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1.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(3): 324-333, 2021 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33939838

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act has improved access to screening and treatment for certain cancers. It is unclear how this policy has affected the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Using a quasi-experimental difference-in-differences (DID) approach, we analyzed Medicaid and uninsured patients in the National Cancer Data Base during two time periods: pre-expansion (2011-2012) and postexpansion (2015-2016). We investigated changes in cancer staging, treatment decisions, and surgical outcomes. RESULTS: In this national cohort, pancreatic cancer patients in expansion states had increased Medicaid coverage relative to those in nonexpansion states (DID = 17.49, p < 0.01). Medicaid expansion also led to an increase in early-stage diagnoses (Stage I/II, DID = 4.71, p = 0.03), higher comorbidity scores among surgical patients (Charlson/Deyo score 0: DID = -13.69, p = 0.02), a trend toward more neoadjuvant radiation (DID = 6.15, p = 0.06), and more positive margins (DID = 11.69, p = 0.02). There were no differences in rates of surgery, postoperative outcomes, or overall survival. CONCLUSION: Medicaid expansion was associated with improved insurance coverage and earlier stage diagnoses for Medicaid and uninsured pancreatic cancer patients, but similar surgical outcomes and overall survival. These findings highlight both the benefits of Medicaid expansion and the potential limitations of policy change to improve outcomes for such an aggressive malignancy.


Assuntos
Cobertura do Seguro/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicaid/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/economia , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/mortalidade , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/cirurgia , Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act , Sistema de Registros , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
2.
J Am Coll Surg ; 232(2): 146-156.e1, 2021 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33242599

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Affordable Care Act facilitated improved insurance coverage for states that expanded Medicaid coverage, but the impact on cancer outcomes is unclear. This study compared changes in the diagnosis and management of colon cancer in states that did and did not participate in Medicaid expansion. STUDY DESIGN: Using a quasi-experimental difference-in-differences (DID) approach, we analyzed Medicaid and uninsured patients in the National Cancer Data Base during 2 time periods: pre (2011-2012) and post expansion (2015-2016). Patients in non-expansion states were compared with those in January 2014 expansion states with regard to changes in patient and facility characteristics, cancer staging, treatment decisions, and surgical outcomes. RESULTS: Along with increased Medicaid coverage (DID = 20.27; p < 0.001), patients in expansion states had an increase in stage I diagnoses (DID = 2.97; p = 0.035), distance traveled (miles, DID = 6.67; p = 0.005), and treatment at integrated network programs (DID = 2.67; p = 0.045). More early-stage patients were treated within 30 days (DID = 7.24; p = 0.035) and more stage IV patients received palliative care (DID = 5.01; p = 0.048). Among surgical patients, Medicaid expansion correlated with fewer urgent cases (< 7 days, DID = -5.88; p = 0.008) and more minimally invasive surgery (DID = 5.00; p = 0.022). There were no observed differences in postoperative outcomes or adjuvant chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Medicaid expansion correlated with earlier diagnosis, enhanced access, and improved surgical care for colon cancer patients. These findings highlight the importance of improving health insurance coverage and can help guide future policy efforts.


Assuntos
Organizações de Assistência Responsáveis/organização & administração , Neoplasias do Colo/diagnóstico , Neoplasias do Colo/cirurgia , Medicaid/organização & administração , Adulto , Quimioterapia Adjuvante , Neoplasias do Colo/patologia , Detecção Precoce de Câncer , Feminino , Política de Saúde , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoas sem Cobertura de Seguro de Saúde , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Metástase Neoplásica , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Cuidados Paliativos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento , Estados Unidos
4.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 25(3): 808-817, 2018 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29302818

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Experiences at specialized hepatobiliary centers have demonstrated efficacy of minimally invasive liver resection, but concerns exist regarding whether these procedures would remain effective once disseminated to a broad range of clinical practices. We sought to present the first comparison of MILR and open liver resection (OLR) for primary liver malignancy from a nationally representative cancer registry. METHODS: Cases of liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer were identified from the National Cancer Data Base Participant Use File. Mixed effects logistic regression and stratified Cox proportional hazards regression were used for analysis. A propensity score matched cohort was used as an alternative form of analysis to evaluate the robustness of results. RESULTS: A total of 3236 cases were analyzed from 2010 to 2011 with 2581 OLR (80%) and 655 MILR (20%). Of the variation in patient selection for MILR 28.5% was related to treatment at a specific treatment center; however, the proportion of MILR was similar among low-, medium-, and high-volume centers. Overall 90-day mortality was lower at high-volume centers (odds ratio [OR] 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40-0.85) compared with low-volume centers. MILR was similar to OLR in both 90-day mortality and overall survival (OR 0.9; 95% CI 0.62-1.10) and hazard ratio [HR] 0.88 (95% CI 0.72-1.07), regardless of treatment center volume. CONCLUSIONS: MILR for primary liver malignancy is used across a variety of practice settings, with similar outcomes to OLR. While volume is associated with short-term outcomes of liver resection as a whole, this relationship is not explained by adoption of MILR at low-volume centers.


Assuntos
Neoplasias dos Ductos Biliares/mortalidade , Carcinoma Hepatocelular/mortalidade , Colangiocarcinoma/mortalidade , Hepatectomia/mortalidade , Neoplasias Hepáticas/mortalidade , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Minimamente Invasivos/mortalidade , Idoso , Neoplasias dos Ductos Biliares/patologia , Neoplasias dos Ductos Biliares/cirurgia , Carcinoma Hepatocelular/patologia , Carcinoma Hepatocelular/cirurgia , Colangiocarcinoma/patologia , Colangiocarcinoma/cirurgia , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Neoplasias Hepáticas/patologia , Neoplasias Hepáticas/cirurgia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico , Pontuação de Propensão , Taxa de Sobrevida
5.
Surg Endosc ; 26(6): 1759-64, 2012 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22219007

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Plasma from the second and third weeks after minimally invasive colorectal resection (MICR) has high levels of the proangiogenic proteins VEGF and angiopoietin 2 and also stimulates, in vitro, endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and migration, which are critical to wound and tumor angiogenesis. Soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) stimulates EC chemotaxis and angiogenesis. The impact of MICR on blood levels of sVCAM-1 is unknown. This study's purpose was to determine plasma sVCAM-1 levels after MICR in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. METHODS: Blood samples from 90 patients (26% rectal, 74% colon) were obtained preoperatively, on postoperative days (POD) 1 and 3, and at other points during the next 2 months. The late samples were bundled into 7-day time blocks. sVCAM-1 levels were determined in duplicate via ELISA and reported as ng/ml. Student's t test was used for data analysis (significance, P < 0.008 after Bonferroni correction). RESULTS: The mean incision length was 7.3 ± 3.1 cm, and the conversion rate was 3%. Compared with preoperative (PreOp) levels (811.3 ± 233.2), the mean plasma sVCAM-1 level was significantly higher on POD 1 (905.7 ± 292.4, P < 0.001) and POD 3 (977.7 ± 271.8, P < 0.001). Levels remained significantly elevated for the POD 7-13, POD 14-20, POD 21-27, and POD 28-67 time blocks. CONCLUSIONS: MICR for CRC is associated with a persistent increase in plasma sVCAM-1 levels during the first month. This sustained increase may promote angiogenesis and stimulate the growth of residual tumor cells early after surgery.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma/cirurgia , Neoplasias do Colo/cirurgia , Laparoscopia/métodos , Molécula 1 de Adesão de Célula Vascular/metabolismo , Adenocarcinoma/sangue , Idoso , Neoplasias do Colo/sangue , Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática , Feminino , Humanos , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasia Residual/sangue , Período Pós-Operatório
6.
Surg Innov ; 18(3): 254-8, 2011 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21398340

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Surgery's impact on blood levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a potent angiogenic factor, is unknown. Preoperative (PreOp) HGF blood levels are elevated in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and correlate with disease stage and prognosis. This study's purpose was to determine plasma HGF levels after minimally invasive colorectal resection (MICR) in patients with CRC. METHODS: Clinical and operative data were collected. Blood samples were obtained in all patients PreOp and on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 3; in some, samples were taken during weeks 2 and 3 after MICR. Late samples were bundled into 7-day time blocks. HGF levels were determined via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in duplicate. Student's t test was used to analyze the data (significance, P < .0125 after Bonferroni correction). RESULTS: A total of 28 CRC patients who underwent MICR were studied. Most had right, sigmoid, or left segmental colectomy. The mean plasma HGF level was higher on POD 1 (2417 ± 1476 pg/mL, P < .001) and POD 3 (2081 ± 1048 pg/mL, P < .001) when compared with PreOp levels (1045 ± 406 pg/mL). Plasma levels were back to baseline by the second (1100 ± 474 pg/mL, P = .64) and third postoperative weeks (1010 ± 327 pg/mL, P = .51). CONCLUSION: MICR for CRC is associated with a 1.9- to 2.3-fold increase in plasma HGF levels during the first 3 PODs after which levels normalize. This transient increase may briefly promote angiogenesis and the growth of residual tumor cells.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais/sangue , Neoplasias Colorretais/cirurgia , Fator de Crescimento de Hepatócito/sangue , Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática , Feminino , Humanos , Laparoscopia , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Minimamente Invasivos , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento , Estados Unidos
7.
Surg Endosc ; 25(6): 1939-44, 2011 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21181203

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Angiostatin and endostatin are endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis with anticancer effects. After minimally invasive colorectal resection (MICR), blood levels of the proangiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoetin 2 (Ang-2) are elevated for 2-4 weeks. Also, postoperative human plasma from weeks 2 and 3 after MICR has been shown to stimulate endothelial cell proliferation and migration, which are critical to angiogenesis. This proangiogenic state may stimulate tumor growth early after MICR. Surgery's impact on angiostatin and endostatin is unknown. This study's purpose is to determine perioperative plasma levels of these two proteins in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients undergoing MICR. METHODS: Endostatin levels were assessed in 34 CRC patients and angiostatin levels in 30 CRC patients. Blood samples were taken preoperatively and on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 3 in all patients; in a subset, samples were taken between POD 7 and 20. The late samples were bundled into 7-day blocks (POD 7-13, POD 14-20) and considered as single time points. Angiostatin and endostatin plasma levels were determined via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in duplicate. Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Student's t test were used to analyze endostatin and angiostatin data, respectively. Significance was set at P<0.0125 (after Bonferroni correction). RESULTS: There was a significant decrease in median plasma endostatin levels on POD 1, which returned to the preoperative level by POD 3. There was no significant difference between pre- and postoperative plasma angiostatin levels. CONCLUSIONS: MICR has a very transient impact on plasma levels of endostatin and no impact on angiostatin during the first 21 days following surgery. Thus, angiostatin and endostatin do not likely contribute to or inhibit the persistent proangiogenic changes noted after MICR.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma/cirurgia , Angiostatinas/sangue , Neoplasias Colorretais/cirurgia , Endostatinas/sangue , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Angiopoietina-2/sangue , Colectomia/métodos , Neoplasias Colorretais/sangue , Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Minimamente Invasivos , Período Pós-Operatório , Fator A de Crescimento do Endotélio Vascular/sangue
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