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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32004421

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Prospective long-term observational studies (LOS) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) lack a core set of universally collected outcome measures, particularly, patient-centered outcomes (PCO), precluding accurate comparisons across studies. Our aim was to identify long-term outcome measures collected and reported in these studies. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of registries and LOS of patients with RA searching in ClinicalTrials.gov, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Registry of Patient Registries, and Google Scholar. The names and acronyms of registries and LOS were further searched in the Medline and EMBASE databases to retrieve published articles. Two independent reviewers undertook data collection, quality appraisal, and data extraction. RESULTS: We identified 88 registries/LOS that met our eligibility criteria. These were divided into two groups: disease-based (52 [59%]) and therapy-based (36 [41%]). Methodological and reporting standards varied across the eligible studies. For clinical outcomes, disease activity was recorded in 88 (100%) of all LOS/registries. The most commonly reported measure (86 [98%]) was the composite outcome, Disease Activity Score of 28 joints (DAS28). Of the PCOs collected, physical functioning was most frequently reported 75 [85%] with the Health Assessment Questionnaire (75 [85%]) as the most commonly used instrument within this domain. Other domains of PCOs were comparatively infrequently recorded: mental (29 [33%]), social (20 [23%]), and health-related quality of life (37 [42%]). CONCLUSION: Most registries/LOS collect measures of disease activity and physical function. However, there is substantial heterogeneity in the collection of relevant PCOs that measure symptom burden, mental and social ramifications of RA.

2.
Clin Rheumatol ; 2020 Jan 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32006180

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Peer support is important for psychosocial well-being in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our objective was to assess the interactions, engagement, and perceptions of participants in an online support group for patients with RA. METHODS: Participants were 18 years or older, diagnosed with RA within 10 years, and residing in the USA or Canada. All participated in a closed Facebook online support group. Membership was by invitation only, and discussions were visible only to members, moderators, and two research staff. Each week, participants discussed a topic posted by a moderator. They also shared other disease-relevant information beside the topics posted. We assessed participants' engagement and qualitatively analyzed the content of their postings in the first 5 weeks of participation. RESULTS: The group had 90 participants: 94% were female and 83% white. Median age was 54 (24-84) years. Mean number of contributors per week was 50 (range, 42-62); 10% of participants never contributed to the discussions. Participation in discussions declined over time. Over three-quarters of participant posting were about information sharing. Participants shared information on disease experiences, medications, social lives (including pictures of themselves, families, and pets), online resources on RA, frustrations, messages of encouragement, and satirical depictions of their disease experience. Many expressed gratitude for the social support provided. CONCLUSION: Participants were generally enthusiastic and shared disease-related information and personal experiences. Social media groups may provide alternative means of providing education and peer support often lacking in traditional models of care.Key Points• The study examines how patients with rheumatoid arthritis engage in an online support group and the nature of their interactions.• This study reveals that social media platforms could provide viable options or complements to the traditional face-to-face small group patient support system.• It may be necessary to pay special attention to how to ensure a sustained participant interest in online social support group among patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

3.
PLoS One ; 15(1): e0227765, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31940409

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients with low bone density or osteoporosis need information for effective prevention or disease management, respectively. However, patients may not be getting enough information from their primary care providers or other sources. Inadequate disease information leaves patients ill-informed and creates misconceptions and unnecessary concerns about the disease. OBJECTIVE: We systematically reviewed and synthesized the available literature to determine patient knowledge, beliefs, and concerns about osteoporosis and identify potential gaps in knowledge. METHODS: A systematic search was conducted for full-text qualitative studies addressing understanding, literacy, and/or perceptions about osteoporosis and its management, using Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, ERIC, PsychINFO, Psyc Behav Sci Collec, and PubMed, from inception through September 2016. Studies were selected by two reviewers, assessed for quality, and themes extracted using the Joanna Briggs Institute data extraction tool. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes and subthemes. RESULTS: Twenty-five studies with a total of 757 participants (including 105 men) were selected for analysis out of 1031 unique citations. Selected studies were from Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Four main themes emerged: inadequate knowledge, beliefs and misconceptions, concerns about osteoporosis, and lack of information from health care providers. Participants had inadequate knowledge about osteoporosis and were particularly uninformed about risk factors, causes, treatment, and prevention. Areas of concern for participants included diagnosis, medication side effects, and inadequate information from primary care providers. CONCLUSION: Although there was general awareness of osteoporosis, many misconceptions and concerns were evident. Education on bone health needs to reinforce areas of knowledge and address deficits, misconceptions, and concerns.

4.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 58(Supplement_7): vii40-vii48, 2019 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31816084

RESUMO

Immune checkpoint inhibitors have advanced the treatment paradigm of various cancers, achieving remarkable survival benefits. However, a myriad of immune-related adverse events (irAE) has been recognized in almost every organ system, presumably because of persistent immune system activation. Rheumatic symptoms such as arthralgia or myalgia are very common. More specific irAE are increasingly being reported. The most frequent ones are inflammatory arthritis, polymyalgia-like syndromes, myositis and sicca manifestations. These rheumatic irAE can develop in ∼5-10% of patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors, although true incidence rates cannot be estimated given the lack of prospective cohort studies, and likely underreporting of rheumatic irAE in oncology trials. In this review, we will provide a summary of the epidemiologic data reported for these rheumatic irAE, until more robust prospective longitudinal studies become available to further define the true incidence rate of rheumatic irAE in patients receiving these novel cancer therapies.

5.
Clin Rheumatol ; 2019 Dec 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31853733

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) interfere with the immune system and could theoretically increase risk of malignancies. However, recent evidence has not substantiated such concerns and physicians are less reluctant in treating patients with underlying cancer with such bDMARDs. We aimed to understand the current utilization patterns of bDMARDs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in cancer patients. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients with prevalent RA and cancer initially seen at MD Anderson Cancer Center between 2002 and 2014. A cohort of cancer patients was identified from the tumor registry, and patients with RA were identified through ICD-9 codes, followed by review of electronic medical records. We included patients 18 years and older, with a cancer diagnosis, and a diagnosis of RA by a rheumatologist. Patients were followed until 2016. RESULTS: We identified 431 patients with RA and cancer that met our inclusion criteria. Overall, 111 (26%) received bDMARDs after their cancer diagnosis; of these, 60 (54%) had received bDMARDs prior to their cancer diagnosis and continued to receive this therapy following their diagnosis. Thirteen (22%) switched to a different bDMARD, and the rest continued to receive the same agent after their cancer diagnosis. Of all patients on a bDMARD, 91 (82%) received tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi). CONCLUSIONS: The treatment landscape of patients with a history of cancer and RA is changing. Future studies evaluating the safety of bDMARDs in patients with a recent history of cancer or with active cancer are needed. Part of the data of this project was presented as a poster at the 2016 American College of Rheumatology annual meeting. Zamora NV, Siddhanamatha H, Barbo A, Tayar J, Lin H, Suarez-Almazor M. Utilization of Biologic Therapy in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Cancer [abstract].Arthritis Rheumatol. 2016; 68 (suppl 10). https://acrabstracts.org/abstract/utilization-of-biologic-therapy-in-patients-with-rheumatoid-arthritis-and-cancer/. Accessed September 30, 2019. Key Points • One in four patients with RA and concomitant cancer received bDMARDs, including TNFi, after their cancer diagnosis, at our institution. • Half of the patients with RA and cancer who received bDMARDs had initiated therapy prior to the cancer diagnosis, continuing thereafter.

6.
J Immunother Cancer ; 7(1): 319, 2019 Nov 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31753014

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare but life-threatening adverse event of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI). Given the limited evidence, data from a large cohort of patients is needed to aid in recognition and management of this fatal complication. METHODS: We reviewed our institutional databases to identify patients who had cancer and MG in the setting of ICI. We systematically reviewed the literature through August 2018 to identify all similar reported patients. We collected data on clinical and diagnostic features, management, and outcomes of these cases. RESULTS: Sixty-five patients were identified. Median age was 73 years; 42 (65%) were males, 31 (48%) had metastatic melanoma, and 13 (20%) had a preexisting MG before ICI initiation. Most patients received anti-PD-1 (82%). Sixty-three patients (97%) developed ICI-related MG (new onset or disease flare) after a median of 4 weeks (1 to 16 weeks) of ICI initiation. Twenty-four patients (37%) experienced concurrent myositis, and respiratory failure occurred in 29 (45%). ICI was discontinued in 61 patients (97%). Death was reported in 24 patients (38%); 15 (23%) due to MG complication. A better outcome was observed in patients who received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) or plasmapheresis (PLEX) as first-line therapy than in those who received steroids alone (95% vs 63% improvement of MG symptoms, p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: MG is a life-threatening adverse event of acute onset and rapid progression after ICI initiation. Early use of IVIG or PLEX, regardless of initial symptoms severity, may lead to better outcomes than steroids alone. Our data suggest the need to reassess the current recommendations for management of ICI-related MG until prospective longitudinal studies are conducted to establish the ideal management approach for these patients.

7.
ACR Open Rheumatol ; 1(9): 560-570, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31777840

RESUMO

Objective: To assess methotrexate (MTX) adherence using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) and characterize associations with adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Eligible patients participated in Forward, the National Databank for Rheumatic Diseases, and recently (12 months or sooner) initiated oral MTX. MEMS was used to compile MTX weekly dosing over 24 weeks. The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ) was completed, and baseline demographics and disease characteristics obtained. MTX adherence (percentage of weeks dose taken correctly), implementation (percentage of weeks dose taken correctly from initiation until last dose), and persistence (duration from initiation to last dose) were calculated. Analyses measured associations between patient characteristics and adherence, modeled using logistic generalized estimating equations and censored Poisson regression, and persistence modeled using Cox regression. Results: Overall, 60 of 119 eligible patients were included in the analysis. MTX adherence, implementation, and persistence were 75%, 80%, and 83%, respectively, at 24 weeks. Demographics and disease characteristics were generally similar between patients with 1 week or less and 2 weeks or more of missed MTX. Unemployment, less disability, higher Patient Global scores, and no prior disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) use were associated with correct dosing. No significant differences in adherence were observed between patients receiving concomitant MTX versus MTX monotherapy, and biologic DMARD-experienced versus biologic DMARD-naïve patients. Higher scores in BMQ Specific Necessity (indicating a greater belief in the necessity of the medication) was associated with a decreased likelihood of dosing at an interval shorter than prescribed (odds ratio 0.89). Conclusion: Even in a participatory group over a short period, MTX adherence was suboptimal and associated with certain demographics, medication experience, and beliefs about medicines. This suggests a need for screening and alternative treatment opportunities in nonadherent MTX patients with RA.

8.
PM R ; 2019 Oct 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31628825

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To date, there have not been any epidemiologic studies that have evaluated the association between swimming over a lifetime and knee health. OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to evaluate the relationship of a history of swimming with knee pain, radiographic knee OA (ROA), and symptomatic knee OA (SOA). DESIGN: Cross-sectional retrospective study. SETTING: Four academic centers in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Respondents to the historical physical activity survey within the Osteoarthritis Initiative with knee radiographs and symptom assessments. METHODS: In this retrospective study nested within the Osteoarthritis Initiative, researchers performed logistic regression with the predictor being swimming over a lifetime and over particular age ranges. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Person-based definitions of frequent knee pain, ROA, and SOA. RESULTS: A total of 2637 participants were included, with a mean age of 64.3 years (SD 8.9), body mass index of 28.4 kg/m2 (SD 4.9), and 44.2% male. Over a lifetime, the adjusted prevalence measures for frequent knee pain, ROA, and SOA for any versus no history of swimming were 36.4% (33.4% - 39.5%) v. 39.9% (37.4% - 42.5%), 54.3% (51.0% - 57.6%) v. 61.1% (58.4% - 63.7%), and 21.9% (19.4% - 24.7%) v. 27.0% (24.7% - 29.4%) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first epidemiologic study to indicate that swimming is potentially beneficial toward knee health, particularly when performed earlier in life (before age 35). Future prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and to better scrutinize the associations in older age groups.

10.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 37 Suppl 118(3): 114-122, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31464670

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To analyse the worldwide occurrence of sicca/Sjögren's (SS) syndrome associated with the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) in patients with cancer. METHODS: The ImmunoCancer International Registry (ICIR) is a Big Data-Sharing multidisciplinary network composed by 40 specialists in Rheumatology, Internal Medicine, Immunology and Oncology from 18 countries focused on the clinical and basic research of the immune-related adverse events (irAEs) related to cancer immunotherapies. For this study, patients who were investigated for a clinical suspicion of SS after being exposed to ICI were included. RESULTS: We identified 26 patients (11 women and 15 men, with a mean age at diagnosis of 63.57 years). Underlying cancer included lung (n=12), renal (n=7), melanoma (n=4), and other (n=3) neoplasia. Cancer immunotherapies consisted of monotherapy (77%) and combined regimens (23%). In those patients receiving monotherapy, all patients were treated with PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors (nivolumab in 9, pembrolizumab in 7 and durvalumab in 4); no cases associated with CTLA-4 inhibitors were identified. The main SS-related features consisted of dry mouth in 25 (96%) patients, dry eye in 17 (65%), abnormal ocular tests in 10/16 (62%) and abnormal oral diagnostic tests in 12/14 (86%) patients. Minor salivary gland biopsy was carried out in 15 patients: histopathological findings consisted of mild chronic sialadenitis in 8 (53%) patients and focal lymphocytic sialadenitis in the remaining 7 (47%); a focus score was measured in 5 of the 6 patients (mean of 1.8, range 1-4). Immunological markers included positive ANA in 13/25 (52%), anti-Ro/ SS-A in 5/25 (20%), RF in 2/22 (9%), anti-La/SS-B in 2/25 (8%), low C3/C4 levels in 1/17 (6%) and positive cryoglobulins in 1/10 (10%). Classification criteria for SS were fulfilled by 10 (62%) out of 16 patients in whom the two key classificatory features were carried out. Among the 26 patients, there were only 3 (11%) who presented exclusively with sicca syndrome without organ-specific autoimmune manifestations. Therapeutic management included measures directed to treat sicca symptoms and therapies against autoimmune-mediated manifestations (glucocorticoids in 42%, second/third-line therapies in 31%); therapeutic response for systemic features was observed in 8/11 (73%). No patient died due to autoimmune involvement. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with Sjögren's syndrome triggered by ICI display a very specific profile different from that reported in idiopathic primary SS, including more frequent occurrence in men, a higher mean age, a predominant immunonegative serological profile, and a notable development of organ-specific autoimmune involvement in spite of the poor immunological profile. The close association found between sicca/Sjögren's syndrome and primarily PD-1 blockade requires further specific investigation.


Assuntos
Antígeno B7-H1 , Receptor de Morte Celular Programada 1/antagonistas & inibidores , Síndrome de Sjogren , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Sistema de Registros , Glândulas Salivares Menores , Síndrome de Sjogren/imunologia
11.
BMJ Open ; 9(7): e028517, 2019 07 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31292181

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The The BIOlogical Dose OPTimisation (BIODOPT) trial is a pragmatic, multicentre, randomised controlled, open-label, parallel-group, equivalence study designed to evaluate tapering of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) in sustained clinical remission or low disease activity (LDA). Traditionally, these patients maintain standard dosage of bDMARD lifelong; however, recent studies indicate that a significant proportion of patients in sustained remission or LDA can taper their bDMARD and maintain stable disease activity. Thus, this trial aims to evaluate whether a disease activity-guided tapering strategy for bDMARDs will enable a significant dosage reduction while maintaining disease activity compared with usual care. From the individual patient's standpoint as well as from a societal perspective, it would be advantageous if bDMARDs could be reduced or even discontinued while maintaining disease activity. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A total of 180 patients with RA, PsA or axSpA treated with bDMARDs and in clinical remission/LDA during the past 12 months will be enrolled from four centres in Denmark. Patients will be randomised in a ratio of 2:1 to either disease activity-guided tapering of bDMARDs (intervention group) or continuation of bDMARDs as usual care (control group).The primary objective is the difference between the two groups in the proportion of patients who have reduced their inclusion dosage of bDMARDs to 50% or less while maintaining stable disease activity at 18 months follow-up. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study is approved by the ethics committee of Northern Jutland, Denmark (N-20170073) and by the Danish Medicine Agency. Patient research partner KHH contributed to refinement of the protocol and approved the final manuscript. Results will be disseminated through publication in international peer-reviewed journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: 2017-001970-41; Pre-results.

12.
J Immunother Cancer ; 7(1): 158, 2019 Jun 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31234936

RESUMO

Following publication of the original article [1], the authors reported an error in the Acknowledgments section. It should be read: 'We are grateful to Mohsin Shah from the Department of Emergency Medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for assisting in study selection, and to Gregory F. Pratt from the Research Medical Library and Erica Goodoff, from the Department of Scientific Publications at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for their valuable contributions.

13.
PLoS One ; 14(6): e0218342, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31220126

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Online health information, if evidence-based and unbiased, can improve patients' and caregivers' health knowledge and assist them in disease management and health care decision-making. OBJECTIVE: To identify standards for the development of health information resources on the internet for patients. METHODS: We searched in MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar for publications describing evaluation instruments for websites providing health information. Eligible instruments were identified by three independent reviewers and disagreements resolved by consensus. Items reported were extracted and categorized into seven domains (accuracy, completeness and comprehensiveness, technical elements, design and aesthetics, usability, accessibility, and readability) that were previously thought to be a minimum requirement for websites. RESULTS: One hundred eleven articles met inclusion criteria, reporting 92 evaluation instruments (1609 items). We found 74 unique items that we grouped into the seven domains. For the accuracy domain, one item evaluated information provided in concordance with current guidelines. For completeness and comprehensiveness, 18 items described the disease with respect to various topics such as etiology or therapy, among others. For technical elements, 27 items evaluated disclosure of authorship, sponsorship, affiliation, editorial process, feedback process, privacy, and data protection. For design and aesthetics, 10 items evaluated consistent layout and relevant graphics and images. For usability, 10 items evaluated ease of navigation and functionality of internal search engines. For accessibility, five items evaluated the availability of websites to people with audiovisual disabilities. For readability, three items evaluated conversational writing style and use of a readability tool to determine the reading level of the text. CONCLUSION: We identified standards for the development of online patient health information. This proposed instrument can serve as a guideline to develop and improve how health information is presented on the internet.

14.
J Rheumatol ; 46(9): 1173-1178, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31043547

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Safety Working Group objective was to identify harm domains from existing outcome measurements in rheumatology. METHODS: Systematically searching the MEDLINE database on January 24, 2017, we identified full-text articles that could be used for harm outcomes in rheumatology. Domains/items from the identified instruments were described and the content synthesized to provide a preliminary framework for harm outcomes. RESULTS: From 435 possible references, 24 were read in full text and 9 were included: 7 measurement instruments were identified. Investigation of domains/items revealed considerable heterogeneity in the grouping and approach. CONCLUSION: The ideal way to assess harm aspects from the patients' perspective has not yet been ascertained.

15.
PLoS Med ; 16(5): e1002800, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31067237

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Treatment decision-making regarding immunosuppressive therapy is challenging for individuals with lupus. We assessed the effectiveness of a decision aid for immunosuppressive therapy in lupus nephritis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a United States multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled trial (RCT), adult women with lupus nephritis, mostly from racial/ethnic minority backgrounds with low socioeconomic status (SES), seen in in- or outpatient settings, were randomized to an individualized, culturally tailored, computerized decision aid versus American College of Rheumatology (ACR) lupus pamphlet (1:1 ratio), using computer-generated randomization. We hypothesized that the co-primary outcomes of decisional conflict and informed choice regarding immunosuppressive medications would improve more in the decision aid group. Of 301 randomized women, 298 were analyzed; 47% were African-American, 26% Hispanic, and 15% white. Mean age (standard deviation [SD]) was 37 (12) years, 57% had annual income of <$40,000, and 36% had a high school education or less. Compared with the provision of the ACR lupus pamphlet (n = 147), participants randomized to the decision aid (n = 151) had (1) a clinically meaningful and statistically significant reduction in decisional conflict, 21.8 (standard error [SE], 2.5) versus 12.7 (SE, 2.0; p = 0.005) and (2) no difference in informed choice in the main analysis, 41% versus 31% (p = 0.08), but clinically meaningful and statistically significant difference in sensitivity analysis (net values for immunosuppressives positive [in favor] versus negative [against]), 50% versus 35% (p = 0.006). Unresolved decisional conflict was lower in the decision aid versus pamphlet groups, 22% versus 44% (p < 0.001). Significantly more patients in the decision aid versus pamphlet group rated information to be excellent for understanding lupus nephritis (49% versus 33%), risk factors (43% versus 27%), medication options (50% versus 33%; p ≤ 0.003 for all); and the ease of use of materials was higher in the decision aid versus pamphlet groups (51% versus 38%; p = 0.006). Key study limitations were the exclusion of men, short follow-up, and the lack of clinical outcomes, including medication adherence. CONCLUSIONS: An individualized decision aid was more effective than usual care in reducing decisional conflict for choice of immunosuppressive medications in women with lupus nephritis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02319525.


Assuntos
Técnicas de Apoio para a Decisão , Imunossupressores/uso terapêutico , Nefrite Lúpica/tratamento farmacológico , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Participação do Paciente , Adulto , Comportamento de Escolha , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Alfabetização em Saúde , Humanos , Imunossupressores/efeitos adversos , Nefrite Lúpica/etnologia , Nefrite Lúpica/imunologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Folhetos , Resultado do Tratamento , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
16.
J Immunother Cancer ; 7(1): 126, 2019 05 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31088575

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite ground-breaking clinical success in the treatment of different cancers, immune checkpoint inhibitors can cause profound inflammatory and immune-related adverse events. Autoimmune inflammatory arthritis following immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment has been reported; however, to date, no cases of crystal arthritis following immune checkpoint inhibitors have been identified. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the first case of recurrent pseudogout, an inflammatory crystal arthritis, in a patient treated with nivolumab, a PD-1 inhibitor, for renal cell carcinoma. The patient had recurrent pseudogout flares about week to 10 days after each nivolumab infusion. After treatment with prophylactic colchicine, the patient well tolerated additional nivolumab infusions without adverse events. In parallel, we characterized immune cells of synovial fluid at each flare. Immunoprofiling of synovial fluid showed that the proportion of inflammatory IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells and amount of IL-17 were notably increased in synovial fluid with every recurrent flair, and correlated with the increase in number of synovial neutrophils, suggesting a potential role of T helper 17 (Th17) cells in neutrophil-driven inflammation during pseudogout arthritis. CONCLUSIONS: This case suggests a potential influence of Th17 cells on the neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil-driven inflammatory events leading to pseudogout induced by immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy.

17.
J Immunother Cancer ; 7(1): 106, 2019 Apr 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30992053

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Checkpoint inhibitors (CPIs) have revolutionized the treatment of cancer, but their use remains limited by off-target inflammatory and immune-related adverse events. Solid organ transplantation (SOT) recipients have been excluded from clinical trials owing to concerns about alloimmunity, organ rejection, and immunosuppressive therapy. Thus, we conducted a retrospective study and literature review to evaluate the safety of CPIs in patients with cancer and prior SOT. METHODS: Data were collected from the medical records of patients with cancer and prior SOT who received CPIs at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from January 1, 2004, through March 31, 2018. Additionally, we systematically reviewed five databases through April 2018 to identify studies reporting CPIs to treat cancer in SOT recipients. We evaluated the safety of CPIs in terms of alloimmunity, immune-related adverse events, and mortality. We also evaluated tumor response to CPIs. RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients with allograft transplantation were identified. The median age was 63 years (range 14-79 years), 74% were male, 62% had metastatic melanoma, 77% received anti-PD-1 agents, and 59% had prior renal transplantation, 28% hepatic transplantation, and 13% cardiac transplantation. Median time to CPI initiation after SOT was 9 years (range 0.92-32 years). Allograft rejection occurred in 41% of patients (11/23 renal, 4/11 hepatic, and 1/5 cardiac transplantations), at similar rates for anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 therapy. The median time to rejection was 21 days (95% confidence interval 19.3-22.8 days). There were no associations between time since SOT and frequency, timing, or type of rejection. Overall, 31% of patients permanently discontinued CPIs because of allograft rejection. Graft loss occurred in 81%, and death was reported in 46%. Of the 12 patients with transplantation biopsies, nine (75%) had acute rejection, and five of these rejections were T cell-mediated. In melanoma patients, 36% responded to CPIs. CONCLUSIONS: SOT recipients had a high allograft rejection rate that was observed shortly after CPI initiation, with high mortality rates. Further studies are needed to optimize the anticancer treatment approach in these patients.

18.
Rheum Dis Clin North Am ; 45(2): 245-256, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30952396

RESUMO

New technologies can do more than just digitize health information; they can support multimedia platforms for patient education and health decision support. Technology can simplify the way health decisions are made by offering quick access to a vast amount of information that can be tailored to specific populations. Digital tools can increase knowledge and assist consumers in comparing health care alternatives. They are well received by patients because of the myriad features that render them visually appealing and entertaining, including audiovisual and interactive elements. To be effective, however, digital tools must be evidence based and developed following quality standards.


Assuntos
Tomada de Decisão Clínica/métodos , Técnicas de Apoio para a Decisão , Multimídia , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Doenças Reumáticas , Humanos
19.
Curr Opin Rheumatol ; 31(3): 293-299, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30870217

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the current evidence on inflammatory arthritis following cancer treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI), and the effects of these therapies in patients with preexisting autoimmune arthritis. RECENT FINDINGS: As the use of ICI for cancer therapy continues to expand, a myriad of immune-related adverse events (irAE) caused by these therapies are being recognized. Arthritis has been increasingly reported as a de novo irAE, presenting sometimes as a well defined disorder, such as rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis, and in other occasions as undifferentiated monoarthritis, oligoarthritis, or polyarthritis. Remitting seronegative symmetric synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) and tenosynovitis have also been reported. Most published cases are reported as mild to moderate in severity. The most common treatment for arthritis has been systemic corticosteroids, although several patients have been treated with traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD), and a few, with biologic DMARD. SUMMARY: Arthritis following ICI therapy is pleomorphic. Prompt identification and treatment are imperative to achieve optimal outcomes. Management should be multidisciplinary, including rheumatologists and oncologists, to ensure prompt symptomatic and functional management and continuation of cancer therapy as appropriate.

20.
JCO Clin Cancer Inform ; 3: 1-12, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30892921

RESUMO

PURPOSE: National hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening recommendations for patients with cancer anticipating systemic anticancer therapy range from universal screening to screening based on risk of HBV infection, cancer therapy-specific risk of HBV reactivation, or both. We conducted cost-effectiveness analyses to identify optimal HBV screening strategies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We constructed decision-analytic models to analyze three strategies (no screening, universal screening, and selective screening based on use of an HBV infection risk tool) for hypothetic cohorts of patients anticipating anticancer therapy at high or lower risk for HBV reactivation. Model parameters were drawn from previously published studies, the SEER-Medicare database, and other online resources. Outcomes included lifetime expected cost, quality-adjusted life expectancy, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, measured in US dollars required to gain an additional quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). RESULTS: For patients at high reactivation risk, universal screening dominated (ie, was cheaper and more effective than) the other two strategies. Universal screening was associated with a gain in life expectancy of 0.01 QALY compared with no screening and cost $76.06 less than no screening and $4.34 less than selective screening. For those at lower reactivation risk, universal screening still dominated selective screening; however, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of the universal screening strategy compared with no screening was $186,917 per QALY gained. CONCLUSION: Universal HBV screening is cost effective and cheaper for patients receiving anticancer therapy associated with a high reactivation risk. For patients receiving anticancer therapy associated with a lower reactivation risk, universal screening is not cost effective.

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