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1.
In. Caribbean Public Health Agency. Caribbean Public Health Agency: 60th Annual Scientific Meeting. Kingston, The University of the West Indies. Faculty of Medical Sciences, 2015. p.[1-75]. (West Indian Medical Journal Supplement).
Monografia em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-17924

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of physical and psychological violence amongst the medical staff in the eight public polyclinics of Barbados. DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross sectional study was conducted utilising a modified version of the standard Workplace Violence Questionnaire by the World Health Organisation, designed to assess the prevalence, types and features of workplace violence. All nursing and physician staff on duty at the island’s eight polyclinics during the study period (June-July 2014) were invited to participate. Statistical analysis was performed using Epi info 7. RESULTS: Of the 102 respondents (72% response rate), a total of 63% (95% CI 53.0%-72.4%) of nursing and physician staff at the polyclinics in Barbados reported having suffered at least one incident of violence in the past 12 months. Verbal abuse was the most frequent (60%; 95% CI 50.1%- 69.7%). The one-year prevalence rates of physical violence, bullying, sexual harassment, and racial harassment were 2.9%, 18.8%, 6.9% and 2.9%, respectively. Logistic regression showed that females were more likely to experience verbal abuse than males (OR=11; 95% CI 2.8-43.1) and nurses more likely than physicians (OR=1.9; 95% CI 1.1-4.7). The client accounted for 64% of the incidents. CONCLUSIONS: More than half of all staff surveyed reported experiencing some type of violence in the past year, female gender being a significant predictor of abuse. This initial process of characterising the extent and type of violence present, can serve as a foundation for further qualitative research exploring reasons for violence experienced.


Assuntos
Local de Trabalho , Violência , Corpo Clínico , Instalações de Saúde , Barbados
2.
In. Caribbean Public Health Agency. Caribbean Public Health Agency: 60th Annual Scientific Meeting. Kingston, The University of the West Indies. Faculty of Medical Sciences, 2015. p.[1-75]. (West Indian Medical Journal Supplement).
Monografia em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-17970

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Following the WHO Commission on the Social Determinants of Health, Caribbean countries committed to identifying and reducing health inequities (Rio Political Declaration 2011). We undertook a systematic review to determine what is known about the social distribution of diabetes (DM), its risk factors and major complications in the Caribbean. This paper describes findings on the distribution by ethnicity, education, occupation and income. DESIGN AND METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase and the Virtual Health Library for Caribbean studies published between 2007 and 2013 that described the distribution by ethnicity, income, education and occupation of: known risk factors for type 2 DM, prevalence of DM, DM control or complications. Only quantitative studies were included; each was assessed for risk of bias. RESULTS: Out of 2796 unique records, 81 articles required full text review, and 29 articles met the inclusion criteria. Few studies examined DM, its risk factors or complications by education (4), income (2) or occupation (1). None described significant relationships but all had a high risk of bias. Statistically significant findings were described from Barbados, Cuba and Trinidad on the distribution of diabetes by ethnicity: higher in Blacks than Whites, and in South Asians in Trinidad compared to other groups (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.14, 3.05). CONCLUSION: Published data in the Caribbean on the social distribution of diabetes, its risk factors and complications were very limited and of overall low quality. Work to better identify health inequities in the Caribbean is required if governments are to meet their commitment to addressing them.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus , Complicações do Diabetes , Fatores de Risco , Dados Demográficos , Região do Caribe , Revisão
3.
In. Caribbean Public Health Agency. Caribbean Public Health Agency: 60th Annual Scientific Meeting. Kingston, The University of the West Indies. Faculty of Medical Sciences, 2015. p.[1-75]. (West Indian Medical Journal Supplement).
Monografia em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-17971

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: We undertook a systematic review to determine the social distribution of diabetes (DM) its risk factors and major complications in the Caribbean. This paper describes our findings on the distribution by gender. DESIGN AND METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase and the Virtual Health Library for Caribbean studies published between 2007 and 2013 that described the distribution by gender of: known risk factors for Type 2 DM, prevalence of DM, and DM control or complications. Only quantitative studies (n>50) were included; each was assessed for risk of bias. Meta-analyses were performed, where appropriate, on studies with a low or medium risk of bias, using random effects models. RESULTS: We found 50 articles from 27 studies, yielding 118 relationships between gender and the outcomes. Women were more likely to have DM, obesity, be less physically active but less likely to smoke. In meta-analyses of good quality population based studies odds ratios for women vs. men for DM, obesity and smoking were: 1.65 (95% CI 1.43, 1.91), 3.10 (2.43, 3.94), and 0.24 (0.17, 0.34). Three studies found men more likely to have better glycaemic control but only one achieved statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Female gender is a determinant of DM prevalence in the Caribbean. In the vast majority of world regions women are at a similar or lower risk of type 2 diabetes than men, even when obesity is higher in women. Caribbean female excess of diabetes may be due to a much greater excess of risk factors in women, especially obesity and physical inactivity.


Assuntos
Gênero e Saúde , Fatores Sexuais , Fatores de Risco , Diabetes Mellitus , Região do Caribe , Revisão , Metanálise
4.
In. Caribbean Public Health Agency. Caribbean Public Health Agency: 60th Annual Scientific Meeting. Kingston, The University of the West Indies. Faculty of Medical Sciences, 2015. p.[1-75]. (West Indian Medical Journal Supplement).
Monografia em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-18016

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This paper seeks to determine the prevalence of herbal medicine use in persons with diabetes and hypertension; and to identify the demographic and socioeconomic profile of persons using such therapies. DESIGN AND METHODS: Secondary data analysis was done using the Barbados Behaviour Risk Factor Survey 2007. The prevalence of herbal medicine use was determined. Crude and adjusted odds ratios were generated for the relationship between these outcomes and age, sex, employment status; marital status; educational level and ethnicity. RESULTS: Herbal use was found to be 7.4% (2.9% to 11.9%) among diabetics, 4.5% (2.3% to 6.7%) among hypertensive persons, and 5.5% (3.2% to 7.8%) among all persons who were either diabetic and or hypertensive. A statistically significant association was seen between herbal use and age only (age 60 years and over compared to age < 60 years adjusted OR 4.0 95%CI 1.3 to 12.3). CONCLUSIONS: Though older persons were more likely to use herbal medicines, this study suggests a rather low prevalence of such practices. A more comprehensive assessment of socioeconomic status and of herbal medicine use is warranted.


Assuntos
Prevalência , Medicina Herbária , Diabetes Mellitus , Hipertensão , Barbados
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