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1.
BioDrugs ; 34(2): 253, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32103456

RESUMO

The article Immunogenicity of Biosimilars for Rheumatic Diseases, Plaque Psoriasis, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review from Clinical Trials and Regulatory Documents, written by Vibeke Strand, Joao Gonçalves, Timothy P. Hickling, Heather E. Jones, Lisa Marshall and John D. Isaacs, was originally published Online First without Open Access.

2.
J Rheumatol ; 2020 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32007934

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Numerous Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) exist for the measurement of physical function for psoriatic arthritis (PsA), but only a few are validated comprehensively. The objective of this project was to prioritize PROMs for measuring physical function for potential incorporation into a standardized Outcome Measurement Set for PsA. METHODS: A working group of 13 members including two patient research partners was formed. PROMs measuring physical function in PsA were identified through a systematic literature review and recommendations by the working group. The rationale for inclusion and exclusion from the original list of existing PROMs was thoroughly discussed and two rounds of Delphi exercises were conducted to achieve consensus. RESULTS: Twelve PROMs were reviewed and discussed. Six PROMs were prioritized: Health Assessment Questionnaire and four modifications (HAQ-Disability Index, HAQ-Spine, modified HAQ, Multidimensional HAQ), Medical Outcome Survey Short Form-36 (SF-36)- physical functioning domain and the PROMIS physical functioning module. CONCLUSION: Through discussion and Delphi exercises, we achieved consensus to prioritize six physical function PROMs for PsA. These six PROMs will undergo further appraisal using the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.1.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32004421

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Prospective long-term observational studies (LOS) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) lack a core set of universally collected outcome measures, particularly, patient-centered outcomes (PCO), precluding accurate comparisons across studies. Our aim was to identify long-term outcome measures collected and reported in these studies. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of registries and LOS of patients with RA searching in ClinicalTrials.gov, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Registry of Patient Registries, and Google Scholar. The names and acronyms of registries and LOS were further searched in the Medline and EMBASE databases to retrieve published articles. Two independent reviewers undertook data collection, quality appraisal, and data extraction. RESULTS: We identified 88 registries/LOS that met our eligibility criteria. These were divided into two groups: disease-based (52 [59%]) and therapy-based (36 [41%]). Methodological and reporting standards varied across the eligible studies. For clinical outcomes, disease activity was recorded in 88 (100%) of all LOS/registries. The most commonly reported measure (86 [98%]) was the composite outcome, Disease Activity Score of 28 joints (DAS28). Of the PCOs collected, physical functioning was most frequently reported 75 [85%] with the Health Assessment Questionnaire (75 [85%]) as the most commonly used instrument within this domain. Other domains of PCOs were comparatively infrequently recorded: mental (29 [33%]), social (20 [23%]), and health-related quality of life (37 [42%]). CONCLUSION: Most registries/LOS collect measures of disease activity and physical function. However, there is substantial heterogeneity in the collection of relevant PCOs that measure symptom burden, mental and social ramifications of RA.

4.
Qual Life Res ; 29(2): 369-380, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31655974

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To assess improvements in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) with ixekizumab treatment in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. METHODS: Adults with plaque psoriasis were enrolled in phase III, double-blind, randomised, controlled trials (UNCOVER-1, UNCOVER-2, or UNCOVER-3). All 3 protocols included a 12-week, placebo-controlled induction period; UNCOVER-2 and UNCOVER-3 also had an active-control group (50 mg etanercept) during induction. After induction, patients in UNCOVER-1 and UNCOVER-2 entered a 48-week withdrawal (maintenance) period (Weeks 12-60), during which Week-12 sPGA (0,1) responders were rerandomized to receive placebo, or 80 mg ixekizumab every 4 weeks (Q4W) or 12 weeks. As a secondary objective, HRQoL was measured by the generic Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 (SF-36) at baseline and Weeks 12 and 60. Changes in mean SF-36 Physical and Mental Component Summary (PCS and MCS) and domain scores and proportions of patients reporting improvements ≥ minimal important differences in SF-36 scores were compared between groups. RESULTS: At Week 12, ixekizumab-treated patients (both dose groups in UNCOVER-1, -2, and -3) reported statistically significantly greater improvements in mean SF-36 PCS and MCS and all 8 SF-36 domain scores versus placebo. Further, more ixekizumab-treated patients than placebo-treated patients reported at least minimal treatment responses in SF-36 PCS and MCS scores and domain scores. Overall improvements in SF-36 PCS and MCS scores were maintained through Week 60. CONCLUSIONS: Ixekizumab-treated patients reported statistically significant improvements in HRQoL at 12 weeks that persisted through 1 year.

5.
BioDrugs ; 34(1): 27-37, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31721107

RESUMO

The goal of this narrative review was to summarize immunogenicity data of biosimilars or biosimilar candidates for rheumatic diseases, plaque psoriasis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), available in peer-reviewed publications or regulatory documents. PubMed records and regulatory documents were searched for immunogenicity data of TNFα or CD20 inhibitor biosimilars or biosimilar candidates. Data collected included the proportion of patients positive for anti-drug antibodies (ADAbs), proportion with neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) among ADAb-positive patients, ADAb/nAb assay characteristics, cross-reactivity, and the effects of ADAbs on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety. We identified eight biosimilars or biosimilar candidates for adalimumab (BI 695501, SB5, ABP 501, GP2017, PF-06410293, MSB-11022, FKB-327, ZRC-3197) four for etanercept (SB4, GP2015, CHS-0214, LBEC0101), and three each for infliximab (SB2, CT-P13, GP1111) and rituximab (CT-P10, GP2013, PF-05280586) with immunogenicity data. Randomized, head-to-head trials with reference products varied in design and methodology of ADAb/nAb detection. The lowest proportions of ADAb-positive (0-13%) and nAb-positive patients (0-3%) were observed in the trials of etanercept and its biosimilars, and the highest with adalimumab, infliximab, and their biosimilars (ADAbs: ≤ 64%; nAbs: ≤ 100%). The most common method of ADAb detection was electrochemiluminescence, and ADAb positivity was associated with nominally inferior efficacy and safety. Overall, there were no significant immunogenicity differences between biosimilars and reference products. However, there are many discrepancies in assessing and reporting clinical immunogenicity. In conclusion, immunogenicity data of biosimilars or biosimilar candidates for TNFα or CD20 inhibitors were collected in trials that varied in design and procedures for ADAb/nAb detection. In general, immunogenicity parameters of biosimilars are similar to those of their reference products.

6.
Curr Med Res Opin ; 36(1): 161-168, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31433680

RESUMO

Objective: Determine healthcare resource utilization (HCRU) and costs associated with fatigue and stiffness among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).Methods: A retrospective claims analysis compared RA patients with fatigue or stiffness to matched RA control patients with neither. Claims from a large US commercial insurance database identified new cases of stiffness/fatigue among newly diagnosed patients. Study patients had ≥2 medical claims for RA ≥45 days apart, continuous insurance coverage ≥12 months before RA index (baseline period) and ≥12 months after fatigue/stiffness index (follow-up period). Controls had no diagnosis of fatigue or stiffness ≥12 months before index. Cases had ≥1 claim of fatigue/stiffness after RA index; the first such claim was the index date. Multivariate logistic regressions, adjusting for baseline demographics, comorbidities, medication use and HCRU, were used to predict the propensity of having a fatigue/stiffness diagnosis. Controls were propensity-score matched to cases. Generalized linear models estimated all-cause and RA-specific costs associated with resource use as well as prescription drugs, adjusting for any unbalanced covariates after propensity-score matching.Results: Approximately 32% of newly diagnosed RA patients suffer from fatigue/stiffness. Matched cohorts were analyzed: fatigue vs. control; stiffness vs. control; fatigue and stiffness vs. control. After RA diagnosis, hospitalizations increased: 83% for fatigue, 117% for stiffness and 148% for both; total office visits increased 63%, 113% and 135%, respectively. Greater HCRU yielded significantly greater (all p < .001) per-patient-per-year hospitalization costs vs. matched controls: fatigue ($2554 vs. $1293); stiffness ($2792 vs. $892); fatigue and stiffness ($3322 vs. $1033). Per-patient-per-year costs of office visits increased significantly (all p < .001) vs. matched controls: fatigue ($1373 vs. $908); stiffness ($1580 vs. $761); fatigue and stiffness ($1989 vs. $921).Conclusions: RA patients with fatigue and/or stiffness report more HCRU and incur significantly higher medical costs than RA patients without them.

7.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 21(1): 263, 2019 12 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31791386

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are important when evaluating treatment benefits in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We compared upadacitinib, an oral, selective JAK-1 inhibitor, with placebo to assess clinically meaningful improvements in PROs in patients with RA who have had inadequate responses to biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARD-IR). METHODS: PRO responses between upadacitinib 15 mg or 30 mg and placebo were evaluated at week 12 from the SELECT-BEYOND trial. Improvement was determined by measuring Patient Global Assessment of Disease Activity (PtGA), pain, Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), duration and severity of morning (AM) stiffness, and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Least squares mean changes and percentage of patients reporting improvements ≥ minimum clinically important differences (MCID) and scores greater than or equal to normative values were determined. The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve clinically meaningful improvements was calculated. RESULTS: In 498 patients, both upadacitinib doses resulted in statistically significant changes from baseline versus placebo in PtGA, pain, HAQ-DI, SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS), 7 of 8 SF-36 domains (15 mg), 6 of 8 SF-36 domains (30 mg), and AM stiffness duration and severity. Compared with placebo, more upadacitinib-treated patients reported improvements ≥ MCID in PtGA, pain, HAQ-DI, SF-36 PCS, 7 of 8 SF-36 domains (15 mg), 5 of 8 SF-36 domains (30 mg), AM stiffness duration and severity, and ISI (30 mg) and scores ≥ normative values in HAQ-DI and SF-36 domains. Across most PROs, NNTs to achieve MCID with upadacitinib ranged from 4 to 7 patients. CONCLUSIONS: In bDMARD-IR RA patients, upadacitinib (15 mg or 30 mg) improved multiple aspects of quality of life, and more patients reached clinically meaningful improvements approaching normative values compared with placebo. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02706847), registered 6 March 2016.

8.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 21(1): 272, 2019 12 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31815649

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the effect of upadacitinib on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with RA who had an inadequate response to csDMARDs. METHODS: Patients in SELECT-NEXT, a randomised controlled trial, were on a background of csDMARDs and received upadacitinib 15 mg and 30 mg or placebo daily for 12 weeks. PROs included Patient Global Assessment of Disease Activity (PtGA), pain, Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F), duration and severity of morning (AM) joint stiffness, Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), and Work Instability Scale for RA (RA-WIS). Least squares mean (LSM) changes were based on mixed-effect repeated measure models. Percentages of patients reporting improvements ≥ minimum clinically important differences (MCIDs) and scores ≥ normative values and number needed to treat (NNT) were determined; group comparisons used chi-square tests. RESULTS: Data from 661 patients were analysed. Compared with placebo, patients receiving upadacitinib reported statistically significant improvements (both doses, P < 0.05) in PtGA, pain, HAQ-DI, FACIT-F, duration and severity of AM stiffness, SF-36 (PCS and 6/8 domains), and RA-WIS at week 12. Significantly, more upadacitinib-treated patients (both doses, P < 0.05) reported improvements ≥ MCID in PtGA, pain, HAQ-DI, FACIT-F, AM stiffness, SF-36 (PCS and 4 or 7/8 domains), and RA-WIS and scores ≥ normative values in HAQ-DI, FACIT-F, and SF-36 (PCS and 4 or 5/8 domains). For most PROs, the incremental NNT with upadacitinib to report clinically meaningful improvement from baseline ranged from 4 to 8 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Upadacitinib 15 mg or 30 mg daily for 12 weeks resulted in significant and clinically meaningful improvements in global disease activity, pain, physical function, fatigue, duration and severity of AM stiffness, HRQOL, and work instability among csDMARD-IR patients with RA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02675426. Retrospectively registered 5 February 2016.

9.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 2019 Dec 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31858963

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we present data from the completed Phase 3 randomised controlled trial (RCT) ORAL Scan (NCT00847613), which evaluated the impact of tofacitinib on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) through 24 months in patients with active RA and inadequate responses to methotrexate (MTX-IR). METHODS: Patients were randomised 4:4:1:1 to receive tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice daily (BID), or placebo advanced to tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg, plus background MTX. Patients receiving placebo advanced to tofacitinib at month 3 (non-responders) or month 6 (remaining patients). Mean changes from baseline in PROs, assessed at months 1-24, included Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index, Patient Global Assessment of disease activity (visual analogue scale [VAS]), Patient Assessment of Arthritis Pain (VAS), health-related quality of life (Short Form-36 version 2), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue and Medical Outcomes Study-Sleep. RESULTS: Overall, 539/797 (67.6%) patients completed 24 months' treatment. At month 3, tofacitinib-treated patients reported signi cant (p<0.05) mean changes from baseline versus placebo across all PROs, and significantly more patients reported improvements ≥ minimum clinically important differences versus placebo. Improvements in PROs with tofacitinib were sustained to month 24. Following advancement to tofacitinib, placebo-treated patients generally reported changes of similar magnitude to tofacitinib-treated patients. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with RA and MTX-IR receiving tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg BID plus MTX reported significant and clinically meaningful improvements in PROs versus placebo at month 3, which were sustained through 24 months.

10.
RMD Open ; 5(2): e001017, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31673415

RESUMO

Objective: Evaluate open-label sarilumab monotherapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis switching from adalimumab monotherapy in MONARCH (NCT02332590); assess long-term safety and efficacy in patients continuing sarilumab during open-label extension (OLE). Methods: During the 48-week OLE, patients received sarilumab 200 mg subcutaneously once every 2 weeks. Safety (March 2017 cut-off) and efficacy, including patient-reported outcomes, were evaluated. Results: In the double-blind phase, patients receiving sarilumab or adalimumab monotherapy showed meaningful improvements in disease activity; sarilumab was superior to adalimumab for improving signs, symptoms and physical function. Overall, 320/369 patients completing the 24-week double-blind phase entered OLE (155 switched from adalimumab; 165 continued sarilumab). Sarilumab safety profile was consistent with previous reports. Treatment-emergent adverse events were similar between groups; no unexpected safety signals emerged in the first 10 weeks postswitch. Among switch patients, improvement in disease activity was evident at OLE week 12: 47.1%/34.8% had changes ≥1.2 in Disease Activity Score (28 joints) (DAS28)-erythrocyte sedimentation rate/DAS28-C-reactive protein. In switch patients achieving low disease activity (LDA: Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) ≤10; Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤11) by OLE week 24, 70.7%/69.5% sustained CDAI/SDAI LDA at both OLE weeks 36 and 48. Proportions of switch patients achieving CDAI ≤2.8 and SDAI ≤3.3 by OLE week 24 increased through OLE week 48. Improvements postswitch approached continuation-group values, including scores ≥normative values. Conclusions: During this OLE, there were no unexpected safety issues in patients switching from adalimumab to sarilumab monotherapy, and disease activity improved in many patients. Patients continuing sarilumab reported safety consistent with prolonged use and had sustained benefit.

11.
RMD Open ; 5(2): e001040, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31673419

RESUMO

Objective: To provide the first direct comparison of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following treatment with tofacitinib monotherapy versus tofacitinib or adalimumab (ADA) in combination with methotrexate (MTX) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with inadequate response to MTX (MTX-IR). Methods: ORAL Strategy (NCT02187055), a phase IIIB/IV, head-to-head, randomised controlled trial, assessed non-inferiority between tofacitinib 5 mg two times per day monotherapy, tofacitinib 5 mg two times per day+MTX and ADA 40 mg every other week+MTX. PROs assessed included the following: Patient Global Assessment of disease activity (PtGA), Pain, Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue and 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) summary and domain scores. Results: Substantial improvements from baseline were reported across all PROs in all treatment arms, which, in the majority, met or exceeded minimum clinically important differences. Compared with tofacitinib monotherapy, tofacitinib+MTX combination treatment conferred significantly greater improvements in PtGA, Pain and SF-36 physical component summary scores at month 6. Statistically or numerically greater improvements were often, but not uniformly, reported for combination treatments compared with tofacitinib monotherapy at other time points. Conclusion: Treatment with tofacitinib+MTX, ADA+MTX and tofacitinib monotherapy resulted in clinically meaningful improvements in PROs in MTX-IR patients with RA. These were comparatively greater with combination treatments versus tofacitinib monotherapy, although differences between treatment arms were small, limiting our ability to confer clinical meaning. Trial registration number: NCT02187055.

12.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 21(1): 221, 2019 10 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31665083

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to explore the impact of sex and disease classification on outcomes in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) patients, including both radiographic (r-) axSpA and non-radiographic (nr-) axSpA, in males and females, respectively. METHODS: AxSpA patients were consecutively recruited from two rheumatology outpatient university clinics. We explored how sex and axSpA disease classification affected patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). General linear models were used to investigate if there was an association between the continuous variables and each of the main effects of interest (sex and axSpA classification), as well as the possible interaction between them. Categorical outcome measures were analyzed with the use of logistic regression with the same fixed effects. We analyzed the relationship between tender point count (TPC) and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). The prevalence of extra-articular manifestations (EAMs) and the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) were determined. RESULTS: According to the protocol, a total of 100 outpatients with axSpA were enrolled (r-axSpA males 30, r-axSpA females 10, nr-axSpA males 25, nr-axSpA females 35). The BASDAI scores appeared higher among nr-axSpA females (median [Q1; Q3], 47 [21; 60]) compared with the combined median for the 3 other subgroups 25 [12; 25]. Female sex was associated with a higher number of tender point count (TPC, P < 0.001). TPC and BASDAI were correlated for female nr-axSpA patients (r = 0.44, P = 0.008) and male nr-axSpA patients (r = 0.56, P = 0.003). Being classified as nr-axSpA was associated with a lower SF-36 Mental Component Summary (median for the 4 subgroups: nr-axSpa females 46.7, nr-axSpA males 52.3 vs. r-axSpA males 56.9 and r-axSpA females 50.4). EAMs were frequent (up to 50%). The CCI was low in all 4 subgroups, and no difference in the CCI between the subgroups was observed (P = 0.14). However, male sex had a significant impact on the CCI (P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: In summary, patients with r-axSpA, regardless of sex, appeared less affected on most PROMs compared with nr-axSpA patients. However, female sex was associated with a higher number of TPC. TPC could possibly confound disease activity outcomes such as BASDAI, and one can consider different thresholds for defining high disease activity depending on the patient's sex. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is registered and approved by the Region of Southern Denmark's Ethics Committee ( S-20150219 ). Registered 19 February 2015.

13.
RMD Open ; 5(2): e001002, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31565243

RESUMO

Objective: To comprehensively assess evidence on the measurement properties of the minimal disease activity (MDA) criteria, a composite measure of the state of disease activity in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods: A targeted literature review was conducted to identify studies that informed the validity and/or ability of the MDA to detect change among patients known to have experienced a change in clinical status. The search was conducted using MEDLINE and Embase databases (published as of October 2017). Pertinent articles provided by investigators and identified from select conference proceedings were also evaluated. Results: A total of 20 publications met the inclusion criteria. The MDA criteria were consistently associated with other indicators of disease activity/severity. The ability of the MDA criteria to detect change was supported in randomised controlled trials (n=10), with a greater percentage of patients randomised to active treatments achieving MDA relative to patients in comparator arms. Long-term observational studies (n=2) provided additional support for the ability of the MDA to detect within-subject change in the real-world settings. Conclusion: Evidence supports the MDA as a valid measure of disease activity in PsA that can detect between-group and within-subject change. The MDA is a comprehensive measure and clinically meaningful endpoint to assess the impact of interventions on PsA disease activity.

14.
RMD Open ; 5(1): e000889, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31168411

RESUMO

Objectives: Glucocorticoids have anti-inflammatory, transrepression-mediated effects, although adverse events (AEs; transactivation-mediated effects) limit long-term use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the efficacy and safety of fosdagrocorat (PF-04171327), a dissociated agonist of the glucocorticoid receptor, versus prednisone or placebo. Methods: In this 12-week, phase II, randomised controlled trial, 323 patients with moderate to severe RA were randomised 1:1:1:1:1:1:1 to fosdagrocorat (1 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg or 15 mg), prednisone (5 mg or 10 mg) or placebo, once daily. The primary endpoints (week 8) were American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (ACR20) responses, and percentage changes from baseline in biomarkers of bone formation (procollagen type 1 N-terminal peptide [P1NP]) and resorption (urinary N-telopeptide to urinary creatinine ratio [uNTx:uCr]). Safety was assessed. Results: ACR20 responses with fosdagrocorat 10 mg and 15 mg were superior to placebo, and fosdagrocorat 15 mg was non-inferior to prednisone 10 mg (week 8 model-predicted ACR20 responses: 47%, 61%, 69% and 73% vs 51%, 71% and 37% with fosdagrocorat 1 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg and 15 mg vs prednisone 5 mg, 10 mg and placebo, respectively). Percentage changes from baseline in P1NP with fosdagrocorat 1 mg, 5 mg and 10 mg met non-inferiority criteria to prednisone 5 mg. Corresponding changes in uNTx:uCr varied considerably. All fosdagrocorat doses reduced glycosylated haemoglobin levels. AEs were similar between groups; 63 (19.5%) patients reported treatment-related AEs; 9 (2.8%) patients reported serious AEs. No patients had adrenal insufficiency, treatment-related significant infections or laboratory abnormalities. No deaths were reported. Conclusion: In patients with RA, fosdagrocorat 10 mg and 15 mg demonstrated efficacy similar to prednisone 10 mg and safety similar to prednisone 5 mg. Trial registration number: NCT01393639.

15.
J Rheumatol Suppl ; 95: 33-37, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31154402

RESUMO

The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA)-Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Working Group reported at the 2018 GRAPPA annual meeting on the outcome of the OMERACT 2018 Conference in Terrigal, Australia. The working group presented the endorsement of the 66/68 joint count for the assessment of peripheral arthritis and the provisional endorsement of the PsA Impact of Disease 12 questionnaire for the assessment of PsA-specific health-related quality of life in PsA randomized controlled trials and observational studies. In this report, the group presents its plan to seek OMERACT endorsement for outcome measures that address the domains of MSK disease activity for enthesitis and dactylitis, physical function, fatigue, and structural damage following the OMERACT Filter 2.1 methodology.


Assuntos
Artrite Psoriásica/tratamento farmacológico , Ensaios Clínicos como Assunto , Psoríase/tratamento farmacológico , Qualidade de Vida , Artrite Psoriásica/diagnóstico , Dermatologia , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Psoríase/diagnóstico , Reumatologia , Resultado do Tratamento
16.
J Rheumatol ; 46(9): 1173-1178, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31043547

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Safety Working Group objective was to identify harm domains from existing outcome measurements in rheumatology. METHODS: Systematically searching the MEDLINE database on January 24, 2017, we identified full-text articles that could be used for harm outcomes in rheumatology. Domains/items from the identified instruments were described and the content synthesized to provide a preliminary framework for harm outcomes. RESULTS: From 435 possible references, 24 were read in full text and 9 were included: 7 measurement instruments were identified. Investigation of domains/items revealed considerable heterogeneity in the grouping and approach. CONCLUSION: The ideal way to assess harm aspects from the patients' perspective has not yet been ascertained.

18.
J Rheumatol ; 46(10): 1259-1267, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30877216

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the effect of sarilumab on patient-perceived impact of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using the 7-domain RA Impact of Disease (RAID) scale. METHODS: Two phase III, randomized, controlled trials of sarilumab in patients with active, longstanding RA were analyzed: (1) sarilumab 150 mg and 200 mg every 2 weeks plus conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (+csDMARD) versus placebo + csDMARD [TARGET (NCT01709578)]; and (2) sarilumab 200 mg versus adalimumab (ADA) 40 mg monotherapy [MONARCH (NCT02332590)]. Least-squares mean (LSM) differences in RAID total score (range 0-10) and 7 key RA symptoms, including pain and fatigue (baseline to Weeks 12 and 24), were compared. "Responders" by RAID total score were defined by improvements from baseline ≥ minimal clinically important difference (MCID), and ≥ patient-acceptable symptom-state (PASS) at endpoint. RESULTS: Sarilumab 150 mg and 200 mg + csDMARD were nominally superior (p < 0.05) versus placebo + csDMARD and 200 mg sarilumab versus ADA 40 mg in LSM differences for RAID total score at weeks 12 (-0.93 and -1.13; -0.49, respectively) and 24 (-0.75 and -1.01; -0.78), and all effects of RA (except functional impairment in MONARCH Week 12). Effects were greater in physical domains (e.g., pain) than mental domains (e.g., emotional well-being). More patients receiving sarilumab versus placebo or ADA reported improvements ≥ MCID and PASS in total RAID scores at both assessments. CONCLUSION: Based on the RAID, sarilumab + csDMARD or as monotherapy reduced the effect of RA on patients' lives to a greater extent than placebo + csDMARD or ADA monotherapy. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01709578 and NCT02332590).

19.
J Rheumatol ; 46(9): 1164-1167, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30824644

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This is an update from the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Core Outcomes in Longterm Observational Studies Special Interest Group with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: Preliminary data and proposed next steps were outlined and discussed by participants. RESULTS: Domains identified after initial steps (systematic review and qualitative research) were pain, physical functioning, participation (i.e., work, social), longterm symptoms, fertility/family planning, emotional well-being, coping, financial status, and adverse events including death. CONCLUSION: The group agreed conceptually that short-term core outcomes could be different from longer term ones. Participants emphasized the importance of analyzing the need for core domains specifically for longterm longitudinal observational studies.

20.
RMD Open ; 5(1): e000806, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30713721

RESUMO

Objectives: Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We evaluated patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with PsA refractory to ≥1 conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (csDMARD-IR) and tumour necrosis factor inhibitor-naïve in a 12-month, phase III randomised controlled trial (OPAL Broaden [NCT01877668]). Methods: Patients (N=422) received tofacitinib 5 mg or 10 mg twice daily, adalimumab 40 mg subcutaneously every 2 weeks or placebo advancing to tofacitinib 5 mg or 10 mg twice daily at month 3. Least squares mean changes from baseline and percentages of patients reporting improvements ≥minimum clinically important differences (MCID); and scores ≥normative values in: Patient Global Assessment of disease activity (PtGA), Pain, Patient Global Joint and Skin Assessment (PGJS), Short Form-36 Health Survey version 2 (SF-36v2), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-Fatigue), EuroQol 5-Dimensions-3-level questionnaire (EQ-5D-3L) and Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) were determined. Nominal p values were cited without multiple comparison adjustments. Results: At month 3, PtGA, Pain, PGJS, FACIT-Fatigue, EQ-5D-3L, ASQoL and SF-36v2 Physical Component Summary (PCS), physical functioning (PF), bodily pain (BP) and vitality domain scores exceeded placebo with both tofacitinib doses (p≤0.05); SF-36v2 social functioning with 5 mg twice daily (p≤0.05). Percentages reporting improvements ≥MCID in PtGA, Pain, PGJS, FACIT-Fatigue, ASQoL and SF-36v2 PCS, PF, BP and general health scores exceeded placebo with both tofacitinib doses (p≤0.05) and were similar with adalimumab. Conclusion: csDMARD-IR patients with active PsA reported statistically and clinically meaningful improvements in PROs with tofacitinib compared with placebo at Month 3.

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