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1.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 185(5): 765-774, 2021 Oct 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34524977

RESUMO

Objective: To examine the association of incident type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk with sleep factors, genetic risk, and their combination effects. Design: Large prospective population-based cohort study. Methods: This population-based prospective cohort study included 360 403 (mean (s.d.) age: 56.6 (8.0) years) participants without T2D at baseline from the UK Biobank. Genetic risk was categorised as high (highest quintile), intermediate (quintiles: 2-4), and low (lowest quintile) based on a polygenic risk score for T2D. Sleep scores, including long or short sleep duration, insomnia, snoring, late chronotype, and excessive daytime sleepiness, were categorized as an unfavourable, intermediate, or favourable sleep and circadian pattern. Results: During a median follow-up of 9.0 years, 13 120 incident T2D cases were recorded. Among the participants with an unfavourable sleep and circadian pattern, 6.96% (95% CI: 6.68-7.24%) developed T2D vs 2.37% (95% CI: 2.28-2.46%) of participants with a favourable sleep and circadian pattern (adjusted hazard ratio (HR): 1.53, 95% CI: 1.45-1.62). Of participants with a high genetic risk, 5.53% (95% CI: 5.36-5.69%) developed T2D vs 2.01% (95% CI: 1.91-2.11%) of participants with a low genetic risk (adjusted HR: 2.89, 95% CI: 2.72-3.07). The association with sleep and circadian patterns was independent of genetic risk strata. Participants in the lowest quintile with an unfavourable sleep and circadian pattern were 3.97-fold more likely to develop T2D than those in the lowest quintile with a favourable sleep and circadian pattern. Conclusions: Sleep and circadian patterns and genetic risk were independently associated with incident T2D. These results indicate the benefits of adhering to a healthy sleep and circadian pattern in entire populations, independent of genetic risk.


Assuntos
Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/epidemiologia , Predisposição Genética para Doença/epidemiologia , Vigilância da População , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/epidemiologia , Sono/fisiologia , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/genética , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/fisiopatologia
2.
Ann Am Thorac Soc ; 2021 Jul 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34242153

RESUMO

RATIONALE: Both genetic variants and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) contribute to the risk of incident severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Whether genetic risk of incident severe COVID-19 is the same regardless of pre-existing COPD is unknown. OBJECTIVES: In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential interaction between genetic risk and COPD in relation to severe COVID-19. METHODS: We constructed a polygenic risk score (PRS) for severe COVID-19 by using 112 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 430,582 participants from the UK Biobank study. We examined the associations of genetic risk and COPD with severe COVID-19 by using logistic regression models. RESULTS: Of 430,582 participants, 712 participants developed severe COVID-19 as of February 22, 2021, of whom 19.8% had pre-existing COPD. Compared with participants at low genetic risk, those at intermediate genetic risk (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.09-1.66) and high genetic risk (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.18-1.92) had higher risk of severe COVID-19 (P for trend = 0.001), and the association was independent of COPD (P for interaction = 0.76). COPD was associated with a higher risk of incident severe COVID-19 (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.12-1.67; P = 0.002). Participants at high genetic risk and with COPD had a higher risk of severe COVID-19 (OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.35-3.04; P < 0.001) than those at low genetic risk and without COPD. CONCLUSIONS: The PRS which combines multiple risk alleles can be effectively used in screening for high-risk populations of severe COVID-19. High genetic risk correlates with a higher risk of severe COVID-19, regardless of pre-existing COPD.

3.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(9): e0008584, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32941447

RESUMO

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has recently emerged as a global threat. Understanding workers' knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) regarding this new infectious disease is crucial to preventing and controlling it. This study aimed to assess KAP regarding COVID-19 during the outbreak among workers in China. The present study was part of a cross-sectional online survey study conducted based on a large labor-intensive factory, which has 180,000 workers from various Chinese provinces, from 2 February 2020 to 7 February 2020. KAP related to COVID-19 were measured by 32 items, each item was measured with an agree/disagree/unclear format, and only correct responses were given 1 point. KAP regarding COVID-19 were measured with 20 items, 6 items and 6 items, respectively. A total of 123,768 valid responses (68.8%) were included in the analysis. Generally, the levels of knowledge (mean: 16.3 out of 20 points), attitudes (mean: 4.5 out of 6 points), and practices (mean: 5.8 out of 6 points) related to COVID-19 were high. Only 36,373 respondents (29.4%) disagreed that gargling with salt water is effective in protecting against COVID-19. Moreover, older respondents had decreased levels of knowledge and practices related to COVID-19 (both P values for the trend <0.001), while better-educated respondents had increased levels of knowledge and practices related to COVID-19 (both P values for the trend <0.001). These results suggest that Chinese workers are highly aware of COVID-19, but health authorities still need to provide correct information on COVID-19 prevention and strengthen health interventions, particularly for older and less-educated workers.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/patologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/patologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Instalações Industriais e de Manufatura , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , SARS-CoV-2 , Inquéritos e Questionários
5.
J Affect Disord ; 277: 495-502, 2020 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32882506

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has gained intense attention globally. However, little is known about the COVID-19-ralated mental health status among workers. METHODS: The cross-sectional online survey with 123,768 workers was conducted from February 2, 2020 to February 7, 2020 on a mega-size labor-intensive factory in Shenzhen, China. Oral consent was obtained prior to the questionnaire survey. The information collected in the survey included demographic characteristics, psychological symptoms, COVID-19-related information, and demands for psychological education and interventions. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were measured by the Zung's Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and Self-Rating Depression Scale. Logistic regression models were performed to determine the association between related factors and mental health status. RESULTS: The prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms was 3.4% and 22.8%, respectively. The dominant epidemic-related factors were having confirmed cases in the community (odds ratio [OR], 2.75, 95% CI, 2.37-3.19) and having confirmed friends (OR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.69-3.52) for the increased risk of anxiety and depression symptoms, respectively. Nevertheless, major traditional risk factors such as general or poor health status and always drinking alcohol were still the dominant factors associated with the increased risk of anxiety and depression symptoms. Overall, 67.3% and 26.8% workers reported desire for psychological education and interventions, respectively. LIMITATIONS: All assessments were self-reported, resulting in a risk of method bias. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show a relatively low prevalence of anxiety symptoms, a relatively high prevalence of depression symptoms, and urgent demand for psychological education and interventions among workers during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Adulto , Ansiedade/psicologia , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/psicologia , Emprego , Feminino , Amigos , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Razão de Chances , Pandemias , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , SARS-CoV-2 , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
6.
J Affect Disord ; 275: 188-193, 2020 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32734907

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although studies have suggested experiencing the epidemic of severe infectious diseases increased the prevalence of mental health problems, the association between COVID-19 epidemic and risk of anxiety and depression symptom in college students in China was unclear. METHODS: A large cross-sectional online survey with 44,447 college students was conducted in Guangzhou, China. The Zung's Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D Scale) were used to define the anxiety and depression symptom, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to analyze the association between COVID-19 epidemic and risk of anxiety and depression symptom. RESULTS: The prevalence of anxiety and depression symptom was 7.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.5%, 8.0%) and 12.2% (95%CI: 11.9%, 12.5%), respectively. Compared with students who reported have not infected or suspected cases in family members and relatives, students who reported having confirmed (OR=4.06; 95%CI: 1.62, 10.19; P = 0.003), and suspected (OR=2.11; 95%CI: 1.11, 4.00; P = 0.023) cases in family members and relatives had higher risk of depression symptom. Additionally, the proportions of students with anxiety and depression symptom reported more demand of psychological knowledge and interventions than those without (P<0.001). LIMITATIONS: All the data in this study was collected through online questionnaire, and we did not evaluate the reliability and validity. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of anxiety and depression symptom was relatively low in college students, but the COVID-19 epidemic-related factors might be associated with higher depression symptom risk.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Estudantes/psicologia , Adolescente , Transtornos de Ansiedade/epidemiologia , COVID-19 , China/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Prevalência , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
7.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(11): 10687-10703, 2020 06 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32532929

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: To investigate the independent and joint effects of leisure activities on disability in activities of daily living (ADL) among the oldest-old Chinese population (aged ≥ 80 years). RESULTS: A total of 3696 participants with ADL disability were identified during the median follow-up period of 3.1 years. Compared to the participants who "never" watched TV or listened to the radio and who "never" kept domestic animals or pets, those who engaged in these activities "almost every day" had a significantly lower ADL disability risk (adjusted hazard ratios were 0.74 and 0.66, respectively; both P < 0.001). Furthermore, participants engaging in multiple leisure activities showed a reduced risk of ADL disability (P for trend < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Frequently watching TV or listening to the radio and keeping domestic animals or pets was associated with a lower risk of ADL disability among the oldest-old Chinese population. METHODS: We included 12,331 participants (aged ≥ 80 years) (mean [SD] age: 89.5 [7.0] years) who managed to perform ADL independently at baseline in the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey 1998-2014 waves. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine whether leisure activities were associated with ADL disability.


Assuntos
Atividades Cotidianas , Pessoas com Deficiência/estatística & dados numéricos , Atividades de Lazer , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Envelhecimento Saudável , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Fatores de Risco
8.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 79(6): 829-836, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32253185

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the associations of regular glucosamine use with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in a large prospective cohort. METHODS: This population-based prospective cohort study included 495 077 women and men (mean (SD) age, 56.6 (8.1) years) from the UK Biobank study. Participants were recruited from 2006 to 2010 and were followed up through 2018. We evaluated all-cause mortality and mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, respiratory and digestive disease. HRs and 95% CIs for all-cause and cause-specific mortality were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for potential confounding variables. RESULTS: At baseline, 19.1% of the participants reported regular use of glucosamine supplements. During a median follow-up of 8.9 years (IQR 8.3-9.7 years), 19 882 all-cause deaths were recorded, including 3802 CVD deaths, 8090 cancer deaths, 3380 respiratory disease deaths and 1061 digestive disease deaths. In multivariable adjusted analyses, the HRs associated with glucosamine use were 0.85 (95% CI 0.82 to 0.89) for all-cause mortality, 0.82 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.90) for CVD mortality, 0.94 (95% CI 0.88 to 0.99) for cancer mortality, 0.73 (95% CI 0.66 to 0.81) for respiratory mortality and 0.74 (95% CI 0.62 to 0.90) for digestive mortality. The inverse associations of glucosamine use with all-cause mortality seemed to be somewhat stronger among current than non-current smokers (p for interaction=0.00080). CONCLUSIONS: Regular glucosamine supplementation was associated with lower mortality due to all causes, cancer, CVD, respiratory and digestive diseases.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/mortalidade , Doenças do Sistema Digestório/mortalidade , Glucosamina/uso terapêutico , Neoplasias/mortalidade , Doenças Respiratórias/mortalidade , Suplementos Nutricionais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mortalidade , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Prospectivos , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
9.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 12(2): 712-5, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27461638

RESUMO

AIM OF STUDY: To clarify the effects of glutathione S-transferases mu-1. (GSTM1) null genotype on the risk of CC, an updated meta-analysis. was performed in Chinese populations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An extensive literature search for relevant studies was conducted on Pub Med, Springer Link, Ovid SP, Chinese Biomedical (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP, and Wan fang Database from their inception through 22 October, 2014. This meta-analysis was performed using the STATA 10.0 software. The crude odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. RESULTS: A total of four studies including 364 cervical cancer cases and 378 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. Overall, significant association was found between GSTM1 null genotype and CC risk when all studies in the Chinese population pooled into the meta--analysis. In subgroup analyses stratified by geographical location, ethnicity, and source of controls; the same results were observed. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis provides the evidence that GSTM1 null genotype may contribute to the CC development in Chinese and studies with large sample size and wider spectrum of population are warranted to verify this finding.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Glutationa Transferase/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero/genética , Alelos , Estudos de Casos e Controles , China , Feminino , Genótipo , Humanos , Razão de Chances
10.
J Biomed Sci ; 22: 100, 2015 Oct 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26511107

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Growth arrest-specific 5 (GAS5) was reported to be implicated and aberrantly express in multiple cancers. However, the expression and mechanism of action of GAS5 were largely poor understood in endometrial carcinoma. RESULTS: According to the result of real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry analysis, we identified that GAS5 was down-regulated in endometrial cancer cells and stimulated the apoptosis of endometrial cancer cells. To investigate the expression of GAS5, PTEN and miR-103, RT-PCR was performed. And we found that the expression of PTEN was up-regulated when endometrial cancer cells overexpressed GAS5. The prediction of bioinformatics online revealed that GAS5 could bind to miR-103, which was further found to be regulated by GAS5. Finally, we found that miR-103 mimic could decrease the mRNA and protein levels of PTEN through luciferase reporter assay and western blotting, and GAS5 plasmid may reverse this regulation effect in endometrial cancer cells. CONCLUSION: In summary, we demonstrate that GAS5 acts as an tumor suppressor lncRNA in endometrial cancer. Through inhibiting the expression of miR-103, GAS5 significantly enhanced the expression of PTEN to promote cancer cell apoptosis, and, thus, could be an important mediator in the pathogenesis of endometrial cancer.


Assuntos
Neoplasias do Endométrio/metabolismo , Genes Supressores de Tumor , MicroRNAs/biossíntese , Proteínas de Neoplasias/biossíntese , PTEN Fosfo-Hidrolase/biossíntese , RNA Longo não Codificante/biossíntese , RNA Neoplásico/biossíntese , Adulto , Idoso , Apoptose/genética , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Neoplasias do Endométrio/genética , Neoplasias do Endométrio/patologia , Feminino , Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica , Humanos , MicroRNAs/genética , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteínas de Neoplasias/genética , PTEN Fosfo-Hidrolase/genética , RNA Longo não Codificante/genética , RNA Neoplásico/genética
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