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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33827984

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Given the increased use and diversity of diagnostic procedures, it is important to understand genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced thyroid cancer. METHODS: Based on self-declared diagnostic radiology examination records in addition to existing literature, we estimated the radiation dose delivered to the thyroid gland from diagnostic procedures during childhood and adulthood in two case-control studies conducted in France. A total of 1071 differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) cases and 1188 controls from the combined studies were genotyped using a custom-made Illumina OncoArray DNA chip. We focused our analysis on variants in genes involved in DNA damage response and repair pathways, representing a total of 5817 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 571 genes. We estimated the odds ratio per milli-Gray (OR/mGy) of the radiation dose delivered to the thyroid gland using conditional logistic regression. We then used an unconditional logistic regression model to assess the association between DNA repair gene variants and DTC risk. We performed a meta-analysis of the two studies. RESULTS: The OR/mGy was 1.02 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.03). We found significant associations between DTC and rs7164173 in CHD2 (p = 5.79 10-5), rs6067822 in NFATc2 (p = 9.26 10-5), rs1059394 and rs699517 both in ENOSF1/THYS, rs12702628 in RPA3, and an interaction between rs7068306 in MGMT and thyroid radiation doses (p= 3.40 10-4). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a role for variants in CDH2, NFATc2, ENOSF1/THYS, RPA3 and MGMT in DTC risk. IMPACT: CDH2, NFATc2, ENOSF1/THYS and RPA3 have not previously been shown to be associated with DTC risk.

2.
BMC Bioinformatics ; 22(1): 86, 2021 Feb 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33627076

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The increasing number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has revealed several loci that are associated to multiple distinct phenotypes, suggesting the existence of pleiotropic effects. Highlighting these cross-phenotype genetic associations could help to identify and understand common biological mechanisms underlying some diseases. Common approaches test the association between genetic variants and multiple traits at the SNP level. In this paper, we propose a novel gene- and a pathway-level approach in the case where several independent GWAS on independent traits are available. The method is based on a generalization of the sparse group Partial Least Squares (sgPLS) to take into account groups of variables, and a Lasso penalization that links all independent data sets. This method, called joint-sgPLS, is able to convincingly detect signal at the variable level and at the group level. RESULTS: Our method has the advantage to propose a global readable model while coping with the architecture of data. It can outperform traditional methods and provides a wider insight in terms of a priori information. We compared the performance of the proposed method to other benchmark methods on simulated data and gave an example of application on real data with the aim to highlight common susceptibility variants to breast and thyroid cancers. CONCLUSION: The joint-sgPLS shows interesting properties for detecting a signal. As an extension of the PLS, the method is suited for data with a large number of variables. The choice of Lasso penalization copes with architectures of groups of variables and observations sets. Furthermore, although the method has been applied to a genetic study, its formulation is adapted to any data with high number of variables and an exposed a priori architecture in other application fields.


Assuntos
Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Análise dos Mínimos Quadrados , Fenótipo
3.
Int J Cancer ; 2021 Feb 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33527407

RESUMO

Incidence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) varies considerably between ethnic groups, with particularly high incidence rates in Pacific Islanders. DTC is one of the cancers with the highest familial risk suggesting a major role of genetic risk factors, but only few susceptibility loci were identified so far. In order to assess the contribution of known DTC susceptibility loci and to identify new ones, we conducted a multiethnic genome-wide association study (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry and of Oceanian ancestry from Pacific Islands. Our study included 1554 cases/1973 controls of European ancestry and 301 cases/348 controls of Oceanian ancestry from seven population-based case-control studies participating to the EPITHYR consortium. All participants were genotyped using the OncoArray-500K Beadchip (Illumina). We confirmed the association with the known DTC susceptibility loci at 2q35, 8p12, 9q22.33 and 14q13.3 in the European ancestry population and suggested two novel signals at 1p31.3 and 16q23.2, which were associated with thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in previous GWAS. We additionally replicated an association with 5p15.33 reported previously in Chinese and European populations. Except at 1p31.3, all associations were in the same direction in the population of Oceanian ancestry. We also observed that the frequencies of risk alleles at 2q35, 5p15.33 and 16q23.2 were significantly higher in Oceanians than in Europeans. However, additional GWAS and epidemiological studies in Oceanian populations are needed to fully understand the highest incidence observed in these populations.

4.
Int J Cancer ; 148(1): 99-105, 2021 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32930425

RESUMO

Polygenic hazard score (PHS) models are associated with age at diagnosis of prostate cancer. Our model developed in Europeans (PHS46) showed reduced performance in men with African genetic ancestry. We used a cross-validated search to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that might improve performance in this population. Anonymized genotypic data were obtained from the PRACTICAL consortium for 6253 men with African genetic ancestry. Ten iterations of a 10-fold cross-validation search were conducted to select SNPs that would be included in the final PHS46+African model. The coefficients of PHS46+African were estimated in a Cox proportional hazards framework using age at diagnosis as the dependent variable and PHS46, and selected SNPs as predictors. The performance of PHS46 and PHS46+African was compared using the same cross-validated approach. Three SNPs (rs76229939, rs74421890 and rs5013678) were selected for inclusion in PHS46+African. All three SNPs are located on chromosome 8q24. PHS46+African showed substantial improvements in all performance metrics measured, including a 75% increase in the relative hazard of those in the upper 20% compared to the bottom 20% (2.47-4.34) and a 20% reduction in the relative hazard of those in the bottom 20% compared to the middle 40% (0.65-0.53). In conclusion, we identified three SNPs that substantially improved the association of PHS46 with age at diagnosis of prostate cancer in men with African genetic ancestry to levels comparable to Europeans.

5.
Int J Cancer ; 148(8): 1895-1909, 2021 Apr 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33368296

RESUMO

Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in over 180 loci have been associated with breast cancer (BC) through genome-wide association studies involving mostly unselected population-based case-control series. Some of them modify BC risk of women carrying a BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation and may also explain BC risk variability in BC-prone families with no BRCA1/2 mutation. Here, we assessed the contribution of SNPs of the iCOGS array in GENESIS consisting of BC cases with no BRCA1/2 mutation and a sister with BC, and population controls. Genotyping data were available for 1281 index cases, 731 sisters with BC, 457 unaffected sisters and 1272 controls. In addition to the standard SNP-level analysis using index cases and controls, we performed pedigree-based association tests to capture transmission information in the sibships. We also performed gene- and pathway-level analyses to maximize the power to detect associations with lower-frequency SNPs or those with modest effect sizes. While SNP-level analyses identified 18 loci, gene-level analyses identified 112 genes. Furthermore, 31 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and 7 Atlas of Cancer Signaling Network pathways were highlighted (false discovery rate of 5%). Using results from the "index case-control" analysis, we built pathway-derived polygenic risk scores (PRS) and assessed their performance in the population-based CECILE study and in a data set composed of GENESIS-affected sisters and CECILE controls. Although these PRS had poor predictive value in the general population, they performed better than a PRS built using our SNP-level findings, and we found that the joint effect of family history and PRS needs to be considered in risk prediction models.

6.
Stat Med ; 40(6): 1498-1518, 2021 Mar 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33368447

RESUMO

An increasing number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) summary statistics is made available to the scientific community. Exploiting these results from multiple phenotypes would permit identification of novel pleiotropic associations. In addition, incorporating prior biological information in GWAS such as group structure information (gene or pathway) has shown some success in classical GWAS approaches. However, this has not been widely explored in the context of pleiotropy. We propose a Bayesian meta-analysis approach (termed GCPBayes) that uses summary-level GWAS data across multiple phenotypes to detect pleiotropy at both group-level (gene or pathway) and within group (eg, at the SNP level). We consider both continuous and Dirac spike and slab priors for group selection. We also use a Bayesian sparse group selection approach with hierarchical spike and slab priors that enables us to select important variables both at the group level and within group. GCPBayes uses a Bayesian statistical framework based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Gibbs sampling. It can be applied to multiple types of phenotypes for studies with overlapping or nonoverlapping subjects, and takes into account heterogeneity in the effect size and allows for the opposite direction of the genetic effects across traits. Simulations show that the proposed methods outperform benchmark approaches such as ASSET and CPBayes in the ability to retrieve pleiotropic associations at both SNP and gene-levels. To illustrate the GCPBayes method, we investigate the shared genetic effects between thyroid cancer and breast cancer in candidate pathways.

7.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 2020 Oct 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33021645

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Polyphenols are natural compounds with anticarcinogenic properties in cellular and animal models, but epidemiological evidence determining the associations of these compounds with thyroid cancer (TC) is lacking. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relations between blood concentrations of 36 polyphenols and TC risk in EPIC (the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition). METHODS: A nested case-control study was conducted on 273 female cases (210 papillary, 45 follicular, and 18 not otherwise specified TC tumors) and 512 strictly matched controls. Blood polyphenol concentrations were analyzed by HPLC coupled to tandem MS after enzymatic hydrolysis. RESULTS: Using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression models, caffeic acid (ORlog2: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.33, 0.93) and its dehydrogenated metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionic acid (ORlog2: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.71, 0.99), were inversely associated with differentiated TC risk. Similar results were observed for papillary TC, but not for follicular TC. Ferulic acid was also inversely associated only with papillary TC (ORlog2: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.51, 0.91). However, none of these relations was significant after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. No association was observed for any of the remaining polyphenols with total differentiated, papillary, or follicular TC. CONCLUSIONS: Blood polyphenol concentrations were mostly not associated with differentiated TC risk in women, although our study raises the possibility that high blood concentrations of caffeic, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionic, and ferulic acids may be related to a lower papillary TC risk.

8.
Int J Cancer ; 147(11): 3119-3129, 2020 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32506468

RESUMO

Over the past two decades, several studies have attempted to understand the hypothesis that disrupting the circadian rhythm may promote the development of cancer. Some have suggested that night work and some circadian genes polymorphisms are associated with cancer, including prostate cancer. Our study aims to test the hypothesis that prostate cancer risk among night workers may be modulated by genetic polymorphisms in the circadian pathway genes based on data from the EPICAP study, a population-based case-control study including 1511 men (732 cases/779 controls) with genotyped data. We estimated odds ratio (ORs) and P values of the association between prostate cancer and circadian gene variants using logistic regression models. We tested the interaction between circadian genes variants and night work indicators that were significantly associated with prostate cancer at pathway, gene and SNP levels. Analyses were also stratified by each of these night work indicators and by cancer aggressiveness. The circadian pathway was significantly associated with aggressive prostate cancer among night workers (P = .004), particularly for men who worked at night for <20 years (P = .0002) and those who performed long night shift (>10 hours, P = .001). At the gene level, we observed among night workers significant associations between aggressive prostate cancer and ARNTL, NPAS2 and RORA. At the SNP-level, no significant association was observed. Our findings provide some clues of a potential modulating effect of circadian genes in the relationship between night work and prostate cancer. Further investigation is warranted to confirm these findings and to better elucidate the biological pathways involved.

9.
PLoS One ; 15(1): e0228187, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31999731

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: GSTM1 and GSTT1 are involved in detoxification of xenobiotics, products of oxidative stress and in steroid hormones metabolism. We investigated whether GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene deletion was associated with DTC risk and explored interaction with non-genetic risk factors of DTC. METHODS: The study included 661 DTC cases and 736 controls from two case-control studies conducted in France and New Caledonia. Odds ratios (OR) and their confidence interval (CI) for DTC associated with GST genotypes, alcohol drinking, tobacco smoking, body mass index and hormonal factors were calculated using logistic regression models. RESULTS: Results are presented for Europeans and Melanesians combined, as no heterogeneity between groups was detected. We found that DTC risk increased with obesity and decrease with alcohol drinking. After stratification by gene deletion status, the OR for obesity was 5.75, (95%CI 2.25-14.7) among individuals with GSTT1 and GSTM1-deleted genotype, and 1.26, (95%CI 0.89-1.77) in carriers of both genes (p-interaction = 0.02). The OR for drinking ≥1 glass/week was 0.33 (95%CI 0.15-0.74) in GSTT1-null individuals while it was 1.01 (95%CI 0.67-1.52) in non-null carriers of the gene (p-interaction = 0.01). No interaction between GST genotypes and other non-genetic risk factors was detected. CONCLUSION: GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes may modulate the DTC risk associated with BMI and alcohol consumption.


Assuntos
Glutationa Transferase/genética , Estilo de Vida , Neoplasias da Glândula Tireoide/genética , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Índice de Massa Corporal , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Deleção de Genes , Genótipo , Hormônios Esteroides Gonadais/metabolismo , Comportamentos de Risco à Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nova Caledônia , Obesidade/complicações , Neoplasias da Glândula Tireoide/etiologia
10.
Int J Epidemiol ; 49(2): 587-596, 2020 04 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31802111

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is the second most common male cancer worldwide, but there is substantial geographical variation, suggesting a potential role for modifiable risk factors in prostate carcinogenesis. METHODS: We identified previously reported prostate cancer risk factors from the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF)'s systematic appraisal of the global evidence (2018). We assessed whether each identified risk factor was causally associated with risk of overall (79 148 cases and 61 106 controls) or aggressive (15 167 cases and 58 308 controls) prostate cancer using Mendelian randomization (MR) based on genome-wide association-study summary statistics from the PRACTICAL and GAME-ON/ELLIPSE consortia. We assessed evidence for replication in UK Biobank (7844 prostate-cancer cases and 204 001 controls). RESULTS: WCRF identified 57 potential risk factors, of which 22 could be instrumented for MR analyses using single nucleotide polymorphisms. For overall prostate cancer, we identified evidence compatible with causality for the following risk factors (odds ratio [OR] per standard deviation increase; 95% confidence interval): accelerometer-measured physical activity, OR = 0.49 (0.33-0.72; P = 0.0003); serum iron, OR = 0.92 (0.86-0.98; P = 0.007); body mass index (BMI), OR = 0.90 (0.84-0.97; P = 0.003); and monounsaturated fat, OR = 1.11 (1.02-1.20; P = 0.02). Findings in our replication analyses in UK Biobank were compatible with our main analyses (albeit with wide confidence intervals). In MR analysis, height was positively associated with aggressive-prostate-cancer risk: OR = 1.07 (1.01-1.15; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The results for physical activity, serum iron, BMI, monounsaturated fat and height are compatible with causality for prostate cancer. The results suggest that interventions aimed at increasing physical activity may reduce prostate-cancer risk, although interventions to change other risk factors may have negative consequences on other diseases.

11.
Int J Cancer ; 146(7): 1841-1850, 2020 04 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31342519

RESUMO

Polyphenols are bioactive compounds with several anticarcinogenic activities; however, human data regarding associations with thyroid cancer (TC) is still negligible. Our aim was to evaluate the association between intakes of total, classes and subclasses of polyphenols and risk of differentiated TC and its main subtypes, papillary and follicular, in a European population. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort included 476,108 men and women from 10 European countries. During a mean follow-up of 14 years, there were 748 incident differentiated TC cases, including 601 papillary and 109 follicular tumors. Polyphenol intake was estimated at baseline using validated center/country-specific dietary questionnaires and the Phenol-Explorer database. In multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models, no association between total polyphenol and the risks of overall differentiated TC (HRQ4 vs. Q1 = 0.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.77-1.29), papillary (HRQ4 vs. Q1 = 1.06, 95% CI 0.80-1.41) or follicular TC (HRQ4 vs. Q1 = 1.10, 95% CI 0.55-2.22) were found. No associations were observed either for flavonoids, phenolic acids or the rest of classes and subclasses of polyphenols. After stratification by body mass index (BMI), an inverse association between the intake of polyphenols (p-trend = 0.019) and phenolic acids (p-trend = 0.007) and differentiated TC risk in subjects with BMI ≥ 25 was observed. In conclusion, our study showed no associations between dietary polyphenol intake and differentiated TC risk; although further studies are warranted to investigate the potential protective associations in overweight and obese individuals.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma Folicular/epidemiologia , Comportamento Alimentar , Polifenóis/administração & dosagem , Câncer Papilífero da Tireoide/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Glândula Tireoide/epidemiologia , Adenocarcinoma Folicular/prevenção & controle , Adulto , Índice de Massa Corporal , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inquéritos Nutricionais/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Prospectivos , Câncer Papilífero da Tireoide/prevenção & controle , Neoplasias da Glândula Tireoide/prevenção & controle
12.
Int J Cancer ; 145(7): 1745-1753, 2019 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30665264

RESUMO

Circadian rhythms regulate several physiological functions and genes controlling the circadian rhythm were found to regulate cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis. Few studies have investigated the role of those circadian genes in prostate cancer occurrence. We aim to investigate the relationship between circadian genes polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk based on data from the EPICAP study, a population-based case-control study including 1,515 men (732 cases / 783 controls) with genotyped data. Odds Ratios (ORs) for association between prostate cancer and circadian gene variants were estimated for each of the 872 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 31 circadian clock genes. We also used a gene-based and pathway-based approach with a focus on the pathway including 9 core circadian genes. Separate analyses were conducted by prostate cancer aggressiveness. The core-circadian pathway (p = 0.0006) was significantly associated to prostate cancer, for either low (p = 0.002) or high (p = 0.01) grade tumor. At the gene level, we observed significant associations between all prostate cancer and NPAS2 and PER1 after correcting for multiple testing, while only RORA was significant for aggressive tumors. At the SNP-level, no significant association was observed. Our findings provide additional evidence of a potential link between genetic variants in circadian genes and prostate cancer risk. Further investigation is warranted to confirm these findings and to better understand the biological pathways involved.


Assuntos
Fatores de Transcrição Hélice-Alça-Hélice Básicos/genética , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Membro 1 do Grupo F da Subfamília 1 de Receptores Nucleares/genética , Proteínas Circadianas Period/genética , Neoplasias da Próstata/patologia , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Relógios Circadianos , Redes Reguladoras de Genes , Estudos de Associação Genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gradação de Tumores , Razão de Chances , Neoplasias da Próstata/genética
13.
Int J Cancer ; 144(8): 1896-1908, 2019 04 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30303517

RESUMO

Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in xenobiotics metabolism (XM) are suspected to play a role in breast cancer risk. However, previous findings based on a SNP by SNP approach need to be replicated taking into account the combined effects of multiple SNPs. We used a gene-set analysis method to study the association between breast cancer risk and genetic variation in XM genes (seen as a set of SNPs) and in the XM pathway (seen as a set of genes). We also studied the interaction between variants in XM genes and tobacco smoking. The analysis was conducted in a case-control study of 1,125 cases and 1,172 controls. Using a dedicated chip, genotyping data of 585 SNPs in 68 XM genes were available. Genetic variation in the whole XM pathway was significantly associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (p = 0.008). This association was mainly driven by genetic variation in NAT2, CYP2C18, CYP2C19, AKR1C2 and ALDH1A3. The association between the XM gene pathway and breast cancer was observed among current and previous smokers, but not among never smokers (p = 0.013 for interaction between XM genes and tobacco smoking status). The association with breast cancer risk indicates that XM genes variants may play a role in breast carcinogenesis through their detoxification function of environmental pollutants, such as those contained in tobacco smoke.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Redes e Vias Metabólicas/genética , Fumar Tabaco/efeitos adversos , Xenobióticos/metabolismo , Adulto , Idoso , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/etiologia , Carcinogênese/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Genótipo , Humanos , Incidência , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Risco , Fumaça/efeitos adversos , Tabaco/efeitos adversos , Fumar Tabaco/epidemiologia
14.
Int J Epidemiol ; 47(2): 526-536, 2018 04 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29315403

RESUMO

Background: Polygenic risk scores (PRS) for breast cancer can be used to stratify the population into groups at substantially different levels of risk. Combining PRS and environmental risk factors will improve risk prediction; however, integrating PRS into risk prediction models requires evaluation of their joint association with known environmental risk factors. Methods: Analyses were based on data from 20 studies; datasets analysed ranged from 3453 to 23 104 invasive breast cancer cases and similar numbers of controls, depending on the analysed environmental risk factor. We evaluated joint associations of a 77-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) PRS with reproductive history, alcohol consumption, menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), height and body mass index (BMI). We tested the null hypothesis of multiplicative joint associations for PRS and each of the environmental factors, and performed global and tail-based goodness-of-fit tests in logistic regression models. The outcomes were breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Results: The strongest evidence for a non-multiplicative joint associations with the 77-SNP PRS was for alcohol consumption (P-interaction = 0.009), adult height (P-interaction = 0.025) and current use of combined MHT (P-interaction = 0.038) in ER-positive disease. Risk associations for these factors by percentiles of PRS did not follow a clear dose-response. In addition, global and tail-based goodness of fit tests showed little evidence for departures from a multiplicative risk model, with alcohol consumption showing the strongest evidence for ER-positive disease (P = 0.013 for global and 0.18 for tail-based tests). Conclusions: The combined effects of the 77-SNP PRS and environmental risk factors for breast cancer are generally well described by a multiplicative model. Larger studies are required to confirm possible departures from the multiplicative model for individual risk factors, and assess models specific for ER-negative disease.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Interação Gene-Ambiente , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco
15.
Int J Cancer ; 141(9): 1830-1840, 2017 11 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28670784

RESUMO

Investigating the most likely causal variants identified by fine-mapping analyses may improve the power to detect gene-environment interactions. We assessed the interplay between 70 single nucleotide polymorphisms identified by genetic fine-scale mapping of susceptibility loci and 11 epidemiological breast cancer risk factors in relation to breast cancer. Analyses were conducted on up to 58,573 subjects (26,968 cases and 31,605 controls) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, in one of the largest studies of its kind. Analyses were carried out separately for estrogen receptor (ER) positive (ER+) and ER negative (ER-) disease. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability (BFDP) was computed to assess the noteworthiness of the results. Four potential gene-environment interactions were identified as noteworthy (BFDP < 0.80) when assuming a true prior interaction probability of 0.01. The strongest interaction result in relation to overall breast cancer risk was found between CFLAR-rs7558475 and current smoking (ORint = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.67-0.88, pint = 1.8 × 10-4 ). The interaction with the strongest statistical evidence was found between 5q14-rs7707921 and alcohol consumption (ORint =1.36, 95% CI: 1.16-1.59, pint = 1.9 × 10-5 ) in relation to ER- disease risk. The remaining two gene-environment interactions were also identified in relation to ER- breast cancer risk and were found between 3p21-rs6796502 and age at menarche (ORint = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.12-1.43, pint =1.8 × 10-4 ) and between 8q23-rs13267382 and age at first full-term pregnancy (ORint = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.83-0.95, pint = 5.2 × 10-4 ). While these results do not suggest any strong gene-environment interactions, our results may still be useful to inform experimental studies. These may in turn, shed light on the potential interactions observed.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Proteína Reguladora de Apoptosis Semelhante a CASP8 e FADD/genética , Interação Gene-Ambiente , Estudos de Associação Genética , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/patologia , Receptor alfa de Estrogênio/genética , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Risco , Fumar/genética
16.
Cancer Epidemiol ; 48: 78-84, 2017 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28426980

RESUMO

The three times higher incidence of thyroid cancer in women compared to men points to a role of female sex hormones in its etiology. However the effects of these factors are poorly understood. We analyzed the association between thyroid cancer and hormonal and reproductive factors among women enrolled in CATHY, a population-based case-control study conducted in France. The study included 430 cases of papillary thyroid cancer and 505 controls frequency-matched on age and area of residence. The odds ratios for thyroid cancer increased with age at menarche (p trend 0.05). Postmenopausal women were at increased risk, as compared to premenopausal women, particularly if menopause followed an ovariectomy, and for women with age at menopause <55years. In addition, use of oral contraceptives and menopausal hormone therapy reduced the association with thyroid cancer by about one third, and breastfeeding by 27%. Overall, these findings provide evidence that the risk of thyroid cancer increases with later age at menarche and after menopause, and decreases with use of oral contraceptives and menopausal hormone therapy. These findings confirm an implication of hormonal factors in papillary thyroid cancer risk, whose mechanisms need to be elucidated.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Papilar/complicações , Terapia de Reposição Hormonal/métodos , Neoplasias da Glândula Tireoide/complicações , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , França , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , História Reprodutiva , Projetos de Pesquisa , Fatores de Risco , Câncer Papilífero da Tireoide
17.
BMC Cancer ; 16(1): 761, 2016 Sep 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27681230

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Overweight and weight gain throughout adult life have been associated with increased risk of breast cancer after the menopause. However the role of body weight at a young age and of the timing of weight gain over the lifetime in postmenopausal breast cancer is not well documented. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study on breast cancer in France that included 739 cases and 815 population controls in postmenopausal women. Height, weight at age 20, 40 and 50 as well as weight one year before diagnosis were obtained during in-person interviews. RESULTS: No association between body mass index at the age of 20 years and breast cancer after the menopause was detected. However, we found that postmenopausal breast cancer was associated with weight gain between ages 40 and 50 years (OR per 5 kg/m2 increase in BMI: 1.45 [95%ci 1.06-1.98]). The increased risk of breast cancer associated with weight gain was more consistent in leaner women at age 20, in older postmenopausal women (>65 years), and in women who did not use menopausal hormone therapy. CONCLUSIONS: These findings point to the importance of controlling for weight gain in middle aged-women. The role of low body weight in young adulthood in breast cancer risk after the menopause should be further scrutinized.

18.
Am J Hum Genet ; 99(4): 903-911, 2016 Oct 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27640304

RESUMO

Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed increased breast cancer risk associated with multiple genetic variants at 5p12. Here, we report the fine mapping of this locus using data from 104,660 subjects from 50 case-control studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). With data for 3,365 genotyped and imputed SNPs across a 1 Mb region (positions 44,394,495-45,364,167; NCBI build 37), we found evidence for at least three independent signals: the strongest signal, consisting of a single SNP rs10941679, was associated with risk of estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer (per-g allele OR ER+ = 1.15; 95% CI 1.13-1.18; p = 8.35 × 10-30). After adjustment for rs10941679, we detected signal 2, consisting of 38 SNPs more strongly associated with ER-negative (ER-) breast cancer (lead SNP rs6864776: per-a allele OR ER- = 1.10; 95% CI 1.05-1.14; p conditional = 1.44 × 10-12), and a single signal 3 SNP (rs200229088: per-t allele OR ER+ = 1.12; 95% CI 1.09-1.15; p conditional = 1.12 × 10-05). Expression quantitative trait locus analysis in normal breast tissues and breast tumors showed that the g (risk) allele of rs10941679 was associated with increased expression of FGF10 and MRPS30. Functional assays demonstrated that SNP rs10941679 maps to an enhancer element that physically interacts with the FGF10 and MRPS30 promoter regions in breast cancer cell lines. FGF10 is an oncogene that binds to FGFR2 and is overexpressed in ∼10% of human breast cancers, whereas MRPS30 plays a key role in apoptosis. These data suggest that the strongest signal of association at 5p12 is mediated through coordinated activation of FGF10 and MRPS30, two candidate genes for breast cancer pathogenesis.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/metabolismo , Cromossomos Humanos Par 5/genética , Fator 10 de Crescimento de Fibroblastos/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Receptores Estrogênicos/metabolismo , Alelos , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Elementos Facilitadores Genéticos/genética , Fator 10 de Crescimento de Fibroblastos/metabolismo , Haplótipos/genética , Humanos , Regiões Promotoras Genéticas/genética , Locos de Características Quantitativas/genética , Receptor Tipo 2 de Fator de Crescimento de Fibroblastos/metabolismo
19.
J Med Genet ; 53(12): 800-811, 2016 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27595995

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The rarity of mutations in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM make it difficult to estimate precisely associated cancer risks. Population-based family studies have provided evidence that at least some of these mutations are associated with breast cancer risk as high as those associated with rare BRCA2 mutations. We aimed to estimate the relative risks associated with specific rare variants in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM via a multicentre case-control study. METHODS: We genotyped 10 rare mutations using the custom iCOGS array: PALB2 c.1592delT, c.2816T>G and c.3113G>A, CHEK2 c.349A>G, c.538C>T, c.715G>A, c.1036C>T, c.1312G>T, and c.1343T>G and ATM c.7271T>G. We assessed associations with breast cancer risk (42 671 cases and 42 164 controls), as well as prostate (22 301 cases and 22 320 controls) and ovarian (14 542 cases and 23 491 controls) cancer risk, for each variant. RESULTS: For European women, strong evidence of association with breast cancer risk was observed for PALB2 c.1592delT OR 3.44 (95% CI 1.39 to 8.52, p=7.1×10-5), PALB2 c.3113G>A OR 4.21 (95% CI 1.84 to 9.60, p=6.9×10-8) and ATM c.7271T>G OR 11.0 (95% CI 1.42 to 85.7, p=0.0012). We also found evidence of association with breast cancer risk for three variants in CHEK2, c.349A>G OR 2.26 (95% CI 1.29 to 3.95), c.1036C>T OR 5.06 (95% CI 1.09 to 23.5) and c.538C>T OR 1.33 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.67) (p≤0.017). Evidence for prostate cancer risk was observed for CHEK2 c.1343T>G OR 3.03 (95% CI 1.53 to 6.03, p=0.0006) for African men and CHEK2 c.1312G>T OR 2.21 (95% CI 1.06 to 4.63, p=0.030) for European men. No evidence of association with ovarian cancer was found for any of these variants. CONCLUSIONS: This report adds to accumulating evidence that at least some variants in these genes are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer that is clinically important.


Assuntos
Proteínas Mutadas de Ataxia Telangiectasia/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/metabolismo , Quinase do Ponto de Checagem 2/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Mutação , Proteínas Nucleares/genética , Neoplasias da Próstata/metabolismo , Proteínas Supressoras de Tumor/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Proteína do Grupo de Complementação N da Anemia de Fanconi , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos , Masculino , Neoplasias Ovarianas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Neoplasias Ovarianas/metabolismo , Neoplasias da Próstata/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Próstata/genética , Risco
20.
PLoS One ; 11(8): e0160316, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27556229

RESUMO

The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799-121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000-120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Mapeamento Cromossômico , Cromossomos Humanos Par 1 , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Alelos , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Biologia Computacional/métodos , Feminino , Frequência do Gene , Estudos de Associação Genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Genótipo , Humanos , Desequilíbrio de Ligação , Gradação de Tumores , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Vigilância da População , Medição de Risco
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