Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 523
Filtrar
1.
BMC Surg ; 20(1): 235, 2020 Oct 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33054733

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The rise in deaths attributed to opioid drugs has become a major public health problem in the United States and in the world. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is associated with a faster postoperative recovery and our aim was to investigate if the use of MIS was associated with lower odds of prolonged opioid prescriptions after major procedures. METHODS: Retrospective study using the IBM Watson Health Marketscan® Commerical Claims and Encounters Database investigating opioid-naïve cancer patients aged 18-64 who underwent open versus MIS radical prostatectomy (RP), partial colectomy (PC) or hysterectomy (HYS) from 2012 to 2017. Propensity weighted logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the independent effect of surgical approach on prolonged opioid prescriptions, defined as prescriptions within 91-180 days of surgery. RESULTS: Overall, 6838 patients underwent RP (MIS 85.5%), 4480 patients underwent PC (MIS 61.6%) and 1620 patients underwent HYS (MIS 41.8%). Approximately 70-80% of all patients had perioperative opioid prescriptions. In the weighted model, patients undergoing MIS were significantly less likely to have prolonged opioid prescriptions in all three surgery types (Odds Ratio [OR] 0.737, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.595-0.914, p = 0.006; OR 0.728, 95% CI 0.600-0.882, p = 0.001; OR 0.655, 95% CI 0.466-0.920, p = 0.015, respectively). CONCLUSION: The use of the MIS was associated with lower odds of prolonged opioid prescription in all procedures examined. While additional studies such as clinical trials are needed for further confirmation, our findings need to be considered for patient counseling as postoperative differences between approaches do exist.

2.
World J Urol ; 2020 Sep 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32909172

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To identify clinical and non-clinical predictors of treatment failure and perioperative complications following ureterorenoscopy versus shockwave lithotripsy. METHODS: The New York State Department of Health Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) database was used to identify 226,331 patients who underwent index ureteroscopy or shockwave lithotripsy for renal stones from 2000 to 2016. Propensity-matched generalized linear-mixed modeling was utilized to compare failure and complication rates between the two procedure groups. RESULTS: 219,383 individuals meeting inclusion criteria who underwent either ureterorenoscopy (n = 124,342) or shockwave lithotripsy (n = 95,041) in New York State between 2000 and 2016 were included in our analysis. After propensity score matching, patients undergoing shockwave lithotripsy were found to have decreased odds of experiencing any type of 30-day complication (P < 0.001 for all) but increased odds of treatment failure at both 90 (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.64-1.77) and 180 (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.76-1.89) days (P < 0.001 for both). CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing shockwave lithotripsy experienced significantly higher odds of treatment failure, although this undesirable outcome appears to be partially offset by lower 30-day complication rates.

3.
Curr Opin Urol ; 30(6): 748-753, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32941255

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review aims to shed light on recent applications of artificial intelligence in urologic oncology. RECENT FINDINGS: Artificial intelligence algorithms harness the wealth of patient data to assist in diagnosing, staging, treating, and monitoring genitourinary malignancies. Successful applications of artificial intelligence in urologic oncology include interpreting diagnostic imaging, pathology, and genomic annotations. Many of these algorithms, however, lack external validity and can only provide predictions based on one type of dataset. SUMMARY: Future applications of artificial intelligence will need to incorporate several forms of data in order to truly make headway in urologic oncology. Researchers must actively ensure future artificial intelligence developments encompass the entire prospective patient population.

4.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2020 Aug 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32827436

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Population-based literature suggest SARS-CoV-2 infection may disproportionately affect racial/ethnic minorities; however, patient-level observations of hospitalization outcomes by race/ethnicity are limited. The aim of this study was to characterize COVID-19-associated morbidity and in-hospital mortality by race/ethnicity. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of nine Massachusetts hospitals including all consecutive adult patients hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. Measured outcomes were assessed and compared by patient-reported race/ethnicity, classified as White, Black, Latinx, Asian, or other. Students t-test, Fischer exact test, and multivariable regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: 379 patients (62.9±16.5 years; 55.7% men) with confirmed COVID-19 were included (49.9% White, 13.7% Black, 29.8% Latinx, 3.7% Asian), of which 376 (99.2%) were insured (34.3% private, 41.2% public, 23.8% public with supplement). Latinx patients were younger, had fewer cardiopulmonary disorders, were more likely to have obesity, more frequently reported fever and myalgia, and had lower D-dimer levels compared to White patients (p&0.05). On multivariable analysis controlling for age, gender, obesity, cardiopulmonary comorbidities, hypertension, and diabetes, no significant differences in in-hospital mortality, ICU admission, or mechanical ventilation by race/ethnicity were found. Diabetes was a significant predictor for mechanical ventilation (OR 1.89; 95% CI 1.11-3.23) while older age was a predictor of in-hospital mortality (OR 4.18; 95% CI 1.94-9.04). CONCLUSIONS: In this multi-center cohort of hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the largest health system in Massachusetts, there was no association between race/ethnicity and clinically relevant hospitalization outcomes, including in-hospital mortality, after controlling for key demographic/clinical characteristics. These findings serve to refute suggestions that certain races/ethnicities may be biologically predisposed to poorer COVID-19 outcomes.

5.
Curr Opin Urol ; 30(5): 701-710, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32732625

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is heightened awareness and trends towards centralizing high-risk, complex surgeries such as radical cystectomy to minimize complications and improve survival. However, after nearly a decade of mandated and/or passive centralization of care, debate regarding its benefits and harms continues. RECENT FINDINGS: During the past decade, mandated and passive centralization has led to an increase in radical cystectomies performed in high-volume hospitals (HVHs) and, perhaps by high-volume surgeons (HVS), in addition to efforts to increase the uptake of multidisciplinary strategies in the management of radical cystectomy patients. Consequently, 30 and 90-day mortality rates and overall survival have improved, and major complications and transfusion rates have decreased. Factors impacting surgical quality, such as negative surgical margin(s), pelvic lymphadenectomy and/or lymph node yield rates have increased. However, current studies have not demonstrated a coadditive impact of centralization on oncological outcomes (i.e. cancer-specific and recurrence-free survival). The benefits of centralization on oncologic survival of radical cystectomy remain unclear given the varied definitions of HVHs and HVSs across studies. In fact, centralization of radical cystectomy could lead to an increase in patient load in HVHs and for HVSs, thereby leading to longer surgery waiting times, a factor that is important in the management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. SUMMARY: The benefits of centralization of radical cystectomy with multidisciplinary management are shown increasingly and convincingly. More studies are necessary to prospectively test the benefits, risks and harms of centralization.

6.
Urology ; 2020 Aug 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32805294

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine recent treatment trends for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), and specifically, to assess whether there was a change in use radical cystectomy (RC) between 2008 and 2015 using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. METHODS: We identified patients presenting with high-grade T1 (T1HG) NMIBC at diagnosis during the study period. Treatment was dichotomized into "RC" and "local treatment" (which included transurethral resection and intravesical therapies). We then employed multivariable logistic regression models to assess the odds of undergoing RC across the study period. Additionally we examined the rates of RC for T1HG NMIBC during the period of BCG-shortage, defined as 2012-2015. RESULTS: We identified 21,817 individuals diagnosed with T1HG bladder cancer during the study period. The majority of patients underwent local treatment (94.5%). During the shortage period, the rate of RC for T1HG NMIBC was significantly lower compared to the preshortage era (5.1% vs 5.9%, P = .007). Across the study period, the utilization of RC for T1HG NMIBC decreased significantly (odds ratio 0.99 per quarter, 95% confidence interval 0.98-0.99, P = .017). CONCLUSION: In our cohort of patients diagnosed with T1HG bladder cancer, we found a significant decrease in the use of radical cystectomy across the study period. Contrary to the hypothesis of increasing rates of RC in the face of BCG shortage, the rate of RC was significantly higher in the pre-shortage era. Further examination of NMIBC treatment patterns will be necessary to assess the impact of BCG availability on therapeutic pathways and oncologic outcomes in patients with high-grade NMIBC.

7.
Urology ; 2020 Aug 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32763323

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To inform treatment decisions for patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PCa), we determined rates of adverse pathologic factors and overall survival (OS) among subgroups of high-risk men. METHODS: Using the National Cancer Database, 89,450 patients with clinical N0M0 unfavorable intermediate-risk, favorable high-risk (cT1c, Gleason 6, prostate-specific antigen [PSA] > 20 ng/mL or cT1c, biopsy Gleason 8, PSA < 10 ng/mL), standard high-risk (all other cT3a, biopsy Gleason ≥ 8, or PSA > 20 ng/mL), or very high-risk (cT3b-T4 or biopsy primary Gleason pattern 5) PCa treated with radical prostatectomy were identified. Rates of adverse pathologic factors (positive surgical margins, T4 disease, or pathologic lymph node involvement) were compared across subgroups. RESULTS: Patients with unfavorable intermediate-risk (n = 31,381) and favorable high-risk (n = 10,296) disease had similar rates of adverse features (7.6% vs 8.2%, adjusted odds ratio 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.92-1.08, P= .974). Patients with standard high-risk (n = 30,260) or very high-risk (n = 7513) disease were significantly more likely to have adverse pathologic factors (15.9% and 26.5%, P < .001 for both). Patients with unfavorable intermediate-risk and favorable high-risk disease had similar 5-year OS (95.7% vs 95.1%, adjusted hazard ratio 1.06, 95% confidence interval 0.92-1.21, P = .411) but better OS compared to standard and very high-risk patients (93.4% and 88.1%, respectively; P < .001). CONCLUSION: Unfavorable intermediate-risk or favorable high-risk PCa patients had low rates of adverse pathologic factors and similar OS. In contrast, standard and very high-risk PCa patients had significantly higher rates of adverse pathologic factors and worse OS. This 3-tiered subclassification of high-risk disease may allow for improved treatment selection among patients considering surgery.

8.
Urol Oncol ; 38(9): 735.e9-735.e15, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32654951

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: A high percent positive biopsy cores (PBC), typically dichotomized at ≥50% is prognostic of worse cancer-specific outcomes for patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer (CaP). The clinical significance of ≥50% PBC for patients with high-risk disease is poorly understood. We examined the association between ≥50% PBC, compared to <50% PBC, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) for patients with high-risk disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We identified 7,569 men from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program who were diagnosed with high-risk CaP (Gleason score of 8-10, prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, or cT3-T4 stage) in 2010-2011 and had 6 to 24 cores sampled at biopsy. Multivariable Fine and Gray competing risks regression was utilized to examine the association between ≥50% PBC and PCSM. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 3.8 years. 56.2% of patients (4,253) had ≥50% PBC. On competing risks regression, ≥50% PBC was associated with a significantly higher risk of PCSM compared to <50% PBC (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 2.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48-2.70, P < 0.001). On subgroup analyses, ≥50% PBC was associated with a significantly higher risk of PCSM only for cT1-T2 disease (AHR 2.23, 95% CI 1.62-3.07) but not cT3-T4 disease (AHR 0.83, 95% CI 0.39-1.76), with a significant interaction (Pinteraction = 0.016). No significant interactions by Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen level, use of definitive therapy, or number of biopsy cores sampled were observed. CONCLUSION: In this large cohort of patients with high-risk CaP, ≥50% PBC was independently associated with an approximately 2-fold increased risk of PCSM for patients with cT1-T2, but not cT3-T4, tumors. Percent PBC, which is a widely available clinical value, should be routinely used to risk stratify men with high-risk disease and identify patients whom may benefit from treatment intensification.

9.
J Gastrointest Surg ; 2020 Jul 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32725520

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Racial disparities exist in patients with rectal cancer with respect to both treatment and survival. Minority-serving hospitals (MSHs) provide healthcare to a disproportionately large percent of minority patients in the USA. We examined the effects of rectal cancer treatment at MSH to understand drivers of these disparities. METHODS: The NCDB was queried (2004-2015), and patients diagnosed with stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma were identified. Racial case mix distribution was calculated at the institutional level, and MSHs were defined as those within the top decile of Black and Hispanic patients. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of receipt of standard of care treatment. Survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate adjusted risk of death. Analyses were clustered by facility. RESULTS: A total of 68,842 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 63,242 (91.9%) were treated at non-MSH, and 5600 (8.1%) were treated at MSH. In multivariable analysis, treatment at MSH (OR 0.70 95%CI 0.61-0.80 p < 0.001) and Black race (OR 0.75 95%CI 0.70-0.81 p < 0.001) were associated with significantly lower odds of receiving standard of care. In adjusted analysis, Black patients had a significantly higher risk of mortality (HR 1.20 95%CI 1.14-1.26 p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Treatment at MSH institutions and Black race were associated with significantly decreased odds of receipt of recommended standard therapy for locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma. Survival was worse for Black patients compared to White patients despite adjustment for receipt of standard of care.

10.
Eur Urol Oncol ; 2020 Jul 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32665140

RESUMO

Testicular cancer is the most commonly diagnosed solid-organ neoplasm among young men, with variable incidence across racial groups. Testicular cancer incidence has increased since the 1970s, most notably among white men. Such trends in testicular cancer remain poorly understood. We investigated age-adjusted incidence rates of testicular cancer from 1975 to 2015 using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data to further understand the nature of the temporal trends and potential drivers of disease. Across this time period, white men had the highest incidence and the largest increase in rate; however, we also note more recent increases in the incidence of testicular cancer across all racial groups being examined. PATIENT SUMMARY: We analyzed the rate of testicular cancer in the United States between 1975 and 2015. In that time, white patients had the highest rate and increase in rate of testicular cancer, but non-white patients also had increasing rates of disease.

11.
Scand J Urol ; 54(4): 290-296, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32538224

RESUMO

Objectives: To examine the temporal association between blood transfusion and 90-day mortality in patients with bladder cancer treated with radical cystectomy.Methods: This represents a retrospective cohort study of patients treated with radical cystectomy within the Premier Hospital network between 2003 and 2015. Patients outcomes were stratified those who received early blood transfusion (day of surgery) vs delayed blood transfusion (postoperative day ≥1) during the index admission. Primary end point was 90-day mortality following surgery.Results: The median age of 12,056 patients identified was 70 years. A total of 7,201 (59.7%) patients received blood transfusion. Within 90 days following surgery, 57 (2.2%), 162 (5.9%) and 123 (6.7%) patients in the early, delayed and both early and delayed transfused patients died respectively. Following multivariate logistic regression to account for patient (age and Charlson Comorbidity Index [CCI]) and hospital (surgeon volume, surgical approach and academic status) factors, delayed blood transfusion was independently associated with 90-day mortality (Odds ratio [OR], 2.64; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.98-3.53; p < 0.001). A sensitivity analysis defining early blood transfusion as <2 days postoperatively, increased 90-day mortality persisted in patients receiving delayed transfusion (OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.63-3.00; p < 0.001). Older patients (≥77 years) with the highest CCI (≥2) had a 7% absolute increase in the predicted probability of 90-day mortality if they were transfused late compared to patients transfused early.Conclusion: Patient undergoing cystectomy may benefit from expedited transfusion to prevent subsequent clinical deterioration which may lead to patient mortality. Future work is needed to elucidate the optimal timing of blood transfusion.

14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32335060

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to examine the overall survival (OS) in patients diagnosed with high-grade T1 non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with early radical cystectomy versus local treatment of the primary tumor, defined as endoscopic management with or without intravesical chemotherapy or immunotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We identified 4900 patients with histologically confirmed, clinically non-metastatic high-grade T1 bladder cancer undergoing surgical intervention using the National Cancer Database for the period 2010 to 2015. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine predictors for the receipt of early radical cystectomy (defined as radical cystectomy within 90 days of diagnosis). We then employed multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models and Kaplan-Meier curves to evaluate the OS according to surgical treatment (early radical cystectomy vs. local treatment). RESULTS: A minority (23.7%) of patients underwent early radical cystectomy. Independent predictors of undergoing early radical cystectomy included lower age, White race, and lower comorbidity status. The median OS was 74.0 months for patients diagnosed with high-grade T1 bladder cancer. The 1- and 5-year survival rates of patients undergoing early radical cystectomy were 94.8% and 71.0%, whereas they were 85.2% and 52.4%, for patients undergoing initial local treatment, respectively (P < .001). Compared with patients undergoing local treatment, patients undergoing early radical cystectomy had a lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.91; P = .002). CONCLUSION: In this cohort of patients presenting with high-grade T1 non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, we found that early radical cystectomy was associated with an OS benefit compared with initial local treatment.

15.
Surg Endosc ; 2020 Apr 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32291540

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is controversy regarding the widespread uptake of robotic surgery across several surgical disciplines. While it has been shown to confer clinical benefits such as decreased blood loss and shorter hospital stays, some argue that the benefits of this technology do not outweigh its high cost. We performed a retrospective insurance-based analysis to investigate how undergoing robotic surgery, compared to open surgery, may impact the time in which an employed individual returns to work after undergoing major surgery. METHODS: We identified a cohort of US adults with employer-sponsored insurance using claims data from the MarketScan database who underwent either open or robotic radical prostatectomy, hysterectomy/myomectomy, and partial colectomy from 2012 to 2016. We performed multiple regression models incorporating propensity scores to assess the effect of robotic vs. open surgery on the number of absent days from work, adjusting for demographic characteristics and baseline absenteeism. RESULTS: In a cohort of 1157 individuals with employer-sponsored insurance, those undergoing open surgery, compared to robotic surgery, had 9.9 more absent workdays for radical prostatectomy (95%CI 5.0 to 14.7, p < 0.001), 25.3 for hysterectomy/myomectomy (95%CI 11.0-39.6, p < 0.001), and 29.8 for partial colectomy (95%CI 14.8-44.8, p < 0.001) CONCLUSION: For the three major procedures studied, robotic surgery was associated with fewer missed days from work compared to open surgery. This information helps payers, patients, and providers better understand some of the indirect benefits of robotic surgery relative to its cost.

18.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(3): e201839, 2020 03 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32232449

RESUMO

Importance: While racial disparities in prostate cancer mortality are well documented, it is not well known how these disparities vary geographically within the US. Objective: To characterize geographic variation in prostate cancer-specific mortality differences between black and white men. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study included data from 17 geographic registries within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2014. Inclusion criteria were men 18 years and older with biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer. Men missing data on key variables (ie, cancer stage, Gleason grade group, prostate-specific antigen level, and survival follow-up data) were excluded. Analysis was performed from September 5 to December 25, 2018. Exposure: Patient SEER-designated race (ie, black, white, or other). Main Outcomes and Measures: Fine and Gray competing-risks regression analyses were used to evaluate the difference in prostate-cancer specific mortality between black and white men. A stratified analysis by Gleason grade group was performed stratified as grade group 1 and grade groups 2 through 5. Results: The final cohort consisted of 229 771 men, including 178 204 white men (77.6%), 35 006 black men (15.2%), and 16 561 men of other or unknown race (7.2%). Mean (SD) age at diagnosis was 64.9 (8.8) years. There were 4773 prostate cancer deaths among white men and 1250 prostate cancer deaths among black men. Compared with white men, black men had a higher risk of mortality overall (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 1.39 [95% CI, 1.30-1.48]). In the stratified analysis, there were 4 registries in which black men had worse prostate cancer-specific survival in both Gleason grade group 1 (Atlanta, Georgia: AHR, 5.49 [95% CI, 2.03-14.87]; Greater Georgia: AHR, 1.88 [95% CI, 1.10-3.22]; Louisiana: AHR, 1.80 [95% CI, 1.06-3.07]; New Jersey: AHR, 2.60 [95% CI, 1.53-4.40]) and Gleason grade groups 2 through 5 (Atlanta: AHR, 1.88 [95% CI, 1.46-2.45]; Greater Georgia: AHR, 1.29 [95% CI, 1.07-1.56]; Louisiana: AHR, 1.28 [95% CI, 1.07-1.54]; New Jersey: AHR, 1.52 [95% CI, 1.24-1.87]), although the magnitude of survival difference was lower than for Gleason grade group 1 in each of these registries. The greatest race-based survival difference for men with Gleason grade group 1 disease was in the Atlanta registry. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that population-level differences in prostate cancer survival among black and white men were associated with a small set of geographic areas and with low-risk prostate cancer. Targeted interventions in these areas may help to mitigate prostate cancer care disparities at the national level.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias da Próstata/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Próstata/mortalidade , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gradação de Tumores , Neoplasias da Próstata/diagnóstico , Neoplasias da Próstata/terapia , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
20.
J Urol ; 204(3): 564-569, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32267200

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Implementation of survivorship care plans has been emphasized as a key component to improving care for cancer survivors. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of survivorship care plan receipt for survivors of genitourinary malignancy including kidney, prostate and bladder cancer, and evaluate whether receipt was associated with a measurable health benefit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Cancer Survivorship modules in 2012, 2014, 2016 and 2017 were analyzed. The proportion of patients with bladder, kidney or prostate cancer receiving a survivorship care plan was calculated. Complex samples multivariable logistic regressions were performed to determine the association of survivorship care plan receipt with sociodemographic variables, and assess the relationship between survivorship care plan receipt and self-reported health status (general, physical and mental). RESULTS: Survivorship care plan distribution increased from 27.5% in 2012 to 39.5% in 2017. Patients with low income, less formal education and extremes of age were less likely to receive a survivorship care plan. Those receiving a survivorship care plan were less likely to report poor physical health (OR 0.70, CI 0.52-0.96, p=0.026). Subanalysis showed a similar result for physical health of patients with prostate cancer (OR 0.68, CI 0.48-0.96, p=0.030) and general health of patients with kidney cancer (OR 0.37, CI 0.19-0.75, p=0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Distribution of survivorship care plans to genitourinary malignancy survivors has increased since 2012 in response to advocacy from national organizations. Nonetheless, utilization is low and there is heterogeneity in the populations likely to receive a survivorship care plan. There is a measurable association between survivorship care plans and improved health status but further study is needed to determine causality.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA