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1.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e050308, 2021 08 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34408055

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The Solution Focused Brief Therapy in Post-Stroke Aphasia feasibility trial had four primary aims: to assess (1) acceptability of the intervention to people with aphasia, including severe aphasia, (2) feasibility of recruitment and retention, (3) acceptability of research procedures and outcome measures, and (4) feasibility of delivering the intervention by speech and language therapists. DESIGN: Two-group randomised controlled feasibility trial with wait-list design, blinded outcome assessors and nested qualitative research. SETTING: Participants identified via two community NHS Speech and Language Therapy London services and through community routes (eg, voluntary-sector stroke groups). PARTICIPANTS: People with aphasia at least 6 months post stroke. INTERVENTION: Solution-focused brief therapy, a psychological intervention, adapted to be linguistically accessible. Participants offered up to six sessions over 3 months, either immediately postrandomisation or after a delay of 6 months. OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary endpoints related to feasibility and acceptability. Clinical outcomes were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months postrandomisation, and at 9 months (wait-list group only). The candidate primary outcome measure was the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale. Participants and therapists also took part in in-depth interviews. RESULTS: Thirty-two participants were recruited, including 43.8% with severe aphasia. Acceptability endpoints: therapy was perceived as valuable and acceptable by both participants (n=30 interviews) and therapists (n=3 interviews); 93.8% of participants had ≥2 therapy sessions (90.6% had 6/6 sessions). Feasibility endpoints: recruitment target was reached within the prespecified 13-month recruitment window; 82.1% of eligible participants consented; 96.9% were followed up at 6 months; missing data <0.01%. All five prespecified feasibility progression criteria were met. CONCLUSION: The high retention and adherence rates, alongside the qualitative data, suggest the study design was feasible and therapy approach acceptable even to people with severe aphasia. These results indicate a definitive randomised controlled trial of the intervention would be feasible. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03245060.


Assuntos
Afasia , Psicoterapia Breve , Acidente Vascular Cerebral , Afasia/etiologia , Afasia/terapia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Humanos , Londres , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações
2.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e047994, 2021 08 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34341046

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate systematically the fidelity of a peer-befriending intervention for people with aphasia. DESIGN: SUpporting wellbeing through Peer-befriending (SUPERB) was a feasibility randomised controlled trial comparing usual care to usual care +peer-befriending. This paper reports on the fidelity of all intervention aspects (training and supervision of providers/befrienders; intervention visits) which was evaluated across all areas of the Behaviour Change Consortium framework. SETTING: Community. PARTICIPANTS: People with aphasia early poststroke and low levels of distress, randomised to the intervention arm of the trial (n=28); 10 peer-befrienders at least 1-year poststroke. INTERVENTION: Peer-befrienders were trained (4-6 hours); and received regular supervision (monthly group while actively befriending, and one-to-one as and when needed) in order to provide six 1-hour peer-befriending visits over 3 months. MAIN MEASURES: Metrics included number and length of training, supervision sessions and visits. All training and supervision sessions and one (of six) visits per pair were rated against fidelity checklists and evaluated for inter-rater and intrarater reliability (Gwets AC1 agreement coefficient). Per-cent adherence to protocol was evaluated. RESULTS: All peer-befrienders received 4-6 hours training over 2-3 days as intended. There were 25 group supervision sessions with a median number attended of 14 (IQR=8-18). Twenty-six participants agreed (92.8%) to the intervention and 21 (80.8%) received all six visits (median visit length 60 min). Adherence was high for training (91.7%-100%) and supervision (83%-100%) and moderate-to-high for befriending visits (66.7%-100%). Where calculable, inter-rater and intrarater reliability was high for training and supervision (Gwets AC1 >0.90) and moderate-to-high for intervention visits (Gwets AC1 0.44-1.0). CONCLUSION: Planning of fidelity processes at the outset of the trial and monitoring throughout was feasible and ensured good-to-high fidelity for this peer-befriending intervention. The results permit confidence in other findings from the SUPERB trial. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02947776.


Assuntos
Afasia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Humanos , Grupo Associado , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
3.
Qual Health Res ; : 10497323211020290, 2021 Jun 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34130554

RESUMO

Aphasia, a language disability, can profoundly affect a person's mood and identity. The experiences of participants who received Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, a psychological intervention, were explored in the Solution-Focused brief therapy In poststroke Aphasia (SOFIA) Trial. Thirty participants with chronic aphasia, 14 with severe aphasia, participated in in-depth interviews that were analyzed using framework analysis. Two overarching themes emerged: valued therapy components (exploring hopes, noticing achievements, companionship, sharing feelings, and relationship with therapist) and perceptions of progress (mood, identity, communication, relationships, and independence). Participants were categorized into four groups: (a) "changed," where therapy had a meaningful impact on a person's life; (b) "connected," where therapy was valued primarily for companionship; (c) "complemental," where therapy complemented a participant's upward trajectory; and (d) "discordant," where therapy misaligned with participants' preference for impairment-based language work. This study suggests that it is feasible to adapt a psychological therapy for people with aphasia, who perceive it as valuable.

4.
Int J Lang Commun Disord ; 56(3): 594-608, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33826205

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Stroke and aphasia can have a profound impact on people's lives, and depression is a common, frequently persistent consequence. Social networks also suffer, with poor social support associated with worse recovery. It is essential to support psychosocial well-being post-stroke, and examine which factors facilitate successful adjustment to living with aphasia. AIMS: In the context of a feasibility randomized controlled trial of peer-befriending (SUPERB), this qualitative study explores adjustment for people with aphasia in the post-acute phase of recovery, a phase often neglected in previous research. METHODS & PROCEDURES: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 people with aphasia and 10 significant others, who were purposively sampled from the wider group of 56 people with aphasia and 48 significant others. Interviews took place in participants' homes; they were analysed using framework analysis. OUTCOMES & RESULTS: Participants with aphasia were 10 women and 10 men; their median (interquartile range-IQR) age was 70 (57.5-77.0) years. Twelve participants had mild aphasia, eight moderate-severe aphasia. Significant others were six women and four men with a median (IQR) age of 70.5 (43-79) years. They identified a range of factors that influenced adjustment to aphasia post-stroke. Some were personal resources, including mood and emotions; identity/sense of self; attitude and outlook; faith and spirituality; and moving forward. Significant others also talked about the impact of becoming carers. Other factors were external sources of support, including familial and other relationships; doctors, nurses and hospital communication; life on the ward; therapies and therapists; psychological support, stroke groups; and community and socializing. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: To promote adjustment in the acute phase, hospital staff should prioritize the humanizing aspects of care provision. In the post-acute phase, clinicians play an integral role in supporting adjustment and can help by focusing on relationship-centred care, monitoring mental health, promoting quality improvement across the continuum of care and supporting advocacy. What this paper adds What is already known on the subject Anxiety and depression are common consequences of stroke, with depression rates high at 33% at 1 year post-onset. There is evidence that the psychological needs of people with aphasia are even greater than those of the general stroke population. Social support and social networks are also negatively impacted. Few studies have examined adjustment when people are still in hospital or in the early stages of post-stroke life in the community (< 6 months). Further, many stroke studies exclude people with aphasia. What this paper adds to existing knowledge Adjustment to living with stroke and aphasia begins in the early stages of recovery. While this partly depends on personal resources, many factors depend on external sources of help and support. These include doctors, nurses and hospital communication, their experience of life on the ward, and their therapists' person-centred care. What are the potential or actual clinical implications of this work? Clinicians play an integral role in facilitating people with aphasia to utilize their personal resources and support systems to adjust to life after stroke. They can help by focusing on relationship-centred care, monitoring mental health, promoting quality improvement across the continuum of care and supporting advocacy.

5.
Clin Rehabil ; 35(8): 1151-1163, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33624514

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility and acceptability of peer-befriending, for people with aphasia. DESIGN: Single-blind, parallel-group feasibility randomised controlled trial comparing usual care to usual care + peer-befriending. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: People with aphasia post-stroke and low levels of distress, recruited from 5 NHS Hospitals and linked community services; their significant others; and 10 befrienders recruited from community. INTERVENTION: Six 1-hour peer-befriending visits over three months. MAIN MEASURES: Feasibility parameters included proportion eligible of those screened; proportion consented; missing data; consent and attrition rates. Acceptability was explored through qualitative interviews. Outcomes for participants and significant others were measured at baseline, 4- and 10-months; for peer-befrienders before training and after one/two cycles of befriending. RESULTS: Of 738 patients identified, 75 were eligible of 89 fully screened (84%), 62 consented (83% of eligible) and 56 randomised. Attrition was 16%. Adherence was high (93% attended ⩾2 sessions, 81% all six). The difference at 10 months on the GHQ-12 was 1.23 points on average lower/better in the intervention arm (95% CI 0.17, -2.63). There was an 88% decrease in the odds of GHQ-12 caseness (95% CI 0.01, 1.01). Fourty-eight significant others and 10 peer-befrienders took part. Procedures and outcome measures were acceptable. Serious adverse events were few (n = 10, none for significant others and peer-befrienders) and unrelated. CONCLUSIONS: SUPERB peer-befriending for people with aphasia post-stroke experiencing low levels of distress was feasible. There was preliminary evidence of benefit in terms of depression. Peer-befriending is a suitable intervention to explore further in a definitive trial.Clinical trial registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT02947776Subject terms: Translational research, mental health, rehabilitation, quality and outcomes, stroke.


Assuntos
Afasia/etiologia , Afasia/reabilitação , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Atenção à Saúde , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Grupo Associado , Método Simples-Cego , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/psicologia
6.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(1): 105425, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33161350

RESUMO

Assessment of mood is critical in determining rehabilitation outcomes for stroke and other acquired brain injury, yet a common consequence of such injuries is aphasia, where language is impaired. Consequently, the use of language-based measures in this population is often not possible. Following a critical review of the neuropsychological aspects of self-reported mood, this paper evaluates the problems in reporting mood after stroke due to aphasia, and discusses implications for the design of adapted instruments. The paper then appraises the construction and psychometric properties of existing, adapted self-report measures developed to try and address these problems, and evaluates their utility and limitations. This includes a focus on the recently validated tablet-based Dynamic Visual Analog Mood Scales (D-VAMS), which uses innovative non-verbal assessment methods based on facial expression modulated via a slider control on a touchscreen interface. Currently, most studies evaluating recovery interventions simply omit individuals with aphasia because of the difficulty of assessing mood and quality of life in this population. However, adapted scales such as the D-VAMS appear to represent an important step forward in assessing mood in people with language impairments, with the use of interactive modulated imagery having wider applications for nonverbal communication as well as the quantification of subjective phenomena.


Assuntos
Afeto , Afasia/diagnóstico , Idioma , Comunicação não Verbal , Autorrelato , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/diagnóstico , Afasia/etiologia , Afasia/fisiopatologia , Afasia/psicologia , Cognição , Humanos , Saúde Mental , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Prognóstico , Psicometria , Qualidade de Vida , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/fisiopatologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/psicologia
7.
Top Stroke Rehabil ; : 1-11, 2020 Sep 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32996432

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Psychoeducation can provide information and support to cope with the physical and emotional effects of a health condition. This scoping review aimed to identify the evidence regarding psychoeducational interventions for people after a Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) and minor stroke. METHODS: This review was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA Extension for Scoping Reviews. Three electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO) were searched for articles on interventions related to psychoeducational support post-TIA and minor/mild stroke. Search retrieved 3722 articles. Three reviewers independently screened titles, abstracts, full-texts, and extracted data for included studies. Study quality was assessed using the JADAD scale. TIDieR checklist was used to describe interventions. RESULTS: Fifteen RCTs were included. Twelve studies were of high quality (JADAD score ≥2), two were of low quality. A total of 1500 participants were recruited across studies. Definition of TIA and minor stroke was unclear, leading to the exclusion of several studies. Various interventions were included, including education/psychoeducation (n = 4); exercise and lifestyle advice (n = 3); telephone-based education/counseling (n = 3); secondary prevention education (n = 1); motivational interviewing (n = 2); self-management (n = 2). Interventions were inconsistently described, with information missing about who delivered it and tailoring. CONCLUSIONS: Definitions of stroke severity are not adequately reported. There are a variety of interventions including education about a range of stroke-specific topics. Many interventions are not adequately described, thus making it difficult to determine if the aim was to provide information or support post-TIA/minor stroke. There is a need for an in-depth systematic review to develop a clear definition of psychoeducation.

8.
Clin Rehabil ; 34(10): 1268-1281, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32567356

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility of recruiting to and delivering a biopsychosocial intervention for carers of stroke survivors. DESIGN: Feasibility randomised controlled study with nested qualitative interview study. SETTING: The intervention was delivered in the community in either a group or one-to-one format. SUBJECTS: Carers and stroke survivors within one year of stroke onset. INTERVENTIONS: A carer targeted intervention delivered by a research psychologist in six structured two-hour sessions or usual care control. The intervention combined education about the biological, psychological and social effects of stroke with strategies and techniques focussing on adjustment to stroke and caregiving. Stroke survivors in both groups received baseline and follow-up assessment but no intervention. MAIN OUTCOME: Recruitment rate, study attrition, fidelity of intervention delivery, acceptability and sensitivity of outcome measures used (health related quality of life, anxiety and depression and carer burden six months after randomisation). RESULTS: Of the 257 carers approached, 41 consented. Six withdrew before randomisation. Eighteen participants were randomised to receive the intervention and 17 to usual care. Attendance at sessions was greater when treated one-to-one. Feedback interviews suggested that participants found the intervention acceptable and peer support particularly helpful in normalising their feelings. Thirty participants were assessed at follow-up with improvements from baseline on all health measures for both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that a biopsychosocial intervention was acceptable to carers and can be delivered in group and one-to-one formats. Timing of approach and mode of intervention delivery is critical and requires tailoring to the carers individual needs.


Assuntos
Cuidadores/psicologia , Intervenção Psicossocial , Apoio Social , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Ansiedade/psicologia , Depressão/psicologia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Qualidade de Vida , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/terapia
9.
Int J Stroke ; 15(3): 244-255, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31980004

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Anxiety is a common and distressing problem after stroke. AIMS: To undertake an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies of anxiety after stroke and integrate the findings with those reported previously. SUMMARY OF REVIEW: Multiple databases were searched in May 2018 and 53 new studies were included following dual independent sifting and data extraction. These were combined with 44 previous studies to form a combined data set of 97 studies, comprising 22,262 participants. Studies using interview methods were of higher quality. Rates of anxiety by interview were 18.7% (95% confidence interval 12.5, 24.9%) and 24.2% (95% confidence interval 21.5, 26.9%) by rating scale. Rates of anxiety did not lower meaningfully up to 24 months after stroke. Eight different anxiety subtypes were also reported. CONCLUSIONS: This review confirms that anxiety occurs in around one in four patients (by rating scale) and one in five patients (by interview). More research on anxiety subtypes is needed for an informed understanding of its effects and the development of interventions.

10.
Health Technol Assess ; 23(47): 1-176, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31524133

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is currently insufficient evidence for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of psychological therapies for post-stroke depression. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility of undertaking a definitive trial to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of behavioural activation (BA) compared with usual stroke care for treating post-stroke depression. DESIGN: Parallel-group, feasibility, multicentre, randomised controlled trial with nested qualitative research and a health economic evaluation. SETTING: Acute and community stroke services in three sites in England. PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling adults 3 months to 5 years post stroke who are depressed, as determined by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) or the Visual Analogue Mood Scales 'Sad' item. Exclusions: patients who are blind and/or deaf, have dementia, are unable to communicate in English, do not have mental capacity to consent, are receiving treatment for depression at the time of stroke onset or are currently receiving psychological intervention. RANDOMISATION AND BLINDING: Participants were randomised (1 : 1 ratio) to BA or usual stroke care. Randomisation was conducted using a computer-generated list with random permuted blocks of varying sizes, stratified by site. Participants and therapists were aware of the allocation, but outcome assessors were blind. INTERVENTIONS: The intervention arm received up to 15 sessions of BA over 4 months. BA aims to improve mood by increasing people's level of enjoyable or valued activities. The control arm received usual care only. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary feasibility outcomes concerned feasibility of recruitment to the main trial, acceptability of research procedures and measures, appropriateness of baseline and outcome measures, retention of participants and potential value of conducting the definitive trial. Secondary feasibility outcomes concerned the delivery of the intervention. The primary clinical outcome 6 months post randomisation was the PHQ-9. Secondary clinical outcomes were Stroke Aphasic Depression Questionnaire - Hospital version, Nottingham Leisure Questionnaire, Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living, Carer Strain Index, EuroQol-5 Dimensions, five-level version and health-care resource use questionnaire. RESULTS: Forty-eight participants were recruited in 27 centre-months of recruitment, at a recruitment rate of 1.8 participants per centre per month. The 25 participants randomised to receive BA attended a mean of 8.5 therapy sessions [standard deviation (SD) 4.4 therapy sessions]; 23 participants were allocated to usual care. Outcome assessments were completed by 39 (81%) participants (BA, n = 18; usual care, n = 21). Mean PHQ-9 scores at 6-month follow-up were 10.1 points (SD 6.9 points) and 14.4 points (SD 5.1 points) in the BA and control groups, respectively, a difference of -3.8 (95% confidence interval -6.9 to -0.6) after adjusting for baseline PHQ-9 score and centre, representing a reduction in depression in the BA arm. Therapy was delivered as intended. BA was acceptable to participants, carers and therapists. Value-of-information analysis indicates that the benefits of conducting a definitive trial would be likely to outweigh the costs. It is estimated that a sample size of between 580 and 623 participants would be needed for a definitive trial. LIMITATIONS: Target recruitment was not achieved, although we identified methods to improve recruitment. CONCLUSIONS: The Behavioural Activation Therapy for Depression after Stroke trial was feasible with regard to the majority of outcomes. The outstanding issue is whether or not a sufficient number of participants could be recruited within a reasonable time frame for a definitive trial. Future work is required to identify whether or not there are sufficient sites that are able to deliver the services required for a definitive trial. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN12715175. FUNDING: This project was funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 23, No. 47. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information.


Assuntos
Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental/métodos , Depressão/etiologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Depressão/terapia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Escalas de Graduação Psiquiátrica , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações , Inquéritos e Questionários , Resultado do Tratamento
11.
Top Stroke Rehabil ; 26(6): 440-447, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31170035

RESUMO

Objective: To identify the key components of a biopsychosocial support intervention to improve mental wellbeing for informal stroke carers within the first year post-stroke based on the combined perspectives of experts in the field of psychological care after stroke and informal stroke carers themselves. Methods: After reviewing the existing literature a cross-sectional mixed-methods design was adopted comprising 1) focus groups with informal stroke carers about their psychological support needs, and 2) nominal group technique with academic and clinical stroke care experts to reach consensus on intervention priorities. Transcripts were thematically analyzed and combined with the ranked priorities from the nominal group to identify key components for intervention content. Results: Key themes for informal stroke carers were associated with: 1) changes in relationships, roles, and dynamics; 2) emotional impact and acceptance; 3) drawing on inner resources; 4) looking for information, solutions, and explanations; 5) support from others. The expert nominal group placed priority on eight ranked areas: 1) acknowledging "normal" emotions; 2) education about the effects of a stroke; 3) reactions to loss and adjustment; 4) recognizing signs and symptoms of not coping; 5) knowing how and when to access practical and emotional support; 6) strategies for taking care of own health; 7) dealing with difficult emotions; and 8) problem solving skills. Conclusions: Themes from the informal carer focus groups, and ranked priority areas will inform the development of a biopsychosocial support intervention for stroke carers to be tested in a feasibility randomized controlled trial.


Assuntos
Cuidadores/psicologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/psicologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/terapia , Adaptação Psicológica , Consenso , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Masculino , Determinação de Necessidades de Cuidados de Saúde , Sistemas de Apoio Psicossocial
12.
BMJ Open ; 9(5): e023560, 2019 05 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31061014

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Treatment fidelity is a complex, multifaceted evaluative process which refers to whether a studied intervention was delivered as intended. Monitoring and enhancing fidelity is one recommendation of the TiDIER (Template for Intervention Description and Replication) checklist, as fidelity can inform interpretation and conclusions drawn about treatment effects. Despite the methodological and translational benefits, fidelity strategies have been used inconsistently within health behaviour intervention studies; in particular, within aphasia intervention studies, reporting of fidelity remains relatively rare. This paper describes the development of a fidelity protocol for the Action Success Knowledge (ASK) study, a current cluster randomised trial investigating an early mood intervention for people with aphasia (a language disability caused by stroke). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A novel fidelity protocol and tool was developed to monitor and enhance fidelity within the two arms (experimental treatment and attention control) of the ASK study. The ASK fidelity protocol was developed based on the National Institutes of Health Behaviour Change Consortium fidelity framework. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study protocol was approved by the Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service Human Research Ethics Committee in Queensland, Australia under the National Mutual Acceptance scheme of multicentre human research projects. Specific ethics approval was obtained for those participating sites who were not under the National Mutual Agreement at the time of application. The monitoring and ongoing conduct of the research project is in line with requirements under the National Mutual Acceptance. On completion of the trial, findings from the fidelity reviews will be disseminated via publications and conference presentations. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12614000979651.


Assuntos
Afasia/reabilitação , Depressão/reabilitação , Patologia da Fala e Linguagem/métodos , Reabilitação do Acidente Vascular Cerebral/métodos , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/fisiopatologia , Pessoal Técnico de Saúde , Afasia/etiologia , Afasia/fisiopatologia , Depressão/etiologia , Humanos , Relações Profissional-Paciente , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Fala , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações
13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30693094

RESUMO

Background: Despite the high prevalence of mood problems after stroke, evidence on effective interventions particularly for those with aphasia is limited. There is a pressing need to systematically evaluate interventions aiming to improve wellbeing for people with stroke and aphasia. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of a peer-befriending intervention. Methods/design: SUPERB is a single blind, parallel group feasibility trial of peer befriending for people with aphasia post-stroke and low levels of psychological distress. The trial includes a nested qualitative study and pilot economic evaluation and it compares usual care (n = 30) with usual care + peer befriending (n = 30). Feasibility outcomes include proportion screened who meet criteria, proportion who consent, rate of consent, number of missing/incomplete data on outcome measures, attrition rate at follow-up, potential value of conducting main trial using value of information analysis (economic evaluation), description of usual care, and treatment fidelity of peer befriending. Assessments and outcome measures (mood, wellbeing, communication, and social participation) for participants and significant others will be administered at baseline, with outcome measures re-administered at 4 and 10 months post-randomisation. Peer befrienders will complete outcome measures before training and after they have completed two cycles of befriending. The qualitative study will use semi-structured interviews of purposively sampled participants (n = 20) and significant others (n = 10) from both arms of the trial, and all peer befrienders to explore the acceptability of procedures and experiences of care. The pilot economic evaluation will utilise the European Quality of life measure (EQ-5D-5 L) and a stroke-adapted version of the Client Service Receipt Inventory (CSRI). Discussion: This study will provide information on feasibility outcomes and an initial indication of whether peer befriending is a suitable intervention to explore further in a definitive phase III randomised controlled trial. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02947776, registered 28th October 2016.

14.
Scand J Caring Sci ; 33(1): 207-214, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30329166

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether varying the communication style of care assistants, encouraging them to use direct instructions and allowing more time for residents' responses influenced the communicative behaviour of care home residents living with dementia. DESIGN: This study used a multiple systematic case study design. Participants were video-recorded during morning care routines in three communication conditions: usual communication, direct instructions and pacing (allowing more time for resident responses). Each dyad acted as its own control. SETTING: The study took place in a residential care home in the East Midlands, UK. PARTICIPANTS: Three dyads (person with dementia/care worker) MEASURES: The level of compliance with instructions was measured. Validated measures were used to rate positive communicative behaviour (engagement with care tasks, eye contact and initiation of interaction) and negative communicative behaviour (e.g. shouting and kicking). RESULTS: Care assistants were able to employ direct instructions after brief training. The use of direct instructions was positively correlated with positive communicative behaviour from residents (p < 0.05). The pacing condition was not employed adequately to evaluate effectiveness. Negative communicative behaviour (resistiveness to care) was rare. CONCLUSION: The use of direct instructions by care assistants holds promise for effective communication with people with dementia and warrants further investigation in larger samples and in varied contexts.


Assuntos
Cuidadores/psicologia , Comunicação , Atenção à Saúde/métodos , Demência/enfermagem , Demência/psicologia , Relações Enfermeiro-Paciente , Assistentes de Enfermagem/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Instituição de Longa Permanência para Idosos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Casas de Saúde , Reino Unido , Adulto Jovem
15.
BMJ Support Palliat Care ; 9(1): 67-74, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26700484

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Patient-reported outcomes are an integral part of modern healthcare. We report a comparison of symptom item content from several validated cancer instruments to that of a published checklist, and identify the important differences this revealed. METHODS: We defined orphans as any symptom not assessed in any of the six selected instruments; champions, in contrast, were present in all six. An empirically derived cancer multisymptom checklist was used.Three symptom categories were identified Orphan-absent from all 6,Champion-present in all 6,Intermediate-underreported. The contents of each validated instrument were cross-referenced against the checklist. RESULTS: Eighteen (39%) checklist symptoms were orphans. Five (11%) were champions: fatigue, pain, anorexia, dyspnoea and nausea. Of the 46 checklist symptoms, 23 (50%) were inconsistently recorded. All 18 orphan symptoms were clinically important checklist symptoms. Common gastrointestinal and neuropsychological symptoms that pose great clinical management challenges were among the orphan symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Of 46 checklist cancer symptoms, over a third were orphans. All orphan symptoms were rated as clinically important and distressing by checklist. Only 5 checklist symptoms were champions: fatigue, pain, anorexia, dyspnoea and nausea. Important-but usually omitted-symptoms included early satiety (6 of 6) and weight loss (5 of 6). The bias appears to disproportionately affect gastrointestinal and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Symptom studies should specifically report the limitations and account for the inherent item bias of any instrument used.


Assuntos
Viés , Lista de Checagem , Neoplasias/complicações , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Avaliação de Sintomas/estatística & dados numéricos , Anorexia/epidemiologia , Dor do Câncer/epidemiologia , Dispneia/epidemiologia , Fadiga/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Náusea/epidemiologia
16.
ERJ Open Res ; 4(1)2018 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29479538

RESUMO

A successful initiative to improve best care practice in IPF supported by electronic medical record changes http://ow.ly/ORxi30hBEmy.

17.
Clin Rehabil ; 32(1): 94-102, 2018 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28653547

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To validate a non-verbal self-report measure of mood - the Dynamic Visual Analogue Mood Scales (D-VAMS) - against the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and assess its suitability as an outcome measure or screening measure for depressed mood following stroke. DESIGN: Cross-sectional observational cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-six stroke survivors (24% with aphasia) recruited from online, from stroke clubs and via an NHS rehabilitation service. METHODS: A set of seven bipolar scales was developed enabling users to report mood by modifying facial expression images using a slider. Participants completed a tablet/computer task, reporting their mood on these scales mixed randomly with versions which used only words. The HADS was then completed, followed by a repeat run of the two versions in a different, random sequence. RESULTS: Exploratory factor analysis identified one factor consistent with pleasantness of mood accounting for 80% of the variance. Internal consistency of D-VAMS was high ( α = 0.95), and there was a high correlation between face-only D-VAMS scores and HADS total scores ( r = -0.80, P < 0.001), as well as HADS-D/HADS-A subscale scores ( r = -0.73, P < 0.001; r = -0.71, P < 0.001). D-VAMS showed good sensitivity and specificity against HADS, with means of 85%/77% (sensitivity/specificity) against the HADS-D and 80%/77% against the HADS-A across nine cut-offs. CONCLUSION: D-VAMS is a valid and reliable measure likely suitable for assessment of depressed mood in aphasia following stroke. Though D-VAMS performed well as a screening measure in this study sample, further study is needed in the acute stage post-stroke.


Assuntos
Afeto , Afasia/psicologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Afasia/etiologia , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Psicometria , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações , Escala Visual Analógica
18.
Neuropsychol Rehabil ; 28(1): 57-116, 2018 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26787096

RESUMO

Many stroke survivors experience fatigue, which is associated with a variety of factors including cognitive impairment. A few studies have examined the relationship between fatigue and cognition and have obtained conflicting results. The aim of the current study was to review the literature on the relationship between fatigue and cognition post-stroke. The following databases were searched: EMBASE (1980-February, 2014), PsycInfo (1806-February, 2014), CINAHL (1937-February, 2014), MEDLINE (1946-February, 2014), Ethos (1600-February, 2014) and DART (1999-February, 2014). Reference lists of relevant papers were screened and the citation indices of the included papers were searched using Web of Science. Studies were considered if they were on adult stroke patients and assessed the following: fatigue with quantitative measurements (≥ 3 response categories), cognition using objective measurements, and the relationship between fatigue and cognition. Overall, 413 papers were identified, of which 11 were included. Four studies found significant correlations between fatigue and memory, attention, speed of information processing and reading speed (r = -.36 to .46) whereas seven studies did not. Most studies had limitations; quality scores ranged from 9 to 14 on the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme Checklists. There was insufficient evidence to support or refute a relationship between fatigue and cognition post-stroke. More robust studies are needed.


Assuntos
Disfunção Cognitiva/fisiopatologia , Fadiga/fisiopatologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/fisiopatologia , Disfunção Cognitiva/etiologia , Fadiga/etiologia , Humanos , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações
19.
BMJ Open ; 7(10): e018309, 2017 Oct 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29061630

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Reducing length of hospital stay for stroke survivors often creates a shift in the responsibility of care towards informal carers. Adjustment to the caregiving process is experienced by many carers as overwhelming, complex and demanding and can have a detrimental impact on mental and physical health and well-being. National policy guidelines recommend that carers' needs are considered and addressed; despite this, few interventions have been developed and empirically evaluated. We developed a biopsychosocial intervention in collaboration with carers of stroke survivors. Our aim is to determine whether the intervention can be delivered in a group setting and evaluated using a randomised controlled trial (RCT). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Feasibility RCT and nested qualitative interview study. We aim to recruit up to 40 stroke carers within 1 year of the stroke onset. Carers are randomised to usual care or usual care plus biopsychosocial intervention. Each intervention group will consist of five stroke carers. The intervention will focus on: psychoeducation, psychological adjustment to stroke, strategies for reducing unwanted negative thoughts and emotions and problem-solving strategies. The main outcome is the feasibility of conducting an RCT. Carer outcomes at 6 months include: anxiety and depression, quality of life and carer strain. Data are also collected from stroke survivors at baseline and 6 months including: level of disability, anxiety and depression, and quality of life. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Favourable ethical opinion was provided by East Midlands - Nottingham2 Research Ethics Committee (14/EMI/1264). This study will determine whether delivery of the biopsychosocial intervention is feasible and acceptable to stroke carers within a group format. It will also determine whether it is feasible to evaluate the effects of the biopsychosocial intervention in an RCT. We will disseminate our findings through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at national and international conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN15643456; Pre-results.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/terapia , Cuidadores/psicologia , Depressão/terapia , Psicoterapia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/terapia , Adaptação Psicológica , Ansiedade/psicologia , Depressão/psicologia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Qualidade de Vida , Projetos de Pesquisa
20.
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol ; 12(3): 236-243, 2017 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26730647

RESUMO

Purpose To identify from a health-care professionals' perspective whether smartphones are used by children and adolescents with acquired brain injury as memory aids; what factors predict smartphone use and what barriers prevent the use of smartphones as memory aids by children and adolescents. Method A cross-sectional online survey was undertaken with 88 health-care professionals working with children and adolescents with brain injury. Results Children and adolescents with brain injury were reported to use smartphones as memory aids by 75% of professionals. However, only 42% of professionals helped their clients to use smartphones. The only factor that significantly predicted reported smartphone use was the professionals' positive attitudes toward assistive technology. Several barriers to using smartphones as memory aids were identified, including the poor accessibility of devices and cost of devices. Conclusion Many children and adolescents with brain injury are already using smartphones as memory aids but this is often not facilitated by professionals. Improving the attitudes of professionals toward using smartphones as assistive technology could help to increase smartphone use in rehabilitation. Implications for Rehabilitation Smartphones could be incorporated into rehabilitation programs for young people with brain injury as socially acceptable compensatory aids. Further training and support for professionals on smartphones as compensatory aids could increase professionals' confidence and attitudes in facilitating the use of smartphones as memory aids. Accessibility could be enhanced by the development of a smartphone application specifically designed to be used by young people with brain injury.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Lesões Encefálicas/reabilitação , Transtornos da Memória/reabilitação , Equipamentos de Autoajuda , Smartphone/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Lesões Encefálicas/complicações , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Transtornos da Memória/etiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
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