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1.
J Affect Disord ; 280(Pt A): 305-314, 2021 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33221716

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The phenomenology and neurobiology of depressive symptoms in anxious youth is poorly understood. METHODS: Association networks of anxiety and depressive symptoms were developed in adolescents with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; N=52, mean age: 15.4±1.6 years) who had not yet developed major depressive disorder. Community analyses were used to create consensus clusters of depressive and anxiety symptoms and to identify "bridge" symptoms between the clusters. In a subset of this sample (n=39), correlations between cortical thickness and depressive symptom severity was examined. RESULTS: Ten symptoms clustered into an anxious community, 5 clustered into a depressive community and 5 bridged the two communities: impaired schoolwork, excessive weeping, low self-esteem, disturbed appetite, and physical symptoms of depression. Patients with more depressive cluster burden had altered cortical thickness in prefrontal, inferior and medial parietal (e.g., precuneus, supramarginal) regions and had decreases in cortical thickness-age relationships in prefrontal, temporal and parietal cortices. LIMITATIONS: Data are cross-sectional and observational. Limited sample size precluded secondary analysis of comorbidities and demographics. CONCLUSIONS: In youth with GAD, a sub-set of symptoms not directly related to anxiety bridge anxiety and depression. Youth with greater depressive cluster burden had altered cortical thickness in cortical structures within the default mode and central executive networks. These alternations in cortical thickness may represent a distinct neurostructural fingerprint in anxious youth with early depressive symptoms. Finally, youth with GAD and high depressive symptoms had reduced age-cortical thickness correlations. The emergence of depressive symptoms in early GAD and cortical development may have bidirectional, neurobiological relationships.

2.
Neuropsychopharmacology ; 46(2): 462-469, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32919400

RESUMO

Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is prevalent and associated with a substantial psychosocial burden and mortality. There are few prior studies of interventions for TRD in adolescents. This was the largest study to date examining the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of 10-Hz transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for adolescents with TRD. Adolescents with TRD (aged 12-21 years) were enrolled in a randomized, sham-controlled trial of TMS across 13 sites. Treatment resistance was defined as an antidepressant treatment record level of 1 to 4 in a current episode of depression. Intention-to-treat patients (n = 103) included those randomly assigned to active NeuroStar TMS monotherapy (n = 48) or sham TMS (n = 55) for 30 daily treatments over 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure was change in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D-24) score. After 6 weeks of blinded treatment, improvement in the least-squares mean (SE) HAM-D-24 scores were similar between the active (-11.1 [2.03]) and sham groups (-10.6 [2.00]; P = 0.8; difference [95% CI], - 0.5 [-4.2 to 3.3]). Response rates were 41.7% in the active group and 36.4% in the sham group (P = 0.6). Remission rates were 29.2% in the active group and 29.0% in the sham group (P = 0.95). There were no new tolerability or safety signals in adolescents. Although TMS treatment produced a clinically meaningful change in depressive symptom severity, this did not differ from sham treatment. Future studies should focus on strategies to reduce the placebo response and examine the optimal dosing of TMS for adolescents with TRD.

3.
Braz. J. Psychiatry (São Paulo, 1999, Impr.) ; 42(5): 481-488, Sept.-Oct. 2020. tab
Artigo em Inglês | LILACS-Express | LILACS | ID: biblio-1132115

RESUMO

Objectives: To prospectively investigate whether baseline clinical characteristics and medication exposure predict development of major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder. Methods: Youth aged 9-20 years with at least one biological parent with bipolar disorder and no prior history of mood or psychotic episodes (n=93) were prospectively evaluated and treated naturalistically during the study. Participants were divided into two groups: converters, defined as those who met DSM-IV criteria for a mood episode during follow-up (n=19); or non-converters (n=74). Logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between baseline clinical variables and medication exposure during follow-up and risk of developing a first mood episode (conversion). Results: Multivariate regression analyses showed that baseline anxiety disorders and subsyndromal mood disorders were associated with increased risk of conversion during follow-up. Adding medication exposure to the multivariate model showed that exposure to antidepressants during follow-up was associated with increased risk of conversion. Conclusions: Caution should be used when treating bipolar offspring with anxiety and/or emerging depressive symptoms using antidepressant agents, given the increased risk of developing a major mood disorder.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32974615

RESUMO

Multiple and diverse psychotherapeutic or psychopharmacologic treatments effectively reduce symptoms for many patients with anxiety disorders, but the trajectory and magnitude of response vary considerably. This heterogeneity of treatment response has invigorated the search for biomarkers of treatment response in anxiety disorders, across the lifespan. In this review, we summarize evidence for biomarkers of treatment response in children, adolescents and adults with generalized, separation and social anxiety disorders as well as panic disorder. We then discuss the relationship between these biomarkers of treatment response and the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders. Finally, we provide context for treatment response biomarkers of the future, including neuronally-derived extracellular vesicles in anxiety disorders and discuss challenges that must be overcome prior to the debut of treatment response biomarkers in the clinic. A number of promising treatment response biomarkers have been identified, although there is an urgent need to replicate findings and to identify which biomarkers might guide clinicians in selecting from available treatments rather than just simply identifying patients who may be less likely to respond to a given intervention.

5.
Braz J Psychiatry ; 2020 Aug 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32876131

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether poor antidepressant tolerability is associated with functional brain changes in children and adolescents of parents with bipolar I disorder (at-risk youth). METHODS: Seventy-three at-risk youth (ages 9-20 years old) who participated in a prospective study and had an available baseline functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan were included. Research records were reviewed for the incidence of adverse reactions related to antidepressant exposure during follow-up. The sample was divided among at-risk youth without antidepressant exposure (n=21), at-risk youth with antidepressant exposure and no adverse reaction (n=12), at-risk youth with antidepressant-related adverse reaction (n=21), and healthy controls (n=20). The fMRI task was a continuous performance test with emotional distracters. Region-of-interest mean activation in brain areas of the fronto-limbic emotional circuit was compared among groups. RESULTS: Right amygdala activation in response to emotional distracters significantly differed among groups (F3,66 = 3.1, p = 0.03). At-risk youth with an antidepressant-related adverse reaction had the lowest amygdala activation, while at-risk youth without antidepressant exposure had the highest activation (p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Decreased right amygdala activation in response to emotional distracters is associated with experiencing an antidepressant-related adverse reaction in at-risk youth. Further studies to determine whether amygdala activation is a useful biomarker for antidepressant-related adverse events are needed.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32860906

RESUMO

AACAP's recent policy statement on Clinical Use of Pharmacogenetic Tests in Prescribing Psychotropic Medications for Children and Adolescents1 recommends that "clinicians avoid using pharmacogenetic testing to select psychotropic medications in children and adolescents." We agree that there are limitations to the nascent evidence base for using pharmacogenetics, especially in combinatorial form (eg, test results that bin medications based on multiple genes). However, all-or-nothing recommendations fail to recognize the nuance and context of this testing and contrast with the AACAP Facts for Families on pharmacogenetic testing. Moreover, pharmacogenetic testing may inform dosing for antidepressants that are commonly used in child and adolescent psychiatry (eg, sertraline, escitalopram, citalopram, fluvoxamine) as well as the tolerability of some psychotropic medications. With this in mind, we wish to remind the AACAP community of the accumulating evidence and to highlight important principles of pharmacogenetic testing in youths. Specifically: 1) pharmacogenetic testing is not always performed by commercial companies and is not always combinatorial; 2) dosing recommendations or assessment of risk for severe hypersensitivity reactions are based on pharmacogenetics in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved product inserts for several medications commonly prescribed to children (eg, citalopram, aripiprazole, atomoxetine, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine at www.fda.gov/drugs/science-and-research-drugs/table-pharmacogenomic-biomarkers-drug-labeling); 3) expert consensus guidelines for dosing or identifying hypersensitivity risk for these drugs are available from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-supported Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC, www.cpicpgx.org/), which provides transparent, regularly updated, and evidence-based evaluations of pharmacogenetic data;2 and 4) randomized trials are not required for clinical dose adjustments; for example, dose adjustments because of decreased hepatic function or concomitant interacting medications are based on pharmacokinetic data, similar to many pharmacokinetic gene-based recommendations from CPIC.

7.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 81(5)2020 08 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32857933

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used to treat pediatric anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD); however, their efficacy and tolerability are difficult to predict. This study evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of escitalopram in adolescents with GAD (DSM-IV-TR) and the impact of variants in HTR2A and serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) genes and cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) phenotypes on response as well as CYP2C19 phenotype on escitalopram pharmacokinetics from February 2015 through November 2018. METHODS: Patients were treated with escitalopram (forced titration to 15 mg/d, then flexible titration to 20 mg/d) (n = 26, mean ± SD age: 14.8 ± 1.7 years) or placebo (n = 25, mean ± SD age: 14.9 ± 1.6 years) for 8 weeks. Outcomes were the change in scores on the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) and Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scales as well as vital signs and adverse events. Plasma escitalopram and desmethylcitalopram area under the curve during 24 hours (AUC0-24) and maximum concentration (Cmax) were determined and compared across CYP2C19 phenotypes. RESULTS: Escitalopram was superior to placebo for mean ± SD baseline-to-endpoint change in PARS (-8.65 ± 1.3 vs -3.52 ± 1.1, P = .005) and CGI scores, and increasing CYP2C19 metabolism was associated with decreases in escitalopram Cmax (P = .07) and AUC0-24 (P < .05). Vital signs, corrected QT interval, and adverse events were similar in patients who received escitalopram and placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Escitalopram reduces anxiety symptoms, and pharmacogenetics variables influence the trajectory and magnitude of improvement. Variation in CYP2C19 metabolism accounts for significant differences in escitalopram pharmacokinetics, raising the possibility that CYP2C19 phenotype should be considered when prescribing escitalopram. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02818751.


Assuntos
Ansiolíticos/uso terapêutico , Transtornos de Ansiedade/tratamento farmacológico , Citalopram/uso terapêutico , Inibidores de Captação de Serotonina/uso terapêutico , Adolescente , Área Sob a Curva , Criança , Citalopram/análogos & derivados , Citalopram/sangue , Citalopram/farmacocinética , Citocromo P-450 CYP2C19/genética , Citocromo P-450 CYP2C19/metabolismo , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Escalas de Graduação Psiquiátrica , Inibidores de Captação de Serotonina/sangue , Inibidores de Captação de Serotonina/farmacocinética , Resultado do Tratamento
8.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32845723

RESUMO

Objective: To determine the effect of CYP2D6 metabolizer status on aripiprazole tolerability in pediatric patients with mood disorders. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed electronic medical record data for 277 patients ≤18 years of age (at the time of CYP2D6 testing) with a mood disorder, receiving oral aripiprazole, and CYP2D6 genotyped as part of routine care. The maximum aripiprazole dose and concomitant medications were extracted from the medical record. The reason for aripiprazole discontinuation was determined to be from side effects (e.g., weight gain, akathisia, GI upset), nonresponse, or other reasons (e.g., financial). Associations with CYP2D6 were analyzed using multivariate linear regression models and chi-square tests. Results: Of the 277 patients (mean age: 14.3 ± 2.4), 57% were normal metabolizers (NMs), 37% were intermediate metabolizers (IMs), 5% were poor metabolizers (PMs), and 1.4% were ultrarapid metabolizers (UMs). A total of 72.2% of the cohort were concomitantly taking a CYP2D6 inhibitor, resulting in phenoconversion. Accounting for phenoconversion resulted in 27% phenoconverted NMs (pNMs), 24% phenoconverted IMs (pIMs), 48% phenoconverted PMs (pPMs), and <1% phenoconverted ultrarapid metabolizers. CYP2D6 pPMs discontinued treatment due to side effects more often than any other CYP2D6 group (67% for pPM, 51% pIM, 57% pNM, chi-square p = 0.024). Body mass index percentile change was associated with the CYP2D6 phenotype (p = 0.038), the time on aripiprazole (p = 0.001), and the number of concomitant CYP2D6 substrates (p = 0.044) in multivariable models. Conclusions: Phenoconverted CYP2D6 metabolizer status is associated with aripiprazole discontinuation. In addition, dose adjustments based on CYP2D6 metabolizer status and concomitant medications could improve aripiprazole treatment outcomes.

9.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 30(10): 606-616, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32721213

RESUMO

Objectives: Placebo response is one of the most significant barriers to detecting treatment effects in pediatric (and adult) clinical trials focusing on affective and anxiety disorders. We sought to identify neurofunctional predictors of placebo response in adolescents with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) by examining dynamic and static functional brain connectivity. Methods: Before randomization to blinded placebo, adolescents, aged 12-17 years, with GAD (N = 25) underwent resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Whole brain voxelwise correlation analyses were used to determine the relationship between change in anxiety symptoms from baseline to week 8 and seed-based dynamic and static functional connectivity maps of regions in the salience and ventral attention networks (amygdala, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex [dACC], and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex [VLPFC]). Results: Greater dynamic functional connectivity variability in amygdala, dACC, VLPFC, and regions within salience, default mode, and frontoparietal networks was associated with greater placebo response. Lower static functional connectivity between amygdala and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, dACC and posterior cingulate cortex and greater static functional connectivity between VLPFC and inferior parietal lobule were associated with greater placebo response. Conclusion: Placebo response is associated with a distinct dynamic and static connectivity fingerprint characterized by "variable" dynamic but "weak" static connectivity in the salience, default mode, frontoparietal, and ventral attention networks. These data provide granular evidence of how circuit-based biotypes mechanistically relate to placebo response. Finding biosignatures that predict placebo response is critically important in clinical psychopharmacology and to improve our ability to detect medication-placebo differences in clinical trials.

10.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 30(7): 465-469, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32614262

RESUMO

Objectives: Despite attentional deficits being a prominent feature of bipolar disorder, there are limited data on the effects of common treatments for bipolar disorder on attention. Thus, we sought to compare the effects of lithium versus quetiapine on attention in adolescents with bipolar disorder. Methods: Adolescents ages 10-17 with bipolar disorder, type I, who were experiencing a manic or mixed episode, were recruited from outpatient settings and the inpatient psychiatric units at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center during their first manic episode. Healthy comparison subjects were recruited from outreach programs in the community. Patients were randomized to lithium or quetiapine, administered in a double-dummy, double-blinded manner for 6 weeks. Attentional deficits were assessed in all groups using the Identical Pairs Continuous Performance Task at baseline and at week 6. Results: Patients with bipolar disorder (n = 79) had impaired attention relative to the healthy group (n = 57) at both baseline and after 6 weeks of treatment. The lithium-treated group (n = 30) had poorer attentional performance than the healthy group at week 6. There was a difference in change in performance between lithium- and quetiapine-treated (n = 49) groups. Conclusion: Youth with bipolar disorder may have impaired attention relative to their healthy peers. Conclusions are limited by the high dropout rate in the lithium-treated group.

11.
Depress Anxiety ; 37(9): 926-934, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32579280

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Psychiatrists frequently struggle with how to sequence treatment for depressed adolescents who do not respond to an adequate trial of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). This study leveraged recent statistical and computational advances to create Bayesian hierarchal models (BHMs) of response in the treatment of SSRI-resistant depression in adolescents study to inform treatment planning. METHODS: BHMs of individual treatment trajectories were developed and estimated using Hamiltonian Monte Carlo no u-turn sampling. From the Monte Carlo pseudorandom sample, 95% credible intervals, means, posterior tail probabilities, and so forth, were determined. Then, for the random effects model, posterior tail probabilities were used to create Bayesian two-tailed p values to evaluate the null hypotheses: no difference in efficacy between SSRIs and venlafaxine. The robustness of the results was examined using the fixed effects model of treatment comparisons. RESULTS: In patients not receiving cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT; n = 168), SSRIs produced greater and faster improvement in depressive symptoms compared to venlafaxine (p = .015). No differences in response or trajectory of response for symptoms of anxiety were detected between SSRIs and venlafaxine (p = .168). For patients receiving CBT (n = 162), SSRIs and venlafaxine produced similar improvements in symptoms of anxiety and depression. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this novel computational approach suggest that a second trial of an SSRI is warranted for depressed adolescents who fail to respond to initial SSRI treatment.


Assuntos
Transtorno Depressivo Maior , Inibidores de Captação de Serotonina , Adolescente , Teorema de Bayes , Cicloexanóis , Depressão , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/tratamento farmacológico , Fluoxetina , Humanos , Resultado do Tratamento
12.
Hum Brain Mapp ; 2020 Jun 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32596977

RESUMO

The ENIGMA group on Generalized Anxiety Disorder (ENIGMA-Anxiety/GAD) is part of a broader effort to investigate anxiety disorders using imaging and genetic data across multiple sites worldwide. The group is actively conducting a mega-analysis of a large number of brain structural scans. In this process, the group was confronted with many methodological challenges related to study planning and implementation, between-country transfer of subject-level data, quality control of a considerable amount of imaging data, and choices related to statistical methods and efficient use of resources. This report summarizes the background information and rationale for the various methodological decisions, as well as the approach taken to implement them. The goal is to document the approach and help guide other research groups working with large brain imaging data sets as they develop their own analytic pipelines for mega-analyses.

13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32500537

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders first emerge during the critical developmental periods of childhood and adolescence. This review synthesizes recent findings on the prevalence, risk factors, and course of the anxiety disorders; and their neurobiology and treatment. METHODS: For this review, searches were conducted using PubMed, PsycINFO, and clinicaltrials.gov. Findings related to the epidemiology, neurobiology, risk factors, and treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders were then summarized. FINDINGS: Anxiety disorders are high prevalence, and early-onset conditions associated with multiple risk factors including early inhibited temperament, environment stress, and structural and functional abnormalities in the prefrontal-amygdala circuitry as well as the default mode and salience networks. The anxiety disorders are effectively treated with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). CONCLUSIONS: Anxiety disorders are high prevalence, early-onset conditions associated with a distinct neurobiological fingerprint, and are consistently responsive to treatment. Questions remain regarding who is at risk of developing anxiety disorders as well as the way in which neurobiology predicts treatment response.

15.
Depress Anxiety ; 37(8): 747-759, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32419335

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pediatric anxiety disorders such as generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are common, impairing, and often undertreated. Moreover, many youth do not respond to standard, evidence-based psychosocial or psychopharmacologic treatment. An increased understanding of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate neurotransmitter systems has created opportunities for novel intervention development for pediatric GAD. METHODS: This narrative review examines potential candidates for pediatric GAD: eszopiclone, riluzole, eglumegad (LY354740), pimavanserin, agomelatine. RESULTS: The pharmacology, preclinical data, clinical trial findings and known side effects of eszopiclone, riluzole, eglumegad (LY354740), pimavanserin, agomelatine, are reviewed, particularly with regard to their potential therapeutic relevance to pediatric GAD. CONCLUSION: Notwithstanding numerous challenges, some of these agents represent potential candidate drugs for pediatric GAD. Further treatment development studies of agomelatine, eszopiclone, pimavanserin and riluzole for pediatric GAD also have the prospect of informing the understanding of GABAergic and glutamatergic function across development.


Assuntos
Transtornos de Ansiedade , Adolescente , Transtornos de Ansiedade/tratamento farmacológico , Criança , Humanos , Resultado do Tratamento
16.
Braz J Psychiatry ; 42(5): 481-488, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32401870

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To prospectively investigate whether baseline clinical characteristics and medication exposure predict development of major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder. METHODS: Youth aged 9-20 years with at least one biological parent with bipolar disorder and no prior history of mood or psychotic episodes (n=93) were prospectively evaluated and treated naturalistically during the study. Participants were divided into two groups: converters, defined as those who met DSM-IV criteria for a mood episode during follow-up (n=19); or non-converters (n=74). Logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between baseline clinical variables and medication exposure during follow-up and risk of developing a first mood episode (conversion). RESULTS: Multivariate regression analyses showed that baseline anxiety disorders and subsyndromal mood disorders were associated with increased risk of conversion during follow-up. Adding medication exposure to the multivariate model showed that exposure to antidepressants during follow-up was associated with increased risk of conversion. CONCLUSIONS: Caution should be used when treating bipolar offspring with anxiety and/or emerging depressive symptoms using antidepressant agents, given the increased risk of developing a major mood disorder.


Assuntos
Transtorno Bipolar , Transtorno Depressivo Maior , Adolescente , Adulto , Transtorno Bipolar/induzido quimicamente , Transtorno Bipolar/tratamento farmacológico , Criança , Manual Diagnóstico e Estatístico de Transtornos Mentais , Humanos , Pais , Estudos Prospectivos , Adulto Jovem
17.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 30(6): 355-365, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32460523

RESUMO

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and long-term safety of vilazodone in children and adolescent outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods: Children and adolescents aged 7-17 years of age with MDD were randomized 2:2:1 to 8 weeks of double-blind placebo, vilazodone 15 or 30 mg/day or fluoxetine 20 mg/day, respectively. The primary and secondary efficacy outcomes, respectively, were change from baseline to week 8 in Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) score total score and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) score analyzed using a mixed model for repeated measurement approach. Patients who completed the 8-week randomized controlled trial (RCT), as well as new (de novo) patients, could participate in a 26-week, vilazodone-only, open-label extension (OLE) study. Results: The RCT enrolled 473 patients (60% female) with an average age of 13 years. Change in CDRS-R and CGI-S scores from baseline to week 8 did not differ between patients who received vilazodone and those randomized to placebo. The least-squares mean change from baseline in CDRS-R scores was similar for vilazodone and placebo (-20.7 vs. -20.3, p = 0.77; least-squares mean difference [LSMD] = -0.40). For fluoxetine, the LSMD versus placebo was -2.3 (p = 0.14). The OLE enrolled 330 patients (60% female) with an average age of 13-14 years. Overall, no new safety concerns were identified compared to what is known in adults. Conclusions: Similar improvements in depressive symptoms were observed in all arms. This study does not support the efficacy of vilazodone 15 or 30 mg/day for pediatric patients with MDD. No new or unexpected safety concerns were detected during the RCT or OLE studies.

19.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 30(4): 261-266, 2020 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32315537

RESUMO

Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics of adolescents with antidepressant treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD) and to examine the utility of the Antidepressant Treatment Record (ATR) in categorizing treatment resistance in this population. Methods: Adolescents with treatment-resistant MDD enrolled in an interventional study underwent a baseline evaluation with the ATR, Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R), and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) scales. Demographic and clinical characteristics were examined with regard to ATR-defined level of resistance (level 1 to ≥3) using analysis of variance and χ2 tests. Results: In adolescents with treatment-resistant MDD (N = 97), aged 12-21 years, most were female (65%), white (89%), and had recurrent illness (78%). Patients were severely ill (median CGI-S score of 5), had a mean CDRS-R score of 63 ± 10, and 17.5% had been hospitalized for depression-related symptoms. Fifty-two patients were classified as ATR 1, whereas 32 were classified as ATR level 2 and 13 patients as ≥3, respectively. For increasing ATR-defined levels, illness duration increased from 12.0 (range: 1.5-31.9) to 14.8 (range: 1.8-31.7) to 19.5 (range: 2.5-36.2) months and the likelihood of treatment with serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and dopamine norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (DNRIs) similarly increased (p = 0.006 for both SNRIs and DNRIs) as did the likelihood of treatment with mixed dopamine serotonin receptor antagonists (χ2 = 17, p < 0.001). Conclusions: This study underscores the morbidity and chronicity of treatment-resistant MDD in adolescents. The present characterization of related clinical features describes the use of nonselective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in adolescents with treatment-resistant depression and raises the possibility that those with the greatest medication treatment resistance are less likely to have had recurrent episodes. The study also demonstrates the utility of the ATR in categorizing treatment resistance in adolescents with MDD.

20.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 30(5): 293-305, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32167792

RESUMO

Objectives: To evaluate the clinical and neurochemical effects of 12-week fish oil, a source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), in depressed adolescents with a family history of bipolar I disorder. Methods: Adolescents with a current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text Revision diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder or Depressive Disorder not otherwise specified, a Childhood Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) Version raw score of ≥40, and at least one biological parent with bipolar I disorder were randomized to double-blind treatment with fish oil (2100 mg/day) or placebo for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure was change in CDRS-R total score, and secondary outcomes measures were change in manic symptoms (Young Mania Rating Scale), global symptom and functioning measures (Clinical Global Impression-Severity [CGI-S] /CGI Improvement [CGI-I], Children's Global Assessment Scale, and Child Behavior Checklist), safety and laboratory measures, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal cortex neurometabolite concentrations using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 4 T. Results: Fifty-six patients were randomized, and 42 completed the 12-week trial (placebo: n = 21; fish oil, n = 21). Subjects randomized to fish oil, but not placebo, exhibited a significant baseline to endpoint increase in erythrocyte n-3 PUFAs. Reductions in CDRS-R scores did not differ between treatment groups (p = 0.15), and similar remission (p = 0.58) and response (p = 0.77) rates were observed. Fish oil produced a significantly greater decrease in CGI-S (p = 0.0042) and CGI-I (p = 0.036) scores compared with placebo. Baseline to endpoint change in ACC creatine (p = 0.004) and ACC choline (Cho) (p = 0.024) differed significantly between groups. Baseline ACC Cho levels were inversely correlated with baseline and baseline to endpoint change in CDRS-R scores, and baseline to endpoint change in ACC Cho correlated with baseline-endpoint change in CDRS-R scores and n-3 PUFA. There were no group differences in safety and tolerability ratings or laboratory measures. Conclusions: Fish oil monotherapy was not superior to placebo for reducing depressive symptoms in high-risk youth as assessed by the CDRS-R, but was safe and well tolerated and superior to placebo on clinician ratings of global symptom improvement. Associations among ACC Cho levels, depression symptom severity, and n-3 PUFA warrant additional investigation.

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