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1.
J Sch Health ; 90(3): 212-223, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31894581

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Violence and bullying perpetration among boys are major public health problems. We address gaps in the literature by examining: (1) how risk and protective factors co-occur, and (2) how different risk/protection profiles are associated with violence and bullying perpetration among adolescent boys. METHODS: Data came from the population-based 2016 Minnesota Student Survey. The analytic sample included boys in grades 8, 9, and 11 (N = 63,818). Latent profile analyses identified patterns of 22 behavioral, intrapersonal, family, and school and community risk/protective factors. Logistic regression analyses examined how these patterns related to violence and bullying perpetration. RESULTS: We identified 5 groups: Class 1: Low risk, high safety, high connectedness; Class 2: Low risk, moderate safety, moderate connectedness; Class 3: Moderate risk, high safety, moderate connectedness; Class 4: High risk, moderate safety, low connectedness; and Class 5: High risk, low safety, low connectedness. Compared to Class 1, Class 5 students had the highest odds of all for violence and bullying perpetration. Class 4 students also demonstrated high odds of violence and bullying, compared to Class 1. Though not as high as Classes 4 or 5, Class 2 and 3 students showed higher odds for both outcomes, compared to Class 1. CONCLUSIONS: Substantive variations exist in boys who engage in violence and bullying. We highlight cumulative, co-occurring risk factors, connectedness to parents and other prosocial adults (eg, teachers), and school and neighborhood safety as important factors to address in school health programs seeking to prevent violence and bullying perpetration among boys.

2.
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry ; : 1359104519868493, 2019 Aug 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31405295

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We tested a model that incorporated potential developmental assets through which connections to parents and friends reduce the likelihood of engaging in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents. METHOD: Data came from the 2016 Minnesota Student Survey, a population-based survey of 8th, 9th, and 11th grade students (N = 119,452). Chi-square test, t-test, and correlations evaluated bivariate relationships between all variables. Indirect effects of three developmental assets (social competency, positive identity, and empowerment) were modeled simultaneously on associations between connections to parents and friends, and past-year NSSI. RESULTS: Bivariate analyses demonstrated protective effects of parent and friend connections on NSSI and that all developmental assets were negatively associated with NSSI. After accounting for demographic variables and associations between developmental assets in a multiple mediator path model, connections to parents showed a stronger, negative direct relationship with NSSI than did connections to friends. Developmental assets, especially positive identity and empowerment, accounted for a greater proportion of the effect of connections to friends on NSSI than the effect of connections to parents. Finally, social competency was no longer significantly related to NSSI in the multiple mediator path model. CONCLUSION: Clinical efforts to prevent NSSI should focus on enhancing adolescents' sense of positive identity and empowerment, as well as connections to parents and prosocial friends.

3.
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry ; 24(4): 821-830, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31315465

RESUMO

AIM: To investigate the function and progression of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and its relationship with suicide attempts. METHOD: Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 15 adolescents psychiatrically hospitalized following a suicide attempt who reported NSSI. Applied thematic analysis was used to identify and examine themes from the interview data. RESULTS: Thematic analysis revealed that the primary function of NSSI was relief from emotional pain, though the function often changed over time. NSSI was often not directly related to patients' suicide attempts, yet risk of suicidal behavior seemed to increase once NSSI lost its effectiveness, and suicide became the only option. CONCLUSION: Clinicians need to understand and monitor the functions of NSSI, and its relationship with suicidality, to prevent suicide attempts among adolescents.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente/fisiologia , Progressão da Doença , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/fisiopatologia , Adolescente , Comportamento do Adolescente/psicologia , Feminino , Hospitalização , Humanos , Masculino , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/psicologia , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia
4.
J Pediatr ; 211: 172-178, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31079853

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare social connectedness factors that facilitate use of primary, dental, and mental healthcare services among transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) and cisgender adolescents. METHODS: Data from the cross-sectional 2016 Minnesota Student Survey were used to examine protective social connectedness factors associated with use of different healthcare services among matched samples of 1916 TGNC and 1916 cisgender youth. Stratified, logistic regression analyses were used to examine background characteristics and social connectedness factors (parent connectedness, connections to other nonparental adults, teacher-student relationships, and friend connections) associated with use of each healthcare service within the last year. RESULTS: For TGNC youth, but not for cisgender youth, higher levels of parent connectedness were associated with receipt of primary (OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.40-3.66) and dental (OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.78-5.08) care services, and lower levels of connectedness to nonparental adults was associated with receipt of mental healthcare (OR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.33-0.93). Among cisgender youth, no protective factors were significantly associated with receipt of primary care services, higher levels of friend connections were associated with receipt of dental services (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.10-3.09), and lower levels of parent connectedness were associated with receipt of mental healthcare (OR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.10-0.40). CONCLUSIONS: To promote the health of TGNC youth, clinicians should understand the distinct factors associated with obtaining healthcare among this population such as the need for tailored efforts focused on strengthening connectedness between TGNC youth and their parents to facilitate receipt of needed care.

5.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-5, 2019 Mar 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30908153

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To identify risk and protective factors associated with greater emotional distress and suicide ideation among international college students. PARTICIPANTS: International students (n = 435) from two Midwestern and two Southeastern universities in the US. METHODS: Online surveys were administered that measured emotional distress, past-year suicide ideation, entrapment, cultural stress, family conflict, perfectionism, ethnic discrimination, interpersonal needs, ethnic identity, and cultural sanctions against suicide. RESULTS: In final linear regression analyses, higher levels of entrapment, unmet interpersonal needs, and ethnic discrimination were significantly associated with increased emotional distress. Only unmet interpersonal needs remained significantly associated with greater past-year suicide ideation in a multivariate regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians working with international students and prevention programmers targeting this population should address students' perceptions of entrapment, ethnic discrimination, and especially unmet interpersonal needs in efforts to decrease or prevent students' feelings of emotional distress and suicide ideation.

6.
Arch Suicide Res ; 23(2): 203-221, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29461934

RESUMO

This study sought to identify factors distinguishing transgender/gender non-conforming (GNC) adolescents across three groups: no self-harm, non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) only, and NSSI and suicide attempt (NSSI + SA). Data were from the 2016 Minnesota Student Survey. The final analytic sample included 1,635 transgender/GNC students in grades 9 and 11. Logistic regression analyses determined factors that best distinguished transgender/GNC students who reported self-harm (NSSI only or NSSI + SA) from those who reported no self-harm, and transgender/GNC adolescents who reported NSSI + SA from those who reported NSSI only. Final models were developed over 3 stages of analysis that tested associations of variables within risk factor, protective factor, and health-risk behavior domains to self-harm. Over half (51.6%) of transgender/GNC adolescents reported past-year self-harm behavior. Factors that consistently distinguished transgender/GNC youth who reported self-harm from those who reported no self-harm included reports of a mental health problem, depression, running away from home, and substance use (alcohol or marijuana use). Factors that distinguished the NSSI + SA group from the NSSI only group were reports of a mental health problem, physical or sexual abuse, relationship violence, bullying victimization, less parent connectedness, lower grades, lower levels of perceived school safety, and running away from home. Clinicians and school personnel need to be prepared to address risk factors and enhance protective factors that may reduce the likelihood this population of vulnerable youth will engage in NSSI and/or attempt suicide.

7.
Am J Prev Med ; 55(6): 787-794, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30344037

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Important mental and physical health disparities exist for transgender and gender diverse youth compared with cisgender youth (i.e., those whose birth-assigned sex and gender identity align), yet little is known about factors that protect transgender and gender diverse youth from health problems. The objective of this paper is to identify modifiable protective factors in the lives of transgender and gender diverse adolescents, with the goal of informing efforts to eliminate disparities in depression, suicidality, and substance use in this population. METHODS: Secondary data analysis of the 2016 Minnesota Student Survey examined associations between eight protective factors (connectedness to parents, adult relatives, friends, adults in the community, and teachers; youth development opportunities; and feeling safe in the community and at school) and depression, suicidality, and substance use (alcohol, binge drinking, marijuana, nicotine) among 2,168 adolescents who identified as transgender, genderqueer, genderfluid, or questioning their gender. Logistic regressions assessed the role of each protective factor separately and simultaneously. RESULTS: Each protective factor was associated with lower odds of emotional distress and substance use. When protective factors were examined simultaneously, parent connectedness was protective for all measures. Feeling safe at school and connected to adults in one's community protected against depression and suicidality; teacher connectedness buffered risk of substance use. CONCLUSIONS: Given that transgender and gender diverse youth report lower levels of connectedness and safety, bolstering an explicitly transgender and gender diverse-friendly network of caring parents, safe and supportive schools, and connections to adults in the community may support efforts to eliminate disparities in depression, suicidality, and substance use.


Assuntos
Fatores de Proteção , Estresse Psicológico/prevenção & controle , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/prevenção & controle , Pessoas Transgênero , Adolescente , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Minnesota , Ideação Suicida , Inquéritos e Questionários
8.
Psychiatry Res ; 268: 65-67, 2018 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30005190

RESUMO

We examined associations between social connections and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among transgender/gender non-conforming (TGNC) youth. Data came from the 2016 Minnesota Student Survey (N = 2168). Logistic regression analyses determined connectedness factors associated with any past-year NSSI and repetitive NSSI, as well as moderating effects of significant connectedness factors on different risk factors. Almost 55% of TGNC students engaged in NSSI, and 40% of self-injurers reported repetitive self-injury. Parent connectedness, connections to non-parental adults, and school safety emerged as robust protective factors. Strategies to prevent/reduce NSSI should focus on fostering connections with prosocial adults, and ensuring schools represent safe places.


Assuntos
Relações Interpessoais , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/epidemiologia , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/psicologia , Estudantes/psicologia , Pessoas Transgênero/psicologia , Adolescente , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores de Proteção , Fatores de Risco , Instituições Acadêmicas/tendências , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/diagnóstico , Comportamento Social , Inquéritos e Questionários
9.
J Smok Cessat ; 13(4): 216-226, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30984294

RESUMO

This study examined the role of social support and behavioral interventions used during the last unsuccessful quit attempt for smokers' intentions to quit smoking within the next 6 months, and identified smokers' attributes associated with use of social support and behavioral interventions. The analytic sample included 7,195 adult daily smokers who responded to the 2010-2011 Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey, conducted in the US, and indicated having a serious quit attempt in the past 12 months. Smokers who relied on social support from friends and family had higher odds of intending to quit than those who did not (OR= 1.39, 95% CI= 1.22:1.58), and smokers who used interventions had higher odds of intending to quit than those who did not (OR= 1.36, 95% CI= 1.07:1.74). These associations were similar for both sexes, all age groups, and nicotine dependence levels. Both, relying on social support and use of behavioral interventions were more common among smokers who were female, higher educated, residing in the Western US region, and those who used pharmacological aids for smoking cessation. Social support and behavioral interventions are associated with higher intentions to quit among attempters who relapsed and thus, may aid future smoking cessation.

10.
Acad Pediatr ; 17(7): 715-722, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28865597

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We investigated differences in prevalence of repetitive nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), suicidal ideation, and a suicide attempt among youth who identified as bisexual, gay/lesbian, and questioning. In addition, we examined which types of social connections were associated with reduced risk of repetitive NSSI and suicidality among youth who identified with a specific sexual minority group. METHODS: Data came from the 2013 Minnesota Student Survey. The analytic sample included 77,758 students in grades 9 and 11. Connectedness factors included parent connectedness, teacher caring, connectedness to other nonparental adults, school safety, and friend caring. Logistic regression analyses, stratified according to sexual minority group, determined social connectedness factors associated with repetitive NSSI, suicidal ideation, and a suicide attempt, as well as moderating effects of significant connectedness factors on different risk factors (depression, anxiety, bullying, and violence victimization). RESULTS: Approximately 3% identified as bisexual or questioning their sexual orientation, and <1% identified as gay/lesbian. Sexual minority youth, particularly bisexual youth, were significantly more likely than heterosexual youth to report repetitive NSSI and suicidality. Effects of connectedness varied across sexual minority groups and outcomes on the basis of types of connections. Parent connectedness emerged as a robust protective factor for all self-harm behaviors among bisexual and questioning youth. Feeling connected to nonparental adults and safe at school represented additional factors that reduced risk of repetitive NSSI and suicidality among certain groups. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to facilitating connections between youth and parents, clinicians might consider encouraging sexual minority youth to remain connected to trusted nonparental adults who could offer support and care. Schools might consider implementing sociocultural norms of acceptance, tolerance, and positive identity development to reduce risk of self-harm.


Assuntos
Bissexualidade/psicologia , Bissexualidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Homossexualidade/psicologia , Homossexualidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/epidemiologia , Tentativa de Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Bullying , Depressão/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Minnesota/epidemiologia , Grupos Minoritários , Relações Pais-Filho , Prevalência , Fatores de Proteção , Fatores de Risco , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/psicologia , Apoio Social , Ideação Suicida , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
11.
J Res Adolesc ; 26(3): 587-594, 2016 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28581648

RESUMO

This study addressed gaps in the literature regarding how different profiles of adolescent risk behavior relate to suicide. Data came from the 2010 Minnesota Student Survey of 9th and 12th grade students. Latent class analysis derived a set of four classes reflecting unique patterns of eight behaviors: maladaptive dieting, prescription drug misuse, illegal drug use, marijuana use, problem drinking, risky sexual behavior, perpetration of interpersonal violence, and self-injury. A class demonstrating high engagement in all risk behaviors, and a class highest on self-injury and maladaptive dieting but low on several other risk behaviors, showed high risk for suicide. Practitioners should carefully monitor adolescents engaging in multiple risk behaviors for suicide, especially if self-injury and maladaptive dieting are present.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente , Assunção de Riscos , Ideação Suicida , Adolescente , Humanos , Minnesota , Comportamento Sexual , Inquéritos e Questionários
12.
J Am Coll Health ; 63(1): 40-8, 2015.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25144520

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidality among undergraduates represent important public health issues. This analysis identified risk factors that distinguished 3 groups, those who reported no history of self-harm; self-injury, but no suicide attempts (NSSI only); and self-injury and a suicide attempt (NSSI + SA) in the past year. METHODS: Data came from 16,044 undergraduates who completed the Fall 2010 National College Health Assessment. RESULTS: Over 3% of students reported NSSI, and one third of these individuals also attempted suicide. Factors that distinguished the NSSI only and NSSI + SA groups from the no self-harm group included current depressive symptoms, nonheterosexual orientation, an eating disorder/extreme weight control behavior, and diagnosis of an internalizing disorder. Factors that distinguished the NSSI + SA group from the NSSI only group were current depressive symptoms and diagnosis of an internalizing disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Students experiencing mental health problems demonstrate increased risk for NSSI and/or suicidal behavior.


Assuntos
Comportamento Autodestrutivo/etiologia , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/psicologia , Estudantes/psicologia , Universidades , Adolescente , Depressão/psicologia , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores de Risco , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia , Adulto Jovem
13.
Suicide Life Threat Behav ; 45(1): 84-97, 2015 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25169623

RESUMO

We sought to identify factors associated with current versus lifetime nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and factors that show consonant and distinct relationships with current NSSI for adolescents and young adults. Data came from a population-based survey of high school students (n = 9,985) and a national survey of college students (n = 7,801). Among both samples, factors associated with current NSSI included male gender, younger age, greater depressive symptoms, more hopelessness, and being the victim of a verbal or physical assault. For high school students, greater anxiety, and for college students, identifying as non-White, negative perceptions of one's weight, a same-sex sexual experience, and involvement in dating violence also distinguished the groups. Findings suggest that clinical and research assessments of lifetime NSSI might not extend to current behavior, and some differences exist in the factors associated with current behavior between adolescents and young adults. Clinical practice and prevention programming efforts should target certain intrapersonal and interpersonal factors associated with current NSSI among younger students during stressful transition periods in their lives, such as entering high school or college, when they might consider initiating or continuing this behavior.


Assuntos
Depressão/epidemiologia , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Homossexualidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/epidemiologia , Maus-Tratos Conjugais/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Fatores Etários , Vítimas de Crime/psicologia , Vítimas de Crime/estatística & dados numéricos , Depressão/psicologia , Grupos Étnicos/psicologia , Feminino , Homossexualidade/psicologia , Esperança , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores de Risco , Instituições Acadêmicas , Autoimagem , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/psicologia , Fatores Sexuais , Maus-Tratos Conjugais/psicologia , Estudantes/psicologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Universidades , Adulto Jovem
14.
Suicide Life Threat Behav ; 44(1): 6-22, 2014 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23855367

RESUMO

Data from the 2010 Minnesota Student Survey was analyzed to identify risk and protective factors that distinguished adolescents across three groups: no suicidality, suicidal ideation only, and suicide attempt. The population-based sample included 70,022 students in grades 9 and 12. Hopelessness and depressive symptoms emerged as important risk factors to distinguish youth who reported suicidal ideation or behavior from those without a history of suicidality. However, these factors were not as important in differentiating adolescents who attempted suicidal from those who considered suicide but did not act on their thoughts. Instead, for both genders, self-injury represented the most important factor to distinguish these youth. Other risk factors that differentiated the latter groups, but not the former groups, for males were dating violence victimization and cigarette smoking, and for females was a same-sex sexual experience. Running away from home also seemed to increase the risk of a suicide attempt among youth in this study. Parent connectedness and academic achievement emerged as important protective factors to differentiate all the groups, yet neighborhood safety appeared to protect against the transition from suicidal thoughts to behavior. Findings from this study suggest risk and protective factors practitioners should target in clinical assessments and intervention programs to help prevent suicidal behavior among youth at greatest risk.


Assuntos
Ideação Suicida , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia , Adolescente , Fatores Etários , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Minnesota/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Psicologia do Adolescente , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Tentativa de Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos
15.
J Adolesc Health ; 53(1 Suppl): S4-12, 2013 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23790200

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To identify risk and protective factors associated with thinking about or attempting suicide among youth involved in verbal and social bullying. METHODS: We analyzed data on 130,908 students in the sixth, ninth, and twelfth grades responding to the 2010 Minnesota Student Survey. Among students involved in frequent bullying (once a week or more during the past 30 days), we compared those who did and did not report suicidal ideation or a suicide attempt during the past year. Separate analyses were conducted for perpetrators only, victims only, and bully-victims. RESULTS: Overall, 6.1% of students reported frequent perpetration only, 9.6% frequent victimization only, and 3.1% both. Suicidal thinking or a suicide attempt was reported by 22% of perpetrators only, 29% of victims only, and 38% of bully-victims. In logistic regression models controlling for demographic and other risk and protective factors, a history of self-injury and emotional distress were risk factors that cross-cut the three bullying involvement groups. Physical abuse, sexual abuse, a mental health problem, and running away from home were additional risk factors for perpetrators only and victims only. Parent connectedness was a cross-cutting protective factor, whereas stronger perceived caring by friends and by nonparental adults were additional protective factors for some groups. CONCLUSIONS: A range of risk and protective factors were associated with suicidal ideation and a suicide attempt among youth involved in verbal and social bullying. Findings may assist in identifying youth at increased risk for suicidal thinking and behavior and in promoting key protective factors.


Assuntos
Bullying/psicologia , Ideação Suicida , Adolescente , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Minnesota/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco , Comportamento Social , Tentativa de Suicídio/prevenção & controle , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia , Tentativa de Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos
16.
Clin Pediatr (Phila) ; 52(6): 557-67, 2013 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23572448

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare depression identification and management perceptions and practices between professions and disciplines in primary care and examine factors that increase the likelihood of administering a standardized depression screening instrument, asking about patients' depressive symptoms, and using best practice when managing depressed adolescents. METHODS: Data came from an online survey of clinicians in Minnesota (20% response rate). Analyses involved bivariate tests and linear regressions. RESULTS: The analytic sample comprised 260 family medicine physicians, 127 pediatricians, 96 family nurse practitioners, and 54 pediatric nurse practitioners. Overall, few differences emerged between physicians and nurse practitioners or family and pediatric clinicians regarding addressing depression among adolescents. Two factors associated with administering a standardized instrument included having clear protocols for follow-up after depression screening and feeling better prepared to address depression among adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: Enhancing clinicians' competence to address depression and developing postscreening protocols could help providers implement universal screening in primary care.


Assuntos
Depressão/diagnóstico , Programas de Rastreamento/métodos , Padrões de Prática Médica/estatística & dados numéricos , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Adolescente , Depressão/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Minnesota/epidemiologia , Profissionais de Enfermagem , Inquéritos e Questionários
17.
Suicide Life Threat Behav ; 43(3): 250-61, 2013 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23565621

RESUMO

Primary care providers were surveyed to determine how prepared they feel to address nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents, their interest in training on NSSI, and factors associated with routinely asking about NSSI when providing health supervision. Participants included family medicine physicians (n = 260), pediatricians (n = 127), family nurse practitioners (n = 96), and pediatric nurse practitioners (n = 54). Almost 50% felt unprepared to address NSSI, and over 70% wanted training in this area. Overall, relative to other areas of mental health care, clinicians felt least prepared to address and wanted more training on NSSI. Just 27% reported they routinely inquired about NSSI during health supervision. Factors associated with routinely asking about NSSI were identifying as female (OR = 2.37; 95% CI = 1.25-4.49), feeling better prepared to address NSSI (OR = 1.51; 95% CI = 1.04-2.20), and more frequently using a psychosocial interview to identify adolescents in distress (OR = 1.23; 95% CI = 1.02-1.48). Teaching clinicians to assess NSSI within a psychosocial interview may increase screening for and identification of the behavior among adolescents in primary care.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente/psicologia , Médicos , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/diagnóstico , Adolescente , Feminino , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/psicologia , Fatores Sexuais , Inquéritos e Questionários
19.
Am J Public Health ; 102 Suppl 3: S317-21, 2012 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22690965

RESUMO

Training primary care providers to incorporate a youth development approach during clinical encounters with young people represents an opportunity to integrate public health into primary care practice. We recommend that primary care providers shift their approach with adolescents from focusing on risks and problems to building strengths and assets. Focusing on strengths rather than problems can improve health by fostering resilience and enhancing protective factors among adolescents. A strength-based approach involves intentionally assessing and reinforcing adolescents' competencies, passions, and talents, as well as collaborating with others to strengthen protective networks of support for young people. Training programs should incorporate interactive strategies that allow clinicians to practice skills and provide tools clinicians can implement in their practice settings.


Assuntos
Medicina do Adolescente/educação , Prestação Integrada de Cuidados de Saúde/métodos , Promoção da Saúde , Medicina Preventiva/educação , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Prática de Saúde Pública , Adolescente , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
20.
J Spec Pediatr Nurs ; 17(2): 79-97, 2012 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22463469

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The purpose of this review is to describe current knowledge about health-risk behaviors and mental health among alternative high school students. CONCLUSIONS: Substance use, diet and/or physical activity, sexual-risk behaviors, mental health, and violence were reviewed. Students were described as marginalized youth facing significant social environmental challenges. Findings from 43 studies published from 1997-2010 suggested a high prevalence of health-risk behaviors among alternative high school students. Very few studies were conducted by nurse researchers. Suggestions for future research include addressing social environmental factors, resiliency, and emotional/mental health outcomes. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Alternative high schools offer a venue to conduct research and implement nursing interventions with high-risk, yet resilient, youth.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente , Educação Especial/estatística & dados numéricos , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Assunção de Riscos , Instituições Acadêmicas/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Dieta/tendências , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Vigilância da População , Comportamento Sexual/psicologia , Comportamento Sexual/estatística & dados numéricos , Fumar/epidemiologia , Estudantes/psicologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Violência/estatística & dados numéricos
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