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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34769872

RESUMO

In combat sports, competitors are separated into weight divisions, to create equality between the athletes. Consequently, rapid weight loss (RWL) is a common practice in combat sports. Although the methods used to induce RWL are similar among athletes, currently, there are limited data concerning the RWL methodologies used by sambo athletes. Therefore, this study aimed at determining RWL procedures among female sambo athletes. Participants in the study were top-level athletes competing at the World Sambo Championship held in Novi Sad. A total sample of 47 female sambo athletes, of whom 24 were seniors (27.3 ± 4 year/age, 1.61 ± 0.09 m/height, 61.8 ± 8.87 kg/weight) and 23 juniors (18.7 ± 0.8 year/age, 1.66 ± 0.07 m/height, 63.7 ± 12.1 kg/weight), were examined in the study. To determine RWL methods, data were collected through a standardized questionnaire. As a result, 88.7% of the female sambo athletes declared that they intentionally cut their weight before the competition. The most commonly used methods were gradual dieting, followed by sauna, fluid restriction, and skipping meals. The most considerable influence on the RWL strategies of athletes came from coaches and personal trainers, while physicians and dietitians were far less influential. The results obtained from this representative sample highlight the most common practices concerning weight cutting prior to competition among females. Therefore, there is a need to inform and educate both athletes and coaches about the potentially harmful effects of RWL in combat sports.


Assuntos
Artes Marciais , Banho a Vapor , Atletas , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Inquéritos e Questionários , Perda de Peso
2.
Food Sci Nutr ; 9(10): 5746-5754, 2021 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34646542

RESUMO

We examined dietary intake of creatine in U.S. men and women aged 65 years and over, and evaluated the association between creatine intake and risk of self-reported medical conditions, and physical functioning/disability variables using data from the 2017-2018 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The NHANES 2017-2018 target population included the noninstitutionalized civilian resident population of the United States aged 65 years and over. Detailed dietary intake data from NHANES elderly were obtained by dietary interview component through a 24-h dietary recall interview, with estimated individual values for total grams of creatine consumed per day for each respondent. A threshold for dietary intake of creatine used to calculate risk between creatine intake and medical conditions was set at 1.00 g/day. The sample population included 1500 participants aged 65 years and older, of which 1221 individuals (627 men and 594 women) provided detailed dietary data via a dietary interview. Creatine intake across all participants was 0.76 ± 0.79 g/day (95% CI from 0.72 to 0.81). As much as 70% of U.S. elderly consume <1.00 g of creatine per day, with about 1 in 5 individuals (19.8%) consume no creatine at all. Elderly with the suboptimal intake of creatine were found to have 2.62 times higher risk of angina pectoris (adjusted OR = 2.62, 95% CI from 1.14 to 6.01, p = .023) and 2.59 times higher risk of liver conditions (adjusted OR = 2.59, 95% CI from 1.23 to 5.48, p = .013), compared with older counterparts who consume ≥1.00 g of creatine per day after controlling for demographic and nutritional variables. The considerable shortage of dietary creatine is associated with an increased risk of heart and liver conditions, which calls for public measures that foster diets rich in creatine-containing foods, and additional research to investigate the role of creatine in age-related diseases.

3.
Exp Gerontol ; 155: 111574, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34601077

RESUMO

In this randomized controlled pilot trial, we investigated the effects of a 6-month intake of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) on several molecular and phenotypic biomarkers of aging in older adults aged 70 years and over. Forty older adults (20 women) were randomly allocated in a parallel-group design to receive 0.5 L per day of HRW (15 ppm of hydrogen) or control drink (0 ppm of hydrogen) during a 6-month intervention period. The biomarkers assessed at baseline and 6-month follow up were molecular markers in the blood (DNA and chromosomes, nutrient sensing, protein, and lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and mitochondria, cell senescence, inflammation), brain metabolism, cognitive functioning, physical function and body composition, resting blood pressure, facial skin features, sleep outcomes, and health-related quality of life. The mean age, weight, and height of study participants were 76.0 ± 5.6 years, 78.2 ± 16.1 kg, height 167.5 ± 11.5 cm, respectively. A significant treatment vs. time interaction was found for telomere length (P = 0.049), with the length increased after HRW intervention (from 0.99 ± 0.15 at baseline to 1.02 ± 0.26 at follow up) and decreased after drinking control water (from 0.92 ± 0.27 to 0.79 ± 0.15). A marker of DNA methylation (Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 2, TET2) expression at 6-month follow-up increased in both groups, yet the degree of elevation was significantly higher in HRW (from 0.81 ± 0.52 at baseline to 1.62 ± 0.66 at follow up) comparing to the control water (from 1.13 ± 0.82 to 1.76 ± 0.87) (P = 0.040). A strong trend for treatment vs. time interaction was found for a degree of DNA methylation (P = 0.166), with the methylation increased in the HRW group (from 120.6 ± 39.8 ng at baseline to 126.6 ± 33.8 ng at follow up) and decreased after taking control water (from 133.6 ± 52.9 ng to 121.2 ± 38.4 ng). HRW was superior to control water to increase brain choline and NAA levels in the left frontal grey matter, brain creatine at the right parietal white matter, and brain NAA at the right parietal mesial grey matter (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found between interventions for other outcomes (P > 0.05), except for a significantly improved chair stand performance after HRW intervention compared to the control water (P = 0.01). Owing to pleiotropic mechanisms of hydrogen action, this simple biomedical gas could be recognized as a possible anti-aging agent that tackles several hallmarks of aging, including loss of function and telomere length shortening. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04430803).

4.
Food Sci Nutr ; 9(9): 5139-5145, 2021 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34532023

RESUMO

The main aim of this randomized-controlled cross-over interventional trial was to assess the acute effects of taking a single dose of hydrogen-rich water (HRW), and compare it with caffeine, HRW plus caffeine, and control water, for alertness, brain metabolism, brain and oxygen saturation, and self-reported adverse events in healthy men and women who were habitual coffee drinkers and were sleep-deprived for 24 hr. Sixteen apparently healthy young adults (8 men and 8 women; age 24.0 ± 3.5 years) were allocated in a cross-over design to receive a single-dose drink of HRW (8 ppm), caffeine (50 mg), HRW plus caffeine, or control drink (tap water) in the morning after 24-hr sleep deprivation and 12-hr fasting. The primary and secondary outcomes were assessed at baseline (pre-intervention) and 15-min follow-up. Significantly less time was needed to complete trail-making test after both HRW and HRW plus caffeine compared with the control drink (p < .05). The number of errors in the symbol digit modalities test was significantly lower after drinking HRW or caffeine than control drink (p < .05). Both HRW and caffeine significantly increased the choline-to-creatine ratio in several brain regions (frontal white and gray matter), while HRW and the combination intervention also affected brain metabolism in the paracentral brain. No participants reported any side effects from any intervention. The attention enhancement driven by HRW appears along with changes in brain metabolism. Being generally recognized as a safe intervention, hydrogen could be thus recommended as a novel intervention that upholds attention in stressed conditions, with its metabolic footprint likely different from caffeine.

7.
SAGE Open Med ; 9: 20503121211036119, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34377472

RESUMO

Introduction: The main aim of this pilot study was to examine the effects of a single-dose intervention with a novel nitrate-producing formulation (MagNOVOx™) on biomarkers of cardiorespiratory endurance and muscular fitness in 12 healthy men. Methods: The study participants (age = 22.7 ± 2.8 years, height = 184.1 ± 5.7 cm, and weight = 82.5 ± 8.4 kg) were randomly allocated to receive either a single dose of MagNOVOx™ or a placebo (inulin) in a cross-over design. The primary outcome for this study was the change in running time to exhaustion evaluated at baseline (before supplementation) and post-intervention. Results: Time to exhaustion was improved after the intervention in 8 out of 11 participants (72.7%) who received MagNOVOx™, and in 1 out of 11 participants (9.1%) who received placebo (p = 0.004), and MagNOVOx™ outcompeted placebo in terms of improving leg press performance (p < 0.01). No significant differences between MagNOVOx™ and placebo were found for blood pressure responses (p > 0.05). Conclusion: These promising findings should be further corroborated in medium- and long-term trials, and different populations, while the exact mechanism of MagNOVOx™ requires additional physiological studies.

8.
J Int Soc Sports Nutr ; 18(1): 53, 2021 Jun 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34193199

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: We described here the annual variations in mean dietary creatine intake from 1999 to 2018 in U.S. children and adults using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) database. METHODS: Dietary intake information from ten consecutive rounds of NHANES (from 1999 to 2000 to 2017-2018) was extracted for a total of 89,161 respondents aged 0-85 years. Individual values for total grams of creatine consumed per day were computed using the average amount of creatine (3.88 g/kg) across all creatine-containing food sources. RESULTS: The average daily intake of creatine across the entire sample was 0.70 ± 0.78 g (95% confidence interval [CI], from 0.69 to 0.71) and 13.1 ± 16.5 mg/kg body weight (95% CI, from 13.0 to 13.2). A significant negative trend for dietary creatine intake was found in infants (r = - 0.019; P = 0.042), and children and adolescents (r = - 0.024; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest a variation in dietary creatine intake in the U.S. population during the past 20 years, with young persons tend to consume fewer grams of creatine per day from 1999 onwards. Long-running studies are highly warranted to assess possible health consequences of variable creatine intake in human nutrition.


Assuntos
Creatina/administração & dosagem , Dieta/tendências , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inquéritos Nutricionais , Fatores de Tempo , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
9.
BMC Proc ; 15(Suppl 6): 11, 2021 May 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34001132

RESUMO

Sport4Health Network (SPORT4H) is a multidisciplinary project co-funded by the European Union Erasmus+ programme aimed to encourage participation in physical activity in working population. SPORT4H includes educational and instructional activities that provide top-notch knowledge on various physical activities that may have an additional benefit to improve healthy lifestyle behaviours across workforce. The aims of Sport4Health 2021 e-symposium organized from 22nd to 23th March 2021 were to: (1) summarize data collected during this project through evaluation of health and fitness profiles for over 40,000 employees from all Sport4HealthNet countries (Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Netherlands, Serbia and Slovenia); (2) discuss the applicability of user-friendly guidelines for physical activity at workplace and e-learning module that includes multicomponent interventions with innovative activities; (3) share experiences from different partners about the effects of educational interventions in specific working environment; and, (4) overview challenges identified during the implementation of interventions at work settings. The Sport4Health 2021 e-symposium facilitated networking between partner institutions, provided practical information for extensive public education that advances physical activity at workplace, and capacitated interaction and recruitment of end-users through e-learning modules and guidelines.

10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33921458

RESUMO

Athletes' lifestyles have been dramatically affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Since COVID-19 primarily affects the respiratory system and to a lesser degree the cardiovascular system, the goal of this study was to examine the effects of COVID-19-caused detraining on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) of recently recovered volleyball athletes. Sixteen experienced volleyball athletes (age 24 ± 4.5 years) who were recently diagnosed and recovered from a COVID-19 infection volunteered to participate in this study and were tested for CRF and spirometry. Given that participants had only mild symptoms of infection, the primary focus of this study was on the effects of detraining on CRF. On average, the time to exhaustion was 9.4 ± 1.4 min. VE, VCO2, RER and oxygen pulse increased, heart rate exceeded 90% of predicted values, and peak VO2 values were typical for this level of athlete (44.1 ± 3.4 mL/kg). Pulmonary function reflected in FVC, FEV1/FVC and MVV values were well above 80% of predicted values for each of the participants while electrocardiography revealed no ischemia, arrythmias or conduction and repolarization abnormalities were found in the tested subjects. Therefore, it can be concluded that participants experienced typical consequences of detraining. Due to a lack of CRF data prior to COVID-19 infection, we were unable to estimate the magnitude detraining had on CRF. Complete CRF assessment after COVID-19 infection in athletes can be useful for screening of residual myocardial and/or respiratory system damage for safe return-to-play decisions.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Aptidão Cardiorrespiratória , Voleibol , Adulto , Atletas , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , SARS-CoV-2 , Adulto Jovem
11.
BMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil ; 13(1): 39, 2021 Apr 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33853685

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Rapid weight loss (RWL) is commonly practiced in combat sports. Both magnitude and methods used to induce RWL are largely similar among combat sports, but currently, there is no data on RWL methodology used by sambo athletes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine RWL procedures sambo athletes apply to lose weight rapidly. METHODS: The sample consisted of 199 participants, of which 132 males and 67 females who participated in the World Sambo Championship 2020 held in Novi Sad, Serbia. Each participant received RWL questionnaire that was available in multiple languages, and every participant was instructed how to fill it out. RESULTS: Almost 87% of sambo participants declared to have intentionally cut their weight prior to the competition, whereby 5.27 kg (SD: ±7.57) was lost. Gradual dieting, sauna use and skipping meals were the most dominant methods used to reduce weight prior to competition while more extreme methods of RWL such as the use of laxatives, diuretics, diet pills and vomiting were also implemented but by much smaller fragment of the participants involved. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from our study largely match with previously conducted RWL studies in terms of prevalence, magnitude and methods used by combat sport athletes, especially in judo and wrestling. Knowing the hazardous consequences of RWL, alternative methods of sustainable weight loss should be considered.

12.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 2021 Apr 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33866527

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Recent clinical trials suggested a potential benefit of dietary creatine on cognitive function for aging individuals. However, the association between creatine consumption from food and cognitive function in the older adults remained undetermined at the populational level. The present study quantified the amount of creatine consumed through a regular diet among U.S. adults aged 60 years and over, and evaluated the link between dietary creatine and cognitive function using data from the 2001-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). METHODS: NHANES 2001-2002 round included a total of 1340 older adults (51.8% women; age 71.4 ± 7.8 years) who provided valid dietary information and cognitive testing measures. Dietary intake information was obtained from the NHANES Dietary Data component through a 24-h in-person dietary recall interview. Cognitive function was assessed using the WAIS III Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSS) conducted during the household interview. RESULTS: A bivariate model revealed a significant positive correlation between DSS scores and creatine intake across the whole sample (τb = 0.043; P = 0.02). The partial models demonstrated a significant correlation between creatine consumption and DSS score when adjusted for sociodemographic variables (r = 0.062; P = 0.039), and nutritional variables (r = 0.055; P = 0.049). The participants who consumed more than 0.95 g of creatine per day (3rd and 4th quartiles of creatine intake) were found to have higher scores on the cognitive functioning test as compared to their peers with lower creatine intake (1st and 2nd quartiles) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that creatine from food might be protective against reduced cognitive performance in the older population. Further research is highly warranted to investigate the role of dietary creatine amount in cognitive function in the older adults.

13.
Nutrients ; 13(4)2021 Mar 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33805862

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Like other combat sports, sambo has competition rules that divide athletes into categories based on gender, age and weight. Athletes in combat sports often resort to rapid weight loss (RWL) methods to be more competitive in lower weight categories and gain an advantage against lighter, smaller and weaker competitors. The aim of this study was to examine the methodology implemented by two different sambo age categories, junior and senior athletes, in order to attain RWL. METHODS: The sample consisted of 103 male sambo elite athletes (seniors/juniors: age 28.5 ± 4.3/18.9 ± 0.8; height (m): 1.7 ± 0.1/1.8 ± 0.1; weight (kg): 76.3 ± 17.8/74.4 ± 16.3; BMI (kg/m2): 25.0 ± 3.8/23.7 ± 3.9) who completed a survey on RWL. RESULTS: Athletes reported losing a mean of 5 kg starting approximately 12 days before a competition. The most common methodology reported by senior and junior sambo athletes was gradually increasing dieting, followed by sauna and plastic suit training. Less common methods adopted were laxatives, diuretics, the use of diet pills and vomiting. There were significant group differences for sauna and diet pill ingestion. Coaches and parents are influential people in the lives of athletes concerning the weight loss strategy to be adopted. CONCLUSIONS: This study's results unequivocally confirm the prevalent practice of RWL in both senior and junior sambo athletes. Although athletes prevalently chose "less harmful" methods, there is a need to inform parents and coaches of the risks and benefits of RWL.


Assuntos
Atletas/estatística & dados numéricos , Artes Marciais/estatística & dados numéricos , Perda de Peso , Adolescente , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Diuréticos/administração & dosagem , Humanos , Laxantes/administração & dosagem , Masculino , Banho a Vapor/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Tempo , Vômito
14.
Nutrients ; 13(3)2021 Mar 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33806719

RESUMO

A possible role of dietary creatine for ensuring proper growth and development remains unknown. The main aim of this cross-sectional study was to quantify the amount of creatine consumed through regular diet among U.S. children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 years and investigate the relationship between creatine intake and growth indicators, using data from the 2001-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). We included data for NHANES 2001-2002 respondents (4291 participants, 2133 boys and 2158 girls) aged 2 to 19 years at the time of screening, who provided valid dietary information and examination measures (standing height and weight). Individual values for total grams of creatine consumed per day for each participant were computed using the average amount of creatine (3.88 g/kg) across all sources of meat-based foods. All participants were categorized for height-for-age and BMI-for-age categories. The average daily intake of creatine across the whole sample was 1.07 ± 1.07 g (95% CI, from 1.04 to 1.10). Height, weight, and BMI were significantly different across creatine quartiles (p < 0.001), with all measures significantly higher in the 4th quartile of creatine intake (≥1.5 g/day) than those in other quartiles (p < 0.05). The participants from the 3rd quartile of creatine intake (0.84-1.49 g/day) were significantly different from others with respect to having lower rates of normal stature and higher rates of tall stature (p < 0.05). Each additional 0.1 g of creatine consumed per day increases height by 0.60 cm (simple model) or 0.30 cm (adjusted model). The daily intake of creatine from a regular diet in taller children and adolescents was higher than in shorter peers aged 2-19 years. Future research has to monitor temporal changes in growth and dietary creatine and validate our findings in interventional studies across pediatric populations.


Assuntos
Creatina , Dieta , Adolescente , Índice de Massa Corporal , Peso Corporal , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos Transversais , Ingestão de Energia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Inquéritos Nutricionais , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos
16.
Res Sports Med ; 29(6): 517-525, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33356580

RESUMO

We analysed the effects of an experimental novel protocol of intensive hydrotherapy with hydrogen-rich water (HRW) on injury recovery in athletic men who suffered an acute ankle sprain (AAS) and compared it with a RICE protocol (rest, ice, compression, elevation). Professional athletes (age 23.7 ± 4.0 years; weight 78.6 ± 5.7 kg, height 182.5 ± 4.3 cm; professional experience 5.9 ± 3.9 years) who incurred AAS during a sport-related activity were randomly assigned immediately after the injury to either hydrogen group (n = 9) or a conventional RICE treatment group (n = 9). Hydrogen group received six 30-min ankle baths with HRW throughout the first 24 h post-injury, with hydrotherapy administered every 4 hours during the intervention period. RICE group stood off the injured leg, with ice packs administered for 20 min every 3 hours, with the injured ankle compressed with an elastic bandage for 24 hours and elevated at all possible times above the level of the heart. HRW was equivalent to RICE protocol to reduce ankle swelling (2.1 ± 0.9% vs. 1.6 ± 0.8%; P = 0.26), range of motion (2.4 ± 1.3 cm vs. 2.7 ± 0.8 cm; P = 0.60), and single-leg balance with eyes opened (18.4 ± 8.2 sec vs. 10.7 ± 8.0 sec; P = 0.06) and closed (5.6 ± 8.4 sec vs. 3.9 ± 4.2 sec; P = 0.59). This non-inferiority pilot trial supports the use of HRW as an effective choice in AAS management. However, more studies are needed to corroborate these findings in other soft tissue injuries.


Assuntos
Traumatismos do Tornozelo/terapia , Traumatismos em Atletas/terapia , Bandagens Compressivas , Crioterapia/métodos , Hidrogênio/uso terapêutico , Hidroterapia/métodos , Entorses e Distensões/terapia , Adulto , Biomarcadores/sangue , Humanos , Masculino , Medição da Dor , Projetos Piloto , Equilíbrio Postural , Amplitude de Movimento Articular , Adulto Jovem
17.
BMC Proc ; 14(Suppl 16): 13, 2020 Nov 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33292242

RESUMO

Physical activity at workplace can positively impact various wellbeing outcomes yet developing and implementing exercise programs that are straightforward, time-efficient and widely applicable remains a notable public health challenge. Sport4Health Network (SPORT4H) project co-funded by the European Union Erasmus+ programme unites health and sport professionals in an effort to encourage participation in physical activity among working population and reduce health risk factors for lifestyle diseases. A two-day SPORT4H scientific forum on non-traditional types of work-place exercise interventions was organized from 14th to 15th September 2020, to critically evaluate evidence on stretching and resistance exercise programs targeted to working population in aim to identify knowledge gaps and future areas of research and application. Evidence on traditional interventions (e.g., walking initiatives, active travel) appears more robust while only few studies evaluated the applicability of non-traditional PA programs in working population. However, we identified a moderate-to-strong link between non-traditional PA programs at the workplace and several health-related physical fitness indices, with resistance exercise turned out to be superior to other exercise interventions analyzed. It appears that low-volume high-repetition resistance exercise favorably affects musculoskeletal disorders, work performance and health-related quality of life in employees who exercised at least 3 times per week for over 8 weeks. In terms of safety, screening protocols should employ health-related questionnaires, adopting a progressive training load, and prescribing training programs to individual participants' needs. Implementing non-traditional PA programs aimed to improve health-related physical fitness and counteract sedentary behavior at workplace might be therefore of utmost importance to contribute to health promotion in this sensible population.

18.
Nutr Res ; 84: 63-69, 2020 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33189432

RESUMO

This pilot trial reports the effects of L-carnosine administration on autonomic nervous system performance, brain metabolism, and various patient- and clinician-reported outcomes in a case series of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We hypothesized that medium-term L-carnosine supplementation would improve selected patient- and clinician-reported outcomes in MS patients, with no negative effects on self-reported side effects. L-carnosine (2 g/day) was administered orally for 8 weeks in 2 women and one man suffering from MS. The intensity of symptoms and signs of MS after L-carnosine administration diminished in 5 out of 7 domains in CASE 1, in 3 out of 7 domains in CASE 2, and one domain in CASE 3; general fatigue was reduced in all 3 cases at the follow-up. This was accompanied by an improved walking distance to exhaustion in all patients, with values improved for 51.1% in CASE 1, 19.5% in CASE 2, and 2.1% in CASE 3 at 8-week follow-up. Tests of autonomic cardiovascular reflexes demonstrate normalized parasympathetic modulation and balanced sympathetic function after L-carnosine intervention in all MS cases. An increase in serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was found at 8-week follow-up in all patients (from 4.6 to 49.6%); this was accompanied by lower blood lactate at post-administration in all cases (23.5% on average). Single-voxel 1.5 T MR spectroscopy revealed increased brain choline-contained compounds (18.9% on average), total creatine (21.2%), and myo-inositol levels (12.3%) in girus cinguli at 8-week follow-up in all MS cases. This case study demonstrates that an 8-week intervention with L-carnosine appears to be a safe and beneficial therapeutic strategy with regard to the reduction of presence and severity of symptoms of MS.


Assuntos
Sistema Nervoso Autônomo/fisiopatologia , Encéfalo/metabolismo , Carnosina/administração & dosagem , Suplementos Nutricionais , Esclerose Múltipla/dietoterapia , Esclerose Múltipla/fisiopatologia , Adulto , Fadiga , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Esclerose Múltipla/metabolismo , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente
19.
J Sports Med (Hindawi Publ Corp) ; 2020: 8836070, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33123594

RESUMO

High-intensity eccentric exercise can cause a delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS), a short-term condition characterized by muscle damage and tenderness that might hold up recovery and jeopardize exercise routine. Previous studies indicated that hydrogen-rich water (HRW) might be a helpful topical intervention to boost recovery in musculoskeletal medicine, yet no data are available concerning the effectiveness and safety of whole-body bathing with supersaturated HRW after DOMS-inducing exercise. This study evaluates the effects of a single-session bathing with HRW on biochemical markers of muscular damage in healthy young men. The six volunteers who were exposed to DOMS-inducing eccentric exercise were assigned to either supersaturated HRW or control whole-body bathing in a double-blind crossover design. Immediately after an exercise session, the participants were immersed up to the neck into a 200 L bathtub with supersaturated HRW (8 mg of H2 per L) or control water (no hydrogen) for 30 min. Blood biomarkers of inflammation and muscular damage and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores for muscle soreness were assessed at baseline (before exercise) and at 24-hour follow-up. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant difference between two groups in serum creatine kinase (CK) response over the period of intervention (P=0.04). A single-session bathing in HRW prevented a rise in circulating biomarkers of muscular damage induced by exercise at 24-hour follow-up, retaining the levels of all biomarkers similar to the baseline values (P > 0.05). On the other hand, serum CK, aldolase, and aspartate transaminase were significantly elevated at 24-hour follow-up as compared to the baseline levels after the control bath (342 ± 309 U/L vs. 465 ± 295 U/L; P > 0.05). HRW bath also induced a significant drop in VAS scores for muscle soreness in comparison with control water, both immediately after an intervention (32.7 ± 8.6% vs. 20.0 ± 12.8%; P=0.02) and at 24-hour follow-up (31.6 ± 24.3% vs. 22.4 ± 27.5%; P=0.03), respectively. No participants reported any major side effects during the trial. This pilot study suggests that the whole-body bathing in supersaturated HRW is a safe procedure that attenuates muscular damage and can ease sore muscles after high-intensity eccentric exercise.

20.
F1000Res ; 9: 245, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32399209

RESUMO

Background: The traditional treatment of soft tissue injuries consists of the RICE protocol - rest, ice, compression, and elevation, followed for up to 72 hours after a trauma. Although designed as an immediate therapy to reduce inflammation that occurs after an acute injury, the RICE protcol might not be the best way to promote healing due to limiting blood flow. Molecular hydrogen (H 2) has recently been put forward as a possible adjuvant treatment in musculoskeletal medicine, yet limited data are available concerning its effectiveness as a first-aid intervention. Case report: We report here a case of an elite professional athlete who suffered a grade II ankle sprain, and who subsequently received six sessions of ankle and foot hydrotherapy (e.g. 30-min at every four hours) with super-saturated hydrogen-rich water during the first 24 hours post-injury. The pain VAS self-completed by the patient dropped from 50 points (moderate pain) at baseline (immediately after injury) to 20 points (mild pain) at 24-h follow-up. Ankle swelling dropped by 2.8% and dorsiflexion range of movement improved by 27.9% from baseline to follow-up, respectively. Conclusions: Our case has indicated that an acute multi-session hydrotherapy with hydrogen-rich water might be a helpful treatment in terms of pain, swelling reduction and regaining range of motion after an ankle sprain.


Assuntos
Traumatismos do Tornozelo , Traumatismos em Atletas/terapia , Hidroterapia , Adulto , Traumatismos do Tornozelo/terapia , Atletas , Humanos , Hidrogênio , Masculino , Água
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