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1.
Acad Med ; 95(10): 1515-1520, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31972674

RESUMO

As academic medical centers and academic health centers continue to adapt to the changing landscape of medicine in the United States, the definition of what it means to be faculty must evolve as well. Both institutional economic priorities and the need to recalibrate educational programs to address current and future societal and patient needs have brought new complexity to faculty identity, faculty value, and the educational mission.The Council of Faculty and Academic Societies, 1 of 3 membership councils of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), established working groups in 2014 to provide a strong voice for academic faculty within the AAMC governance and leadership structures. The Faculty Identity and Value Working Group was charged with identifying the attributes and qualities of future academic medicine faculty in light of the transformational changes occurring at many medical schools and teaching hospitals. The working group developed a framework that could be applied throughout the United States by AAMC member schools to define and value teaching activities. This report adds to the work of others by offering a contemporary construct that is flexible and easily adaptable to enable fair and transparent implementation of an education value system; it is especially relevant for systems in which mergers and acquisitions lead to a large number of clinicians. An example of such an implementation at a large and growing academic medical center is provided.The ability to identify and quantify educational effort by faculty could be transformative by highlighting the fundamental importance of faculty to the development of the future medical workforce.


Assuntos
Docentes de Medicina/organização & administração , Inovação Organizacional , Faculdades de Medicina/organização & administração , Humanos , Sociedades Médicas , Estados Unidos
2.
Acad Med ; 93(7): 979-984, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29166355

RESUMO

Increasing rates of burnout-with accompanying stress and lack of engagement-among faculty, residents, students, and practicing physicians have caused alarm in academic medicine. Central to the debate among academic medicine's stakeholders are oft-competing issues of social accountability; cost containment; effectiveness of academic medicine's institutions; faculty recruitment, retention, and satisfaction; increasing expectations for faculty; and mission-based productivity.The authors propose that understanding and fostering what contributes to faculty and institutional vitality is central to preventing burnout during times of change. They first look at faculty vitality and how it is threatened by burnout, to provide a framework for a greater understanding of faculty well-being. Then they draw on higher education literature to determine how vitality is defined in academic settings and what factors affect faculty vitality within the context of academic medicine. Next, they propose a model to explain and examine faculty vitality in academic medicine, followed by a discussion of the need for a greater understanding of faculty vitality. Finally, the authors offer conclusions and propose future directions to promote faculty vitality.The authors encourage institutional decision makers and other stakeholders to focus particular attention on the evolving expectations for faculty, the risk of extensive faculty burnout, and the opportunity to reduce burnout by improving the vitality and resilience of these talented and crucial contributors. Faculty vitality, as defined by the institution, has a critical role in ensuring future institutional successes and the capacity for faculty to thrive in a complex health care economy.


Assuntos
Esgotamento Profissional/etiologia , Esgotamento Profissional/terapia , Docentes de Medicina/psicologia , Esgotamento Profissional/psicologia , Humanos , Satisfação no Emprego , Faculdades de Medicina/normas , Engajamento no Trabalho , Carga de Trabalho/psicologia , Carga de Trabalho/normas
3.
J Healthc Leadersh ; 8: 19-29, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29355187

RESUMO

Formal training in the multifaceted components of leadership is now accepted as highly desirable for health care leaders. Despite natural leadership instincts, some core leadership competencies ("differentiating competencies") must be formally taught or refined. Leadership development may begin at an early career stage. Despite the recognized need, the number of comprehensive leadership development opportunities is still limited. Leadership training programs in health care were started primarily as internal institutional curricula, with a limited scope, for the development of faculty or practitioners. More comprehensive national leadership programs were developed in response to the needs of specific cohorts of individuals, such as programs for women, which are designed to increase the ranks of senior women leaders in the health sciences. As some programs reach their 20th year of existence, outcomes research has shown that health care leadership training is most effective when it takes place over time, is comprehensive and interdisciplinary, and incorporates individual/institutional projects allowing participants immediate practical application of their newly acquired skills. The training should envelop all the traditional health care domains of clinical practice, education, and research, so the leader may understand all the activities taking place under his/her leadership. Early career leadership training helps to develop a pipeline of leaders for the future, setting the foundation for further development of those who may chose to pursue significant leadership opportunities later in their career. A combination of early and mid-to-late career development may represent the optimal training for effective leaders. More training programs are needed to make comprehensive leadership development widely accessible to a greater number of potential health care leaders. This paper addresses the skills that health care leaders should develop, the optimal leadership development concepts that must be acquired to succeed as a health care leader today, some resources for where such training may be obtained, and what gaps are still present in today's system.

4.
Acad Med ; 90(3): 279-82, 2015 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25406611

RESUMO

Academic medicine in the United States is at a crossroads. There are many drivers behind this, including health care reform, decreased federal research funding, a refined understanding of adult learning, and the emergence of disruptive innovations in medicine, science, and education. As faculty members are at the core of all academic activities, the definition of "faculty" in academic medicine must align with the expectations of institutions engaged in patient care, research, and education. Faculty members' activities have changed and continue to evolve. Academic health centers must therefore define new rules of engagement that reflect the interplay of institutional priorities with the need to attract, retain, and reward faculty members. In this Commentary, the authors describe and explore the potential effects of the changing landscape for institutions and their clinical faculty members. The authors make a case for institutions to adapt faculty appointment, evaluation, and promotion processes, and they propose a framework for a standardized definition of "faculty" that allows for individual variability. This framework also provides a means to evaluate and reward faculty members' contributions in education, research, and clinical care. The authors propose a deliberate national conversation to ensure that careers in academic medicine remain attractive and sustainable and that the future of academic medicine is secure.


Assuntos
Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/organização & administração , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Docentes de Medicina , Administração de Recursos Humanos , Papel Profissional , Humanos , Estados Unidos
5.
Am J Surg ; 206(5): 727-31, 2013 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24011565

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Formal leadership training is a relatively recent addition to the educational armamentarium of the health care executive. Leadership training opportunities for physicians, surgeons, and scientists have gradually appeared over the past 15 to 20 years, but information about them has been scant, with few comprehensive reviews made available to the community at large. This article describes the major opportunities available to obtain formal and informal leadership training for careers in medical school administration. Programs that are specifically targeted to women are described in detail. DATA SOURCES: Information was obtained from the author's direct knowledge, direct communication with the leadership of each program, and the Web site of each sponsoring organization, when available. CONCLUSIONS: Many opportunities for leadership training are now available to surgeons, with several specifically designed for women. The author strongly encourages surgeons to avail themselves of these opportunities, as both anecdotal information and published data suggest that these programs are highly effective in enhancing leadership careers.


Assuntos
Educação Profissionalizante , Liderança , Educação Continuada , Docentes , Feminino , Fundações , Humanos , Diretores Médicos , Sociedades Médicas , Mulheres
6.
Acad Med ; 88(9): 1368-75, 2013 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23899902

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To determine how U.S. MD-granting medical schools manage, fund, and evaluate faculty affairs/development functions and to determine the evolution of these offices between 2000 and 2010. METHOD: In December 2010, the authors invited faculty affairs designees at 131 U.S. MD-granting medical schools to complete a questionnaire developed by the Association of American Medical Colleges Group on Faculty Affairs, based on a 2000 survey. Schools were asked about core functions, budget, staffing, and performance metrics. The authors analyzed the data using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: A total of 111 schools (84.7%) responded. Fifty percent of the offices were established since 2000. Seventy-eight percent reported their top core function as administrative support for appointments, promotions, and tenure, as in 2000. Faculty policies, appointments, databases, governance support, grievance proceedings, management issues, and annual trend analyses continued as major functions. All 11 core functions identified in 2000 remain predominantly provided by central offices of faculty affairs, except support of major leadership searches. Web site communication emerged as a new core function. Similar to 2000, several other offices were responsible for some faculty development functions. Office size and budget correlated positively with size of the faculty and age of the office (P < .05 for all). Thirty-five schools (31.5%) reported formally evaluating their faculty affairs office. CONCLUSIONS: The number of faculty affairs offices and their responsibilities have substantially increased since 2000. Most major core functions have not changed. These offices are now an established part of the central administration of most medical schools.


Assuntos
Docentes de Medicina/organização & administração , Faculdades de Medicina/organização & administração , Desenvolvimento de Pessoal/organização & administração , Estudos Transversais , Coleta de Dados , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Política Organizacional , Faculdades de Medicina/tendências , Desenvolvimento de Pessoal/tendências , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
7.
Public Health Nutr ; 16(6): 1020-7, 2013 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23046540

RESUMO

Public health nutrition sits at the nexus of a global crisis in food, environmental and health systems that has generated - along with numerous other problems - an urgent and changing problem of food insecurity. The 'new' food insecurity, however, is different from the old: it is bimodal, encompassing issues of both under- and over-consumption, hunger and obesity, quantity and quality; it has assumed a decidedly urban dimension; and it implicates rich and poor countries alike. The complexity of the expressions of this challenge requires new approaches to public health nutrition and food policy that privilege systemic, structural and environmental factors over individual and mechanistic ones. In this context, the current paper argues that school food systems rise with buoyant potential as promising intervention sites: they are poised to address both modes of the food security crisis; integrate systemic, structural and environmental with behavioural approaches; and comprise far-reaching, system-wide efforts that influence the wider functioning of the food system. Based on a discussion of Bogotá and other pioneering policies that explicitly aim to create a broader food system with long-term foundations for good public health and food security, the paper suggests a new research and action agenda that gives special attention to school food in urban contexts.


Assuntos
Dieta , Serviços de Alimentação , Abastecimento de Alimentos , Promoção da Saúde , Política Nutricional , Saúde Pública , Instituições Acadêmicas , Criança , Colômbia , Saúde Global , Humanos , Fome , Obesidade/prevenção & controle , Pesquisa , População Urbana
8.
Acad Med ; 86(1): 113, 2011 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21191204
10.
J Natl Med Assoc ; 98(9): 1449-59, 2006 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-17019912

RESUMO

Women and minority faculty and students are seriously underrepresented in university and academic healthcare institutions. The role of mentoring has been identified as one of the significant factors in addressing this underrepresentation. We have described the mentoring efforts at two institutions of higher learning in assisting women and minority students and faculty in being accomplished in their academic pursuits. One-hundred-thirty students and >50 women and minority faculty have participated in the mentoring programs described. The number of participants has increased dramatically over the years and continues to evolve positively. These programs appear to be quite successful in the short term. Further evaluation of measurable outcomes will be necessary to fully determine their true impact. The mentoring models for women and underrepresented minority faculty and students at Creighton University Health Sciences Schools and Wake Forest University School of Medicine will serve as a guide for other Health Sciences Schools.


Assuntos
Diversidade Cultural , Docentes de Medicina , Mentores , Grupos Minoritários , Faculdades de Medicina , Estudantes de Medicina , Educação Médica , Feminino , Humanos , Liderança , Masculino , Nebraska , North Carolina
11.
J Pediatr Surg ; 39(6): 984-90, 2004 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-15185240

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Declining interest in the field of surgery is attributed to lifestyle issues, more women per class, high debt, and long residency. To maintain surgery as a premier career choice, female students must find surgery to be professionally and personally rewarding. METHODS: A 35-item questionnaire was mailed to 95 women pediatric surgeons (WPS), assessing multiple professional and personal factors. Responses were entered into a confidential database and analyzed by chi2 or t tests. RESULTS: Seventy-nine percent of surveys were returned; practice was identified as academic (60%) and private (40%). Respondents were grouped by age: A, less than 44 years (41%); B, 45 to 54 years (37%); and C, greater than 55 years (22%). For academic WPS, 81% are on timeline for promotion. Insufficient protected time was a significant obstacle for a successful academic career in groups A and B (P =.001). Clinical load, on-call responsibilities, lack of mentorship, and departmental support were major obstacles in all groups (P =.05). Seventy-three percent of WPS in private practice were satisfied with their role in practice management; poor practice conditions were cited as the most frequent reason for job relocation. Sixty-one percent of WPS are married, and 46% are raising children. WPS had statistically significant more responsibilities for child care and household tasks in comparison with their partners. Eighty-three percent report career satisfaction but desire more time with family and for personal interests. Part-time and flexible work schedules were identified as attractive ways to achieve career-family balance. Eighty-four percent believe that quality-of-life issues are the dominant reason that fewer medical students choose surgical fields. CONCLUSIONS: WPS express career satisfaction but share the concerns of their female colleagues in other surgical disciplines. Quality of life is viewed as central to career choice for the current generation of medical students; female role models are key to recruiting women into pediatric surgery.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Cirurgia Geral , Satisfação no Emprego , Pediatria , Médicas/psicologia , Adulto , Canadá , Escolha da Profissão , Mobilidade Ocupacional , Coleta de Dados , Educação Médica/economia , Família , Feminino , Cirurgia Geral/educação , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Estilo de Vida , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pediatria/educação , Médicas/provisão & distribuição , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos , Tolerância ao Trabalho Programado
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