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1.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 116(1): 16, 2021 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33566555

RESUMO

Article Title: ACG Clinical Guideline: Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

2.
Dig Dis Sci ; 2021 Jan 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33433804

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prescription drug costs exert profound effects on commercial insurance coverage and access to effective therapy. AIMS: We aimed to assess threshold pricing to achieve budget neutrality of FDA-approved drugs treating irritable bowel syndrome from an insurance perspective, based on cost-savings resulting in decreased healthcare utilization through effective disease management. METHODS: We constructed a decision-analytic model from an insurance perspective to assess the budget impact of IBS prescription drugs under usual insurance coverage levels in practice: (1) unrestricted drug access or (2) step therapy in a primary care population of middle-age, care-seeking IBS patients. Budget-neutral drug prices were then calculated which resulted in $0 budget impact to insurers with a short-term, one-year time horizon. RESULTS: If used according to FDA labeling, IBS-D drugs cost between $4778 and $16,844 per year and IBS-C drugs cost between $4319 and $4955 per year. These drug costs often exceed insurance expenditures of $6999 for IBS-D and $3929 for IBS-C if left untreated. Therefore, for drugs to have $0 budget impact to insurers, their prices would need to be discounted 36.7-74.2% for IBS-D drugs and 59.3-82.5% for IBS-C. IBS drugs are already priced to support step therapy "failing one of several common, inexpensive IBS treatments with a responder rate > 30-40%," reflecting the subpopulation with more severe disease and greater healthcare costs. CONCLUSIONS: Broader prescription drug coverage for patients failing common, inexpensive IBS treatments to which at least 30-40% of patients would typically respond appears warranted to enable gastroenterologists to offer personalized approaches targeting specific mechanisms of this heterogeneous disease.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33418133

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The etiology of diverticulitis is poorly understood. The long-held belief that constipation and low-fiber diet are risk factors for diverticulosis has recently been challenged by studies that suggest that more frequent bowel movements predispose to diverticulosis. We aim to prospectively explore the association between bowel movement frequency and incident diverticulitis. DESIGN: We studied participants of the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and Health Professional Follow-up Study (HPFS). Participants' medical history, lifestyle factors and diet were used in Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios(HRs) and 95% confidence intervals(CI). RESULTS: In the NHS during over 24 years of follow-up encompassing 1,299,922 person-years, we documented 5,214 incident cases of diverticulitis, and in the HPFS over 14 years encompassing 368,661 person-years of follow-up, we documented 390 incident cases of diverticulitis. We observed an inverse association between the frequency of bowel movements and risk of diverticulitis. In the NHS, compared with women who had daily bowel movements, those with more than once daily bowel movements had a HR of 1.30 (95% CI, 1.19, 1.42) and those with less frequent bowel movements had a HR of 0.89 (95% CI, 0.82, 0.95; p-trend < 0.0001). In the HPFS, the corresponding HRs were 1.29 (95% CI, 1.04, 1.59) and 0.61 (95% CI, 0.36, 1.03; p-trend = 0.003). The association between bowel movements and diverticulitis was not modified by categories of age, BMI, physical activity, laxative use or fiber intake. CONCLUSION: More frequent bowel movements appear to be a risk factor for subsequent diverticulitis both in men and women. Further studies are needed to understand the potential mechanisms that may underlie this association.

5.
Clin Geriatr Med ; 37(1): 71-83, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33213775

RESUMO

Fecal incontinence can be a challenging and stigmatizing disease with a high prevalence in the elderly population. Despite effective treatment options, most patients do not receive care. Clues in the history and physical examination can assist the provider in establishing the diagnosis. Direct inquiry about the presence of incontinence is key. Bowel disturbances are common triggers for symptoms and represent some of the easiest treatment targets. We review the epidemiology and impact of the disease, delineate a diagnostic and treatment approach for primary care physicians to identify patients with suspected fecal incontinence and describe appropriate treatment options.

6.
Neurogastroenterol Motil ; : e14039, 2020 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33263195

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Racial disparity in healthcare is defined as differences in healthcare services received by racial groups not due to difference in needs or preferences. As irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is highly correlated with social factors, healthcare disparities are important factors in the sociocultural model of IBS. We used healthcare utilization as a lens to examine potential racial disparities in IBS. METHODS: We retrospectively matched 3823 IBS minority patients who self-identified as "Hispanic," "Black," or "Asian" to white IBS controls and examined the number of patients with gastroenterology consults, gastroenterology procedures, and IBS-related Primary Care visits within each cohort from 2003 to 2017. KEY RESULTS: Minority IBS patients were less likely to receive a gastroenterology consult than white IBS controls. Both Black and Asian IBS patients were more likely to have an IBS-related Primary Care visit than white IBS controls. All 3 minority IBS cohorts received significantly more gastroenterology procedures compared to white IBS controls. CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: Minority IBS patients are more likely to receive gastroenterology procedures than white IBS patients. Further studies are needed to determine whether increased procedure likelihood in minority IBS patients represents a communication gap between minority patients and their providers or patient preference.

8.
Int J Eat Disord ; 2020 Nov 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33244769

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Little research exists on Rome IV disorders of gut-brain interaction (DGBI; formerly called functional gastrointestinal disorders) in outpatients with eating disorders (EDs). These data are particularly lacking for avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID), which shares core features with DGBI. We aimed to identify the frequency and nature of DGBI symptoms among outpatients with EDs. METHOD: Consecutively referred pediatric and adult patients diagnosed with an ED (n = 168, 71% female, ages 8-76 years) in our tertiary care ED program between March 2017 and July 2019 completed a modified Rome IV Questionnaire for DGBI and psychopathology measure battery. RESULTS: The majority (n = 122, 72%) of participants reported at least one bothersome gastrointestinal symptom. Sixty-six (39%) met criteria for a DBGI, most frequently functional dyspepsia-post-prandial distress syndrome subtype (31%). DGBI were surprisingly less frequent among patients with ARFID (30%) versus EDs that are associated with shape or weight concerns (45%; X2 [1] = 3.61, p = .058, Cramer's V = .147). Among those with ARFID, DGBI presence was associated with the fear of aversive consequences prototype and multiple comorbid prototype presence. DISCUSSION: We demonstrated notable overlap between DGBI and EDs, particularly post-prandial distress symptoms. Further research is needed to examine if gastrointestinal symptoms predict or are a result of greater ED pathology, including ARFID prototypes.

9.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 115(11): 1741-1745, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33156087
11.
J Neurogastroenterol Motil ; 26(4): 496-504, 2020 09 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32807749

RESUMO

Background/Aims: CSP01 is a novel superabsorbent hydrogel that absorbs gastrointestinal fluids and maintains high viscoelastic properties into the colon, where these fluids are released. Methods: We conducted a single-center, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled pilot study comparing change in colonic transit time (CTT) among patients with chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) and irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) treated for 21 days with either CSP01 hydrogel, active control (carboxymethylcellulose [CMC]) or placebo. CTT was measured using wireless motility capsule transit testing at pre-treatment and end-of-treatment. The primary endpoint was change in CTT. Results: Forty subjects (20 CSP01, 11 CMC, 9 placebo) were enrolled and 38 completed the study. There was no significant change in mean CTT by treatment group (P = 0.297). In the placebo group, CTT increased by 15.3 minutes between baseline and end of treatment, increased by 366.4 minutes for CMC, and decreased by 727.4 minutes for CSP01. In post hoc analyses among those with CIC, mean CTT decreased by 1079 minutes for CSP01 (P = 0.025 compared to placebo), 919 minutes for CMC (P = 0.117 compared to placebo) and increased by 1113 minutes for placebo. Among patients with IBS-C, there was no significant difference in change in CTT for any treatment group. One subject in the CSP01 arm developed back pain attributed to constipation and withdrew without a second CTT measurement; there were no other adverse events. Conclusion: CSP01 significantly decreased CTT compared to placebo among patients with CIC, but not in patients with IBS-C.

12.
Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 5(11): 986-995, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32818437

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Use of antibiotics in early life has been linked with childhood inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but data for adults are mixed, and based on smaller investigations that did not compare risk among siblings with shared genetic or environmental risk factors. We aimed to investigate the association between antibiotic therapy and IBD in a large, population-based study. METHODS: In this prospective case-control study, we identified people living in Sweden aged 16 years or older, with a diagnosis of IBD based on histology and at least one diagnosis code for IBD or its subtypes (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease). We identified consecutive patients with incident IBD from the ESPRESSO (Epidemiology Strengthened by histoPathology Reports in Sweden) study, cross-referenced with the Swedish Patient Register and the Prescribed Drug Register. We accrued data for cumulative antibiotic dispensations until 1 year before time of matching for patients and up to five general population controls per patient (matched on the basis of age, sex, county, and calendar year). We also included unaffected full siblings as a secondary control group. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% CIs for diagnosis of incident IBD. FINDINGS: We identified 23 982 new patients with IBD (15 951 ulcerative colitis, 7898 Crohn's disease, 133 unclassified IBD) diagnosed between Jan 1, 2007, and Dec 31, 2016. 117 827 matched controls and 28 732 siblings were also identified. After adjusting for several risk factors, aOR in patients who had used antibiotics versus those who had never used antibiotics was 1·88 (95% CI 1·79-1·98) for diagnosis of incident IBD, 1·74 (1·64-1·85) for ulcerative colitis, and 2·27 (2·06-2·49) for Crohn's disease. aOR was higher in patients who had received one antibiotic dispensation (1·11, 1·07-1·15), two antibiotic dispensations (1·38, 1·32-1·44), and three or more antibiotic dispensations (1·55, 1·49-1·61) than patients who had none. Increased risk was noted for ulcerative colitis (aOR with three or more antibiotic dispensations 1·47, 95% CI 1·40-1·54) and Crohn's disease (1·64, 1·53-1·76) with higher estimates corresponding to broad-spectrum antibiotics. Similar but attenuated results were observed when siblings were used as the reference group, with an aOR of 1·35 (95% CI 1·28-1·43) for patients who had received three or more dispensations, compared with general population controls. INTERPRETATION: Higher cumulative exposure to systemic antibiotic therapy, particularly treatments with greater spectrum of microbial coverage, may be associated with a greater risk of new-onset IBD and its subtypes. The association between antimicrobial treatment and IBD did not appear to differ when predisposed siblings were used as the reference controls. Our findings, if substantiated by longer-term prospective studies in humans or mechanistic preclinical investigations, suggest the need to further emphasise antibiotic stewardship to prevent the rise in dysbiosis-related chronic diseases, including IBD. FUNDING: National Institutes of Health. Crohn's and Colitis Foundation.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos , Disbiose , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais , Adolescente , Adulto , Idade de Início , Antibacterianos/classificação , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Gestão de Antimicrobianos , Biópsia/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Sistemas de Informação em Farmácia Clínica/estatística & dados numéricos , Disbiose/induzido quimicamente , Disbiose/prevenção & controle , Feminino , Humanos , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/epidemiologia , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/patologia , Masculino , Estudos Prospectivos , Medição de Risco/métodos , Fatores de Risco , Irmãos , Suécia/epidemiologia
13.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila) ; 13(10): 877-888, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32718943

RESUMO

Low-dose aspirin is recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force for primary prevention of colorectal cancer in certain individuals. However, broader implementation will require improved precision prevention approaches to identify those most likely to benefit. The major urinary metabolite of PGE2, 11α-hydroxy-9,15-dioxo-2,3,4,5-tetranor-prostane-1,20-dioic acid (PGE-M), is a biomarker for colorectal cancer risk, but it is unknown whether PGE-M is modifiable by aspirin in individuals at risk for colorectal cancer. Adults (N = 180) who recently underwent adenoma resection and did not regularly use aspirin or NSAIDs were recruited to a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of aspirin at 81 or 325 mg/day for 8-12 weeks. The primary outcome was postintervention change in urinary PGE-M as measured by LC/MS. A total of 169 participants provided paired urine samples for analysis. Baseline PGE-M excretion was 15.9 ± 14.6 (mean ± S.D, ng/mg creatinine). Aspirin significantly reduced PGE-M excretion (-4.7 ± 14.8) compared with no decrease (0.8 ± 11.8) in the placebo group (P = 0.015; mean duration of treatment = 68.9 days). Aspirin significantly reduced PGE-M levels in participants receiving either 81 (-15%; P = 0.018) or 325 mg/day (-28%; P < 0.0001) compared with placebo. In 40% and 50% of the individuals randomized to 81 or 325 mg/day aspirin, respectively, PGE-M reduction reached a threshold expected to prevent recurrence in 10% of individuals. These results support that aspirin significantly reduces elevated levels of PGE-M in those at increased colorectal cancer risk to levels consistent with lower risk for recurrent neoplasia and underscore the potential utility of PGE-M as a precision chemoprevention biomarker. The ASPIRED trial is registered as NCT02394769.

14.
BMC Gastroenterol ; 20(1): 221, 2020 Jul 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32652931

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous studies of the relationship between dietary factors and risk of diverticulosis have yielded inconsistent results. We therefore sought to investigate the association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and prevalent diverticulosis. METHODS: Our study population included participants in the Gastrointestinal Disease and Endoscopy Registry (GIDER), a colonoscopy-based longitudinal cohort at the Massachusetts General Hospital, who provided comprehensive information on dietary intake and lifestyle factors using validated questionnaires prior to colonoscopy. Information on presence and location of diverticula was obtained from the endoscopist at the end of each procedure. We used Poisson regression modeling to calculate the prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Among 549 participants with a mean age of 61 years enrolled in GIDER, we confirmed diverticulosis in 245 (44.6%). The prevalence of diverticulosis appeared to decrease with higher consumption of fruit and vegetables (Ptrend = 0.007 for fruit and 0.008 for vegetables, respectively). Compared to participants with less than five servings of vegetables per week, the multivariable-adjusted PRs of diverticulosis were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.60-1.17) with five to seven servings per week and 0.62 (95% CI, 0.44-0.89) with greater than one serving per day. Similarly, compared to participants with less than five servings per week of fruit, the multivariable-adjusted PR of diverticulosis was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.41-0.87) with greater than one serving per day. These associations were not modified by age, BMI, smoking, or red meat intake (All Pinteraction > 0.055). CONCLUSION: In a colonoscopy-based longitudinal cohort study, we show that higher consumption of fruit and vegetables is associated with lower risk of prevalent diverticulosis.

15.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 18(12): 2833-2834.e3, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32629121

RESUMO

Google Trends is an online tool that allows measurement of search term popularity on Google, spatially and temporally. While not an epidemiological tool for determining incidence, it can estimate the popularity of a certain disease by search volume over time.1,2 It has previously correlated well with infectious disease incidence and has demonstrated utility in disease forecasting, especially with influenza data.3 We utilized Google Trends to investigate whether search interest in common gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms would correlate with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) incidence data.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Gastroenteropatias/diagnóstico , Internet/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Comorbidade , Gastroenteropatias/epidemiologia , Humanos , Incidência , Prognóstico , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
16.
Dig Dis Sci ; 2020 May 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32361922

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Examining the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) across regions has been challenging given significant methodological heterogeneity. AIMS: We aimed to perform a uniform assessment of the global burden of IBS using data from Google Trends, a novel, online tool. METHODS: Google Trends measures popularity of a search term in a given week compared to popularity of all search terms in that week, calculated as relative search volume (RSV). We compiled data on the popularity of IBS and its treatments across 173 countries between 2014 and 2018. We compared Google Trends popularity for IBS with prior epidemiological prevalence data, while controlling for gross domestic product (GDP) per capita and physician density. RESULTS: Of the 173 countries with Google Trends data, 137 countries also had data for GDP per capita and physician density. Worldwide popularity of IBS as a search topic increased from 79 to 89 (13% increase by RSV) over the 5-year period between 2014 and 2018. Country-specific change in IBS RSV ranged from - 35% (Nigeria) to + 64% (Pakistan). There was poor correlation between the Google Trends data and prior epidemiological data (0.08, Pearson correlation, p = 0.64). Popularity of the low-FODMAP diet increased the most among 8 common therapies (RSV 41 to 89, 117% increase). CONCLUSIONS: Google Trends is a novel tool that can complement traditional epidemiological methods in gastrointestinal disease. Future research is needed to assess its utility and accuracy as a measure of disease burden across different gastrointestinal diseases.

17.
Drug Des Devel Ther ; 14: 1391-1400, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32308371

RESUMO

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain associated with changes in bowel habits. It is the most common GI problem seen by gastroenterologists. IBS is a heterogenous disorder encompassing a spectrum of underlying mechanisms and clinical presentations. The pathophysiology of diarrhea-predominant form of IBS (IBS-D) remains poorly understood, and current available therapeutic options for IBS-D are limited. Eluxadoline is a novel, locally acting mixed µ- and κ-opioid receptor agonist and δ-receptor antagonist approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of adults with IBS-D. Data from two phase III clinical trials showed that approximately 25-30% of the eluxadoline-treated patients achieved composite clinical response, defined by a reduction of abdominal pain and improvement in stool consistency. Patients who achieve composite response during the first month of therapy were significantly more likely to demonstrate sustained clinical response. The most common adverse events reported with eluxadoline use were constipation, nausea and abdominal pain. The risk of abuse, dependence, or withdrawal is low. Serious adverse events associated with eluxadoline include sphincter of Oddi spasm (SOS) and pancreatitis particularly in patients without a gallbladder. Development of pancreatitis is likely secondary to SOS, but it remains unclear why pancreatitis occurs so quickly after initial doses. This adverse event profile helps guide proper selection of IBS-D patients for eluxadoline use, with important contraindications including absence of a gallbladder, biliary duct obstruction or sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, alcoholism, history of pancreatitis, or structural diseases of the pancreas. With the recent clinical trials demonstrating its efficacy, eluxadoline provides an additional option to the few existing pharmacologic interventions available for IBS-D. In this review, we discuss the drug development, efficacy and safety of eluxadoline, as well as selection criteria for identifying appropriate candidates for this medication.

18.
Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 5(6): 537-547, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32192628

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Long-term colorectal cancer incidence and mortality after colorectal polyp removal remains unclear. We aimed to assess colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in individuals with removal of different histological subtypes of polyps relative to the general population. METHODS: We did a matched cohort study through prospective record linkage in Sweden in patients aged at least 18 years with a first diagnosis of colorectal polyps in the nationwide gastrointestinal ESPRESSO histopathology cohort (1993-2016). For each polyp case, we identified up to five matched reference individuals from the Total Population Register on the basis of birth year, age, sex, calendar year of biopsy, and county of residence. We excluded patients and reference individuals with a diagnosis of colorectal cancer either before or within the first 6 months after diagnosis of the index polyp. Polyps were classified by morphology codes into hyperplastic polyps, sessile serrated polyps, tubular adenomas, tubulovillous adenomas, and villous adenomas. Colorectal cancer cases were identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry, and cause-of-death data were retrieved from the Cause of Death Register. We collected information about the use of endoscopic examination before and after the index biopsy from the Swedish National Patient Registry, and counted the number of endoscopies done before and after the index biopsies. We calculated cumulative risk of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality at 3, 5, 10, and 15 years, and computed hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for colorectal cancer incidence and mortality using a stratified Cox proportional hazards model within each of the matched pairs. FINDINGS: 178 377 patients with colorectal polyps and 864 831 matched reference individuals from the general population were included in our study. The mean age of patients at polyp diagnosis was 58·6 (SD 13·9) years for hyperplastic polyps, 59·7 (14·2) years for sessile serrated polyps, 63·9 (12·9) years for tubular adenomas, 67·1 (12·1) years for tubulovillous adenomas, and 68·9 (11·8) years for villous adenomas. During a median of 6·6 years (IQR 3·0-11·6) of follow-up, we documented 4278 incident colorectal cancers and 1269 colorectal cancer-related deaths in patients with a polyp, and 14 350 incident colorectal cancers and 5242 colorectal cancer deaths in general reference individuals. The 10-year cumulative incidence of colorectal cancer was 1·6% (95% CI 1·5-1·7) for hyperplastic polyps, 2·5% (1·9-3·3) for sessile serrated polyps, 2·7% (2·5-2·9) for tubular adenomas, 5·1% (4·8-5·4) for tubulovillous adenomas, and 8·6% (7·4-10·1) for villous adenomas compared with 2·1% (2·0-2·1) in reference individuals. Compared with reference individuals, patients with any polyps had an increased risk of colorectal cancer, with multivariable HR of 1·11 (95% CI 1·02-1·22) for hyperplastic polyps, 1·77 (1·34-2·34) for sessile serrated polyps, 1·41 (1·30-1·52) for tubular adenomas, 2·56 (2·36-2·78) for tubulovillous adenomas, and 3·82 (3·07-4·76) for villous adenomas (p<0·05 for all polyp subtypes). There was a higher proportion of incident proximal colon cancer in patients with serrated (hyperplastic and sessile) polyps (52-57%) than in those with conventional (tubular, tubulovillous, and villous) adenomas (30-46%). For colorectal cancer mortality, a positive association was found for sessile serrated polyps (HR 1·74, 95% CI 1·08-2·79), tubulovillous adenomas (1·95, 1·69-2·24), and villous adenomas (3·45, 2·40-4·95), but not for hyperplastic polyps (0·90, 0·76-1·06) or tubular adenomas (0·97, 0·84-1·12). INTERPRETATION: In a largely screening-naive population, compared with individuals from the general population, patients with any polyps had a higher colorectal cancer incidence, and those with sessile serrated polyps, tubulovillous adenomas, and villous adenomas had a higher colorectal cancer mortality. FUNDING: US National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, American Gastroenterological Association, Union for International Cancer Control.


Assuntos
Adenoma Viloso/cirurgia , Pólipos Adenomatosos/cirurgia , Carcinoma/epidemiologia , Pólipos do Colo/cirurgia , Neoplasias Colorretais/cirurgia , Adenoma/patologia , Adenoma/cirurgia , Adenoma Viloso/patologia , Pólipos Adenomatosos/patologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Carcinoma/mortalidade , Pólipos do Colo/patologia , Neoplasias Colorretais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Colorretais/mortalidade , Neoplasias Colorretais/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Hiperplasia , Incidência , Armazenamento e Recuperação da Informação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mortalidade , Suécia/epidemiologia
19.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 115(5): 746-755, 2020 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32108661

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Mortality concern is a frequent driver of care seeking in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Data on mortality in IBS are scarce, and population-based studies have been limited in size. We examined mortality in IBS. METHODS: A nationwide, matched, population-based cohort study was conducted in Sweden. We identified 45,524 patients undergoing a colorectal biopsy at any of Sweden's 28 pathology departments and with a diagnosis of IBS from 2002 to 2016 according to the National Patient Register, a nationwide registry of inpatient and outpatient specialty care. We compared the mortality risk between these individuals with IBS and age- and sex-matched reference individuals (n = 217,316) from the general population and siblings (n = 53,228). In separate analyses, we examined the role of mucosal appearance for mortality in IBS. Finally, we examined mortality in 41,427 patients with IBS not undergoing a colorectal biopsy. Cox regression estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for death. RESULTS: During follow-up, there were 3,290 deaths in individuals with IBS (9.4/1,000 person-years) compared with 13,255 deaths in reference individuals (7.9/1,000 person-years), resulting in an HR of 1.10 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.14). After adjustment for confounders, IBS was not linked to mortality (HR = 0.96; 95% CI = 0.92-1.00). The risk estimates were neutral when patients with IBS were compared with their siblings. The underlying mucosal appearance on biopsy had only a marginal impact on mortality, and patients with IBS not undergoing a colorectal biopsy were at no increased risk of death (HR = 1.02; 95% CI = 0.99-1.06). DISCUSSION: IBS does not seem to confer an increased risk of death.


Assuntos
Síndrome do Intestino Irritável/mortalidade , Medição de Risco/métodos , Adulto , Biópsia , Causas de Morte/tendências , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Síndrome do Intestino Irritável/diagnóstico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Vigilância da População/métodos , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Taxa de Sobrevida/tendências , Suécia/epidemiologia
20.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 18(11): 2471-2478, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31923640

RESUMO

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Individuals with eating disorders (EDs) frequently have constipation-related symptoms, although the mechanisms of this relationship are not clear. We examined the frequency of and relation between EDs and constipation in patients with chronic constipation referred for anorectal manometry. METHODS: We analyzed data from 279 patients with chronic constipation (79.2% female) evaluated at a tertiary center from June 2017 through September 2018. Participants completed a standardized psychometric assessment (patient assessment of constipation symptoms questionnaire and hospital anxiety and depression scale and visceral sensitivity index analyses) and anorectal manometry. A subset of patients completed colonic transit testing. Participants with clinically significant ED pathology were identified based on scores of 20 or higher on the Eating Attitudes Test-26. We performed a logistic regression analysis to examine factors associated with the likelihood of having ED pathology. Odds ratios were calculated based on continuous variables. We examined the contribution of anxiety to the relationship between severity of ED pathology and symptoms of constipation (such as abdominal pain) using a regression-based bootstrapping approach. RESULTS: Of the study participants, 53 (19.0%) had clinically significant ED pathology. The presence of ED pathology was associated with greater general anxiety scores, based on the hospital anxiety and depression scale (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.05-1.38), and greater gastrointestinal-specific anxiety scores, based on the visceral sensitivity index (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.03-1.09). Gastrointestinal-specific anxiety fully mediated the relationship between the severity of ED pathology and constipation (standardized ß, 0.11-0.16; P = .026-.024). We found no differences in anorectal manometry or colonic transit between patients with vs without ED pathology. CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of patients with chronic constipation, we found that 19% had clinically significant ED pathology. Our preliminary finding indicated that ED pathology might contribute to constipation via gastrointestinal-specific anxiety. Clinicians should consider screening patients with chronic constipation for EDs-especially patients who report symptoms such as bloating and abdominal pain.

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