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1.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 3503, 2019 Aug 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31409809

RESUMO

Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) affects 10-20% of the population and is associated with substantial functional deficits. Here, we identify 42 loci for self-reported daytime sleepiness in GWAS of 452,071 individuals from the UK Biobank, with enrichment for genes expressed in brain tissues and in neuronal transmission pathways. We confirm the aggregate effect of a genetic risk score of 42 SNPs on daytime sleepiness in independent Scandinavian cohorts and on other sleep disorders (restless legs syndrome, insomnia) and sleep traits (duration, chronotype, accelerometer-derived sleep efficiency and daytime naps or inactivity). However, individual daytime sleepiness signals vary in their associations with objective short vs long sleep, and with markers of sleep continuity. The 42 sleepiness variants primarily cluster into two predominant composite biological subtypes - sleep propensity and sleep fragmentation. Shared genetic links are also seen with obesity, coronary heart disease, psychiatric diseases, cognitive traits and reproductive ageing.

2.
Stat Med ; 2019 Aug 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31441522

RESUMO

It is increasingly of interest in statistical genetics to test for the presence of an additive interaction between genetic (G) and environmental (E) risk factors. In case-control studies involving a rare disease, a statistical test of no additive G×E interaction typically entails a test of no relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI). It has been shown that a likelihood ratio test of a null RERI incorporating the G-E independence assumption (RERI-LRT) outperforms the standard approach. The RERI-LRT relies on correct specification of a logistic model for the binary outcome, as a function of G, E, and auxiliary covariates. However, when at least one exposure is not categorical or auxiliary covariates are present, nonparametric estimation may not be feasible, while parametric logistic regression will a priori rule out the null hypothesis of no additive interaction in most practical situations, inflating type I error rate. In this paper, we present a general approach to test for G × E additive interaction exploiting G-E independence. Unlike the RERI-LRT, it allows the regression model for the binary outcome to remain unrestricted, and nonetheless still allows for covariate adjustment in order to ensure the G-E independence assumption or to rule out residual confounding. The methods are illustrated through extensive simulation studies and an ovarian cancer study.

3.
Sleep ; 2019 Aug 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31386152

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: We examined the night-to-night associations of evening use of alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine with actigraphically estimated sleep duration, sleep efficiency, and wake after sleep onset (WASO) among a large cohort of African American adults. METHODS: Participants in the Jackson Heart Sleep Study underwent wrist actigraphy for an average of 6.7 nights and completed concurrent daily sleep diary assessments to record any consumption of alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine within 4 hours of bedtime. Linear mixed-effect models were fit and adjusted for age, sex, educational attainment, body mass index, depression, anxiety, stress, and having work/school the next day. RESULTS: Eligible participants (n = 785) were an average of 63.7 years (SD: 10.6), and were predominantly female (67.9%). There were 5164 days of concurrent actigraphy and sleep diary data. Evening alcohol use was associated with that night's lower sleep efficiency (-0.98% [95% CI: -1.67% to -0.29%], p = 0.005), but not with WASO or sleep duration. Evening nicotine use was associated with that night's lower sleep efficiency [1.74% (95% CI: -2.79 to -0.68), p = 0.001] and 6.09 minutes higher WASO ([95% CI: 0.82 to 11.35], p = 0.02), but was not associated with sleep duration. Evening caffeine use was not associated with any of the sleep parameters. CONCLUSION: Nicotine and alcohol use within 4 hours of bedtime were associated with increased sleep fragmentation in the associated night, even after controlling for multiple potential confounders. These findings support the importance of sleep health recommendations that promote the restriction of evening alcohol and nicotine use to improve sleep continuity.

4.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 11410, 2019 Aug 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31388106

RESUMO

Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) burden differs by race/ethnicity. Although familial aggregation and heritability studies suggest a genetic basis, little is known about the genetic susceptibility to PAD, especially in non-European descent populations. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the ankle brachial index (ABI) and PAD (defined as an ABI < 0.90) have not been conducted in Hispanics/Latinos. We performed a GWAS of PAD and the ABI in 7,589 participants aged >45 years from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). We also performed GWAS for ABI stratified by Hispanic/Latino ethnic subgroups: Central American, Mexican, and South American (Mainland group), and Cuban, Dominican, and Puerto Rican (Caribbean group). We detected two genome-wide significant associations for the ABI in COMMD10 in Puerto Ricans, and at SYBU in the Caribbean group. The lead SNP rs4466200 in the COMMD10 gene had a replication p = 0.02 for the ABI in Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) African Americans, but it did not replicate in African Americans from the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS). In a regional look-up, a nearby SNP rs12520838 had Bonferroni adjusted p = 0.05 (unadjusted p = 7.5 × 10-5) for PAD in MESA Hispanics. Among three suggestive associations (p < 10-7) in subgroup-specific analyses, DMD on chromosome X, identified in Central Americans, replicated in MESA Hispanics (p = 2.2 × 10-4). None of the previously reported ABI and PAD associations in whites generalized to Hispanics/Latinos.

5.
Bioinformatics ; 2019 Jul 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31329242

RESUMO

SUMMARY: The Genomic Data Storage (GDS) format provides efficient storage and retrieval of genotypes measured by microarrays and sequencing. We developed GENESIS to perform various single- and aggregate-variant association tests using genotype data stored in GDS format. GENESIS implements highly flexible mixed models, allowing for different link functions, multiple variance components, and phenotypic heteroskedasticity. GENESIS integrates cohesively with other R/Bioconductor packages to build a complete genomic analysis workflow entirely within the R environment. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: https://bioconductor.org/packages/GENESIS; vignettes included. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary tables and figures are available at Bioinformatics online.

6.
Diabetes Care ; 42(9): 1784-1791, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31213470

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)-associated genetic variants and examine their implications for glycemic status evaluated by HbA1c in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos with diverse genetic ancestries. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of HbA1c in 9,636 U.S. Hispanics/Latinos without diabetes from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, followed by a replication among 4,729 U.S. Hispanics/Latinos from three independent studies. RESULTS: Our GWAS and replication analyses showed 10 previously known and novel loci associated with HbA1c at genome-wide significance levels (P < 5.0 × 10-8). In particular, two African ancestry-specific variants, HBB-rs334 and G6PD-rs1050828, which are causal mutations for sickle cell disease and G6PD deficiency, respectively, had ∼10 times larger effect sizes on HbA1c levels (ß = -0.31% [-3.4 mmol/mol]) and -0.35% [-3.8 mmol/mol] per minor allele, respectively) compared with other HbA1c-associated variants (0.03-0.04% [0.3-0.4 mmol/mol] per allele). A novel Amerindian ancestry-specific variant, HBM-rs145546625, was associated with HbA1c and hematologic traits but not with fasting glucose. The prevalence of hyperglycemia (prediabetes and diabetes) defined using fasting glucose or oral glucose tolerance test 2-h glucose was similar between carriers of HBB-rs334 or G6PD-rs1050828 HbA1c-lowering alleles and noncarriers, whereas the prevalence of hyperglycemia defined using HbA1c was significantly lower in carriers than in noncarriers (12.2% vs. 28.4%, P < 0.001). After recalibration of the HbA1c level taking HBB-rs334 and G6PD-rs1050828 into account, the prevalence of hyperglycemia in carriers was similar to noncarriers (31.3% vs. 28.4%, P = 0.28). CONCLUSIONS: This study in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos found several ancestry-specific alleles associated with HbA1c through erythrocyte-related rather than glycemic-related pathways. The potential influences of these nonglycemic-related variants need to be considered when the HbA1c test is performed.

7.
PLoS One ; 14(6): e0217796, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31251759

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographically quantified QRS duration measures ventricular depolarization and conduction. QRS prolongation has been associated with poor heart failure prognosis and cardiovascular mortality, including sudden death. While previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 32 QRS SNPs across 26 loci among European, African, and Asian-descent populations, the genetics of QRS among Hispanics/Latinos has not been previously explored. METHODS: We performed a GWAS of QRS duration among Hispanic/Latino ancestry populations (n = 15,124) from four studies using 1000 Genomes imputed genotype data (adjusted for age, sex, global ancestry, clinical and study-specific covariates). Study-specific results were combined using fixed-effects, inverse variance-weighted meta-analysis. RESULTS: We identified six loci associated with QRS (P<5x10-8), including two novel loci: MYOCD, a nuclear protein expressed in the heart, and SYT1, an integral membrane protein. The top SNP in the MYOCD locus, intronic SNP rs16946539, was found in Hispanics/Latinos with a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 0.04, but is monomorphic in European and African descent populations. The most significant QRS duration association was with intronic SNP rs3922344 (P = 1.19x10-24) in SCN5A/SCN10A. Three other previously identified loci, CDKN1A, VTI1A, and HAND1, also exceeded the GWAS significance threshold among Hispanics/Latinos. A total of 27 of 32 previously identified QRS duration SNPs were shown to generalize in Hispanics/Latinos. CONCLUSIONS: Our QRS duration GWAS, the first in Hispanic/Latino populations, identified two new loci, underscoring the utility of extending large scale genomic studies to currently under-examined populations.

8.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 2773, 2019 06 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31235808

RESUMO

Dental caries and periodontitis account for a vast burden of morbidity and healthcare spending, yet their genetic basis remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we identify self-reported dental disease proxies which have similar underlying genetic contributions to clinical disease measures and then combine these in a genome-wide association study meta-analysis, identifying 47 novel and conditionally-independent risk loci for dental caries. We show that the heritability of dental caries is enriched for conserved genomic regions and partially overlapping with a range of complex traits including smoking, education, personality traits and metabolic measures. Using cardio-metabolic traits as an example in Mendelian randomization analysis, we estimate causal relationships and provide evidence suggesting that the processes contributing to dental caries may have undesirable downstream effects on health.


Assuntos
Cárie Dentária/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Periodontite/genética , Cárie Dentária/epidemiologia , Genômica , Hereditariedade , Humanos , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Periodontite/epidemiologia , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Locos de Características Quantitativas/genética , Autorrelato/estatística & dados numéricos
9.
Hum Mol Genet ; 2019 Apr 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31127295

RESUMO

Elevated blood pressure (BP), a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, is influenced by both genetic and lifestyle factors. Cigarette smoking is one such lifestyle factor. Across five ancestries, we performed a genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP) in 129 913 individuals in stage 1 and follow-up analysis in 480 178 additional individuals in stage 2. We report here 136 loci significantly associated with MAP and/or PP. Of these, 61 were previously published through main-effect analysis of BP traits, 37 were recently reported by us for systolic BP and/or diastolic BP through gene-smoking interaction analysis and 38 were newly identified (P < 5 × 10-8, false discovery rate < 0.05). We also identified nine new signals near known loci. Of the 136 loci, 8 showed significant interaction with smoking status. They include CSMD1 previously reported for insulin resistance and BP in the spontaneously hypertensive rats. Many of the 38 new loci show biologic plausibility for a role in BP regulation. SLC26A7 encodes a chloride/bicarbonate exchanger expressed in the renal outer medullary collecting duct. AVPR1A is widely expressed, including in vascular smooth muscle cells, kidney, myocardium and brain. FHAD1 is a long non-coding RNA overexpressed in heart failure. TMEM51 was associated with contractile function in cardiomyocytes. CASP9 plays a central role in cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Identified only in African ancestry were 30 novel loci. Our findings highlight the value of multi-ancestry investigations, particularly in studies of interaction with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences may contribute to novel findings.

10.
Sleep ; 42(8)2019 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31139831

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Daytime sleepiness is a consequence of inadequate sleep, sleep-wake control disorder, or other medical conditions. Population variability in prevalence of daytime sleepiness is likely due to genetic and biological factors as well as social and environmental influences. DNA methylation (DNAm) potentially influences multiple health outcomes. Here, we explored the association between DNAm and daytime sleepiness quantified by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). METHODS: We performed multi-ethnic and ethnic-specific epigenome-wide association studies for DNAm and ESS in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA; n = 619) and the Cardiovascular Health Study (n = 483), with cross-study replication and meta-analysis. Genetic variants near ESS-associated DNAm were analyzed for methylation quantitative trait loci and followed with replication of genotype-sleepiness associations in the UK Biobank. RESULTS: In MESA only, we detected four DNAm-ESS associations: one across all race/ethnic groups; three in African-Americans (AA) only. Two of the MESA AA associations, in genes KCTD5 and RXRA, nominally replicated in CHS (p-value < 0.05). In the AA meta-analysis, we detected 14 DNAm-ESS associations (FDR q-value < 0.05, top association p-value = 4.26 × 10-8). Three DNAm sites mapped to genes (CPLX3, GFAP, and C7orf50) with biological relevance. We also found evidence for associations with DNAm sites in RAI1, a gene associated with sleep and circadian phenotypes. UK Biobank follow-up analyses detected SNPs in RAI1, RXRA, and CPLX3 with nominal sleepiness associations. CONCLUSIONS: We identified methylation sites in multiple genes possibly implicated in daytime sleepiness. Most significant DNAm-ESS associations were specific to AA. Future work is needed to identify mechanisms driving ancestry-specific methylation effects.

11.
Int J Epidemiol ; 48(3): 876-886, 2019 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30929011

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Hypertension and diabetes have been associated with inefficient arsenic metabolism, primarily through studies undertaken in populations exposed through drinking water. Recently, rice has been recognized as a source of arsenic exposure, but it remains unclear whether populations with high rice consumption but no known water exposure are at risk for the health problems associated with inefficient arsenic metabolism. METHODS: The relationships between arsenic metabolism efficiency (% inorganic arsenic, % monomethylarsenate and % dimethylarsinate in urine) and three hypertension- and seven diabetes-related traits were estimated among 12 609 participants of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). A two-sample Mendelian randomization approach incorporated genotype-arsenic metabolism relationships from literature, and genotype-trait relationships from HCHS/SOL, with a mixed-effect linear model. Analyses were stratified by rice consumption and smoking. RESULTS: Among never smokers with high rice consumption, each percentage point increase in was associated with increases of 1.96 mmHg systolic blood pressure (P = 0.034) and 1.85 mmHg inorganic arsenic diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.003). Monomethylarsenate was associated with increased systolic (1.64 mmHg/percentage point increase; P = 0.021) and diastolic (1.33 mmHg/percentage point increase; P = 0.005) blood pressure. Dimethylarsinate, a marker of efficient metabolism, was associated with lower systolic (-0.92 mmHg/percentage point increase; P = 0.025) and diastolic (-0.79 mmHg/percentage point increase; P = 0.004) blood pressure. Among low rice consumers and ever smokers, the results were consistent with no association. Evidence for a relationship with diabetes was equivocal. CONCLUSIONS: Less efficient arsenic metabolism was associated with increased blood pressure among never smokers with high rice consumption, suggesting that arsenic exposure through rice may contribute to high blood pressure in the Hispanic/Latino community.

12.
PLoS Genet ; 15(4): e1007739, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30990817

RESUMO

Sleep disordered breathing (SDB)-related overnight hypoxemia is associated with cardiometabolic disease and other comorbidities. Understanding the genetic bases for variations in nocturnal hypoxemia may help understand mechanisms influencing oxygenation and SDB-related mortality. We conducted genome-wide association tests across 10 cohorts and 4 populations to identify genetic variants associated with three correlated measures of overnight oxyhemoglobin saturation: average and minimum oxyhemoglobin saturation during sleep and the percent of sleep with oxyhemoglobin saturation under 90%. The discovery sample consisted of 8,326 individuals. Variants with p < 1 × 10(-6) were analyzed in a replication group of 14,410 individuals. We identified 3 significantly associated regions, including 2 regions in multi-ethnic analyses (2q12, 10q22). SNPs in the 2q12 region associated with minimum SpO2 (rs78136548 p = 2.70 × 10(-10)). SNPs at 10q22 were associated with all three traits including average SpO2 (rs72805692 p = 4.58 × 10(-8)). SNPs in both regions were associated in over 20,000 individuals and are supported by prior associations or functional evidence. Four additional significant regions were detected in secondary sex-stratified and combined discovery and replication analyses, including a region overlapping Reelin, a known marker of respiratory complex neurons.These are the first genome-wide significant findings reported for oxyhemoglobin saturation during sleep, a phenotype of high clinical interest. Our replicated associations with HK1 and IL18R1 suggest that variants in inflammatory pathways, such as the biologically-plausible NLRP3 inflammasome, may contribute to nocturnal hypoxemia.


Assuntos
Hexoquinase/genética , Subunidade alfa de Receptor de Interleucina-18/genética , Oxiemoglobinas/metabolismo , Sono/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Moléculas de Adesão Celular Neuronais/genética , Biologia Computacional , Proteínas da Matriz Extracelular/genética , Feminino , Redes Reguladoras de Genes , Variação Genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Hipóxia/sangue , Hipóxia/genética , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteína 3 que Contém Domínio de Pirina da Família NLR/genética , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Oxigênio/sangue , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Serina Endopeptidases/genética , Síndromes da Apneia do Sono/sangue , Síndromes da Apneia do Sono/genética , Adulto Jovem
13.
J Hypertens ; 37(4): 775-789, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30817459

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association of genetic variants of EPHA4, a receptor tyrosine kinase, with hypertension, and its role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contractility. METHODS: Data from two human genetic studies, ADVANCE and HCHS/SOL, were analyzed for association of EPHA4 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) with hypertension risks. The effect of EPHA4 signalling on mouse VSMC contractility was assessed. RESULTS: We identified a SNV (rs75843691 hg19 chr2:g.222395371 C>G), located in the third intron of EPHA4 gene, being significantly associated with hypertension in human female patients (P value = 8.3 × 10, below the Bonferroni-corrected critical P value) but not male patients with type 2 diabetes from the ADVANCE clinical trial. We found that EPHA4 was expressed in VSMCs and its stimulation by anti-EPHA4 antibody led to reduced VSMC contractility. Estrogen enhanced the contractility-lowering effect of EPHA4 stimulation. Conversely, siRNA knockdown of Epha4 expression in VSMCs resulted in increased contractility of VSMCs from female mice but not from male mice. CONCLUSION: EPHA4 appears to be a sex-specific hypertension risk gene in type 2 diabetic patients. Forward EPHA4 signalling reduces VSMC contractility, and estrogen is a modifier of this effect. The effect of EPHA4 on VSMCs contractility explains the association of EPHA4 gene with hypertension risks in female patients.

14.
Genet Epidemiol ; 43(3): 263-275, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30653739

RESUMO

When testing genotype-phenotype associations using linear regression, departure of the trait distribution from normality can impact both Type I error rate control and statistical power, with worse consequences for rarer variants. Because genotypes are expected to have small effects (if any) investigators now routinely use a two-stage method, in which they first regress the trait on covariates, obtain residuals, rank-normalize them, and then use the rank-normalized residuals in association analysis with the genotypes. Potential confounding signals are assumed to be removed at the first stage, so in practice, no further adjustment is done in the second stage. Here, we show that this widely used approach can lead to tests with undesirable statistical properties, due to both combination of a mis-specified mean-variance relationship and remaining covariate associations between the rank-normalized residuals and genotypes. We demonstrate these properties theoretically, and also in applications to genome-wide and whole-genome sequencing association studies. We further propose and evaluate an alternative fully adjusted two-stage approach that adjusts for covariates both when residuals are obtained and in the subsequent association test. This method can reduce excess Type I errors and improve statistical power.


Assuntos
Estudos de Associação Genética , Modelos Genéticos , Simulação por Computador , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Hemoglobinas/metabolismo , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Modelos Lineares , Fenótipo
15.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(2): 260-274, 2019 Feb 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30639324

RESUMO

With advances in whole-genome sequencing (WGS) technology, more advanced statistical methods for testing genetic association with rare variants are being developed. Methods in which variants are grouped for analysis are also known as variant-set, gene-based, and aggregate unit tests. The burden test and sequence kernel association test (SKAT) are two widely used variant-set tests, which were originally developed for samples of unrelated individuals and later have been extended to family data with known pedigree structures. However, computationally efficient and powerful variant-set tests are needed to make analyses tractable in large-scale WGS studies with complex study samples. In this paper, we propose the variant-set mixed model association tests (SMMAT) for continuous and binary traits using the generalized linear mixed model framework. These tests can be applied to large-scale WGS studies involving samples with population structure and relatedness, such as in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program. SMMATs share the same null model for different variant sets, and a virtue of this null model, which includes covariates only, is that it needs to be fit only once for all tests in each genome-wide analysis. Simulation studies show that all the proposed SMMATs correctly control type I error rates for both continuous and binary traits in the presence of population structure and relatedness. We also illustrate our tests in a real data example of analysis of plasma fibrinogen levels in the TOPMed program (n = 23,763), using the Analysis Commons, a cloud-based computing platform.

16.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 843, 2019 Jan 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30696834

RESUMO

Five sequence variants in SLC16A11 (rs117767867, rs13342692, rs13342232, rs75418188, and rs75493593), which occur in two non-reference haplotypes, were recently shown to be associated with diabetes in Mexicans from the SIGMA consortium. We aimed to determine whether these previous findings would replicate in the HCHS/SOL Mexican origin group and whether genotypic effects were similar in other HCHS/SOL groups. We analyzed these five variants in 2492 diabetes cases and 5236 controls from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), which includes U.S. participants from six diverse background groups (Mainland groups: Mexican, Central American, and South American; and Caribbean groups: Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican). We estimated the SNP-diabetes association in the six groups and in the combined sample. We found that the risk alleles occur in two non-reference haplotypes in HCHS/SOL, as in the SIGMA Mexicans. The haplotype frequencies were very similar between SIGMA Mexicans and the HCHS/SOL Mainland groups, but different in the Caribbean groups. The SLC16A11 sequence variants were significantly associated with risk for diabetes in the Mexican origin group (P = 0.025), replicating the SIGMA findings. However, these variants were not significantly associated with diabetes in a combined analysis of all groups, although the power to detect such effects was 85% (assuming homogeneity of effects among the groups). Additional analyses performed separately in each of the five non-Mexican origin groups were not significant. We also analyzed (1) exclusion of young controls and, (2) SNP by BMI interactions, but neither was significant in the HCHS/SOL data. The previously reported effects of SLC16A11 variants on diabetes in Mexican samples was replicated in a large Mexican-American sample, but these effects were not significant in five non-Mexican Hispanic/Latino groups sampled from U.S. populations. Lack of replication in the HCHS/SOL non-Mexicans, and in the entire HCHS/SOL sample combined may represent underlying genetic heterogeneity. These results indicate a need for future genetic research to consider heterogeneity of the Hispanic/Latino population in the assessment of disease risk, but add to the evidence suggesting SLC16A11 as a potential therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes.

17.
Pain ; 2018 Nov 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30431558

RESUMO

Painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is the leading cause of chronic orofacial pain, but its underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. While many environmental factors have been associated with higher risk of developing painful TMD, family and twin studies support a heritable genetic component as well. We performed a GWAS assuming an additive genetic model of TMD in a discovery cohort of 999 cases and 2031 TMD-free controls from the Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment (OPPERA) study. Using logistic models adjusted for sex, age, enrollment site, and race, we identified three distinct loci that were significant in combined or sex-segregated analyses. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on chromosome 3 (rs13078961) was significantly associated with TMD in males only (odds ratio [OR]=2.9, 95% CI: 2.02-4.27, P=2.2x10). This association was nominally replicated in a meta-analysis of seven independent orofacial pain cohorts including 160,194 participants (OR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.0-1.35, P = 2.3x10). Functional analysis in human dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and blood indicated this variant is an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL), with the minor allele associated with decreased expression of the nearby muscle RAS oncogene homolog (MRAS) gene (beta = -0.51, P = 2.43x10). Male mice, but not female mice, with a null mutation of Mras displayed persistent mechanical allodynia in a model of inflammatory pain. Genetic and behavioral evidence support a novel mechanism by which genetically-determined MRAS expression moderates the resiliency to chronic pain. This effect is male-specific and may contribute to the lower rates of painful TMD in men.Written work prepared by employees of the Federal Government as part of their official duties is, under the U.S. Copyright Act, a "work of the United States Government" for which copyright protection under Title 17 of the United States Code is not available. As such, copyright does not extend to the contributions of employees of the Federal Government.

18.
Hum Mol Genet ; 2018 Nov 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30403821

RESUMO

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Its prevalence and severity vary across ancestral background. Although OSA traits are heritable, few genetic associations have been identified. To identify genetic regions associated with OSA and improve statistical power, we applied admixture mapping on three primary OSA traits (the apnea hypopnea index [AHI], overnight average oxyhemoglobin saturation [SaO2] and percentage time SaO2<90%) and a secondary trait (respiratory event duration) in a Hispanic/Latino American population study of 11,575 individuals with significant variation in ancestral background. Linear mixed models were performed using previously inferred African, European and Amerindian local genetic ancestry markers. Global African ancestry was associated with a lower AHI, higher oxyhemoglobin saturation and shorter event duration. Admixture mapping analysis of the primary OSA traits identified local African ancestry at the chromosomal region 2q37 as genome-wide significantly associated with AHI (P<5.7×10-5), and European and Amerindian ancestries at 18q21 suggestively associated with both AHI and percentage time SaO2<90% (P<10-3). Follow-up joint ancestry-SNP association analyses identified novel variants in ferrochelatase (FECH), significantly associated with AHI and percentage time SaO2<90% after adjusting for multiple tests (P<8×10-6). These signals contributed to the admixture mapping associations and were replicated in independent cohorts. In this first admixture mapping study of OSA, novel associations with variants in the iron/heme metabolism pathway suggest a role for iron in influencing respiratory traits underlying OSA.

19.
Genet Epidemiol ; 2018 Oct 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30368908

RESUMO

Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) are weighted sums of risk allele counts of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with a disease or trait. PRSs are typically constructed based on published results from Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWASs), and the majority of which has been performed in large populations of European ancestry (EA) individuals. Although many genotype-trait associations have generalized across populations, the optimal choice of SNPs and weights for PRSs may differ between populations due to different linkage disequilibrium (LD) and allele frequency patterns. We compare various approaches for PRS construction, using GWAS results from both large EA studies and a smaller study in Hispanics/Latinos: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL, n = 12 , 803 ). We consider multiple approaches for selecting SNPs and for computing SNP weights. We study the performance of the resulting PRSs in an independent study of Hispanics/Latinos from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI, n = 3 , 582 ). We support our investigation with simulation studies of potential genetic architectures in a single locus. We observed that selecting variants based on EA GWASs generally performs well, except for blood pressure trait. However, the use of EA GWASs for weight estimation was suboptimal. Using non-EA GWAS results to estimate weights improved results.

20.
Int J Epidemiol ; 47(6): 2059-2069, 2018 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30137430

RESUMO

Background: Associations of adult height with cardiometabolic and pulmonary traits have been studied in majority European ancestry populations using Mendelian randomization and polygenic risk score (PRS) analysis. The standard PRS approach entails creating a PRS for height using variants identified in prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS). It is unclear how well the standard PRS approach performs in non-European populations and whether height-trait associations observed in Europeans are also observed in other populations. Methods: In the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), we used: (i) the standard approach to create a PRS for height (PRS1) and (ii) a novel approach to optimize the selection of variants from previously established height association loci to better explain height in HCHS/SOL (PRS2). We also estimated the extent to which PRS-trait associations were independent or mediated by the PRS effect on height. Results: In 7539 women and 5245 men, PRS1 and PRS2 explained 9 and 29% of the variance in measured height, respectively. Both PRS1 and PRS2 were associated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/ FVC ratio, total cholesterol and 2-hour oral glucose-tolerance test insulin levels. Additionally, PRS2 was associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate and ankle brachial index. Both PRS1 and PRS2 had pleiotropic associations with FEV1/ FVC ratio in mediation analyses. Conclusions: Associations of polygenic scores of height with measures of lung function and cholesterol were consistent with those observed in prior studies of majority European ancestry populations. Mediation analysis may augment standard PRS approaches to disentangle pleiotropic and mediated effects.

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