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1.
Int J Public Health ; 69: 1607218, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38939515

RESUMO

Objectives: Acknowledging peer support as the cornerstone in mitigating the psychosocial burden arising from the second victim phenomenon, this study assesses the economic benefits of a Peer Support Program (PSP), compared to data of the Resilience In Stressful Events (RISE) program in the US, within the acute inpatient care sector in Germany. Methods: Employing a Markov model, this economic evaluation analyzes the cost benefits, including sick day and dropout costs, over a 1-year period, comparing scenarios with and without the Peer Support Program from a hospital perspective. The costs were calculated as an example based on a hospital with 1,000 employees. The estimations are considered conservative. Results: The anticipated outcomes demonstrate an average cost saving of €6,672 per healthcare worker participating in the Peer Support Program, leading to an annual budgetary impact of approximately €6,67 Mio. for the studied hospital. Conclusion: The integration of a PSP proves economically advantageous for German hospitals, not only preserving financial resources but also reducing absenteeism, and mitigating turnover, thereby enhancing overall patient care.


Assuntos
Grupo Associado , Humanos , Alemanha , Análise Custo-Benefício , Apoio Social , Cadeias de Markov , Absenteísmo
2.
Z Evid Fortbild Qual Gesundhwes ; 187: 8-14, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38762346

RESUMO

Clinical Risk Management (CRM) is an important instrument to continuously improve safety of health care delivery. In Germany, hospitals are required by law to implement CRM and incidence reporting systems. Since 2010, nation-wide surveys have been conducted periodically to evaluate implementation of CRM in hospitals. The instrument used in these surveys is constantly being updated to reflect previous experiences, as well as to adapt to ongoing trends and developments in CRM practices. The survey instrument used in 2022 consisted of up to 200 items and took up to an hour to complete. In this study, we aimed to develop a short instrument to measure the level of CRM implementation in hospitals, evaluate its psychometric properties, and to offer benchmarking data for health care facilities of different sizes. We used data collected in 2022 as part of KHaSiMiR study, employing a cross-sectional self-reported online survey. The hospital administrations were invited to designate one CRM manager to participate in the study. Out of 1,411 general hospitals invited, 401 responses were collected (response rate of 28%). After removing the cases with excessive missings, we imputed remaining missing values using multiple imputation, and split the resulting sample (n=362) in two halves (i.e., exploratory and testing subsamples). A principal component analysis was applied on the first subsample. We validated the resulting model using confirmatory factor analysis in the testing subsample. We evaluated internal consistency, and tested external validity of the established instrument using correlation analysis with two single-item measures: subjective evaluation of CRM implementation compared to similar organizations and compared to own ideal level. The principal component analysis included 45 items from the full instrument. The analysis resulted in a three-factor model with 26 items. In the confirmatory factor analysis, the model demonstrated acceptable fit with the data according to the commonly used fit indices: Chi2/df=1.36, CFI=0.941, TLI=0.930, RMSEA=0.045 (90% CI=0.032-0.056), SRMR=0.049. Cronbach's alpha of all three factors was good (>0.70). All three factors had statistically significant positive correlations with each other (0.359-0.497) and with the two single items (0.282-0.532). None of the correlations were high enough (>0.7) to indicate multicollinearity. The proposed short clinical risk management implementation (Short CRiMI) questionnaire is psychometrically valid and can be used to rapidly evaluate CRM implementation in hospitals. Further research can provide evidence of its external validity and association with quality and safety outcomes. Benchmarking data can be used to compare the results with the data from the most recent Germany-wide survey.


Assuntos
Psicometria , Gestão de Riscos , Humanos , Alemanha , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estudos Transversais , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Benchmarking , Implementação de Plano de Saúde
3.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 378, 2024 Apr 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38589877

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: When healthcare students witness, engage in, or are involved in an adverse event, it often leads to a second victim experience, impacting their mental well-being and influencing their future professional practice. This study aimed to describe the efforts, methods, and outcomes of interventions to help students in healthcare disciplines cope with the emotional experience of being involved in or witnessing a mistake causing harm to a patient during their clerkships or training. METHODS: This systematic review followed the PRISMA guidelines and includes the synthesis of eighteen studies, published in diverse languages from 2011 to 2023, identified from the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS and APS PsycInfo. PICO method was used for constructing a research question and formulating eligibility criteria. The selection process was conducted through Rayyan. Titles and abstracts of were independently screened by two authors. The critical appraisal tools of the Joanna Briggs Institute was used to assess the risk of bias of the included studies. RESULTS: A total of 1354 studies were retrieved, 18 met the eligibility criteria. Most studies were conducted in the USA. Various educational interventions along with learning how to prevent mistakes, and resilience training were described. In some cases, this experience contributed to the student personal growth. Psychological support in the aftermath of adverse events was scattered. CONCLUSION: Ensuring healthcare students' resilience should be a fundamental part of their training. Interventions to train them to address the second victim phenomenon during their clerkships are scarce, scattered, and do not yield conclusive results on identifying what is most effective and what is not.


Assuntos
Resiliência Psicológica , Estudantes , Humanos , Atenção à Saúde , Aprendizagem , Saúde Mental
4.
BMJ Open ; 14(4): e079319, 2024 Apr 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38684267

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Lifelong learning is the foundation for professionals to maintain competence and proficiency in several aspects of economy and medicine. Until now, there is no evidence of overconfidence (the belief to be better than others or tested) and clinical tribalism (the belief that one's own group outperforms others) in the specialty of health economics. We investigated the hypothesis of overconfidence effects and their relation to learning motivation and motivational patterns in healthcare providers regarding healthcare economics. METHODS: We conducted a national convenience online survey of 116 healthcare workers recruited from social and personal networks to detect overconfidence effects and clinical tribalism and to assess learning motivation. Instruments included self-assessments for five learning dimensions (factual knowledge, skills, attitude, problem-solving and behaviour) and a four-item situational motivation scale. The analysis comprised paired t-tests, correlation analyses and two-step cluster analyses. RESULTS: We detected overplacement, overestimation and signs of clinical tribalism. Responders in the physician subgroup rated themselves superior to colleagues and that their professional group was superior to other professions. Participants being educators in other competencies showed high overconfidence in health economics. We detected two groups of learners: overconfident but motivated persons and overconfident and unmotivated learners. Learning motivation did not correlate with overconfidence effects. DISCUSSION: We could show the presence of overconfidence in health economics, which is consistent with studies in healthcare and the economy. The subjective perception of some medical educators, being role models to students and having a superior 'attitude' (eg, morality) concerning the economy may foster prejudice against economists as students might believe them. It also may aggravate moral distress and disrupts interactions between healthcare providers managers and leaders. Considering the study's limitations, lifelong interprofessional and reflective training and train-the-trainer programmes may be mandatory to address the effects.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde , Aprendizagem , Motivação , Autoavaliação (Psicologia) , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde
6.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38429575

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Transitions from inpatient care are associated with risks for the safety of patients. In 2017, the framework agreement on discharge management was legally defined. There is currently a lack of empirical data in Germany on the implementation of measures to ensure safe transitions of patients after inpatient care. The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the discharge management strategies implemented by German general hospitals. METHODS: Between March and May 2022, specific discharge management strategies as well as structural and organizational characteristics were assessed in a nationwide survey of 401 general hospitals, and descriptive statistics and group comparisons were performed. RESULTS: Seven of nine strategies surveyed were implemented in > 95% of all hospitals. The evaluation of discharge planning was only implemented in 61% of the hospitals, and systematic documentation, analysis, and evaluation of readmissions in 54%. Hospitals with a higher number of hospital beds reported significantly less often about "early contact with follow-up care providers" and "organization of a seamless transition to follow-up care." DISCUSSION: A large part of the strategies in discharge management from inpatient treatment is implemented in German general hospitals. However, measures for evaluation and the systematic analysis of discharge processes and readmissions of patients have only been partially implemented. However, these are necessary to systematically evaluate and potentially improve the discharge processes.


Assuntos
Hospitais Gerais , Alta do Paciente , Gestão de Riscos , Alemanha , Alta do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Hospitais Gerais/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Pesquisas sobre Atenção à Saúde , Readmissão do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos
7.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 12(3)2024 Jan 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38338236

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The second victim phenomenon and moral injury are acknowledged entities of psychological harm for healthcare providers. Both pose risks to patients, healthcare workers, and medical institutions, leading to further adverse events, economic burden, and dysfunctionality. Preceding studies in Germany and Austria showed a prevalence of second victim phenomena exceeding 53 percent among physicians, nurses, emergency physicians, and pediatricians. Using two German instruments for assessing moral injury and second victim phenomena, this study aimed to evaluate their feasibility for general practitioners and healthcare assistants. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide anonymous online survey in Germany among general practitioners and healthcare assistants utilizing the SeViD (Second Victims in Deutschland) questionnaire, the German version of the Second Victim Experience and Support Tool Revised Version (G-SVESTR), and the German version of the Moral Injury Symptom and Support Scale for Health Professionals (G-MISS-HP). RESULTS: Out of 108 participants, 67 completed the survey. In G-SVESTR, the collegial support items exhibited lower internal consistency than in prior studies, while all other scales showed good-quality properties. Personality traits, especially neuroticism, negatively correlated to age, seem to play a significant role in symptom count and warrant further evaluation. Multiple linear regression indicated that neuroticism, agreeableness, G-SVESTR, and G-MISS-HP were significant predictors of symptom count. Furthermore, moral injury partially mediated the relationship between second victim experience and symptom count. DISCUSSION: The results demonstrate the feasible use of the questionnaires, except for collegial support. With respect to selection bias and the cross-sectional design of the study, moral injury may be subsequent to the second victim phenomenon, strongly influencing symptom count in retrospect. This aspect should be thoroughly evaluated in future studies.

8.
Med Sci Law ; 64(2): 96-112, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37365924

RESUMO

Patient safety is high on the policy agenda internationally. Learning from safety incidents is a core component in achieving the important goal of increasing patient safety. This study explores the legal frameworks in the countries to promote reporting, disclosure, and supporting healthcare professionals (HCPs) involved in safety incidents. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted to ascertain an overview of the legal frameworks at national level, as well as relevant policies. ERNST (The European Researchers' Network Working on Second Victims) group peer-reviewed data collected from countries was performed to validate information. Information from 27 countries was collected and analyzed, giving a response rate of 60%. A reporting system for patient safety incidents was in place in 85.2% (N = 23) of countries surveyed, though few (37%, N = 10) were focused on systems-learning. In about half of the countries (48.1%, N = 13) open disclosure depends on the initiative of HCPs. The tort liability system was common in most countries. No-fault compensation schemes and alternative forms of redress were less common. Support for HCPs involved in patient safety incidents was extremely limited, with just 11.1% (N = 3) of participating countries reporting that supports were available in all healthcare institutions. Despite progress in the patient safety movement worldwide, the findings suggest that there are considerable differences in the approach to the reporting and disclosure of patient safety incidents. Additionally, models of compensation vary limiting patients' access to redress. Finally, the results highlight the need for comprehensive support for HCPs involved in safety incidents.


Assuntos
Responsabilidade Legal , Erros Médicos , Humanos , Erros Médicos/prevenção & controle , Estudos Transversais , Segurança do Paciente , Direitos do Paciente
9.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 11(18)2023 Sep 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37761698

RESUMO

(1) Background: The second victim phenomenon (SVP) plays a critical role in workplace and patient safety. So far, there are limited epidemiological data on the SVP in German-speaking countries. Some studies have been carried out in Germany, but so far, no quantitative studies have been carried out in Austria examining the prevalence, symptom load and preferred support measures for second victims (SVs). This study therefore examines the SVP among Austrian pediatricians. (2) Methods: A nationwide, cross-sectional and anonymous online study was conducted using the SeViD questionnaire (Second Victims in Deutschland) including the Big Five Inventory-10 (BFI-10). Statistical analysis included binary-logistic and multiple linear regression with the bootstrapping, bias-corrected and accelerated (BCa) method based on 1000 bootstrap samples. (3) Results: Of 414 Austrian pediatricians, 89% self-identified as SVs. The main cause of becoming an SV was the unexpected death or suicide of a patient. High neuroticism and extraversion values as well as working in outpatient care positively correlated with having experienced the SVP. A preferred support strategy was access to legal counseling. (4) Conclusions: Austrian pediatricians have the highest SVP prevalence measured with the SeViD questionnaire. Further research should focus on prevention strategies and intervention programs.

10.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 751, 2023 Jul 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37443003

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pandemics such as COVID-19 pose threats to the physical safety of healthcare workers and students. They can have traumatic experiences affecting their personal and professional life. Increasing rates of burnout, substance abuse, depression, and suicide among healthcare workers have already been identified, thus making mental health and psychological wellbeing of the healthcare workers a major issue. The aim of this systematic review is to synthesize the characteristics of emotional support programs and interventions targeted to healthcare workers and students since the onset of COVID-19 and other SARS-CoV pandemics and to describe the effectiveness and experiences of these programs. METHOD: This was a mixed method systematic review. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed, and the review was registered on PROSPERO [CRD42021262837]. Searches were conducted using Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases. The COVIDENCE systematic review management system was used for data selection and extraction by two independent reviewers. The JBI (Joanna Briggs Institute) critical appraisal tools were used to assess the quality of selected studies by two additional reviewers. Finally, data extraction and narrative analysis were conducted. RESULTS: The search retrieved 3161 results including 1061 duplicates. After screening, a total of 19 articles were included in this review. Participants in studies were nurses, physicians, other hospital staff, and undergraduate medical students mostly working on the front-line with COVID-19 patients. Publications included RCTs (n = 4), quasi-experimental studies (n = 2), cross-sectional studies (n = 6), qualitative interview studies (n = 3), and systematic reviews (n = 4). Most (63.4%) of the interventions used online or digital solutions. Interventions mostly showed good effectiveness (support-seeking, positive emotions, reduction of distress symptoms etc.) and acceptance and were experienced as helpful, but there were some conflicting results. CONCLUSION: Healthcare organizations have developed support strategies focusing on providing emotional support for these healthcare workers and students, but it is difficult to conclude whether one program offers distinct benefit compared to the others. More research is needed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of emotional support interventions for health workers.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Coronavírus Relacionado à Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Estudos Transversais , Pessoal de Saúde , Adaptação Psicológica , Estudantes
11.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 816, 2023 Jul 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37525127

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Insights around second victims (SV) and patient safety has been growing over time. An overview of the available evidence is lacking. This review aims to describe (i) the impact a patient safety incident can have and (ii) how healthcare professionals can be supported in the aftermath of a patient safety incident. METHODS: A literature search in Medline, EMBASE and CINAHL was performed between 1 and 2010 and 26 November 2020 with studies on SV as inclusion criteria. To be included in this review the studies must include healthcare professionals involved in the aftermath of a patient safety incident. RESULTS: In total 104 studies were included. SVs can suffer from both psychosocial (negative and positive), professional and physical reactions. Support can be provided at five levels. The first level is prevention (on individual and organizational level) referring to measures taken before a patient safety incident happens. The other four levels focus on providing support in the aftermath of a patient safety incident, such as self-care of individuals and/or team, support by peers and triage, structured support by an expert in the field (professional support) and structured clinical support. CONCLUSION: The impact of a patient safety incident on healthcare professionals is broad and diverse. Support programs should be organized at five levels, starting with preventive actions followed by self-care, support by peers, structured professional support and clinical support. This multilevel approach can now be translated in different countries, networks and organizations based on their own culture, support history, structure and legal context. Next to this, they should also include the stage of recovery in which the healthcare professional is located in.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde , Segurança do Paciente , Humanos , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Triagem
12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36901278

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patient care in the prehospital emergency setting is error-prone. Wu's publications on the second victim syndrome made very clear that medical errors may lead to severe emotional injury on the caregiver's part. So far, little is known about the extent of the problem within the field of prehospital emergency care. Our study aimed at identifying the prevalence of the Second Victim Phenomenon among Emergency Medical Services (EMS) physicians in Germany. METHODS: Web-based distribution of the SeViD questionnaire among n = 12.000 members of the German Prehospital Emergency Physician Association (BAND) to assess general experience, symptoms and support strategies associated with the Second Victim Phenomenon. RESULTS: In total, 401 participants fully completed the survey, 69.1% were male and the majority (91.2%) were board-certified in prehospital emergency medicine. The median length of experience in this field of medicine was 11 years. Out of 401 participants, 213 (53.1%) had experienced at least one second victim incident. Self-perceived time to full recovery was up to one month according to 57.7% (123) and more than one month to 31.0% (66) of the participants. A total of 11.3% (24) had not fully recovered by the time of the survey. Overall, 12-month prevalence was 13.7% (55/401). The COVID-19 pandemic had little effect on SVP prevalence within this specific sample. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that the Second Victim Phenomenon is very frequent among prehospital emergency physicians in Germany. However, four out of ten caregivers affected did not seek or receive any assistance in coping with this stressful situation. One out of nine respondents had not yet fully recovered by the time of the survey. Effective support networks, e.g., easy access to psychological and legal counseling as well as the opportunity to discuss ethical issues, are urgently required in order to prevent employees from further harm, to keep healthcare professionals from leaving this field of medical care and to maintain a high level of system safety and well-being of subsequent patients.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Serviços Médicos de Emergência , Medicina de Emergência , Médicos , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Pandemias
13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36767279

RESUMO

(1) Background: The Second Victim Phenomenon (SVP) is widespread throughout health care institutions worldwide. Second Victims not only suffer emotional stress themselves; the SVP can also have a great financial and reputational impact on health care institutions. Therefore, we conducted a study (Kollegiale Hilfe I/KoHi I) in the Hietzing Clinic (KHI), located in Vienna, Austria, to find out how widespread the SVP was there. (2) Methods: The SeViD (Second Victims in Deutschland) questionnaire was used and given to 2800 employees of KHI, of which 966 filled it in anonymously. (3) Results: The SVP is prevalent at KHI (43% of the participants stated they at least once suffered from SVP), although less prevalent and pronounced than expected when compared to other studies conducted in German-speaking countries. There is still a need for action, however, to ensure a psychologically safer workspace and to further prevent health care workers at KHI from becoming psychologically traumatized.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde , Hospitais , Humanos , Áustria/epidemiologia , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Ansiedade , Instalações de Saúde
14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36498086

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The experience of a second victim phenomenon after an event plays a significant role in health care providers' well-being. Untreated; it may lead to severe harm to victims and their families; other patients; hospitals; and society due to impairment or even loss of highly specialised employees. In order to manage the phenomenon, lifelong learning is inevitable but depends on learning motivation to attend training. This motivation may be impaired by overconfidence effects (e.g., over-placement and overestimation) that may suggest no demand for education. The aim of this study was to examine the interdependency of learning motivation and overconfidence concerning second victim effects. METHODS: We assessed 176 physicians about overconfidence and learning motivation combined with a knowledge test. The nationwide online study took place in early 2022 and addressed about 3000 German physicians of internal medicine. Statistics included analytical and qualitative methods. RESULTS: Of 176 participants, 83 completed the assessment. Analysis showed the presence of two overconfidence effects and in-group biases (clinical tribalism). None of the effects correlated directly with learning motivation, but cluster analysis revealed three different learning types: highly motivated, competent, and confident "experts", motivated and overconfident "recruitables", and unmotivated and overconfident "unawares". Qualitative analysis revealed four main themes: "environmental factors", "emotionality", "violence and death", and "missing qualifications" contributing to the phenomenon. DISCUSSION: We confirmed the presence of overconfidence in second victim management competencies in about 3% of all persons addressed. Further, we could detect the same three learning motivation patterns compared to preceding studies on learning motivation in other medical competencies like life support and infection control. These findings considering overconfidence effects may be helpful for safety managers, medical teachers, curriculum developers and supervisors to create preventive educational curricula on second victim recognition and management.


Assuntos
Motivação , Autoavaliação (Psicologia) , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Pessoal de Saúde , Currículo
15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36554750

RESUMO

The concept of second victims (SV) was introduced 20 years ago to draw attention to healthcare professionals involved in patient safety incidents. The objective of this paper is to advance the theoretical conceptualization and to develop a common definition. A literature search was performed in Medline, EMBASE and CINAHL (October 2010 to November 2020). The description of SV was extracted regarding three concepts: (1) involved persons, (2) content of action and (3) impact. Based on these concepts, a definition was proposed and discussed within the ERNST-COST consortium in 2021 and 2022. An international group of experts finalized the definition. In total, 83 publications were reviewed. Based on expert consensus, a second victim was defined as: "Any health care worker, directly or indirectly involved in an unanticipated adverse patient event, unintentional healthcare error, or patient injury and who becomes victimized in the sense that they are also negatively impacted". The proposed definition can be used to help to reduce the impact of incidents on both healthcare professionals and organizations, thereby indirectly improve healthcare quality, patient safety, person-centeredness and human resource management.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde , Segurança do Paciente , Humanos , Consenso , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde , Recursos Humanos
16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36360916

RESUMO

This quantitative study examines whether employees in the fields of intensive care or acute and emergency medicine experience psychological distress because of their daily work. In addition, it was examined if self-stigmatization tendencies can significantly influence the willingness to seek help, and therefore psychological problems are not being treated adequately. These problems lead to various difficulties in professional and private contexts and ultimately endanger patient safety. From May to June 2021, an online questionnaire survey was conducted. This questionnaire combined two validated measuring instruments (PHQ-D and SSDS). To ensure high participation, the departments of anesthesia and/or intensive care medicine in 68 German hospitals were contacted, of which 5 responded positively. A total of 244 people participated in the questionnaire survey. On average, depressive symptoms were of mild severity. At the same time, self-stigmatization regarding depressive symptoms was high. These results highlight the practical need to prepare staff who work in the field of intensive care or acute and emergency medicine at the early onset for potentially traumatic and emotionally demanding events during their university education or studies. Adequate, evaluated, and continuously available support services from the psychosocial field should become an integral part of every staff care structure.


Assuntos
Medicina de Emergência , Angústia Psicológica , Humanos , Estereotipagem , Pessoal de Saúde , Cuidados Críticos
17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36141754

RESUMO

(1) Background: Patient safety is a pressing issue in healthcare. Besides economical and organizational issues, human factors play a crucial role in providing safe care. Safe and clear communication on both the healthcare workers' and patients' sides contribute to the avoidance of medical errors and increase patients' and healthcare workers' satisfaction. Globally, the incidence of experiencing at least one adverse event in obstetrics is about 10%, of which half are classified as preventable. According to international research, improving communication skills may decrease preventable adverse events. The research question was to what extent communication training for pregnant women impacts the quality of communication and mutual understanding during birth. (2) Methods: Communication interventions with pregnant women were conducted in two German university obstetric departments in a mixed methods research design, based on the Health Action Process Approach. The online classes covered the awareness of personal wishes, the understanding and usage of communication strategies, self-efficacy and empathy. This study presents the qualitative results. Out of 142 mothers who answered two questionnaires before the communication training and after the birth, 24 in-depth semistructured interviews were conducted to explore the subjective impact of the communication training. The results were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. (3) Results: The majority of participants felt incentivized to be aware of their personal wishes for birth and to express them. Perceived positive experiences with sufficient competency in communication, empathy and mutual understanding outweighed negative treatments and experiences in the hospital, some of which could be attributed to structural problems. (4) Discussion: The reported positive effects of the communication training underline the need but also the potential for communication lessons to reflect and improve communication skills in obstetrics. However, negative experiences due to structural problems in the healthcare system may be buffered by communication skills but not solved.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde , Parto , Comunicação , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez , Gestantes , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Universidades
18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35564924

RESUMO

The COVID-19 pandemic led to the implementation of interventions to provide emotional and psychological support to healthcare workers in many countries. This ecological study aims to describe the strategies implemented in different countries to support healthcare professionals during the outbreak. Data were collected through an online survey about the measures to address the impact of the pandemic on the mental health of healthcare workers. Healthcare professionals, researchers, and academics were invited to respond to the survey. Fifty-six professionals from 35 countries contributed data to this study. Ten countries (28.6%) reported that they did not launch any national interventions. Both developed and developing countries launched similar initiatives. There was no relationship between the existence of any type of initiative in a country with the incidence, lethality, and mortality rates of the country due to COVID-19, and per capita income in 2020. The 24 h hotline for psychological support was the most frequent intervention. Tools for self-rescue by using apps or websites were extensively used, too. Other common interventions were the development of action protocols, availability of regular and updated information, implantation of distance learning systems, early detection of infection programs for professionals, economic reinforcements, hiring of staff reinforcement, and modification of leave and vacation dates.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Atenção à Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Humanos , Pandemias , Recursos Humanos
19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35457724

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Comparable to second victim phenomenon (SVP), moral injury (MI) affects health professionals (HP) working in stressful environments. Information on how MI and SVP intercorrelate and their part in a psychological trauma complex is limited. We tested and validated a German version of the Moral Injury Symptom and Support Scale for Health Professionals (G-MISS-HP) instrument, screening for MI and correlated it with the recently developed German version of the Second Victim Experience and Support Tool (G-SVESTR) instrument, testing for SVP. METHODS: After translating Moral Injury Symptom and Support Scale for Health Professionals (MISS-HP), we conducted a cross-sectional online survey providing G-MISS-HP and G-SVEST-R to HP. Statistics included Pearson's interitem correlation, reliability analysis, principal axis factoring and principal components analysis with Promax rotation, confirmatory factor and ROC analyses. RESULTS: A total of 244 persons responded, of whom 156 completed the survey (33% nurses, 16% physicians, 9% geriatric nurses, 7.1% speech and language therapists). Interitem and corrected item-scale correlations did not measure for one item sufficiently. It was, therefore, excluded from further analyses. The nine-item score revealed good reliability (Guttman's lambda 2 = 0.80; Cronbach's alpha = 0.79). Factor validity was demonstrated, indicating that a three-factor model from the original study might better represent the data compared with our two-factor model. Positive correlations between G-MISS-HP and G-SVESTR subscales demonstrated convergent validity. ROC revealed sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 63% for G-MISS-HP using a nine-item scale with cutoff value of 28.5 points. Positive and negative predictive values were 62% and 69%, respectively. Subgroup analyses did not reveal any differences. CONCLUSION: G-MISS-HP with nine items is a valid and reliable testing instrument for moral injury. However, strong intercorrelations of MI and SVP indicate the need for further research on the distinction of these phenomena.


Assuntos
Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Análise Fatorial , Humanos , Psicometria , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/diagnóstico , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35329298

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The second victim phenomenon is common among nurses in intensive care units. Apart from quantitative studies, little is known about individual cases among those high-risk groups. This study evaluates the natural history and cause of second victim traumatization in Western Austria for the first time to tailor specific intervention. METHODS: A total of 20 guided interviews were conducted with intensive care nurses in Western Austria. All interviews were transcribed and analyzed with MAXQDA software. Evaluation followed the structuring qualitative content analysis scheme according to Kuckartz. RESULTS: The most frequent symptoms of the second victim phenomenon reported were feelings of guilt and problems with falling asleep. Coping with the second victim phenomenon was accomplished by conversations in private as well as among work colleagues. CONCLUSIONS: Intensive care nurses are exposed to many exceptional situations which have a high likelihood of resulting in second victim traumatization. As proximal psychosocial support is considered to be a main source of coping, wide-spread implementation of effective psychosocial peer support programs ought to be applied by medical organizations. Patient safety measures such as proactive and reactive clinical risk management (e.g., CIRS) should be linked to second victim support.


Assuntos
Erros Médicos , Angústia Psicológica , Áustria , Cuidados Críticos , Humanos , Segurança do Paciente
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