximal), 1.8 cm (SD 1.7) horizontal (lateral), 1.0 cm (SD 0.3) deep; for the soleus motor branch: 1.4 cm (SD 1.1) vertical (distal), 1.6 cm (SD 0.7) horizontal (lateral), 2.8 cm (SD 0.7) deep; and for the tibialis posterior motor branch: 4.3 cm (SD 1.5) vertical (distal), 1.9 cm (SD 0.9) horizontal (lateral), 4.2 cm (SD 0.8) deep. CONCLUSION: These findings may help in the identification of tibial motor nerve branches to the gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis posterior muscles for selective motor nerve blocks in the management of spastic equinovarus foot.


Assuntos
Pé Torto Equinovaro/etiologia , Espasticidade Muscular/etiologia , Músculo Esquelético/inervação , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações , Nervo Tibial/anatomia & histologia , Ultrassonografia/métodos , Idoso , Pé Torto Equinovaro/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Espasticidade Muscular/patologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/patologia
18.
J Clin Med ; 8(2)2019 02 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30744116

RESUMO

Recent literature highlights the importance of identifying factors associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Actual validated biomarkers include neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid assessments; however, we investigated non-Aß-dependent factors associated with dementia in 12 MCI and 30 AD patients. Patients were assessed for global cognitive function (Mini-Mental state examination-MMSE), physical function (Physical Performance Test-PPT), exercise capacity (6-min walking test-6MWT), maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), brain volume, vascular function (flow-mediated dilation-FMD), inflammatory status (tumor necrosis factor-α ,TNF- α, interleukin-6, -10 and -15) and neurotrophin receptors (p75NTR and Tropomyosin receptor kinase A -TrkA). Baseline multifactorial information was submitted to two separate backward stepwise regression analyses to identify the variables associated with cognitive and physical decline in demented patients. A multivariate regression was then applied to verify the stepwise regression. The results indicated that the combination of 6MWT and VO2max was associated with both global cognitive and physical function (MMSE = 11.384 + (0.00599 × 6MWT) - (0.235 × VO2max)); (PPT = 1.848 + (0.0264 × 6MWT) + (19.693 × VO2max)). These results may offer important information that might help to identify specific targets for therapeutic strategies (NIH Clinical trial identification number NCT03034746).

19.
Front Neurol ; 10: 41, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30766508

RESUMO

Background: The combined use of Robot-assisted UL training and Botulinum toxin (BoNT) appear to be a promising therapeutic synergism to improve UL function in chronic stroke patients. Objective: To evaluate the effects of Robot-assisted UL training on UL spasticity, function, muscle strength and the electromyographic UL muscles activity in chronic stroke patients treated with Botulinum toxin. Methods: This single-blind, randomized, controlled trial involved 32 chronic stroke outpatients with UL spastic hemiparesis. The experimental group (n = 16) received robot-assisted UL training and BoNT treatment. The control group (n = 16) received conventional treatment combined with BoNT treatment. Training protocols lasted for 5 weeks (45 min/session, two sessions/week). Before and after rehabilitation, a blinded rater evaluated patients. The primary outcome was the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Secondary outcomes were the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) and the Medical Research Council Scale (MRC). The electromyographic activity of 5 UL muscles during the "hand-to-mouth" task was explored only in the experimental group and 14 healthy age-matched controls using a surface Electromyography (EMGs). Results: No significant between-group differences on the MAS and FMA were measured. The experimental group reported significantly greater improvements on UL muscle strength (p = 0.004; Cohen's d = 0.49), shoulder abduction (p = 0.039; Cohen's d = 0.42), external rotation (p = 0.019; Cohen's d = 0.72), and elbow flexion (p = 0.043; Cohen's d = 1.15) than the control group. Preliminary observation of muscular activity showed a different enhancement of the biceps brachii activation after the robot-assisted training. Conclusions: Robot-assisted training is as effective as conventional training on muscle tone reduction when combined with Botulinum toxin in chronic stroke patients with UL spasticity. However, only the robot-assisted UL training contributed to improving muscle strength. The single-group analysis and the qualitative inspection of sEMG data performed in the experimental group showed improvement in the agonist muscles activity during the hand-to-mouth task. Clinical Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT03590314.

20.
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med ; 55(1): 47-55, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29898585

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The outcome measures (OMs) in clinical trials for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) still represent an issue. A recent study highlighted that three additional clinical OMs, the 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT), the 9-Hole Peg Test, and foot dorsal flexion dynamometry, further improve discrimination between severely and mildly affected patients. Another study has recently assessed the validity and reliability of the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT). AIM: The aim of this study was to identify the most useful scales in the clinical evaluation of CMT1A patients. DESIGN: Observational study of the baseline data collected in a multicenter, prospective, randomized, single blind, controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an innovative rehabilitation protocol based on treadmill training, stretching, respiratory, and proprioceptive exercises (TreSPE study) in CMT1A patients. SETTING: The outpatient service of the four Italian centers involved, which are specialized in hereditary neuropathies. POPULATION: Fifty-three subjects with a clinical and genetically confirmed diagnosis of CMT1A. METHODS: At baseline, in addition to the CMT Neuropathy Score, all subjects underwent walking evaluation (6MWT, 10MWT), balance assessment (Berg Balance Scale [BBS], Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB]) and a subjective evaluation of quality of life (SF36) and walking ability (Walk12). RESULTS: Analyzing the baseline data, as expected, we found a strong correlation between walk and balance evaluation, proving the validity of these tests in investigating the functional impairment of CMT1A subjects. Particularly, we found that subjects with better balance control walk at higher speed and perceive less limitations in their physical activities or motor skills. This can be reconducted to the fact that ankle stability depends upon different factors such as anatomy integrity, muscle strength and proprioception. CONCLUSIONS: We identify the 6MWT, 10MWT, and SPPB as the most useful scales, in addition to the CMTNS, to evaluate the functional impairment of CMT1A patients who retain their walking capability and we suggest the use of SPPB because of its rapidity to assess balance and gait disorders in clinical settings. CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: In the clinical practice it is important to evaluate patients comprehensively but rapidly. These outcome measures can help us to correctly assess balance and walking ability in CMT1A patients.


Assuntos
Doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth/fisiopatologia , Doença de Charcot-Marie-Tooth/reabilitação , Modalidades de Fisioterapia , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Destreza Motora/fisiologia , Força Muscular/fisiologia , Dinamômetro de Força Muscular , Equilíbrio Postural/fisiologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Qualidade de Vida , Amplitude de Movimento Articular/fisiologia , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Método Simples-Cego , Teste de Caminhada , Caminhada/fisiologia
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