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1.
Complement Ther Med ; 49: 102320, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32147031

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Craniosacral therapy (CST) is an established complementary modality for several health complaints. A clinic for psychosomatics in Norway has included CST into a multimodal treatment approach for severely traumatized patients. The aim of this study was to investigate and describe the indications for the use of craniosacral therapy within trauma therapy. Specifically, to explore treatment philosophy, criteria for improvement, treatment aims, and the evaluation of the risk profile of the multimodal treatment approach. METHODS: Semi-structured individual interviews (n = 8) and one focus group interview were conducted with the therapists at the Clinic for Psychosomatics, Hospital of Southern Norway, Kristiansand, Norway. The text data were transcribed verbatim, and the analysis of the material was conducted according to conventional and direct content analysis. RESULTS: The therapists at the clinic applied a holistic treatment approach, based on their understanding of mind and body as one entity. To access emotions and traumata, they used a mixture of different treatment techniques. The therapists experienced patients with severe bodily symptoms as being less cognitively present and attributed this to the symptoms craving most mental resources. The craniosacral therapists' specific aims and task within the multimodal trauma therapy was to ease these physical complaints, so that cognitive and emotional resources could be utilized for therapy. The psychotherapists found that emotions and traumata were more accessible after CST. The general treatment goals were to increase symptom tolerance levels and to enable better self-care. Furthermore, the ability to transform negative behaviors and develop positive alternatives were considered to be signs of improvement. CONCLUSION: The study participants considered that patients with complex traumas, including post-traumatic stress disorder, seemed to benefit from this multimodal treatment approach and appreciated its' holistic treatment philosophy, including craniosacral therapy. With regard to patient safety, the study participants recommended that craniosacral therapy for severely traumatized patients should only be provided in cooperation with psychotherapists, or other highly qualified health personnel working in specialized institutions.

2.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 20(1): 90, 2020 Mar 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32183808

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Parents often choose Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) as a supportive agent with the aim to reduce cancer treatment-related symptoms in their children. Therefore, it is necessary to understand parents´ information and communication needs regarding CAM. The aim of the present study was to review the research literature as to identify the information and communication needs of parents of children with cancer, and the children themselves, regarding the use of CAM. METHODS: An integrative systematic review design was chosen. Searches were performed in AMED, CAMbase, CINAHL (Ebsco), EMBASE, PubMed and PsycInfo, Theme eJournals and Karger. The search was limited to studies published in English, German, Dutch, and the Scandinavian languages. Using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria, two reviewers independently screened the title and abstracts of the relevant papers. A data extraction form and critical appraisal checklists were used to extract data for analysis, and a mixed methods synthesis was applied. RESULTS: Out of 24 studies included, 67% were of quantitative and 33% of qualitative study design. Five main themes emerged from the analysis of 21 studies: Information on CAM, sources of CAM information, communication about CAM, informed decision-making on CAM, and Risk/benefit of CAM. The majority of the parents did not disclose the CAM use of their children because they feared negative reactions from the attending oncologist. To make informed treatment decisions for their children, parents wanted unbiased information about CAM and would act accordingly. They demand open communication about these modalities and respect for the family's autonomy when choosing CAM for their children. CONCLUSION: There is an urgent need for parents of children with cancer for high quality information on CAM from reliable and scientific sources. Development of authoritative evidence-based decision tools is thus warranted to enable health care professionals and parents of children with cancer to make well informed, individual decisions concerning CAM.

3.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 19(1): 341, 2019 Nov 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31783842

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Traditional and complementary medicine (T&CM) is commonly used by cancer patients in Northern Norway, in particular spiritual forms like traditional healing. T&CM is mainly used complementary to conventional cancer treatment and is rarely discussed with conventional health care providers, increasing the risk of negative interaction with conventional cancer care. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of T&CM among cancer patients in Tromsø, and to investigate the differences in T&CM use between people living with cancer, people with cancer previously, and people without a history of cancer. METHOD: Data was drawn from the seventh survey of the Tromsø study conducted in 2015-2016. All inhabitants of Tromsø aged 40 and above were invited to participate (n = 32,591) of whom n = 21,083 accepted the invitation (response rate 65%). Data was collected thorough three self-administered questionnaires and a comprehensive clinical examination. Pearson chi-square tests, Fisher exact tests and one-way ANOVA tests were used to describe differences between the groups while binary logistic regressions were used for adjusted values. RESULTS: Eight percent of the participants (n = 1636) reported to have (n = 404) or have had (n = 1232) cancer. Of the participants with cancer at present 33.4% reported use of T&CM within the last year, 13.6% had consulted a T&CM provider, 17.9% had used herbal medicine/natural remedies and 6.4% had practiced self-help techniques. The participants with cancer at present were more likely to have visited a T&CM provider than participants with cancer previously (13.6% vs. 8.7%, p = 0.020). Among the participants with cancer at present, 6.4% reported to have consulted a TM provider, 5.8% had consulted an acupuncturist, while 4.7% had consulted other CM providers. Women were significantly more likely than men to have used acupuncture and self-help techniques. No significant gender differences were found regarding visits to other CM providers, TM providers nor use of herbal medicine/natural remedies. CONCLUSION: The findings are in line with previous research suggesting that both men and women use TM complementary to other CM modalities outside the official health care system. As herbal medicine might interact with conventional cancer treatment, health care providers need to discuss such use with their patients.


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Neoplasias/terapia , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
4.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 19(1): 305, 2019 Nov 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31711478

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC) has emerged as a primary approach to health care. This care focuses on the cultural diversity of the patients rather than the views of the health care professionals. PC-CSHC enables the patient to feel comfortable, respected, and trusted in the health care delivery process. As users of traditional and complementary medicine (T&CM) rarely inform their conventional health care providers of such use, the providers need to identify the users of T&CM themselves to avoid negative interaction with conventional medicine and to be able to provide them with PC-CSHC. Since the patterns of traditional medicine (TM) use are different to those of complementary medicine (CM), the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence, and the health- and sociodemographic associations for visits to TM- and CM providers in an urban population. METHOD: The data were collected through two self-administrated questionnaires from the seventh survey of the Tromsø Study, a population-based cohort study conducted in 2015-2016. All inhabitants of Tromsø aged 40 or above were invited (n = 32,591) and n = 21,083 accepted the invitation (response rate 65%). Pearson chi-square tests and one-way ANOVA tests were used to describe differences between the groups whereas binary logistic regressions were used for adjusted values. RESULTS: The results revealed that 2.5% of the participants had seen a TM provider, 8.5% had seen a CM provider whereas 1% had visited both a TM and a CM provider during a 12-month period. TM users tended to be older, claim that religion was more important to them, have poorer economy and health, and have lower education compared to CM users. We found that more than 90% of the participants visiting T&CM providers also used conventional medicine. CONCLUSION: A considerable number of the participants in this study employed parallel health care modalities including visits to conventional, traditional, and complementary medicine providers. To offer patient-centered culturally sensitive health care that is tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy and spiritual needs, conventional health care providers need knowledge about, and respect for their patients' use of parallel health care systems.


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares/psicologia , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Pacientes/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Assistência Ambulatorial/psicologia , Assistência Ambulatorial/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos de Coortes , Terapias Complementares/estatística & dados numéricos , Demografia , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega , Pacientes/estatística & dados numéricos , Prevalência , Religião , Confiança
6.
Explore (NY) ; 15(2): 115-125, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30262161

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Healing is reported to be used by 16.8% of the population, however utilization may be considerably higher in selected patient groups. The aim of this study was to map the symptoms the participants reported when visiting a healer for the first time, and to evaluate the subjectively experienced benefits and risks from the healing sessions. METHOD: Data were obtained from the Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP) questionnaire. One-hundred adults who, for the first time, referred themselves to a healer in southern Norway between January 2016 and January 2017 were included in the study. Eligible for analyses were 92 participants who fulfilled their treatment plan and returned both the baseline (pre) and post-treatment questionnaire. The occurring symptoms were grouped according to their nature into four symptom groups: pain, psychological problems, fatigue and other. With regard to the observational character of the study, all results were described and interpreted descriptively and exact p-values were given and interpreted as measures of effect. RESULTS: The participants who visited the healers in this study were mainly women (80%) with chronic disease (82%), with pain, fatigue and/or psychological problems as main complaints. They experienced an improvement of symptoms, well-being and improved activity level of approximately 50% regardless of the nature of the complaints. Women reported more improvement than men did. The pre-post changes was found after an average of 4.1 treatments. Forty percent of the participants reported adverse effects, which occurred directly after the healing session, generally lasting for less than one day. CONCLUSION: The study participants reported substantial improvement of, and major reduction of the burden of symptoms, improved well-being and activity level after healing sessions. Due to the observational nature of the study, no interpretations about specificity of the descriptive results or the mechanisms of effect can be made.


Assuntos
Fadiga/terapia , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Terapias Mente-Corpo/métodos , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Doença Crônica/terapia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Terapias Mente-Corpo/efeitos adversos , Estudos Prospectivos , Autorrelato , Inquéritos e Questionários
7.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 18(1): 854, 2018 Nov 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30428878

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Both conventional health care providers and complementary therapists treat cancer patients. To provide effective treatment, both types of providers should to be familiar with their own as well as alternative types of treatment. Our aim was to compare how conventional health care providers (oncology doctors, oncology nurses, family physicians) and complementary therapists (acupuncturists, reflexologists, massage therapists) seek information about conventional and complementary cancer treatments. METHOD: This analysis was conducted on the basis of feedback from 466 participants. We used self-administered questionnaires in a cross-sectional study. RESULTS: The majority of the medical doctors (96%) searched for evidence-based information regarding conventional cancer treatments. They gathered this information mostly from guidelines, which is considered best practice and is expected from Norwegian health personnel. Eighty-one percent of the nurses gather this information from evidence based resources such as UpToDate. Colleagues were asked for information by 58% of the medical doctors and 64% of the nurses. Moreover, 50% of the medical doctors and 57% of the nurses searched for evidence-based information about complementary cancer modalities. The acupuncturists gathered evidence-based information for both conventional (79%) and complementary (77%) modalities, followed by the reflexologists (54 and 54%, respectively) and massage therapists (54 and 52%, respectively). Nearly half of the acupuncturist (49%) asked a colleague for information. CONCLUSION: To provide safe cancer care, it is important that advice about complementary modalities is based on current and evidence-based evaluations. The majority of the medical doctors and nurses in this study sought information according to evidence-based medicine regarding conventional cancer treatments, and about half of them gathered evidence-based information about complementary cancer modalities. This was also true for the complementary therapists as they gathered information about complementary and conventional treatments from evidence-based evaluations. This demonstrates that since the term evidence-based medicine was first introduced in 1991, the approach has grown extensively and both conventional and complementary providers use this approach to seek information.


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoal de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Comportamento de Busca de Informação , Informática Médica/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias/terapia , Terapias Complementares/psicologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Oncologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega , Médicos de Família/psicologia , Médicos de Família/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários
8.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 18(1): 260, 2018 09 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30257693

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Due to limitations of conventional medicine for atopic eczema (AE), complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widely used as an alternative, maintaining, or simultaneous treatment for AE. We aimed to evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of CAM for children with AE under 14 years old. METHODS: We searched for randomized trials on CAM in 12 Chinese and English databases from their inception to May 2018. We included children (< 14 years) diagnosed with AE, who received CAM therapy alone or combined with conventional medicine. We extracted data, and used the Cochrane "Risk of bias" tool to assess methodological quality. Effect was presented as relative risk (RR) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using RevMan 5.3. RESULTS: Twenty-four randomized controlled trials involving 2233 children with AE were included. Methodological quality was of unclear or high risk of bias in general. The trials tested 5 different types of CAM therapies, including probiotics, diet, biofilm, borage oil, and swimming. Compared to placebo, probiotics showed improved effect for the SCORAD index (MD 9.01, 95% CI 7.12-10.90; n = 5). For symptoms and signs such as itching, skin lesions, CAM combined with usual care was more effective for symptom relief ≥95% (RR 1.47, 95% CI 1.30-1.68; n = 8), and for ≥50% symptoms improvement (RR 1.34, 1.25-1.45; n = 9) compared to usual care. There was no statistic significant difference between CAM and usual care on ≥95% improvement or ≥ 50% improvement of symptoms. However, swimming, diet and biofilm showed improvement of clinical symptoms compared with usual care. At follow-up of 8 weeks to 3 years, CAM alone or combined with usual care showed lower relapse rate (RR 0.38, 0.28-0.51, n = 2; RR 0.31, 0.24-0.40, n = 7; respectively) compared to usual care. Twelve out of 24 trials reported no occurrence of severe adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Low evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities may improve symptoms of childhood AE and reduce relapse rate. Safety remains unclear due to insufficient reporting. Further well-designed randomized trials are needed to confirm the potential beneficial effect and to establish safety use.


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares , Dermatite Atópica/terapia , Adolescente , Viés , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Dermatite Atópica/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Risco , Resultado do Tratamento
9.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 77(1): 1476638, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29848221

RESUMO

In Northern Norway, traditional healing has been preserved by passing down the knowledge through generations. Religious prayers of healing (reading) and Sami rituals (curing) are examples of methods that are used. We have examined traditional healers' understanding of traditional healing, the healing process and their own practice, as well as what characteristics healers should have. Semi-structured individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted among 15 traditional healers in two coastal Sami municipalities in Norway. The traditional healers understood traditional healing as the initiation of the patient's self-healing power. This power was initiated through healing rituals and explained as the power of God and placebo effect. During the healing ritual, the doctor's medical diagnoses, the patient's personal data and a prayer in the name of The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit were used in combination with steel and elements from the nature. The traditional healers stated that they had to be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Healers who claimed that they had supernatural abilities (clairvoyant or warm hands) were regarded as extra powerful. According to the participants in this study, the healers must be trustworthy, calm and mentally strong. Moreover, these traditional healers drew on information from conventional medicine when performing their rituals.


Assuntos
Medicina Tradicional , Adulto , Regiões Árticas , Grupos Étnicos , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Xamanismo
10.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 18(1): 109, 2018 Mar 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29580283

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Intentional use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has previously only been researched in small, possibly biased, samples. There seems to be a lack of scientific information regarding healthy individual's attitudes and presumed use of CAM. The aim of this study is to describe prevalence and characteristics of participants who intend to see a CAM provider compared to participants who intend to see a medical doctor (MD) only when suffering from a chronic, non- life-threatening disease and in the need of treatment. Further to describe differences between the groups regarding expected reasons for CAM use and expected skills of CAM providers. METHOD: The survey was conducted in January 2016 as part of the "TNS Gallup Health policy Barometer". In total, 1728 individuals aged 16-92 years participated in the study, constituting an overall response rate of 47%. The survey included questions regarding opinions and attitudes towards health, health services and health politics in Norway. RESULTS: The majority of the participants (90.2%) would see a MD only if they were suffering from a chronic, non- life-threatening disease and were in the need of treatment. Men over the age of 60 with a university education tended to see a MD only. Only 9.8% of all respondents would in addition visit a CAM provider. Being an intentional user of a MD + CAM provider was associated with being a woman under the age of 60. The respondents believed that CAM providers have professional competence based on formal training in CAM. They also believed that individuals seeing a CAM provider have poor health and are driven by the hope of being cured. Further, that they have heard that others have good experience with such treatment. CONCLUSION: Intentional use of CAM is associated with positive attitudes, trustworthiness, and presumed positive experiences in the CAM-patient-setting. Intentional CAM users also have the impression that CAM providers have professional competence based on formal training in alternative therapies.


Assuntos
Doença Crônica/psicologia , Doença Crônica/terapia , Terapias Complementares , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Assistência Ambulatorial/psicologia , Atitude Frente a Saúde , Terapias Complementares/psicologia , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega , Prevalência , Adulto Jovem
11.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 77(1): 1438572, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29466927

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: When people in Northern Norway get ill, they often use traditional medicine. The global aim of this study was to examine the extended family networks' function and responsibility in cases of illness in the family, in two Northern Norwegian communities with a population of mixed ethnicity. METHODS: Semi-structured individual interviews with 13 participants and 4 focus group interviews with total 11 participants were conducted. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. RESULTS: The participants grew up in areas where it was common to seek help from traditional healers. They were organized in networks and shared responsibility for the patient and they provided practical help and support for the family. According to the networks, health-care personnel should make room for the entire network to visit the patient in severe and life-threatening situations. CONCLUSION: Traditional networks are an extra resource for people in these communities. The networks seem to be essential in handling and disseminating hope and manageability on an individual as well as a collective level. Health personnel working in communities with mixed ethnicity should have thorough knowledge of the mixed culture, including the importance of traditional network to the patients.


Assuntos
Grupos Étnicos , Medicina Tradicional , População Rural , Rede Social , Regiões Árticas , Cultura , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega , Pesquisa Qualitativa
12.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 18(1): 44, 2018 Jan 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29386005

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Many complementary therapies offer benefits for patients with cancer. Others may be risky for patients due to negative interactions with conventional treatment and adverse effects. Therefore, cancer patients need guidance from health care providers to assess complementary modalities appropriately to receive benefits and avoid harm. METHOD: In a self-administered questionnaire-based cross-sectional study, we compared knowledge and attitudes of health care providers with no training in complementary modalities to that of health care providers with training in complementary modalities about the risks for patients who combine complementary modalities with conventional treatment in cancer care. The analysis was based on responses from 466 participants. RESULTS: The attitudes and knowledge about direct risk followed provider specialty. Ninety-four percent of the medical doctors, 93% of the nurses, and 87% of the providers with dual training, but 70% of the complementary therapists, believed that complementary modalities can cause adverse effects (p < 0.001). The majority of the medical doctors and nurses believed that it is risky to combine complementary and conventional cancer treatments (78% and 93%, respectively), compared to 58% of the providers with dual training and 43% of the complementary therapists (p < 0.001). Eighty-nine percent of the medical doctors and nurses believed that complementary modalities should be subjected to more scientific testing before being accepted by conventional health care providers, in contrast to 56% of the dually trained and 57% of the complementary therapists (p < 0.001). The majority of the medical doctors (61%) and nurses (55%) would have neither discouraged nor encouraged the use of complementary modalities if patients asked them for advice. Moreover, less than 1% of the complementary therapists would have discouraged the use of conventional cancer treatments. The study participants believed that the most important factor to recommend a complementary cancer modality to patients is evidence for safety. CONCLUSION: The health care providers in this study believed that complementary modalities are associated with direct risk and can cause adverse effects, and that it is risky to combine conventional and complementary treatments due to potential harmful interactions.


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Pessoal de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Padrões de Prática Médica/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Segurança do Paciente , Medição de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários
13.
J Immigr Minor Health ; 20(5): 1197-1205, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28994002

RESUMO

Mexican immigrants have a rich history of traditional healers. This analysis describes the conditions for which Mexican immigrants seek treatment from sobadores, and delineates factors that influence seeking treatment from a sobador or a biomedical doctor. This systematic qualitative analysis uses interview data collected with 24 adult Mexican immigrants to North Carolina who had been treated by a sobador in the previous 2 years. Immigrants are engaged in medical pluralism, seeking care from sobadores and biomedical doctors based on the complaint and patient's age. Using a hierarchy of resort, adults seek treatment from sobadores for musculoskeletal pain not involving a fracture. Doctors are first consulted when treating children; sobadores are consulted if doctors do not provide culturally appropriate treatment. Mexican immigrants seek care that addresses their culturally determined health concerns. The need to improve access to culturally competent biomedical health care for vulnerable immigrant populations continues.


Assuntos
Emigrantes e Imigrantes/psicologia , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Americanos Mexicanos/psicologia , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/etnologia , Adulto , Competência Cultural , Diversidade Cultural , Feminino , Gastroenteropatias/terapia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Infertilidade/terapia , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Massagem/psicologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Dor Musculoesquelética/terapia , North Carolina , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Fatores Socioeconômicos
14.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 17(1): 530, 2017 Dec 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29233186

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In Northern Norway, traditional medicine (TM) is shaped by both Christianity and traditional Sami nature worship. The healing rituals may include prayer and the use of tools such as moss, water, stones, wool and soil. Examples of TM modalities offered is cupping, blood-stemming, laying on of hands, healing prayers, and rituals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the use of TM in areas with predominantly Sami and Norwegian populations, and the influence of ethnicity, geography, gender, age, education, household income, religiosity and self-reported health on such use. METHODS: The study is based on data collected in the first SAMINOR Survey (SAMINOR 1) conducted in 2003/2004, including three self-administered questionnaires, clinical measures, and blood analyses. Data was collected in 24 municipalities in Norway known to have a substantial population of Sami. All residents aged 30 and 36-78/79 years in the predefined regions were invited regardless of ethnic background (N = 27,987). Of these, 16,865 (60.3%) accepted to participate and gave their consent to medical research. RESULTS: Of the 16,544 people responding to the question about TM use, 2276 (13.8%) reported to have used TM once or more during their lifetime. The most outstanding characteristic of the TM users was the affiliation to the Laestadian church, where 34.3% (n = 273) reported such use, followed by an inner Finnmark residence (31.1%, n = 481) and a Sami ethnicity (25.7%, n = 1014). Women were slightly more likely to use TM compared to men (15.9% and 11.5% accordingly, p < 0.001), and the TM users were slightly younger than the non-TM users (mean age 52.3 versus 54.3 years, p < 0.001). The TM users also had lower income (p < 0.001) than the non-TM users. We found no significant differences between the TM users and the non-TM users concerning years of education, and whether the participants were living with a spouse/partner or not. CONCLUSION: Further studies are necessary to examine the development of TM use in Norway over time, and use in areas with mainly Norwegian inhabitants. There is also a lack of studies quantifying TM use among Sami people in Sweden, Finland and Russia.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicina Tradicional/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Autoavaliação
15.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 76(1): 1398010, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29130420

RESUMO

People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Adulto , Regiões Árticas , Cristianismo , Competência Cultural , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega , Pesquisa Qualitativa
16.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 17(1): 301, 2017 Jun 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28595577

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Effective interdisciplinary communication is important to achieve better quality in health care. The aims of this study were to compare conventional and complementary providers' experience of communication about complementary therapies and conventional medicine with their cancer patients, and to investigate how they experience interdisciplinary communication and cooperation. METHOD: This study analyzed data from a self-administrated questionnaire. A total of 606 different health care providers, from four counties in Norway, completed the questionnaire. The survey was developed to describe aspects of the communication pattern among oncology doctors, nurses, family physicians and complementary therapists (acupuncturists, massage therapists and reflexologists/zone-therapists). Between-group differences were analyzed using chi-square, ANOVA and Fisher's exact tests. Significance level was defined as p < 0.05 without adjustment for multiple comparisons. RESULT: Conventional providers and complementary therapists had different patterns of communication with their cancer patients regarding complementary therapies. While complementary therapists advised their patients to apply both complementary and conventional modalities, medical doctors were less supportive of their patients' use of complementary therapies. Of conventional providers, nurses expressed more positive attitudes toward complementary therapies. Opportunities to improve communication between conventional and complementary providers were most strongly supported by complementary providers and nurses; medical doctors were less supportive of such attempts. A number of doctors showed lack of respect for complementary therapists, but asked for more research, guidelines for complementary modalities and training in conventional medicine for complementary therapists. CONCLUSION: For better quality of care, greater communication about complementary therapy use is needed between cancer patients and their conventional and complementary providers. In addition, more communication between conventional and complementary providers is needed. Nurses may have a crucial role in facilitating communication, as they are positive toward complementary therapies and they have more direct communication with patients about their treatment preferences.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Neoplasias/psicologia , Pacientes/psicologia , Terapia por Acupuntura/psicologia , Adulto , Comunicação , Terapias Complementares , Feminino , Humanos , Relações Interprofissionais , Massagem/psicologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias/terapia , Noruega , Recursos Humanos
17.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 17(1): 324, 2017 Jun 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28629411

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Engagement in healthy lifestyle behaviors, such as healthy diet and regular physical activity, are known to reduce the risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD). Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is known to be associated with having a healthy lifestyle. The primary aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and predictors of CAM use in CHD patients, and in those without CHD but at risk for developing CHD, using Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) as a guiding conceptual framework. METHOD: Questionnaire data were collected from 12,981 adult participants in the cross-sectional sixth Tromsø Study (2007-8). Eligible for analyses were 11,103 participants who reported whether they had used CAM or not. Of those, 830 participants reported to have or have had CHD (CHD group), 4830 reported to have parents, children or siblings with CHD (no CHD but family risk), while 5443 reported no CHD nor family risk of CHD. We first compared the patterns of CAM use in each group, and then examined the PMT predictors of CAM use. Health vulnerability from the threat appraisal process of PMT was assessed by self-rated health and expectations for future health. Response efficacy from the coping appraisal process of PMT was assessed as preventive health beliefs and health behavior frequency. RESULTS: Use of CAM was most commonly seen in people with no CHD themselves, but family risk of developing CHD (35.8%), compared to people already diagnosed with CHD (30.2%) and people with no CHD nor family risk (32.1%). All four of the PMT factors; self-rated health, expectations for future health, preventive health beliefs, and the health behavior index - were predictors for CAM use in the no CHD but family risk group. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that people use CAM in response to a perceived risk of developing CHD, and to prevent disease and to maintain health.


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares/estatística & dados numéricos , Doença das Coronárias/terapia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Doença das Coronárias/psicologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Motivação , Noruega , Inquéritos e Questionários
18.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 17(1): 262, 2017 May 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28499371

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Complementary therapists spend considerable time with their patients, especially in the first consultation. The communication between patients and their therapists is important for raising consciousness and activation of the patient's self-healing power. Thus, the aims in this study were to delineate what complementary therapists regard as essential in patient consultations, their view of the healing process, and how the therapists understand the placebo effect and its position in the healing process. METHODS: Semi-structured individual interviews (n = 4), focus group interview (n = 1) and participant observation were conducted among four different complementary therapists in a Norwegian community. The text data was transcribed verbatim and the analysis of the material was conducted according to conventional and direct content analysis. Some codes were predefined and others were defined during the analysis. RESULTS: The pilot study showed that the implemented methods seems feasible and fit well with the aims of this study. Complementary therapists (chiropractor, naprapath (musculoskeletal therapist), acupuncturist and acupuncturist/homeopath) representing four different complementary modalities participated. A combination of the conversation and examination during the first consultation formed the basis for the therapist's choice of treatment. A successful consultation was characterized by a fruitful relationship between the therapist and the patient. Moreover, the therapist needs to be humble and show the patient respect. Patients' positive beliefs and expectations about the treatment play a significant role in the healing process. The more hope the therapist can bring about, the more easily the patient can start believing that it is possible to get well. CONCLUSION: This was a pilot study. Therefore the findings should be appreciated as limited and preliminary. Therapists' and patients' mutual understanding and treatment goals were essential for a successful consultation. The therapists emphasized their professional skills and therapeutic competence as important when building fruitful relationships with their patients. Exerting authority and making the patient feel confident were essential factors for a successful healing process. The complementary therapists understood the placebo effect as the patient's self-healing power, resulting from establishing trust and belief in the treatment process.


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares/psicologia , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Pacientes/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Emoções , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega , Projetos Piloto , Efeito Placebo , Relações Profissional-Paciente , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Recursos Humanos
19.
J Immigr Minor Health ; 19(5): 1186-1195, 2017 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27449216

RESUMO

Latino immigrants to the New Settlement area of the southeastern United States face structural and cultural obstacles to accessing the conventional health care system, and come from areas with long traditions of medical treatments from healers without professional training or licensure. Little is known about the use of such healers in New Settlement areas. This study focuses on sobadores, healers who use manipulative therapy. Goals were to describe sobadores practicing in North Carolina, including their background, conditions treated, and their understanding of the pathophysiology of their patients' conditions and how their treatments work. The paper also describes who sobadores treat and sobadores' understanding of where their treatment fits into patients' pursuit of relief from symptoms. This focused ethnography draws from in-depth, semi-structured interviews conducted with six sobadores from Mexico practicing in North Carolina. These sobadores appear to meet both structural and cultural needs for healthcare in the immigrant Latino population.


Assuntos
Emigrantes e Imigrantes , Hispano-Americanos , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Manipulações Musculoesqueléticas/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , North Carolina/epidemiologia
20.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 160(2): 223-236, 2016 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27709351

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To access frequency and severity of adverse effects (AE) of non-hormonal drugs (NHD) for hot flashes in breast cancer survivors compared to controls and analyze adverse-effect risk by reviewing published randomized trials. METHODS: Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO and PubMed databases were searched. Trials were included where participants were survivors of breast cancer suffering from hot flashes, treatment included self-administered venlafaxine, gabapentin or clonidine, and AE were reported. AE frequency and severity were graded. A meta-analysis of ten trials with sub-group analyses was conducted. RESULTS: Forty-nine studies were identified, and 12 were included. A total of 1467 participants experienced 772 adverse effects, 81 % (n = 627) in the treatment group and 19 % (n = 145) in the control group. Sixty-seven percent of AE was graded as mild and 33 % as moderate. The frequency of AE for NHD was overall significant compared to placebo. Sub-group analysis indicated that AE frequency and severity increased at higher doses of venlafaxine and gabapentin compared to placebo. CONCLUSION: The odds for experiencing AE was significantly higher in patients randomized to high-dose NHD than those randomized to controls, including placebo, low-dose medication and acupuncture. These therapies should be considered as a potential treatment alternative.


Assuntos
Antineoplásicos/efeitos adversos , Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/efeitos adversos , Neoplasias da Mama/complicações , Neoplasias da Mama/tratamento farmacológico , Sobreviventes de Câncer , Fogachos/epidemiologia , Fogachos/etiologia , Antineoplásicos/administração & dosagem , Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/uso terapêutico , Terapia Combinada , Feminino , Humanos , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Resultado do Tratamento
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