Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 66
Filtrar
1.
Gen Dent ; 69(1): 17-20, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33350950

RESUMO

The objective of this study was to compare fluoride levels in commercially available black tea, green tea, and matcha tea. Tea samples were purchased from a local supermarket in the United States and prepared according to the manufacturer's directions to mimic consumer activity. The selected products included 3 black teas (Bigelow Earl Grey, Twinings of London Lady Grey, and Lipton), 2 green teas (Bigelow and Lipton), and 3 matcha teas (Mighty Leaf, Celestial Seasonings, and Matcha Love). For all products except Mighty Leaf and Matcha Love, 250 mL of deionized water (DIW) was heated to boiling. One tea bag was added and stirred for 2 minutes. For Mighty Leaf matcha, 300 mL of DIW was used, but the sample was otherwise prepared as previously described. Matcha Love was prepared by stirring 0.5 tsp of green tea powder for 2 minutes in 30 mL of DIW heated to boiling. A 10-mL aliquot was taken from each tea group and from DIW alone (control) and combined with 10 mL of total ionic strength adjustment buffer (TISAB II) before it was measured with a combination fluoride electrode and pH/ion meter. The sample size was 5 separately prepared and independently measured tea servings per group. Fluoride concentrations were calculated from a calibration curve constructed from appropriate fluoride standards and then statistically analyzed using analysis of variance followed by the Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc test (α = 0.05). The DIW control group had negligible fluoride content. All tested tea samples contained fluoride in amounts ranging from 0.521 to 6.082 mg/L. The mean concentration differed significantly among brands and types of tea. Matcha green tea powder had the highest concentration of fluoride. Most teas contain a higher fluoride concentration than optimally fluoridated water (0.7 mg/L). Dental healthcare professionals should consider this information when advising caries prevention regimens for patients and determining the potential for dental or skeletal fluorosis in at-risk patients.


Assuntos
Fluoretos , Chá , Fluoretos/análise , Humanos , Estados Unidos
2.
Dent Traumatol ; 2020 Nov 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33217137

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/AIM: Little is known about the effect of dental trauma and mouthguards (MG) on teeth with ceramic laminate veneers (CLV). The aim was to evaluate the influence of CLV thickness and the presence of a MG with and without antagonist tooth contact on impact stresses during dental trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve 2D-finite element models of a head with maxillary structures and upper incisors, six with and six without antagonist tooth, were created in three CLV conditions: sound incisor (no CLV), 0.3 mm CLV, and 1.0 mm CLV. These were evaluated with and without a 4.0-mm ethylene-vinyl acetate MG, with and without an antagonist tooth. An impact analysis was performed in which the head frontally hits a rigid surface at a speed of 1 m/s (3.6 km/h). The results were analyzed using Critical modified von Mises (MPa). The mean of the 10% highest modified von Mises stresses in each structure was collected. RESULTS: MG presence substantially reduced impact stresses in the CLV and tooth structures. The contact of the antagonist tooth promoted better stress distribution and reduced the stress levels in the traumatized tooth. Critical stress areas were found in the palatal enamel, incisal enamel, labial cervical area, and enamel under the CLV for all models without MG. In the models with MG, the stresses reduced significantly. Critical modified von Mises stress showed that sound or prepared enamel experienced more critical impact stresses than 0.3 or 1.0-mm thick CLV. CONCLUSIONS: The use of 4.0 mm EVA mouthguard reduced the impact stress levels in models with 0.3-mm CLV and 1.0-mm CLV, similar to a sound tooth. The contact of an antagonist tooth and the MG better distributed the stresses and reduced the impact stress in the traumatized tooth.

3.
J Prosthet Dent ; 2020 Nov 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33218745

RESUMO

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: How the loading rate might affect the mechanical properties of interim materials and interim fixed dental prostheses is unclear. PURPOSE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the material stiffness, material strength, and structural strength of interim 3-unit fixed dental prostheses fabricated from 3 interim materials when stressed at different loading rates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Bar-shaped specimens and anatomically correct interim 3-unit fixed dental prostheses with a modified-ridge lap pontic were fabricated from polyethyl methacrylate resin (Trim) and 2 bis-acrylic composite resins (TempSmart; Integrity) (n=10). Flexural modulus and strength of the bar specimens, representing material stiffness and strength, were determined with a 4-point bend test in a universal testing machine. The structural strength of the prosthesis was assessed from the failure load from a vertical force applied on the occlusal surface of the pontic. Three loading rates, 0.5, 5, or 10 mm/min, were evaluated. Results were statistically analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons (α=.05). RESULTS: Loading rate and material significantly affected flexural modulus, flexural strength, and structural strength (P<.05). Increasing loading rate significantly increased the flexural modulus of all materials (P<.05), but the effect of loading rate on the flexural strength of bis-acrylic composite resins was mostly insignificant. Polyethyl methacrylate specimens did not fracture when loaded at 0.5 or 5 mm/min, and the interim fixed dental prostheses made from polyethyl methacrylate did not fracture at the 0.5 mm/min loading rate. Dual-polymerizing bis-acrylic composite resin had significantly higher flexural modulus and strengths than autopolymerizing bis-acrylic composite resin. CONCLUSIONS: Polyethyl methacrylate resin had the lowest stiffness among the interim materials tested and did not fracture but excessively deformed at the low loading rate. Dual-polymerizing bis-acrylic composite resin consistently had higher stiffness and material strength and provided higher structural strength than the autopolymerizing bis-acrylic composite resin. Loading rate significantly affected the mechanical properties of polyethyl methacrylate resin (P<.05), but the effect was indistinct for the bis-acrylic materials.

4.
J Appl Oral Sci ; 28: e20190544, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32348440

RESUMO

Objective To evaluate the influence of three levels of dental structure loss on stress distribution and bite load in root canal-treated young molar teeth that were filled with bulk-fill resin composite, using finite element analysis (FEA) to predict clinical failure. Methodology Three first mandibular molars with extensive caries lesions were selected in teenager patients. The habitual occlusion bite force was measured using gnathodynamometer before and after endodontic/restoration procedures. The recorded bite forces were used as input for patient-specific FEA models, generated from cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) scans of the teeth before and after treatment. Loads were simulated using the contact loading of the antagonist molars selected based on the CT scans and clinical evaluation. Pre and post treatment bite forces (N) in the 3 patients were 30.1/136.6, 34.3/133.4, and 47.9/124.1. Results Bite force increased 260% (from 36.7±11.6 to 131.9±17.8 N) after endodontic and direct restoration. Before endodontic intervention, the stress concentration was located in coronal tooth structure; after rehabilitation, the stresses were located in root dentin, regardless of the level of tooth structure loss. The bite force used on molar teeth after pulp removal during endodontic treatment resulted in high stress concentrations in weakened tooth areas and at the furcation. Conclusion Extensive caries negatively affected the bite force. After pulp removal and endodontic treatment, stress and strain concentrations were higher in the weakened dental structure. Root canal treatment associated with direct resin composite restorative procedure could restore the stress-strain conditions in permanent young molar teeth.


Assuntos
Força de Mordida , Resinas Compostas/química , Resinas Compostas/uso terapêutico , Restauração Dentária Permanente/métodos , Dente Molar , Dente não Vital/terapia , Criança , Força Compressiva , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Módulo de Elasticidade , Análise de Elementos Finitos , Humanos , Modelagem Computacional Específica para o Paciente , Valores de Referência , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Resistência à Tração , Dente não Vital/diagnóstico por imagem , Resultado do Tratamento
5.
Pediatr Dent ; 42(2): 141-145, 2020 Mar 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32276682

RESUMO

Purpose: To compare fracture strength, failure mode, and chairside time of Class IV fractures restored with CEREC (Chairside Economic Restorations of Esthetic Ceramics) technology or direct composite. Methods: Forty-eight fractured anterior bovine teeth were randomly assigned to three experimental groups (indirect restoration) with margin designs including: A) butt joint, B) short chamfer (one mm), and C) long chamfer (two mm) and a control group (direct composite). Preparations were scanned; restorations were milled from zirconia-reinforced lithium-silicate blocks and cemented. Fracture load (N) and failure mode were analyzed. Techniques were timed from start of margin preparation through finishing. Results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance or the Kruskal-Wallis test (significance level: P=0.05). Results: Fracture loads (mean±standard deviation) for groups A, B, and C and control group were 2,177±644 N, 2,183±507 N, 2,666±609 N, and 2,358±886 N, respectively (not significantly different; P=0.26). The direct composite was significantly different from all indirect groups (P<0.01) for failure mode. Chairside time was longer for direct restoration. Conclusions: Fracture strength is similar for directly and indirectly fabricated Class IV restorations, with margin design not affecting strength or failure mode. Practitioner's chairside time, but not total time, is reduced when using indirect methods.


Assuntos
Estética Dentária , Fraturas dos Dentes , Animais , Bovinos , Resinas Compostas , Falha de Restauração Dentária , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Teste de Materiais
6.
Angle Orthod ; 90(2): 278-284, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31545075

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To measure post-gel shrinkage, elastic modulus, and flexural strength of orthodontic adhesives and to predict shrinkage stress using finite element analysis (FEA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The following 6 orthodontic adhesives were tested: Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif), Transbond Plus Color Change (3M Unitek), Greengloo (Ormco, Brea, Calif), Ortho Connect (GC America, Alsip, Ill), Trulock (RMO, Denver, Colo), GoTo (Reliance, Itasca, Ill). Post-gel shrinkage was measured using a biaxial strain gauge during light curing. Elastic modulus and flexural strength were measured with a 4-point bending test. Analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc tests were used to compare the shrinkage, elastic modulus, and flexural strengths among the materials (α = .05). Shrinkage stresses caused by the post-gel shrinkage and elastic modulus values were calculated using a cross-sectional FEA of a metallic bracket bonded to an incisor. RESULTS: Properties were highly different among the adhesives (P ≤ .0001). Transbond XT (0.38 ± 0.09 percent volumetric contraction) and GoTo (0.42 ± 0.05 percent volumetric contraction) had the lowest post-gel shrinkage; Transbond Plus Color Change had the highest (0.84 ± 0.08 percent volumetric contraction). OrthoConnect (6.8 ± 0.6 gigapascals) had the lowest elastic modulus; GoTo (28.3 ± 3.1 gigapascals) had the highest. Trulock (64.1 ± 8.2 megapascals) had the lowest flexural strength; Greengloo (139.1 ± 20.7 megapascals) had the highest. FEA showed that the highest shrinkage stresses were generated with Transbond Plus Color Change and the lowest with OrthoConnect. CONCLUSIONS: Post-gel shrinkage of orthodontic adhesives was comparable with restorative composites, which are known to create shrinkage stresses in restored teeth. FEA indicated that this shrinkage creates stresses in the adhesive and in the enamel around the brackets.


Assuntos
Colagem Dentária , Cimentos Dentários , Braquetes Ortodônticos , Adesivos , Estudos Transversais , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Módulo de Elasticidade , Humanos , Teste de Materiais , Cimentos de Resina , Resistência ao Cisalhamento
7.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190544, 2020. tab, graf
Artigo em Inglês | LILACS, BBO - Odontologia | ID: biblio-1101250

RESUMO

Abstract Objective To evaluate the influence of three levels of dental structure loss on stress distribution and bite load in root canal-treated young molar teeth that were filled with bulk-fill resin composite, using finite element analysis (FEA) to predict clinical failure. Methodology Three first mandibular molars with extensive caries lesions were selected in teenager patients. The habitual occlusion bite force was measured using gnathodynamometer before and after endodontic/restoration procedures. The recorded bite forces were used as input for patient-specific FEA models, generated from cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) scans of the teeth before and after treatment. Loads were simulated using the contact loading of the antagonist molars selected based on the CT scans and clinical evaluation. Pre and post treatment bite forces (N) in the 3 patients were 30.1/136.6, 34.3/133.4, and 47.9/124.1. Results Bite force increased 260% (from 36.7±11.6 to 131.9±17.8 N) after endodontic and direct restoration. Before endodontic intervention, the stress concentration was located in coronal tooth structure; after rehabilitation, the stresses were located in root dentin, regardless of the level of tooth structure loss. The bite force used on molar teeth after pulp removal during endodontic treatment resulted in high stress concentrations in weakened tooth areas and at the furcation. Conclusion Extensive caries negatively affected the bite force. After pulp removal and endodontic treatment, stress and strain concentrations were higher in the weakened dental structure. Root canal treatment associated with direct resin composite restorative procedure could restore the stress-strain conditions in permanent young molar teeth.


Assuntos
Humanos , Criança , Força de Mordida , Resinas Compostas/química , Dente não Vital/terapia , Restauração Dentária Permanente/métodos , Dente Molar , Valores de Referência , Resistência à Tração , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Resultado do Tratamento , Resinas Compostas/uso terapêutico , Dente não Vital/diagnóstico por imagem , Força Compressiva , Análise de Elementos Finitos , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico , Módulo de Elasticidade , Modelagem Computacional Específica para o Paciente
8.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 150(12): 1040-1047, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31761017

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Complete removal of existing composite restorations without unnecessary removal of tooth structure is challenging. The authors compared the amount of tooth structure removed and composite remaining in Class III preparations when using an erbium laser or a rotary instrument. METHODS: Mesiolingual and distolingual preparations were prepared in 14 extracted anterior teeth, restored with shade-matched composite, finished, and polished. One restoration was removed with an erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser and the other with a rotary instrument (handpiece and carbide burs). Gypsum models made from vinyl polysiloxane impressions of the preparation and removal stages were scanned. The 2 scans were precisely aligned to calculate the amount of tooth structure removed and residual composite, which were statistically compared (t test) between the bur and laser groups. RESULTS: Rotary instruments removed significantly more tooth structure than the laser in terms of mean depth (P = .0017) but not maximum depth (P = .0762). Although mean depth of tooth loss was smaller in the laser group, the area of tooth loss was significantly larger (P = .0004) because the rotary instrumentation left significantly more composite than the laser in terms of volume (P = .0104), mean depth (P = .0375), maximum depth (P = .0318), and area (P = .0056). CONCLUSIONS AND PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser was more selective in removing existing composite restorations than a rotary instrument because it removed less tooth structure and left behind less composite. Unintentional loss of tooth structure and unnoticeable residual composite are inevitable when removing existing composites. Erbium lasers are alternative means of composite removal that may be more selective than a rotary instrument.


Assuntos
Érbio , Gálio , Cromo , Escândio , Ítrio
9.
Gen Dent ; 67(2): 68-72, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30875310

RESUMO

This study assessed application techniques for cementation of fiber-reinforced posts (FRPs). The treatment groups were defined by FRP luting application techniques and included 5 groups of 10 simulated teeth each: 1, application of the cement on the post using a syringe; 2, application of the cement in the canal using a syringe; 3, application of the cement in the canal and on the post using a syringe; 4, application of the cement in the canal using a syringe/Lentulo spiral instrument; and 5, application of the cement in the canal using a syringe/Lentulo spiral and on the post using a syringe. A dual-curing, automixing cement was utilized as the luting agent. For each group, the canals were endodontically prepared using tapered hand and rotary files and obturated, and then the FRPs were cemented in place. All specimens were encased in acrylic and sectioned at 2 locations, creating 4 viewing surfaces: coronal (C), middle coronal (MC), middle apical (MA), and apical (A). The surfaces were examined using a stereomicroscope and digitized computer software. The efficacy of each FRP application technique was determined in terms of percentages of cement void area by group and by surface. Group 1 exhibited a significantly (P < 0.05) greater overall percentage of cement void area than all other groups. Group 2 exhibited the smallest overall percentage of void area, although the difference was not always statistically significant. There were no statistically significant differences among the surfaces in cement void area (P > 0.05) when the areas of the different groups were combined. The most efficacious cementation method was the injection of cement into the canal space with a syringe, while the use of a Lentulo spiral instrument was found to be an unnecessary step.


Assuntos
Cimentação , Teste de Materiais , Técnica para Retentor Intrarradicular , Cimentação/instrumentação , Cimentação/métodos , Cimentos Dentários , Cimentos de Ionômeros de Vidro , Humanos , Cimentos de Resina
10.
Pediatr Dent ; 40(5): 370-374, 2018 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30355434

RESUMO

Purpose: Polymerization shrinkage stress is determined by shrinkage as well as elastic modulus. Elastic modulus develops during polymerization. This study evaluated how elastic modulus affects shrinkage stresses in a primary molar for three types of restorative materials. Methods: Elastic modulus of resin composite, compomers, and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) were determined using four-point bending of rectangular beams at 10 minutes, 24 hours, and after one to four weeks storage in water (n equals 10). Results were analyzed using twoway analysis of variance and pairwise comparisons (α equals 0.05). The elastic moduli were used with published shrinkage data to calculate stresses at the tooth-restoration interface in finite element models of a cross-sectioned restored primary molar. Results: The elastic modulus ranged between 5.6 to 19.9 gigapascal. Elastic modulus values were lowest at 10 minutes, regardless of material, and increased significantly (43 to 95 percent) in 24 hours; RMGI continued to increase (64 percent) for one week. Shrinkage stresses increased nonproportionally (resin composite 31 percent, compomer 35 percent, RMGI 52 percent) with increasing elastic modulus for sustained volumetric shrinkage. Conclusions: Elastic modulus development is material dependent and an important factor in polymerization shrinkage stress. Maturation of restorative materials can cause long-lasting stress increases if shrinkage is not alleviated by hygroscopic expansion.


Assuntos
Materiais Dentários , Restauração Dentária Permanente/instrumentação , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Módulo de Elasticidade/fisiologia , Dente Molar/cirurgia , Dente Decíduo/cirurgia , Compômeros , Resinas Compostas , Restauração Dentária Permanente/métodos , Análise de Elementos Finitos , Cimentos de Ionômeros de Vidro , Humanos , Polimerização
11.
J Prosthet Dent ; 120(2): 246-251, 2018 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29551379

RESUMO

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Denture tooth fracture may limit the longevity of dental prostheses. Whether the strength of the denture tooth material is affected by the denture processing technique is unclear. PURPOSE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate whether the denture processing technique affects the mechanical properties of denture tooth materials. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two denture processing techniques, injection and compression molding, were tested for 3 types of denture teeth: nanohybrid composite (NHC), interpenetrating network (IPN), and microfiller-reinforced polyacrylic (MRP). Denture teeth were processed by using an injection-molded resin or a compression-molded resin. Unprocessed denture teeth served as the control. After teeth were processed, they were sectioned into rectangular beams for 3-point bend testing (n=20 to 24). Elastic moduli were determined from load deflection and maximum stress from maximum bending load. The results were statistically analyzed by using 2-way ANOVA and multiple comparisons (α=.05). RESULTS: The processing technique and the type of denture tooth affected both the elastic modulus and the maximum stress. The injection-molded technique resulted in significantly higher (24% to 26%) elastic modulus for NHC and IPN (12% higher in MRP, but not statistically significant) and higher (12% to 17%) maximum stresses for IPN and MRP (3% lower in NHC, but not statistically significant). Compression-molded technique increased the elastic modulus of IPN and NHC by 10% to 17% (3% lower in MRP but not statistically significant), but maximum stresses were not statistically significantly different in any of the tested teeth. Regardless of processing, MRP teeth had the highest elastic modulus (8.0 to 9.2 GPa) but the lowest maximum stresses (97 to 124 MPa), whereas IPN teeth had the lowest elastic modulus (5.5 GPa) but high or highest maximum stress (171 to 192 MPa). CONCLUSIONS: The injection-molded technique significantly increased the elastic modulus of NHC and IPN teeth and significantly increased the maximum stress of IPN teeth. The compression-molded technique did not significantly affect mechanical properties of denture teeth.


Assuntos
Materiais Dentários/química , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Bases de Dentadura , Planejamento de Dentadura/métodos , Dentaduras , Módulo de Elasticidade , Resinas Acrílicas , Análise de Variância , Fenômenos Químicos , Físico-Química , Força Compressiva , Humanos , Injeções , Teste de Materiais , Pressão , Estresse Mecânico
12.
Dent Mater ; 34(1): 152-160, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29061285

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The relationship between post-gel shrinkage, total shrinkage, and cuspal flexure was examined. Cuspal flexure was measured on restored typodont teeth, which offered a standardized tooth shape for comparison of shrinkage stress effects among restorative composites. METHODS: Six restorative composites were compared (Filtek LS, Venus Flowable, Tetric EvoCeram, Filtek Flowable, Esthet-X, and Filtek Supreme). Total shrinkage was determined from changes in projected surface area before and after polymerization (n=10). Post-gel shrinkage was determined with a biaxial strain gauge that measured strain development during polymerization (n=10). Cuspal flexure was determined using typodont maxillary second premolars with standard MOD slot preparation (n=10). Flexure was determined by comparing the three-dimensionally scanned cuspal surfaces before and after restoration. Restoration bonding to the typodont cavity was achieved by sandblasting and adhesive application. Bond integrity was verified by measuring dye penetration. Results were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc test (significance level 0.05). Pearson was used for correlations. RESULTS: Total and post-gel shrinkage were significant different for all composites (t-test; P<0.001). Depending on the composite, only 9-41% of the total shrinkage was recorded as post-gel shrinkage. Bond integrity of restored typodont teeth was 96-99%. Cuspal flexure correlated strongly with post-gel shrinkage, but there was no correlation with total shrinkage. SIGNIFICANCE: Cuspal flexure of restored typodont teeth showed the effect of shrinkage stress caused by polymerizing composite restorations, ensuring standardization while maintaining the effects of tooth/cavity geometry. Post-gel shrinkage gave a good indication to screen composites for the stress they may generate; total shrinkage had no direct correlation with stress.


Assuntos
Resinas Compostas/química , Restauração Dentária Permanente/métodos , Dente Pré-Molar , Adaptação Marginal Dentária , Falha de Restauração Dentária , Imageamento Tridimensional , Técnicas In Vitro , Teste de Materiais , Maleabilidade , Polimerização , Propriedades de Superfície
13.
Braz Oral Res ; 31(suppl 1): e62, 2017 Aug 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28902242

RESUMO

Polymerization shrinkage stress of resin-based materials have been related to several unwanted clinical consequences, such as enamel crack propagation, cusp deflection, marginal and internal gaps, and decreased bond strength. Despite the absence of strong evidence relating polymerization shrinkage to secondary caries or fracture of posterior teeth, shrinkage stress has been associated with post-operative sensitivity and marginal stain. The latter is often erroneously used as a criterion for replacement of composite restorations. Therefore, an indirect correlation can emerge between shrinkage stress and the longevity of composite restorations or resin-bonded ceramic restorations. The relationship between shrinkage and stress can be best studied in laboratory experiments and a combination of various methodologies. The objective of this review article is to discuss the concept and consequences of polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composite resins and resin cements. Literature relating to polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress generation, research methodologies, and contributing factors are selected and reviewed. Clinical techniques that could reduce shrinkage stress and new developments on low-shrink dental materials are also discussed.


Assuntos
Resinas Compostas/química , Análise do Estresse Dentário/métodos , Polimerização , Cimentos de Resina/química , Luzes de Cura Dentária , Análise do Estresse Dentário/instrumentação , Teste de Materiais
14.
Int J Comput Dent ; 20(3): 275-285, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28852745

RESUMO

Marginal integrity is important for the longevity of a restoration. An increase in the marginal discrepancy after cementation contributes adversely to the longevity of a restoration. In the past, the preferred method to overcome this discrepancy was to create internal space for the cement by using a number of coats of a die-spacing material. In the digital age, however, this method is no longer the only option. Currently, an amount of die spacer is engineered into the computer program and forms part of the milling process. The present study attempted to identify the optimal setting of the Spacer parameter that a) is necessary for the complete cementation of a Cerec milled all-ceramic crown, and b) does not compromise the strength of the crown postcementation.

15.
Braz. oral res. (Online) ; 31(supl.1): e62, Aug. 2017. graf
Artigo em Inglês | LILACS | ID: biblio-889457

RESUMO

Abstract Polymerization shrinkage stress of resin-based materials have been related to several unwanted clinical consequences, such as enamel crack propagation, cusp deflection, marginal and internal gaps, and decreased bond strength. Despite the absence of strong evidence relating polymerization shrinkage to secondary caries or fracture of posterior teeth, shrinkage stress has been associated with post-operative sensitivity and marginal stain. The latter is often erroneously used as a criterion for replacement of composite restorations. Therefore, an indirect correlation can emerge between shrinkage stress and the longevity of composite restorations or resin-bonded ceramic restorations. The relationship between shrinkage and stress can be best studied in laboratory experiments and a combination of various methodologies. The objective of this review article is to discuss the concept and consequences of polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composite resins and resin cements. Literature relating to polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress generation, research methodologies, and contributing factors are selected and reviewed. Clinical techniques that could reduce shrinkage stress and new developments on low-shrink dental materials are also discussed.


Assuntos
Resinas Compostas/química , Análise do Estresse Dentário/métodos , Polimerização , Cimentos de Resina/química , Luzes de Cura Dentária , Análise do Estresse Dentário/instrumentação , Teste de Materiais
16.
Gen Dent ; 65(4): 63-68, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28682285

RESUMO

Tooth erosion from an acidic insult may be exacerbated by toothbrushing. The purposes of this study were to develop an in vitro methodology to measure enamel loss after brushing immediately following an acidic episode and to investigate the effect of brushing with an anti-erosive toothpaste. The null hypotheses tested were that tooth erosion after brushing with the toothpaste would not be different from brushing with water and that a 1-hour delay before brushing would not reduce tooth erosion. Forty bovine enamel slabs were embedded, polished, and subjected to baseline profilometry. Specimens were bathed in hydrochloric acid for 10 minutes to simulate stomach acid exposure before post-acid profilometry. Toothbrushing was then simulated with a cross-brushing machine and followed by postbrushing profilometry. Group 1 was brushed with water; group 2 was brushed with a 50:50 toothpaste-water slurry; and groups 3 and 4 were immersed in artificial saliva for 1 hour before brushing with water or the toothpaste slurry, respectively. The depth of enamel loss was analyzed and compared using 1-way analysis of variance and post hoc testing (α = 0.05). Greater enamel loss was measured in groups brushed with toothpaste than in groups brushed with water. One-hour immersion in artificial saliva significantly reduced enamel loss when teeth were brushed with water (group 3; P < 0.05) but not with toothpaste (group 4). This study established a protocol for measuring enamel loss resulting from erosion followed by toothbrush abrasion. The results confirmed the abrasive action of toothpaste on acid-softened enamel.


Assuntos
Esmalte Dentário/efeitos dos fármacos , Erosão Dentária/etiologia , Cremes Dentais/efeitos adversos , Animais , Bovinos , Ácido Clorídrico/efeitos adversos , Técnicas In Vitro , Erosão Dentária/diagnóstico , Escovação Dentária/efeitos adversos
17.
J Adhes Dent ; 19(3): 239-243, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28580462

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Short initial light curing or "tack curing" is used to create a semi-gel state in luting cements for easier excess material cleanup. The effect of tack curing on the final cure of luting cements was measured in terms of hardness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three cement types were tested: two dual-curing composite cements (RelyX Unicem 2; Maxcem Elite); three light-curing veneer cements (Choice 2; Variolink Esthetic LC; RelyX Veneer); and two self-curing resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) luting cements (RelyX Luting Plus; Nexus RMGI). Cements were placed in 1.5 × 2 × 8 mm plaster slots covered with orange glass during curing and were cured from one end. Tack curing was performed for 2 to 5 s using an LED curing light, followed 2 min later by 10-40 s final light curing or self-curing, as per manufacturer instructions (n = 10). Control groups received only final light curing or self-curing. After 24 h storage (37°C, 100% humidity), Vickers hardness was measured in 0.5-mm depth increments. Results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and pairwise comparisons (α = 0.05). RESULTS: The hardness of dual-curing and light-curing cements significantly decreased with increasing depth (p = 0.0001). Tack curing of dual-curing and light-curing cements tended to increase hardness at all depths, except near the surface for light-curing veneer cements. Self-curing cements showed no hardness reduction with depth and no effect from tack curing. CONCLUSION: Although a slight surface hardness reduction may occur in light-curing veneer cements, the overall effect on three luting cement types was insignificant or resulted in only a slight increase in depth-of-cure.


Assuntos
Teste de Materiais , Cimentos de Resina , Cimentos Dentários , Cimentos de Ionômeros de Vidro , Dureza
18.
Pediatr Dent ; 39(3): 125-130, 2017 May 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28583237

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To investigate intrapulpal temperature rise in a primary molar during light activation of a composite restoration to determine if clinically significant pulpal temperatures (greater than 5.5 degrees Celsius) were reached. METHODS: Restorative composites (EsthetX HD, Filtek Supreme Ultra, Filtek Bulk Fill) were placed into a primary molar with occlusal preparation (1.5 mm depth; remaining pulpal floor thickness one mm). The pulp was extirpated through a root access to place a thermocouple against the pulpal roof. Temperature changes were recorded during composite restoration light polymerization with three curing lights (one quartz-tungsten-halogen, two LEDs). Sample size was 10. Samples received additional irradiation to assure complete polymerization, followed by a third irradiation for calculating the exothermic heat contribution (subtracting third irradiation temperatures from first irradiation temperatures). Cured restorations were removed after each test, and the tooth was reused. Results were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis (α =0.05). RESULTS: Type of curing light and composite material affected the intrapulpal temperature rise, which was up to five degrees Celsius for one combination of LED-composite. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should be aware of the potential for clinically significant intrapulpal temperature rises when light-activating composite restorations in a primary molar with a moderately deep cavity.


Assuntos
Temperatura Corporal/fisiologia , Luzes de Cura Dentária , Polpa Dentária/fisiologia , Dente Molar/fisiologia , Resinas Compostas , Restauração Dentária Permanente , Humanos , Polimerização , Dente Decíduo/fisiologia
19.
J Investig Clin Dent ; 8(2)2017 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26616243

RESUMO

AIM: The aim of the present study was to test the neutralizing effect of mouthwashes on salivary pH after an acidic challenge. METHODS: Twelve participants were recruited for three visits, one morning per week. Resting saliva was collected at baseline and after 2-min swishing with 20 mL orange juice as an acidic challenge. Participants then rinsed their mouth for 30 s with 20 mL water (control), an over-the-counter mouthwash (Listerine), or a two-step mouthwash, randomly assigned for each visit. Saliva was collected immediately, 15, and 45 min after rinsing. The pH values of the collected saliva were measured and analyzed with anova, followed by Student-Newman-Keuls post-hoc test (significance level: 0.05). RESULTS: Orange juice significantly lowered salivary pH. Immediately after rinsing, Listerine and water brought pH back to baseline values, with the pH significantly higher in the Listerine group. The two-step mouthwash raised pH significantly higher than Listerine and water, and higher than the baseline value. Salivary pH returned to baseline and was not significantly different among groups at 15 and 45 min post-rinsing. CONCLUSIONS: Mouth rinsing after an acidic challenge increased salivary pH. The tested mouthwashes raised pH higher than water. Mouthwashes with a neutralizing effect can potentially reduce tooth erosion from acid exposure.


Assuntos
Concentração de Íons de Hidrogênio , Antissépticos Bucais , Salicilatos , Saliva/química , Terpenos , Adulto , Tampões (Química) , Citrus sinensis/química , Combinação de Medicamentos , Feminino , Sucos de Frutas e Vegetais , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Água
20.
Dent Traumatol ; 33(1): 57-63, 2017 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27194626

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/AIM: Custom-fitted mouthguards are devices used to prevent dental injuries. The aim of this study was to verify the influence of the antagonist contact on the stresses and strains of the anterior teeth, shock absorption and displacement of EVA custom-fitted mouthguards during a horizontal impact. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Finite element models of human maxillary central incisors with and without a mouthguard for different occlusion conditions (with and without antagonist contact) were created based on tomography. A nonlinear dynamic impact analysis using the single-step Houbolt method was performed in which a rigid object hit the model at 1 m s-1 . Strain and stress were evaluated by means of Von Mises and Critical modified Von Mises criterion and shock absorption during impact were calculated as well as the mouthguard displacement. RESULTS: The model without mouthguard and without antagonist contact showed the highest stress and strain values at the enamel and dentin in the tooth crown on impact compared to the model without mouthguard and with antagonist contact. Mouthguard presence reduced the stress and strain values regardless of the occlusion condition. The mouthguard displacement decreased with the mandibular antagonist contact. CONCLUSIONS: Mouthguards are efficient at decreasing the stress and strain values on the tooth in front of an impact reaching more than 90% of shock absorption. A mouthguard with balanced occlusion and maximum number of contacts with mandibular anterior teeth should be considered because it reduces mouthguard displacement.


Assuntos
Oclusão Dentária , Incisivo , Protetores Bucais , Traumatismos Dentários/prevenção & controle , Fenômenos Biomecânicos , Modelos Dentários , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Desenho de Equipamento , Análise de Elementos Finitos , Humanos , Incisivo/diagnóstico por imagem , Estresse Mecânico , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...