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2.
Psychosomatics ; 61(1): 19-23, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31630833

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Oral presentations at academic conferences typically describe recent or ongoing research projects or provide literature reviews. However, conversion of these presentations into full-length journal articles is not routine. OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess the frequency with which oral presentations at the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry's annual meetings from 2012 to 2018 were turned into peer-reviewed publications and review the factors that affected publication of them. METHODS: Conference presentation titles and authors from the 2012-2018 Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Annual Meetings were searched using PubMed to find corresponding published reports by the presenters. Data were organized in an Excel spreadsheet, and the time to publication, the journals in which they were published, and general content areas were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 287 oral presentations delivered during the study period, 47% were published in a peer-reviewed journal. Articles were published in 72 different journals; the journals that published the most articles were Psychosomatics, General Hospital Psychiatry, Psycho-oncology, Academic Psychiatry, and the Journal of General Internal Medicine. The most common subspecialty topics of the published articles were neuropsychiatry, psycho-oncology, surgery and transplantation, and delirium. The mean time to publication after presentation was 1 year. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of the rate at which presentations are converted into peer-reviewed publications can be used to enhance the academic success of presenters, and strategies to enhance the rate of publication (e.g., by coaching on scientific writing or by selecting oral presentations with the highest publication potential) can be established.

3.
Psychosomatics ; 61(2): 154-160, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31839256

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: An increasing number of patients are admitted to general hospitals for injuries sustained in suicide attempts and for assessment of their ongoing risk for suicide. However, clinical staff may lack knowledge and expertise in the provision of a safe environment for potentially suicidal patients. OBJECTIVE: In an effort to follow the Joint Commission's recommendations on the care of suicidal patients, a Suicide Prevention Interdisciplinary Task Force was created. The task force sought to design and implement a suicide checklist that would facilitate creation of a safe environment for potentially suicidal inpatients on nonpsychiatric units in a general hospital. METHODS: We describe the development and implementation of a Care of the Suicide and Self-Injury Patient Checklist and report on data derived from incident reports related to self-harm/suicide attempts over a 4-year period. We also report results of a Research Electronic Data Capture survey of nurses' feedback on the checklist. RESULTS: After implementation of the Care of the Suicide and Self-Injury Patient Checklist, a total of 47 incidents of patient self-injury were reported over 4 years on nonpsychiatric inpatient units at a large general hospital; only three sustained permanent or serious harm. The Research Electronic Data Capture survey revealed that 88% of responding nurses believed that the Care of the Suicide and Self-Injury Patient Checklist guided creation of a safe environment and 90% believed that it supported consistent practice. CONCLUSIONS: The Care of the Suicide and Self-Injury Patient Checklist contributed to the creation of a safe environment while caring for potentially suicidal patients on nonpsychiatric inpatient units and guided clinicians on the management of potentially self-injurious individuals.

6.
Psychosomatics ; 60(6): 539-548, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31493903

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry, similar to other medical specialties, relies on the education of students, residents, fellows, and life-long learners for growth of the field. C-L psychiatry is unique as it exists at the intersection of psychiatry with other medical subspecialties. Traditional teaching methods have been used in C-L psychiatry programs for more than 50 years, while technology has recently advanced as available resources and the learning styles of today's learners have evolved. A growing number of younger trainees are taking advantage of new ways to learn. OBJECTIVES: We sought to examine both traditional and novel teaching methodologies and how each of these educational methodologies fits within adult learning theory and in the context of how digital natives learn about C-L psychiatry. METHODS: In this narrative review, we drew upon the experiences of the authors as both life-long learners and educators. We then reviewed the literature pertaining to teaching methods that have been used in C-L psychiatry as well as emerging methods that could potentially be used in C-L psychiatry. RESULTS: C-L psychiatry has used traditional teaching methods such as readings, didactic lectures, case-based rounds, and problem-based learning. Novel teaching methodologies such as teaching rotations, simulations, social media, podcasts, movie clubs, and the use of mobile tablet computers have been used in general psychiatry and other medical specialties, while literature specific to C-L psychiatry was sparse. CONCLUSIONS: Opportunities abound to make use of new teaching methodologies and technologies to appeal to future generations of C-L psychiatrists.

8.
Psychosomatics ; 60(4): 361-364, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31060743

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Case reports continue to serve as valuable educational tools; they facilitate case-based learning and provide excellent opportunities for collaboration. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to review the benefits of writing case reports and to analyze the characteristics of case reports published in a journal that focuses on care at the interface of psychiatry and medicine. METHODS: The literature on writing case reports as tools for medical education was reviewed. Then, case reports published in Psychosomatics were examined, and quantitative data (e.g., subjective quality measures, number of references and authors) were recorded. RESULTS: Of the 76 case reports published during a 3-year span (2015-2017), the majority examined an unusual presentation or treatment (86%), used an approach to teaching and critical thinking (84%), provided a sizable literature review (80%), and discussed a differential diagnosis of signs, symptoms, and disorders (53%). CONCLUSIONS: Case reports provide intellectually-challenging opportunities for learning that foster scientific thought, encourage the use of evidence-based medicine, improve writing and critical thinking, provide experience with the peer-review process, and help to develop skills needed to write scholarly publications.

9.
Acad Psychiatry ; 43(1): 71-75, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29725993

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Although mentorship is essential for the professional development of physicians, the literature on trainees' mentorship experiences and perceptions of effective mentoring is more limited. This descriptive study examines residents' experiences of mentoring and their perceptions about the impact of mentorship on professional development, comparing experiences in mentoring that is assigned versus self-initiated. METHODS: A web-based self-administered cross-sectional survey of all senior residents (≥PGY-3) at a major urban academic medical center was conducted from March 27 to May 31, 2015. RESULTS: Of the 327 eligible senior residents, 204 (62%) responded and completed the survey. Most residents (82%) reported multiple mentors and 65% reported that their primary mentorship relationship was self-initiated. Residents who self-initiated their primary mentorship were significantly more likely to strongly/somewhat agree that their mentor had a positive impact on publications and scholarly projects (88 vs 44%, p = 0.0063) as well as research (88 vs 55%, p = 0.0001) compared to residents with assigned mentorship, with no significant differences measured by gender, race, or ethnicity. Forty-four percent of residents indicated they had unmet needs for mentoring in at least one of several professional areas. CONCLUSIONS: Most residents perceive mentoring relationships as important to many aspects of their career development. Still 44% of residents reported unmet needs for mentoring in one or more areas, a result that needs further exploration. Since the majority of residents' primary mentoring relationships were self-initiated rather than assigned, and these were seen as more important for research and publications, programs should consider how to support the connection between residents and potential mentors.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Docentes de Medicina/psicologia , Internato e Residência , Mentores/estatística & dados numéricos , Percepção , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos , Adulto , Escolha da Profissão , Estudos Transversais , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Mentores/psicologia , Desenvolvimento de Pessoal/métodos
13.
Psychosomatics ; 59(6): 554-560, 2018 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30274799

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Case presentation and analysis is a useful way to revisit key clinical themes, broad concepts, and teach others, especially when it comes to cross-cultural clinical issues. Patients from different cultural backgrounds tend to have different explanatory models of illnesses and related help seeking behaviors. Ineffective communication between clinicians and patients from nonmajority cultural groups may lead to less satisfaction with care and disparities in access to health care and in treatment outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: To address health disparities, psychiatrists need to be able to understand the illness beliefs of all patients, particularly those from diverse cultural backgrounds. Using cultural humility to work with patients from all cultures by understanding the patients' values and preferences is a key attitude for successful cross-cultural clinical encounters.


Assuntos
Competência Cultural/psicologia , Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente/métodos , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Relações Médico-Paciente , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Transtornos Mentais/diagnóstico , Psiquiatria/métodos , Estados Unidos
20.
JMIR Med Educ ; 3(2): e14, 2017 Sep 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28893726

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Lifestyle medicine is the science and application of healthy lifestyles as interventions for the prevention and treatment of disease, and has gained significant momentum as a specialty in recent years. College is a critical time for maintenance and acquisition of healthy habits. Longer-term, more intensive web-based and in-person lifestyle medicine interventions can have a positive effect. Students who are exposed to components of lifestyle medicine in their education have improvements in their health behaviors. A semester-long undergraduate course focused on lifestyle medicine can be a useful intervention to help adopt and sustain healthy habits. OBJECTIVE: To describe a novel, evidence based curriculum for a course teaching the concepts of Lifestyle Medicine based on a web-based course offered at the Harvard Extension School. METHODS: The course was delivered in a web-based format. The Lifestyle Medicine course used evidence based principles to guide students toward a "coach approach" to behavior change, increasing their self-efficacy regarding various lifestyle-related preventive behaviors. Students are made to understand the cultural trends and national guidelines that have shaped lifestyle medicine recommendations relating to behaviors. They are encouraged to engage in behavior change. Course topics include physical activity, nutrition, addiction, sleep, stress, and lifestyle coaching and counseling. The course addressed all of the American College of Preventive Medicine/American College of Lifestyle Medicine competencies save for the competency of office systems and technologies to support lifestyle medicine counseling. RESULTS: The course was well-received, earning a ranking of 4.9/5 at the school. CONCLUSIONS: A novel, semester-long course on Lifestyle Medicine at the Harvard Extension School is described. Student evaluations suggest the course was well-received. Further research is needed to evaluate whether such a course empowers students to adopt behavior changes.

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