Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 42
Filtrar
Filtros adicionais











Intervalo de ano
1.
Sleep Med Clin ; 14(3): 351-362, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31375203

RESUMO

In recent years, the diagnostic approach to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) has become more objective and accurate. This was achieved mainly by introduction of methods to exactly quantify electromyographic (EMG) activity in various muscles during REM sleep. The most established muscle combination for RBD diagnosis is the mentalis and upper extremity EMG. Computer-assisted systems for this analysis have been described, and an increasing number of studies looked into analysis of video events. Recently, prodromal phases of isolated RBD have been recognized.

2.
Handb Clin Neurol ; 161: 381-396, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31307615

RESUMO

Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD), sleep paralysis, and nightmare disorder are the three REM sleep parasomnias outlined by the International Classification of Sleep Disorders. In this review we address the clinical neurophysiology of these disorders. The majority of neurophysiologic studies have been conducted in RBD, and fewer studies have evaluated patients with nightmare disorder or isolated sleep paralysis. Neurophysiologic studies of REM sleep parasomnias mostly used polysomnography (PSG), or were performed on animals to shed light on the pathophysiology of these disorders. Fewer studies used electoencephalography or electromyography outside the context of PSG, evoked potentials, or autonomic neurophysiologic studies. In this chapter, the main neurophysiologic findings in REM sleep parasomnias are described and their implications and relevance are discussed.

3.
J Sleep Res ; : e12875, 2019 Jun 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31162763

RESUMO

Restless legs syndrome is a common neurological disorder with a clear female predominance. This study aims to evaluate gender differences in clinical, laboratory and polysomnographic features in patients with restless legs syndrome. For this retrospective analysis, 42 women and 42 men from the Innsbruck RLS database matched by age and therapy were included. Demographic data as well as different severity scales (IRLS, RLS-6 and CGI) were evaluated. Laboratory parameters included several indicators of serum iron status. In all patients, polysomnography was performed according to the AASM guidelines, and periodic leg movements during sleep were scored according to the AASM criteria. IRLS, RLS-6 and CGI revealed more severe symptoms in women (IRLS median [range]: 17.5 [0-35] versus 13.5 [0-32], p = 0.028; RLS-6 median [range]: 18 [0-39] versus 12 [1-42], p = 0.014). Women had lower serum ferritin levels than men (median [range] in µg L-1 : 74 [9-346] versus 167 [15-389], p < 0.001). Twenty-two women and eight men (53.7% versus 22.2%, p = 0.003) had ferritin values below 75 µg L-1 . Periodic leg movements during sleep indices were significantly lower in women than in men (median [range] in number per hr: 11.4 [0-62.5] versus 40 [0-154], p = 0.004, and 12.6 [0-58.5] versus 40 [0.5-208], p = 0.002, for night I and night II, respectively). Restless legs syndrome severity as measured by validated scales was worse in women, while periodic leg movements during sleep indices were higher in men. These results suggest a possible gender difference in phenotypical presentation of restless legs syndrome, manifesting with predominantly sensory symptoms in women and predominantly motor symptoms in men.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31234200

RESUMO

Sleep disturbances are common in Parkinson's disease and comprise the entire spectrum of sleep disorders. On the one hand regulation of sleep and wakefulness is affected in Parkinson's disease, leading to the development of disorders, such as insomnia and daytime sleepiness. While on the other hand control of motor activity during sleep is impaired, with subsequent manifestation of parasomnias (mainly REM sleep behavior disorders, but also, albeit more rarely, sleepwalking, and overlap parasomnia). Restless legs syndrome has been reported to be frequent in patients with Parkinson's disease, although there is no consensus on whether it is more frequent in Parkinson's disease than in the general population. The same is true for sleep-related breathing disorders. Regarding the diagnosis of sleep disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease, one of the main challenges is correctly identifying excessive daytime sleepiness as there are many potential confounding factors, for example it is necessary to distinguish sleep-related breathing disorders from medication effects, and to distinguish restless legs syndrome from the concomitant presence of potential mimics specific to Parkinson's disease, such as akathisia, nocturnal leg cramps, nocturnal hypokinesia, early morning dystonia, etc. The correct diagnosis of REM sleep behavior disorder is also not always easy, and video-polysomnography should be performed in order to exclude mimic-like movements at the end of sleep apneas or violent periodic leg movements of sleep. These aspects and specific considerations about diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease will be reviewed.

6.
Brain ; 142(3): 744-759, 2019 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30789229

RESUMO

Idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder (iRBD) is a powerful early sign of Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. This provides an unprecedented opportunity to directly observe prodromal neurodegenerative states, and potentially intervene with neuroprotective therapy. For future neuroprotective trials, it is essential to accurately estimate phenoconversion rate and identify potential predictors of phenoconversion. This study assessed the neurodegenerative disease risk and predictors of neurodegeneration in a large multicentre cohort of iRBD. We combined prospective follow-up data from 24 centres of the International RBD Study Group. At baseline, patients with polysomnographically-confirmed iRBD without parkinsonism or dementia underwent sleep, motor, cognitive, autonomic and special sensory testing. Patients were then prospectively followed, during which risk of dementia and parkinsonsim were assessed. The risk of dementia and parkinsonism was estimated with Kaplan-Meier analysis. Predictors of phenoconversion were assessed with Cox proportional hazards analysis, adjusting for age, sex, and centre. Sample size estimates for disease-modifying trials were calculated using a time-to-event analysis. Overall, 1280 patients were recruited. The average age was 66.3 ± 8.4 and 82.5% were male. Average follow-up was 4.6 years (range = 1-19 years). The overall conversion rate from iRBD to an overt neurodegenerative syndrome was 6.3% per year, with 73.5% converting after 12-year follow-up. The rate of phenoconversion was significantly increased with abnormal quantitative motor testing [hazard ratio (HR) = 3.16], objective motor examination (HR = 3.03), olfactory deficit (HR = 2.62), mild cognitive impairment (HR = 1.91-2.37), erectile dysfunction (HR = 2.13), motor symptoms (HR = 2.11), an abnormal DAT scan (HR = 1.98), colour vision abnormalities (HR = 1.69), constipation (HR = 1.67), REM atonia loss (HR = 1.54), and age (HR = 1.54). There was no significant predictive value of sex, daytime somnolence, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, sleep apnoea, urinary dysfunction, orthostatic symptoms, depression, anxiety, or hyperechogenicity on substantia nigra ultrasound. Among predictive markers, only cognitive variables were different at baseline between those converting to primary dementia versus parkinsonism. Sample size estimates for definitive neuroprotective trials ranged from 142 to 366 patients per arm. This large multicentre study documents the high phenoconversion rate from iRBD to an overt neurodegenerative syndrome. Our findings provide estimates of the relative predictive value of prodromal markers, which can be used to stratify patients for neuroprotective trials.

7.
Sleep ; 42(3)2019 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30551198

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) are frequent motor phenomena; however, population-based data are scarce. We assessed the prevalence of PLMS and factors associated with PLMS within two German population-based cohorts, the SHIP-TREND and BiDirect. METHODS: Single-night polysomnography was performed on 1107 subjects recruited from the general population (mean age: 52.9 years, 54.1% men) in the SHIP-TREND and on 247 participants (mean age: 57.6 years, 50.6% men) in the BiDirect. PLMS were evaluated using the standard criteria of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Sociodemographic data, behavioral variables, medical history, current medication, and other sleep disorders were assessed. RESULTS: The prevalence of PLMS index (PLMSI) >15/hour was 32.4% (SHIP-TREND) and 36.4% (BiDirect). In multivariable models, age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.05 per +1 year), male gender (OR = 2.20), restless legs syndrome (OR = 2.32), physical inactivity (OR = 1.52), current smoking (OR = 1.49), diabetes (OR = 2.13), antidepressant use (OR = 2.27), lower serum magnesium (OR per -0.1 mmol/L = 1.27) showed a positive, and the intake of beta-blockers an inverse association with PLMSI >15/hour in SHIP-TREND. In BiDirect, age (OR = 1.13 per +1 year), body mass index (OR = 1.11 per +1 kg/m2), and restless legs syndrome (OR = 8.77) were significantly associated with PLMSI >15/hour. CONCLUSIONS: A high PLMSI is frequent in the German population. Age, male gender, restless legs syndrome, physical inactivity, current smoking, obesity, diabetes, antidepressant use, and lower magnesium were independently associated with PLMSI >15/hour in at least one of the cohorts.

8.
Sleep Med ; 54: 94-100, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30529783

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The International Restless Legs Study Group (IRLSSG) has developed the IRLS (International Restless Legs Syndrome Severity Scale) and validated it as a clinician/researcher administered scale to be used when both patient and examiner are present. The IRLSSG recognized the need for a self-completing scale that can be used economically in clinical practice and in large population-based studies. In this study the validity and the reliability of the IRLS as a self-administered scale (sIRLS) is assessed. METHODS: Established RLS patients were recruited by eight centers in four countries and consented to participate in this study. The validity of the sIRLS was assessed by patients completing the sIRLS before a clinician administered the IRLS. The reliability of the sIRLS was assessed by patients completing the sIRLS again, two weeks after the first one, provided no change had occurred. RESULTS: Overall, 173 patients were recruited and 164 of them were included in the analyses. The sIRLS showed satisfactory scaling assumptions and no relevant floor or ceiling effect. One factor explained 61.3% of the variance. Cronbach's alpha was 0.93 and the item homogeneity index was 0.59. Intraclass correlation coefficient between the sIRLS and the IRLS was 0.94. The sIRLS standard error of measurement was 3.61 (½ SD at baseline = 4.11). The results mostly overlapped those of the IRLS analyzed in parallel. DISCUSSION: The sIRLS is a reliable, valid and precise instrument that showed tight association with the IRLS. These findings support the use of the sIRLS for self-evaluation of RLS severity. The responses obtained on the sIRLS and the IRLS scale varied slightly. Therefore, we recommend that either the sIRLS or the IRLS scale be used as the only scale for serial measures over time.

10.
Nat Commun ; 9(1): 5229, 2018 Dec 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30523329

RESUMO

Analysis of sleep for the diagnosis of sleep disorders such as Type-1 Narcolepsy (T1N) currently requires visual inspection of polysomnography records by trained scoring technicians. Here, we used neural networks in approximately 3,000 normal and abnormal sleep recordings to automate sleep stage scoring, producing a hypnodensity graph-a probability distribution conveying more information than classical hypnograms. Accuracy of sleep stage scoring was validated in 70 subjects assessed by six scorers. The best model performed better than any individual scorer (87% versus consensus). It also reliably scores sleep down to 5 s instead of 30 s scoring epochs. A T1N marker based on unusual sleep stage overlaps achieved a specificity of 96% and a sensitivity of 91%, validated in independent datasets. Addition of HLA-DQB1*06:02 typing increased specificity to 99%. Our method can reduce time spent in sleep clinics and automates T1N diagnosis. It also opens the possibility of diagnosing T1N using home sleep studies.

11.
Mov Disord ; 2018 Oct 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30311259

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Restless legs syndrome is a sensorimotor neurological disorder of the limbs that impairs quality of life and disturbs sleep. However, there has been progress in understanding the disease involving the dopaminergic system as well as iron metabolism. The exact pathophysiological mechanisms of restless legs syndrome remain elusive. We tried to elucidate the underlying mechanisms in iron metabolism in restless legs syndrome subjects on a systemic, cellular, and mitochondrial level. METHODS: We conducted a study prospectively recruiting 168 restless legs syndrome patients and 119 age-matched healthy controls focusing on iron metabolism using human monocytes as surrogates. RESULTS: Evaluation of systemic iron metabolism parameters in the circulation showed no significant difference between patients and controls. We observed a significant reduction in mRNA levels of heme oxygenase 1 and mitochondrial iron genes like mitoferrin 1 and 2 in monocytes isolated from restless legs syndrome patients, indicating mitochondrial iron deficiency. Interestingly, we also observed reduced expression of iron regulatory protein 2 along with impaired activity of mitochondrial aconitase and reduced mitochondrial superoxide formation in restless legs syndrome subjects. Along this line, patients had reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity that improved in restless legs syndrome subjects under treatment with dopaminergic drugs compared with untreated patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that restless legs syndrome is linked to mitochondrial iron deficiency and associated impairment of mitochondrial function. This is partly corrected by treatment with dopaminergic drugs compared with untreated patients, which may be linked to an effect of dopamine on cellular iron homeostasis.

12.
Mov Disord ; 33(6): 1016-1020, 2018 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29756641

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: MAPT haplotypes are associated with PD, but their association with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To study the role of MAPT variants in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. METHODS: Two cohorts were included: (A) PD (n = 600), rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (n = 613) patients, and controls (n = 981); (B) dementia with Lewy bodies patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (n = 271) and controls (n = 950). MAPT-associated variants and the entire coding sequence of MAPT were analyzed. Age-, sex-, and ethnicity-adjusted analyses were performed to examine the association between MAPT, PD, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. RESULTS: MAPT-H2 variants were associated with PD (odds ratios: 0.62-0.65; P = 0.010-0.019), but not with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. In PD, the H1 haplotype odds ratio was 1.60 (95% confidence interval: 1.12-2.28; P = 0.009), and the H2 odds ratio was 0.68 (95% confidence interval: 0.48-0.96; P = 0.03). The H2/H1 haplotypes were not associated with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm the protective effect of the MAPT-H2 haplotype in PD, and define its components. Furthermore, our results suggest that MAPT does not play a major role in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, emphasizing different genetic background than in PD in this locus. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

13.
PLoS One ; 13(4): e0195573, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29624601

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sleep disordered breathing is a common but often undiagnosed comorbidity in heart failure patients. Cardiac implantable electronic devices used for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) may detect sleep apnea by use of a transthoracic impedance sensor. Validation of the AP scan® algorithm (Boston Scientific®) was performed by using the diagnostic gold standard polysomnography (PSG). METHODS: Forty-one patients with impaired left ventricular ejection fraction, frequent right ventricular pacing due to atrioventricular block and heart failure symptoms despite optimal medical therapy underwent upgrading to biventricular pacing. Within one month after left ventricular lead implantation, sleep apnea was assessed by single-night PSG and AP scan® measurements. RESULTS: AP scan® measurements were valid in only 21 of 41 (51.2%) patients in the index night of the PSG. The PSG determined apnea-hypopnea index did not correlate statistically significant with the AP scan® measurements (r = 0.41, 95% confidence interval -0.05-0.72, p = 0.07). The degree of overestimation is displayed by using the Bland-Altman method: mean difference -12.4, standard deviation ± 15.8, 95% confidence interval -43.3-18.6. CONCLUSIONS: In heart failure patients receiving CRT upgrading, the AP scan® algorithm may need further improvement before it can be recommended for sleep apnea detection.


Assuntos
Dispositivos de Terapia de Ressincronização Cardíaca , Insuficiência Cardíaca/complicações , Polissonografia , Síndromes da Apneia do Sono/complicações , Síndromes da Apneia do Sono/diagnóstico , Idoso , Algoritmos , Terapia de Ressincronização Cardíaca , Dispositivos de Terapia de Ressincronização Cardíaca/estatística & dados numéricos , Cardiografia de Impedância , Estudos Cross-Over , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Insuficiência Cardíaca/terapia , Humanos , Masculino , Polissonografia/estatística & dados numéricos , Disfunção Ventricular Esquerda/complicações , Disfunção Ventricular Esquerda/terapia
14.
Sleep ; 41(6)2018 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29554362

RESUMO

Study Objectives: To evaluate the utility of multimodal low-cost approaches including actigraphy, a wrist-worn device monitoring rest/activity cycles, in identifying patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD). Methods: Seventy patients diagnosed with sleep disorders causing different motor manifestations during sleep (iRBD, sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome) and 20 subjects without any relevant motor manifestation during sleep, underwent video-polysomnography (vPSG) and 2 week actigraphy, completed six validated RBD screening questionnaires, and sleep apps use was assessed. Actigraphy was analyzed automatically, and visually by seven blinded sleep medicine experts who rated as "no," "possible," and "probable" RBD. Results: Quantitative actigraphy analysis distinguished patients from controls, but not between patients with different types of motor activity during sleep. Visual actigraphy rating by blinded experts in sleep medicine using pattern recognition identified vPSG confirmed iRBD with 85%-95% sensitivity, 79%-91% specificity, 81%-91% accuracy, 57.7% ± 11.3% positive predictive value, 95.1% ± 3.3% negative predictive value, 6.8 ± 2.2 positive likelihood ratio, 0.14 ± 0.05 negative likelihood ratio and 0.874-0.933 area under the ROC curve (AUC). AUC of the best performing questionnaire was 0.868. Few patients used sleep apps; therefore, their potential utility in the evaluated patients' groups is limited. Conclusions: Visual analysis of actigraphy using pattern recognition can identify subjects with iRBD, and is able to distinguish iRBD from other motor activities during sleep, even when patients are not aware of the disease in contrast to questionnaires. Therefore, actigraphy can be a reliable screening instrument for RBD potentially useful in the general population.

15.
Ann Clin Transl Neurol ; 5(3): 315-322, 2018 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29560376

RESUMO

Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate perceptual decision-making and reflection impulsivity in drug naïve patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) and patients with dopaminergic therapy. Methods: A total of 35 RLS patients (20 who were drug naïve regarding dopaminergic medication and 15 patients treated with dopaminergic therapy without augmentation or impulse control disorders) were included in this study. We used the Beads task and the Pixel task which assess reflection impulsivity and perceptual decision-making, respectively. Results were compared to 20 healthy controls. Results: Both RLS patient groups gathered less evidence than healthy controls in the Beads task before making a decision (P < 0.001), but patients with dopaminergic treatment gathered less information than drug naïve patients (P = 0.026). Moreover, both patient groups made more choices against the evidence than healthy controls (both P < 0.01), but there was no difference between the two patient groups. In the Pixel task, we found an effect of task difficulty on reaction times with patients and controls responding faster with reduced task difficulty. There was neither an effect of group on reaction times nor an effect of group on error rates. Conclusions: Reflection impulsivity is common in RLS patients, regardless whether they are drug naïve or treated with dopaminergic therapy. Thus, RLS patients tend to gather less information compared to healthy controls which could have a negative effect on decision-making in daily life and should be investigated further.

16.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 52: 98-101, 2018 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29576439

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Individuals with rapid eye movement (REM)-sleep behavior disorder (RBD) are likely to progress to synucleinopathies, mainly Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy-bodies (DLB) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). The genetics of RBD only partially overlaps with PD and DLB, and the role of LRRK2 variants in risk for RBD is still not clear. METHODS: The full coding sequence, exon-intron boundaries and 5' and 3' untranslated regions of LRRK2 were sequenced using targeted next-generation sequencing. A total of 350 RBD patients and 869 controls were sequenced, and regression and burden models were used to examine the association between LRRK2 variants and RBD. RESULTS: No pathogenic mutations that are known to cause PD were identified in RBD patients. The p.N551K-p.R1398H-p.K1423K haplotype was associated with a reduced risk for RBD (OR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.44-0.98, p = 0.0055 for the tagging p.N551K substitution). A common variant, p.S1647T, was nominally associated with risk for RBD (OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.05-1.56, p = 0.029). Burden analysis identified associations with domains and exons that were derived by the variants of the protective haplotype, and no burden of other rare variants was identified. CONCLUSIONS: Carriers of the LRRK2 p.N551K-p.R1398H-p.K1423K haplotype have a reduced risk for developing RBD, yet PD-causing mutations probably have minor or no role in RBD. Additional work is needed to confirm these results and to identify the mechanism associated with reduced risk for RBD.

17.
Nat Rev Neurol ; 14(1): 40-55, 2018 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29170501

RESUMO

So-called idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD), formerly seen as a rare parasomnia, is now recognized as the prodromal stage of an α-synucleinopathy. Given the very high risk that patients with idiopathic RBD have of developing α-synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson disease (PD), PD dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies or multiple system atrophy, and the outstandingly high specificity and very long interval between the onset of idiopathic RBD and the clinical manifestations of α-synucleinopathies, the prodromal phase of this disorder represents a unique opportunity for potentially disease-modifying intervention. This Review provides an update on classic and novel biomarkers of α-synuclein-related neurodegeneration in patients with idiopathic RBD, focusing on advances in imaging and neurophysiological, cognitive, autonomic, tissue-specific and other biomarkers. We discuss the strengths, potential weaknesses and suitability of these biomarkers for identifying RBD and neurodegeneration, with an emphasis on predicting progression to overt α-synucleinopathy. The role of video polysomnography in providing quantifiable and potentially treatment-responsive biomarkers of neurodegeneration is highlighted. In light of all these advances, and the now understood role of idiopathic RBD as an early manifestation of α-synuclein disease, we call for idiopathic RBD to be reconceptualized as isolated RBD.

18.
J Clin Sleep Med ; 14(1): 41-46, 2018 Jan 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29246266

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Few studies have addressed dreaming in patients with sleep apnea. We hypothesized that respiratory events and subsequent oxygen desaturation act as an important physiological trigger and may thus influence dream content in patients with a sleep-related breathing disorder. METHODS: Seventy-six patients (28 women, mean age 54 years, range 20-82) who underwent polysomnography because of suspected sleep apnea participated in this study. Dream reports and dream questionnaires were collected immediately after first morning awakening, at 5:30 AM, at the sleep laboratory. Dream content analysis with respect to possible respiratory-related content was performed. Patients were stratified into primary snoring, mild, moderate, and severe sleep apnea groups. RESULTS: In 63 patients sleep apnea was diagnosed (mild n = 31, 49.2%, moderate n = 13, 20.6%, severe n = 19, 30.2%), and 13 subjects in whom a sleep-related breathing disorder was not confirmed were included as a control group with primary snoring. There was no significant difference in respiratory-related dream topics between patients and controls. Also, no influence of respiratory parameters measured during polysomnography on dream content was detectable. CONCLUSIONS: We failed to detect a difference in dream content between patients with sleep apnea and controls. Further studies are required to determine whether these results indicate that the incorporation of respiratory events into dreams is absent in patients with sleep apnea or represents a bias due to the collection of dream content in the early morning hours.

19.
Lancet Neurol ; 16(11): 898-907, 2017 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29029846

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Restless legs syndrome is a prevalent chronic neurological disorder with potentially severe mental and physical health consequences. Clearer understanding of the underlying pathophysiology is needed to improve treatment options. We did a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) to identify potential molecular targets. METHODS: In the discovery stage, we combined three GWAS datasets (EU-RLS GENE, INTERVAL, and 23andMe) with diagnosis data collected from 2003 to 2017, in face-to-face interviews or via questionnaires, and involving 15 126 cases and 95 725 controls of European ancestry. We identified common variants by fixed-effect inverse-variance meta-analysis. Significant genome-wide signals (p≤5 × 10-8) were tested for replication in an independent GWAS of 30 770 cases and 286 913 controls, followed by a joint analysis of the discovery and replication stages. We did gene annotation, pathway, and gene-set-enrichment analyses and studied the genetic correlations between restless legs syndrome and traits of interest. FINDINGS: We identified and replicated 13 new risk loci for restless legs syndrome and confirmed the previously identified six risk loci. MEIS1 was confirmed as the strongest genetic risk factor for restless legs syndrome (odds ratio 1·92, 95% CI 1·85-1·99). Gene prioritisation, enrichment, and genetic correlation analyses showed that identified pathways were related to neurodevelopment and highlighted genes linked to axon guidance (associated with SEMA6D), synapse formation (NTNG1), and neuronal specification (HOXB cluster family and MYT1). INTERPRETATION: Identification of new candidate genes and associated pathways will inform future functional research. Advances in understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie restless legs syndrome could lead to new treatment options. We focused on common variants; thus, additional studies are needed to dissect the roles of rare and structural variations. FUNDING: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Helmholtz Zentrum München-Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt, National Research Institutions, NHS Blood and Transplant, National Institute for Health Research, British Heart Foundation, European Commission, European Research Council, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH Research Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre, and UK Medical Research Council.


Assuntos
Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Síndrome das Pernas Inquietas/epidemiologia , Síndrome das Pernas Inquietas/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Proteínas Ligadas por GPI/genética , Humanos , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Netrinas , Semaforinas/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA