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1.
Depress Anxiety ; 2019 Nov 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31689000

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Physical activity is increasingly recognized as an important modifiable factor for depression. However, the extent to which individuals with stable risk factors for depression, such as high genetic vulnerability, can benefit from the protective effects of physical activity, remains unknown. Using a longitudinal biobank cohort integrating genomic data from 7,968 individuals of European ancestry with high-dimensional electronic health records and lifestyle survey responses, we examined whether physical activity was prospectively associated with reduced risk for incident depression in the context of genetic vulnerability. METHODS: We identified individuals with incident episodes of depression, based on two or more diagnostic billing codes for a depressive disorder within 2 years following their lifestyle survey, and no such codes in the year prior. Polygenic risk scores were derived based on large-scale genome-wide association results for major depression. We tested main effects of physical activity and polygenic risk scores on incident depression, and effects of physical activity within stratified groups of polygenic risk. RESULTS: Polygenic risk was associated with increased odds of incident depression, and physical activity showed a protective effect of similar but opposite magnitude, even after adjusting for BMI, employment status, educational attainment, and prior depression. Higher levels of physical activity were associated with reduced odds of incident depression across all levels of genetic vulnerability, even among individuals at highest polygenic risk. CONCLUSIONS: Real-world data from a large healthcare system suggest that individuals with high genetic vulnerability are more likely to avoid incident episodes of depression if they are physically active.

2.
Cell ; 179(3): 589-603, 2019 Oct 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31607513

RESUMO

Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have focused primarily on populations of European descent, but it is essential that diverse populations become better represented. Increasing diversity among study participants will advance our understanding of genetic architecture in all populations and ensure that genetic research is broadly applicable. To facilitate and promote research in multi-ancestry and admixed cohorts, we outline key methodological considerations and highlight opportunities, challenges, solutions, and areas in need of development. Despite the perception that analyzing genetic data from diverse populations is difficult, it is scientifically and ethically imperative, and there is an expanding analytical toolbox to do it well.

3.
Mol Psychiatry ; 2019 Oct 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31591465

RESUMO

Schizophrenia is a common, chronic and debilitating neuropsychiatric syndrome affecting tens of millions of individuals worldwide. While rare genetic variants play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia, most of the currently explained liability is within common variation, suggesting that variation predating the human diaspora out of Africa harbors a large fraction of the common variant attributable heritability. However, common variant association studies in schizophrenia have concentrated mainly on cohorts of European descent. We describe genome-wide association studies of 6152 cases and 3918 controls of admixed African ancestry, and of 1234 cases and 3090 controls of Latino ancestry, representing the largest such study in these populations to date. Combining results from the samples with African ancestry with summary statistics from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) study of schizophrenia yielded seven newly genome-wide significant loci, and we identified an additional eight loci by incorporating the results from samples with Latino ancestry. Leveraging population differences in patterns of linkage disequilibrium, we achieve improved fine-mapping resolution at 22 previously reported and 4 newly significant loci. Polygenic risk score profiling revealed improved prediction based on trans-ancestry meta-analysis results for admixed African (Nagelkerke's R2 = 0.032; liability R2 = 0.017; P < 10-52), Latino (Nagelkerke's R2 = 0.089; liability R2 = 0.021; P < 10-58), and European individuals (Nagelkerke's R2 = 0.089; liability R2 = 0.037; P < 10-113), further highlighting the advantages of incorporating data from diverse human populations.

4.
Biol Psychiatry ; 2019 Aug 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31570195

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of depression is higher in individuals with autoimmune diseases, but the mechanisms underlying the observed comorbidities are unknown. Shared genetic etiology is a plausible explanation for the overlap, and in this study we tested whether genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which is associated with risk for autoimmune diseases, is also associated with risk for depression. METHODS: We fine-mapped the classical MHC (chr6: 29.6-33.1 Mb), imputing 216 human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and 4 complement component 4 (C4) haplotypes in studies from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Major Depressive Disorder Working Group and the UK Biobank. The total sample size was 45,149 depression cases and 86,698 controls. We tested for association between depression status and imputed MHC variants, applying both a region-wide significance threshold (3.9 × 10-6) and a candidate threshold (1.6 × 10-4). RESULTS: No HLA alleles or C4 haplotypes were associated with depression at the region-wide threshold. HLA-B*08:01 was associated with modest protection for depression at the candidate threshold for testing in HLA genes in the meta-analysis (odds ratio = 0.98, 95% confidence interval = 0.97-0.99). CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence that an increased risk for depression was conferred by HLA alleles, which play a major role in the genetic susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, or C4 haplotypes, which are strongly associated with schizophrenia. These results suggest that any HLA or C4 variants associated with depression either are rare or have very modest effect sizes.

5.
Am J Psychiatry ; 176(10): 846-855, 2019 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31416338

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Individuals at high risk for schizophrenia may benefit from early intervention, but few validated risk predictors are available. Genetic profiling is one approach to risk stratification that has been extensively validated in research cohorts. The authors sought to test the utility of this approach in clinical settings and to evaluate the broader health consequences of high genetic risk for schizophrenia. METHODS: The authors used electronic health records for 106,160 patients from four health care systems to evaluate the penetrance and pleiotropy of genetic risk for schizophrenia. Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) for schizophrenia were calculated from summary statistics and tested for association with 1,359 disease categories, including schizophrenia and psychosis, in phenome-wide association studies. Effects were combined through meta-analysis across sites. RESULTS: PRSs were robustly associated with schizophrenia (odds ratio per standard deviation increase in PRS, 1.55; 95% CI=1.4, 1.7), and patients in the highest risk decile of the PRS distribution had up to 4.6-fold higher odds of schizophrenia compared with those in the bottom decile (95% CI=2.9, 7.3). PRSs were also positively associated with other phenotypes, including anxiety, mood, substance use, neurological, and personality disorders, as well as suicidal behavior, memory loss, and urinary syndromes; they were inversely related to obesity. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrates that an available measure of genetic risk for schizophrenia is robustly associated with schizophrenia in health care settings and has pleiotropic effects on related psychiatric disorders as well as other medical syndromes. The results provide an initial indication of the opportunities and limitations that may arise with the future application of PRS testing in health care systems.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31421235

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Genomic discoveries should be investigated in generalizable child psychiatric samples to justify and inform studies that will evaluate their use for specific clinical purposes. In youth consecutively referred for neuropsychiatric evaluation, we examined: 1) the convergent and discriminant validity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) polygenic risk scores (PRS) in relation to DSM-based ADHD phenotypes; 2) the association of ADHD PRS with phenotypes beyond ADHD that share its liability and have implications for outcome; and 3) the extent to which youth with high ADHD PRS manifest a distinctive clinical profile. METHOD: Participants were 433 youth, ages 7 to 18, from the Longitudinal Study of Genetic Influences on Cognition. We used logistic/linear regression and mixed effects models to examine associations with ADHD-related polygenic variation from the largest ADHD GWAS to date. We replicated key findings in 5140 adult patients from a local health system biobank. RESULTS: Among referred youth, ADHD PRS associated with ADHD diagnoses, cross-diagnostic ADHD symptoms and academic impairment (OR's ∼1.4; R2's ∼2-3%) as well as cross-diagnostic variation in aggression and working memory. In adults, ADHD PRS associated with ADHD and phenotypes beyond the condition that have public health implications. Finally, youth with a high ADHD polygenic burden showed a more severe clinical profile than those with low burden (beta's∼.2). CONCLUSION: Among child and adolescent outpatients, ADHD polygenic risk associated with ADHD and related phenotypes as well as clinical severity. Results extend the scientific foundation for studies of ADHD polygenic risk in the clinical setting and highlight directions for further research.

7.
N Engl J Med ; 381(7): 668-676, 2019 08 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31412182

RESUMO

Knowledge gained from observational cohort studies has dramatically advanced the prevention and treatment of diseases. Many of these cohorts, however, are small, lack diversity, or do not provide comprehensive phenotype data. The All of Us Research Program plans to enroll a diverse group of at least 1 million persons in the United States in order to accelerate biomedical research and improve health. The program aims to make the research results accessible to participants, and it is developing new approaches to generate, access, and make data broadly available to approved researchers. All of Us opened for enrollment in May 2018 and currently enrolls participants 18 years of age or older from a network of more than 340 recruitment sites. Elements of the program protocol include health questionnaires, electronic health records (EHRs), physical measurements, the use of digital health technology, and the collection and analysis of biospecimens. As of July 2019, more than 175,000 participants had contributed biospecimens. More than 80% of these participants are from groups that have been historically underrepresented in biomedical research. EHR data on more than 112,000 participants from 34 sites have been collected. The All of Us data repository should permit researchers to take into account individual differences in lifestyle, socioeconomic factors, environment, and biologic characteristics in order to advance precision diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.


Assuntos
Bancos de Espécimes Biológicos , Pesquisa Biomédica , Estudos de Coortes , Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Estudos Observacionais como Assunto , Medicina de Precisão , Projetos de Pesquisa , Estados Unidos
8.
Am J Psychiatry ; 176(8): 609-614, 2019 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31366225
9.
Mol Psychiatry ; 2019 Jul 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31341239

RESUMO

Although exposure to adversity increases risk for poor mental health outcomes, many people exposed to adversity do not develop such outcomes. Psychological resilience, defined broadly as positive emotional and/or behavioral adaptation to adversity, may be influenced by genetic factors that have remained largely unexplored in the era of large-scale genome-wide studies. In this perspective, we provide an integrative framework for studying human genome-wide variation underlying resilience. We first outline three complementary working definitions of psychological resilience-as a capacity, process, and outcome. For each definition, we review emerging empirical evidence, including findings from positive psychology, to illustrate how a resilience-based framework can guide novel and fruitful directions for the field of psychiatric genomics, distinct from the ongoing study of psychiatric risk and related traits. Finally, we provide practical recommendations for future genomic research on resilience, highlighting a need to augment cross-sectional findings with prospective designs that include detailed measurement of adversities and outcomes. A research framework that explicitly addresses resilience could help us to probe biological mechanisms of stress adaptation, identify individuals who may benefit the most from prevention and early intervention, and ascertain modifiable protective factors that mitigate negative outcomes even for those at high genetic risk.

10.
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet ; 180(5): 310-319, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31081985

RESUMO

Though a growing body of preclinical and translational research is illuminating a biological basis for resilience to stress, little is known about the genetic basis of psychological resilience in humans. We conducted genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of self-assessed (by questionnaire) and outcome-based (incident mental disorders from predeployment to postdeployment) resilience among European (EUR) ancestry soldiers in the Army study to assess risk and resilience in servicemembers. Self-assessed resilience (N = 11,492) was found to have significant common-variant heritability (h2 = 0.162, se = 0.050, p = 5.37 × 10-4 ), and to be significantly negatively genetically correlated with neuroticism (rg = -0.388, p = .0092). GWAS results from the EUR soldiers revealed a genome-wide significant locus on an intergenic region on Chr 4 upstream from doublecortin-like kinase 2 (DCLK2) (four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in LD; top SNP: rs4260523 [p = 5.65 × 10-9 ] is an eQTL in frontal cortex), a member of the doublecortin family of kinases that promote survival and regeneration of injured neurons. A second gene, kelch-like family member 36 (KLHL36) was detected at gene-wise genome-wide significance [p = 1.89 × 10-6 ]. A polygenic risk score derived from the self-assessed resilience GWAS was not significantly associated with outcome-based resilience. In very preliminary results, genome-wide significant association with outcome-based resilience was found for one locus (top SNP: rs12580015 [p = 2.37 × 10-8 ]) on Chr 12 downstream from solute carrier family 15 member 5 (SLC15A5) in subjects (N = 581) exposed to the highest level of deployment stress. The further study of genetic determinants of resilience has the potential to illuminate the molecular bases of stress-related psychopathology and point to new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

11.
Brain Behav ; 9(6): e01282, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30993908

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Individuals with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) symptoms show deficits in emotion processing, but results of prior studies have been conflicting, and little is known about developmental trajectories of emotion processing over time. We examined the association between GAD symptoms and sensitivity to recognizing emotional facial expressions (emotion sensitivity: ES) for three emotions (happiness, anger, fear) in a large, diverse, population-based sample. We hypothesized that higher anxiety scores would be associated with poorer performance, and expected that ES performance and anxiety scores would decline across the lifespan. METHOD: Participants were 7,176 responders to a web-based ES study (age range = 10-96 years old). RESULTS: Higher GAD-7 scores were associated with poorer ES performance for all emotion categories (happiness, anger, fear). The relationship between GAD-7 and ES scores remained significant after controlling for the effects of age and sex, and there was no significant interaction, indicating that the relationship does not change across age. Age significantly predicted ES and GAD-7 scores across emotions, with older ages showing lower ES scores and lower anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: In the largest study of its kind, GAD symptoms were associated with impaired ES performance across three emotion types. Future research should explore the connection between anxiety symptoms, cognitive processing, and social processing to better characterize the mechanisms of how GAD is linked with both social and non-social information processing. Future work may also look at if ES is related over time to changes in anxiety, making it a promising target for intervention.

12.
Psychol Med ; : 1-9, 2019 Apr 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30982473

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Whereas genetic susceptibility increases the risk for major depressive disorder (MDD), non-genetic protective factors may mitigate this risk. In a large-scale prospective study of US Army soldiers, we examined whether trait resilience and/or unit cohesion could protect against the onset of MDD following combat deployment, even in soldiers at high polygenic risk. METHODS: Data were analyzed from 3079 soldiers of European ancestry assessed before and after their deployment to Afghanistan. Incident MDD was defined as no MDD episode at pre-deployment, followed by a MDD episode following deployment. Polygenic risk scores were constructed from a large-scale genome-wide association study of major depression. We first examined the main effects of the MDD PRS and each protective factor on incident MDD. We then tested the effects of each protective factor on incident MDD across strata of polygenic risk. RESULTS: Polygenic risk showed a dose-response relationship to depression, such that soldiers at high polygenic risk had greatest odds for incident MDD. Both unit cohesion and trait resilience were prospectively associated with reduced risk for incident MDD. Notably, the protective effect of unit cohesion persisted even in soldiers at highest polygenic risk. CONCLUSIONS: Polygenic risk was associated with new-onset MDD in deployed soldiers. However, unit cohesion - an index of perceived support and morale - was protective against incident MDD even among those at highest genetic risk, and may represent a potent target for promoting resilience in vulnerable soldiers. Findings illustrate the value of combining genomic and environmental data in a prospective design to identify robust protective factors for mental health.

13.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 1776, 2019 04 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30992449

RESUMO

Polygenic risk scores (PRS) have shown promise in predicting human complex traits and diseases. Here, we present PRS-CS, a polygenic prediction method that infers posterior effect sizes of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using genome-wide association summary statistics and an external linkage disequilibrium (LD) reference panel. PRS-CS utilizes a high-dimensional Bayesian regression framework, and is distinct from previous work by placing a continuous shrinkage (CS) prior on SNP effect sizes, which is robust to varying genetic architectures, provides substantial computational advantages, and enables multivariate modeling of local LD patterns. Simulation studies using data from the UK Biobank show that PRS-CS outperforms existing methods across a wide range of genetic architectures, especially when the training sample size is large. We apply PRS-CS to predict six common complex diseases and six quantitative traits in the Partners HealthCare Biobank, and further demonstrate the improvement of PRS-CS in prediction accuracy over alternative methods.


Assuntos
Predisposição Genética para Doença , Modelos Genéticos , Herança Multifatorial/genética , Característica Quantitativa Herdável , Artrite Reumatoide/diagnóstico , Artrite Reumatoide/genética , Teorema de Bayes , Neoplasias da Mama/diagnóstico , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Simulação por Computador , Doença da Artéria Coronariana/diagnóstico , Doença da Artéria Coronariana/genética , Bases de Dados Genéticas/estatística & dados numéricos , Depressão/diagnóstico , Depressão/genética , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/diagnóstico , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/diagnóstico , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/genética , Desequilíbrio de Ligação/genética , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Fatores de Risco
14.
Psychol Med ; : 1-8, 2019 Mar 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30854987

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Retrospective reports of lifetime experience with mental disorders greatly underestimate the actual experiences of disorder because recall error biases reporting of earlier life symptoms downward. This fundamental obstacle to accurate reporting has many adverse consequences for the study and treatment of mental disorders. Better tools for accurate retrospective reporting of mental disorder symptoms have the potential for broad scientific benefits. METHODS: We designed a life history calendar (LHC) to support this task, and randomized more than 1000 individuals to each arm of a retrospective diagnostic interview with and without the LHC. We also conducted a careful validation with the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition. RESULTS: Results demonstrate that-just as with frequent measurement longitudinal studies-use of an LHC in retrospective measurement can more than double reports of lifetime experience of some mental disorders. CONCLUSIONS: The LHC significantly improves retrospective reporting of mental disorders. This tool is practical for application in both large cross-sectional surveys of the general population and clinical intake of new patients.

15.
Pac Symp Biocomput ; 24: 272-283, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30864329

RESUMO

The link between cardiovascular diseases and neurological disorders has been widely observed in the aging population. Disease prevention and treatment rely on understanding the potential genetic nexus of multiple diseases in these categories. In this study, we were interested in detecting pleiotropy, or the phenomenon in which a genetic variant influences more than one phenotype. Marker-phenotype association approaches can be grouped into univariate, bivariate, and multivariate categories based on the number of phenotypes considered at one time. Here we applied one statistical method per category followed by an eQTL colocalization analysis to identify potential pleiotropic variants that contribute to the link between cardiovascular and neurological diseases. We performed our analyses on ~530,000 common SNPs coupled with 65 electronic health record (EHR)-based phenotypes in 43,870 unrelated European adults from the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network. There were 31 variants identified by all three methods that showed significant associations across late onset cardiac- and neurologic- diseases. We further investigated functional implications of gene expression on the detected "lead SNPs" via colocalization analysis, providing a deeper understanding of the discovered associations. In summary, we present the framework and landscape for detecting potential pleiotropy using univariate, bivariate, multivariate, and colocalization methods. Further exploration of these potentially pleiotropic genetic variants will work toward understanding disease causing mechanisms across cardiovascular and neurological diseases and may assist in considering disease prevention as well as drug repositioning in future research.

16.
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol ; 33(2): 137-144, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30790331

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Relatively little is known about antepartum suicidal behaviour and pregnancy outcomes. We examined associations of antepartum suicidal behaviour, alone and in combination with psychiatric disorders, with adverse infant and obstetric outcomes. METHODS: We included 188 925 singleton livebirths from a retrospective cohort (1996-2016). Suicidal behaviour, psychiatric disorders, and outcomes were derived from electronic medical records. We performed multivariable logistic regressions with generalised estimating equations to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). RESULTS: The prevalence of antepartum suicidal behaviour was 152.44 per 100 000 singleton livebirths. Nearly two-thirds (64.24%) of women with suicidal behaviour also had psychiatric disorders. Compared to women without psychiatric disorders and suicidal behaviour, women with psychiatric disorders alone had 1.3-fold to 1.4-fold increased odds of delivering low birthweight or preterm infants and 1.2-fold increased odds of experiencing obstetric complications. Women with suicidal behaviour alone had increased odds of preterm labour (aOR 2.05, 95% CI 1.16, 3.62). Women with both suicidal behaviour and psychiatric disorders had > twofold increased odds of delivering low birthweight (aOR 2.52, 95% CI 1.40, 4.54), preterm birth (aOR 2.44, 95% CI 1.63, 3.66), and low birthweight/preterm birth (aOR 2.30, 95% CI 1.54, 3.44) infants; the odds of preterm labour (aOR 1.62, 95% CI 1.06, 2.47), placental abruption (aOR 2.33, 95% CI 1.20, 4.51), preterm rupture of membranes (aOR 1.63, 95% CI 1.08, 2.46), and postpartum haemorrhage (aOR 1.93, 95%CI 1.09, 3.40) were elevated. CONCLUSIONS: Antepartum suicidal behaviour, when co-occurring with psychiatric disorders, is associated with increased odds of adverse infant and obstetric outcomes. Future studies are warranted to understand the causal roles of suicidal behaviour and psychiatric disorders in pregnancy.


Assuntos
Complicações do Trabalho de Parto/psicologia , Complicações na Gravidez/psicologia , Transtornos Psicóticos/epidemiologia , Ideação Suicida , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Complicações do Trabalho de Parto/epidemiologia , Razão de Chances , Gravidez , Complicações na Gravidez/epidemiologia , Resultado da Gravidez , Estudos Retrospectivos , Tentativa de Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
17.
Biol Psychiatry ; 86(2): 110-119, 2019 Jul 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30686506

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genetic risk for bipolar disorder (BD) is conferred through many common alleles, while a role for rare copy number variants (CNVs) is less clear. Subtypes of BD including schizoaffective disorder bipolar type (SAB), bipolar I disorder (BD I), and bipolar II disorder (BD II) differ according to the prominence and timing of psychosis, mania, and depression. The genetic factors contributing to the combination of symptoms among these subtypes are poorly understood. METHODS: Rare large CNVs were analyzed in 6353 BD cases (3833 BD I [2676 with psychosis, 850 without psychosis, and 307 with unknown psychosis history], 1436 BD II, 579 SAB, and 505 BD not otherwise specified) and 8656 controls. CNV burden and a polygenic risk score (PRS) for schizophrenia were used to evaluate the relative contributions of rare and common variants to risk of BD, BD subtypes, and psychosis. RESULTS: CNV burden did not differ between BD and controls when treated as a single diagnostic entity. However, burden in SAB was increased relative to controls (p = .001), BD I (p = .0003), and BD II (p = .0007). Burden and schizophrenia PRSs were increased in SAB compared with BD I with psychosis (CNV p = .0007, PRS p = .004), and BD I without psychosis (CNV p = .0004, PRS p = 3.9 × 10-5). Within BD I, psychosis was associated with increased schizophrenia PRSs (p = .005) but not CNV burden. CONCLUSIONS: CNV burden in BD is limited to SAB. Rare and common genetic variants may contribute differently to risk for psychosis and perhaps other classes of psychiatric symptoms.

18.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 76(4): 399-408, 2019 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30673066

RESUMO

Importance: Increasing evidence shows that physical activity is associated with reduced risk for depression, pointing to a potential modifiable target for prevention. However, the causality and direction of this association are not clear; physical activity may protect against depression, and/or depression may result in decreased physical activity. Objective: To examine bidirectional relationships between physical activity and depression using a genetically informed method for assessing potential causal inference. Design, Setting, and Participants: This 2-sample mendelian randomization (MR) used independent top genetic variants associated with 2 physical activity phenotypes-self-reported (n = 377 234) and objective accelerometer-based (n = 91 084)-and with major depressive disorder (MDD) (n = 143 265) as genetic instruments from the largest available, nonoverlapping genome-wide association studies (GWAS). GWAS were previously conducted in diverse observational cohorts, including the UK Biobank (for physical activity) and participating studies in the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (for MDD) among adults of European ancestry. Mendelian randomization estimates from each genetic instrument were combined using inverse variance weighted meta-analysis, with alternate methods (eg, weighted median, MR Egger, MR-Pleiotropy Residual Sum and Outlier [PRESSO]) and multiple sensitivity analyses to assess horizontal pleiotropy and remove outliers. Data were analyzed from May 10 through July 31, 2018. Main Outcomes and Measures: MDD and physical activity. Results: GWAS summary data were available for a combined sample size of 611 583 adult participants. Mendelian randomization evidence suggested a protective relationship between accelerometer-based activity and MDD (odds ratio [OR], 0.74 for MDD per 1-SD increase in mean acceleration; 95% CI, 0.59-0.92; P = .006). In contrast, there was no statistically significant relationship between MDD and accelerometer-based activity (ß = -0.08 in mean acceleration per MDD vs control status; 95% CI, -0.47 to 0.32; P = .70). Furthermore, there was no significant relationship between self-reported activity and MDD (OR, 1.28 for MDD per 1-SD increase in metabolic-equivalent minutes of reported moderate-to-vigorous activity; 95% CI, 0.57-3.37; P = .48), or between MDD and self-reported activity (ß = 0.02 per MDD in standardized metabolic-equivalent minutes of reported moderate-to-vigorous activity per MDD vs control status; 95% CI, -0.008 to 0.05; P = .15). Conclusions and Relevance: Using genetic instruments identified from large-scale GWAS, robust evidence supports a protective relationship between objectively assessed-but not self-reported-physical activity and the risk for MDD. Findings point to the importance of objective measurement of physical activity in epidemiologic studies of mental health and support the hypothesis that enhancing physical activity may be an effective prevention strategy for depression.

19.
Transl Psychiatry ; 9(1): 22, 2019 01 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30655502

RESUMO

In 2015, ~800,000 people died by suicide worldwide. For every death by suicide there are as many as 25 suicide attempts, which can result in serious injury even when not fatal. Despite this large impact on morbidity and mortality, the genetic influences on suicide attempt are poorly understood. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of severity of suicide attempts to investigate genetic influences. A discovery GWAS was performed in Yale-Penn sample cohorts of European Americans (EAs, n = 2,439) and African Americans (AAs, n = 3,881). We found one genome-wide significant (GWS) signal in EAs near the gene LDHB (rs1677091, p = 1.07 × 10-8) and three GWS associations in AAs: ARNTL2 on chromosome 12 (rs683813, p = 2.07 × 10-8), FAH on chromosome 15 (rs72740082, p = 2.36 × 10-8), and on chromosome 18 (rs11876255, p = 4.61 × 10-8) in the Yale-Penn discovery sample. We conducted a limited replication analysis in the completely independent Army-STARRS cohorts. rs1677091 replicated in Latinos (LAT, p = 6.52 × 10-3). A variant in LD with FAH rs72740082 (rs72740088; r2 = 0.68) was replicated in AAs (STARRS AA p = 5.23 × 10-3; AA meta, 1.51 × 10-9). When combined for a trans-population meta-analysis, the final sample size included n = 20,153 individuals. Finally, we found significant genetic overlap with major depressive disorder (MDD) using polygenic risk scores from a large GWAS (r2 = 0.007, p = 6.42 × 10-5). To our knowledge, this is the first GWAS of suicide attempt severity. We identified GWS associations near genes involved in anaerobic energy production (LDHB), circadian clock regulation (ARNTL2), and catabolism of tyrosine (FAH). These findings provide evidence of genetic risk factors for suicide attempt severity, providing new information regarding the molecular mechanisms involved.


Assuntos
Transtorno Depressivo Maior/genética , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/psicologia , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia , Adulto , Afro-Americanos/genética , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Modelos Lineares , Masculino , Herança Multifatorial , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Estados Unidos
20.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(1): 157-163, 2019 01 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30583798

RESUMO

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition affecting more than 20% of men over 60 years, yet little is known about its genetic architecture. We performed a genome-wide association study of ED in 6,175 case subjects among 223,805 European men and identified one locus at 6q16.3 (lead variant rs57989773, OR 1.20 per C-allele; p = 5.71 × 10-14), located between MCHR2 and SIM1. In silico analysis suggests SIM1 to confer ED risk through hypothalamic dysregulation. Mendelian randomization provides evidence that genetic risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus is a cause of ED (OR 1.11 per 1-log unit higher risk of type 2 diabetes). These findings provide insights into the biological underpinnings and the causes of ED and may help prioritize the development of future therapies for this common disorder.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/complicações , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Disfunção Erétil/etiologia , Disfunção Erétil/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Hipotálamo/patologia , Alelos , Fatores de Transcrição Hélice-Alça-Hélice Básicos/genética , Cromossomos Humanos Par 6/genética , Simulação por Computador , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , Masculino , Proteínas Repressoras/genética
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