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1.
Nat Genet ; 51(5): 793-803, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31043756

RESUMO

Bipolar disorder is a highly heritable psychiatric disorder. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) including 20,352 cases and 31,358 controls of European descent, with follow-up analysis of 822 variants with P < 1 × 10-4 in an additional 9,412 cases and 137,760 controls. Eight of the 19 variants that were genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10-8) in the discovery GWAS were not genome-wide significant in the combined analysis, consistent with small effect sizes and limited power but also with genetic heterogeneity. In the combined analysis, 30 loci were genome-wide significant, including 20 newly identified loci. The significant loci contain genes encoding ion channels, neurotransmitter transporters and synaptic components. Pathway analysis revealed nine significantly enriched gene sets, including regulation of insulin secretion and endocannabinoid signaling. Bipolar I disorder is strongly genetically correlated with schizophrenia, driven by psychosis, whereas bipolar II disorder is more strongly correlated with major depressive disorder. These findings address key clinical questions and provide potential biological mechanisms for bipolar disorder.


Assuntos
Transtorno Bipolar/genética , Loci Gênicos , Transtorno Bipolar/classificação , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/genética , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Transtornos Psicóticos/genética , Esquizofrenia/genética , Biologia de Sistemas
2.
Nat Neurosci ; 22(3): 343-352, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30718901

RESUMO

Major depression is a debilitating psychiatric illness that is typically associated with low mood and anhedonia. Depression has a heritable component that has remained difficult to elucidate with current sample sizes due to the polygenic nature of the disorder. To maximize sample size, we meta-analyzed data on 807,553 individuals (246,363 cases and 561,190 controls) from the three largest genome-wide association studies of depression. We identified 102 independent variants, 269 genes, and 15 genesets associated with depression, including both genes and gene pathways associated with synaptic structure and neurotransmission. An enrichment analysis provided further evidence of the importance of prefrontal brain regions. In an independent replication sample of 1,306,354 individuals (414,055 cases and 892,299 controls), 87 of the 102 associated variants were significant after multiple testing correction. These findings advance our understanding of the complex genetic architecture of depression and provide several future avenues for understanding etiology and developing new treatment approaches.


Assuntos
Depressão/genética , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/genética , Córtex Pré-Frontal/metabolismo , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Variação Genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino , Herança Multifatorial , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
3.
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet ; 180(6): 439-447, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30708398

RESUMO

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is clinically heterogeneous with prevalence rates twice as high in women as in men. There are many possible sources of heterogeneity in MDD most of which are not measured in a sufficiently comparable way across study samples. Here, we assess genetic heterogeneity based on two fundamental measures, between-cohort and between-sex heterogeneity. First, we used genome-wide association study (GWAS) summary statistics to investigate between-cohort genetic heterogeneity using the 29 research cohorts of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC; N cases = 16,823, N controls = 25,632) and found that some of the cohort heterogeneity can be attributed to ascertainment differences (such as recruitment of cases from hospital vs. community sources). Second, we evaluated between-sex genetic heterogeneity using GWAS summary statistics from the PGC, Kaiser Permanente GERA, UK Biobank, and the Danish iPSYCH studies but did not find convincing evidence for genetic differences between the sexes. We conclude that there is no evidence that the heterogeneity between MDD data sets and between sexes reflects genetic heterogeneity. Larger sample sizes with detailed phenotypic records and genomic data remain the key to overcome heterogeneity inherent in assessment of MDD.

4.
Nat Genet ; 51(2): 245-257, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30643258

RESUMO

Humans vary substantially in their willingness to take risks. In a combined sample of over 1 million individuals, we conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of general risk tolerance, adventurousness, and risky behaviors in the driving, drinking, smoking, and sexual domains. Across all GWAS, we identified hundreds of associated loci, including 99 loci associated with general risk tolerance. We report evidence of substantial shared genetic influences across risk tolerance and the risky behaviors: 46 of the 99 general risk tolerance loci contain a lead SNP for at least one of our other GWAS, and general risk tolerance is genetically correlated ([Formula: see text] ~ 0.25 to 0.50) with a range of risky behaviors. Bioinformatics analyses imply that genes near SNPs associated with general risk tolerance are highly expressed in brain tissues and point to a role for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. We found no evidence of enrichment for genes previously hypothesized to relate to risk tolerance.


Assuntos
Comportamento/fisiologia , Loci Gênicos/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Genética Comportamental/métodos , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Genótipo , Humanos , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética
5.
Sci Rep ; 8(1): 17692, 2018 Dec 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30523285

RESUMO

Clues from the epidemiology of schizophrenia, such as the increased risk in those born in winter/spring, have led to the hypothesis that prenatal vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk of later schizophrenia. We wish to explore this hypothesis in a large Danish case-control study (n = 2602). The concentration of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) was assessed from neonatal dried blood samples. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were calculated when examined for quintiles of 25OHD concentration. In addition, we examined statistical models that combined 25OHD concentration and the schizophrenia polygenic risk score (PRS) in a sample that combined the new sample with a previous study (total n = 3464; samples assayed and genotyped between 2008-2013). Compared to the reference (fourth) quintile, those in the lowest quintile (<20.4 nmol/L) had a significantly increased risk of schizophrenia (IRR = 1.44, 95%CI: 1.12-1.85). None of the other quintile comparisons were significantly different. There was no significant interaction between 25OHD and the PRS. Neonatal vitamin D deficiency was associated with an increased risk for schizophrenia in later life. These findings could have important public health implications related to the primary prevention of schizophrenia.

6.
Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl ; 93: 134-144, 2018 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30274046

RESUMO

Lecithin is a mixture of phospholipids (PLs) that are found in living organisms. It gained the interest as a bio- and hemocompatible modifying agent for biomaterials. In this paper, we focused on the elaboration of a simple and well-described technology of metals coating with low-cost substance that could be useful in biomaterials industry. We studied the utility of lecithin suspension for stainless steel coating by electrophoretic deposition method. Our goal was to find a relationship between the conditions of lecithin suspension preparation, obtained suspension properties (vesicles size and structure, zeta potential, electrophoretic mobility) and lecithin coating features (topography, roughness). We found that final pH value, zeta potential and electrophoretic mobility of lecithin suspensions were not altered by initial solution pH value. However, the presence of hydrated Na+ ions forced forming of large multi-layered vesicles. We obtained uniform lecithin coatings with the use of electrophoretic deposition, which has a great potential to be used in a large scale.

7.
Nat Hum Behav ; 2(4): 269-275, 2018 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29881783

RESUMO

The etiology of individual differences in educational attainment and occupational status includes genetic as well as environmental factors1-5 and can change as societies change3,6,7. The extent of genetic influence on these social outcomes can be viewed as an index of success in achieving meritocratic values of equality of opportunity by rewarding talent and hard work, which are to a large extent influenced by genetic factors, rather than rewarding environmentally driven privilege. To the extent that the end of the Soviet Union and the independence of Estonia led to an increase in meritocratic selection of individuals in education and occupation, genetic influence should be higher in the post-Soviet era than in the Soviet era. Here we confirmed this hypothesis: DNA differences (single-nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) explained twice as much variance in educational attainment and occupational status in the post-Soviet era compared to the Soviet era in both polygenic score analyses and SNP heritability analyses of 12 500 Estonians. This is the first demonstration of a change in the extent of genetic influence in the same population following a massive and abrupt social change - in this case, the shift from a communist to a capitalist society.

8.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 75(9): 901-910, 2018 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29936532

RESUMO

Importance: Urban life has been proposed as an environmental risk factor accounting for the increased prevalence of schizophrenia in urban areas. An alternative hypothesis is that individuals with increased genetic risk tend to live in urban/dense areas. Objective: To assess whether adults with higher genetic risk for schizophrenia have an increased probability to live in more populated areas than those with lower risk. Design, Setting, and Participants: Four large, cross-sectional samples of genotyped individuals of European ancestry older than 18 years with known addresses in Australia, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands were included in the analysis. Data were based on the postcode of residence at the time of last contact with the participants. Community-based samples who took part in studies conducted by the Queensland Institute for Medical Research Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMR), UK Biobank (UKB), Netherlands Twin Register (NTR), or QSkin Sun and Health Study (QSKIN) were included. Genome-wide association analysis and mendelian randomization (MR) were included. The study was conducted between 2016 and 2018. Exposures: Polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia derived from genetic data (genetic risk is independently measured from the occurrence of the disease). Socioeconomic status of the area was included as a moderator in some of the models. Main Outcomes and Measures: Population density of the place of residence of the participants determined from census data. Remoteness and socioeconomic status of the area were also tested. Results: The QIMR participants (15 544; 10 197 [65.6%] women; mean [SD] age, 54.4 [13.2] years) living in more densely populated areas (people per square kilometer) had a higher genetic loading for schizophrenia (r2 = 0.12%; P = 5.69 × 10-5), a result that was replicated across all 3 other cohorts (UKB: 345 246; 187 469 [54.3%] women; age, 65.7 [8.0] years; NTR: 11 212; 6727 [60.0%] women; age, 48.6 [17.5] years; and QSKIN: 15 726; 8602 [54.7%] women; age, 57.0 [7.9] years). This genetic association could account for 1.7% (95% CI, 0.8%-3.2%) of the schizophrenia risk. Estimates from MR analyses performed in the UKB sample were significant (b = 0.049; P = 3.7 × 10-7 using GSMR), suggesting that the genetic liability to schizophrenia may have a causal association with the tendency to live in urbanized locations. Conclusions and Relevance: The results of this study appear to support the hypothesis that individuals with increased genetic risk tend to live in urban/dense areas and suggest the need to refine the social stress model for schizophrenia by including genetics as well as possible gene-environment interactions.

9.
Genetics ; 209(3): 941-948, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29739817

RESUMO

Accurate estimation of genetic correlation requires large sample sizes and access to genetically informative data, which are not always available. Accordingly, phenotypic correlations are often assumed to reflect genotypic correlations in evolutionary biology. Cheverud's conjecture asserts that the use of phenotypic correlations as proxies for genetic correlations is appropriate. Empirical evidence of the conjecture has been found across plant and animal species, with results suggesting that there is indeed a robust relationship between the two. Here, we investigate the conjecture in human populations, an analysis made possible by recent developments in availability of human genomic data and computing resources. A sample of 108,035 British European individuals from the UK Biobank was split equally into discovery and replication datasets. Seventeen traits were selected based on sample size, distribution, and heritability. Genetic correlations were calculated using linkage disequilibrium score regression applied to the genome-wide association summary statistics of pairs of traits, and compared within and across datasets. Strong and significant correlations were found for the between-dataset comparison, suggesting that the genetic correlations from one independent sample were able to predict the phenotypic correlations from another independent sample within the same population. Designating the selected traits as morphological or nonmorphological indicated little difference in correlation. The results of this study support the existence of a relationship between genetic and phenotypic correlations in humans. This finding is of specific interest in anthropological studies, which use measured phenotypic correlations to make inferences about the genetics of ancient human populations.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Desequilíbrio de Ligação , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Antropologia , Evolução Biológica , Bancos de Espécimes Biológicos , Variação Genética , Genética Populacional , Genótipo , Humanos , Fenótipo , Reino Unido
10.
Nat Commun ; 9(1): 1865, 2018 05 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29760457

RESUMO

There are mean differences in complex traits among global human populations. We hypothesize that part of the phenotypic differentiation is due to natural selection. To address this hypothesis, we assess the differentiation in allele frequencies of trait-associated SNPs among African, Eastern Asian, and European populations for ten complex traits using data of large sample size (up to ~405,000). We show that SNPs associated with height ([Formula: see text]), waist-to-hip ratio ([Formula: see text]), and schizophrenia ([Formula: see text]) are significantly more differentiated among populations than matched "control" SNPs, suggesting that these trait-associated SNPs have undergone natural selection. We further find that SNPs associated with height ([Formula: see text]) and schizophrenia ([Formula: see text]) show significantly higher variance in linkage disequilibrium (LD) scores across populations than control SNPs. Our results support the hypothesis that natural selection has shaped the genetic differentiation of complex traits, such as height and schizophrenia, among worldwide populations.


Assuntos
Genoma Humano , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Característica Quantitativa Herdável , Esquizofrenia/genética , Seleção Genética , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano , Alelos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático , Estatura , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Frequência do Gene , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Desequilíbrio de Ligação , Fenótipo , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Tamanho da Amostra , Esquizofrenia/etnologia , Esquizofrenia/patologia , Relação Cintura-Quadril
11.
Nat Genet ; 50(5): 668-681, 2018 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29700475

RESUMO

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common illness accompanied by considerable morbidity, mortality, costs, and heightened risk of suicide. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis based in 135,458 cases and 344,901 controls and identified 44 independent and significant loci. The genetic findings were associated with clinical features of major depression and implicated brain regions exhibiting anatomical differences in cases. Targets of antidepressant medications and genes involved in gene splicing were enriched for smaller association signal. We found important relationships of genetic risk for major depression with educational attainment, body mass, and schizophrenia: lower educational attainment and higher body mass were putatively causal, whereas major depression and schizophrenia reflected a partly shared biological etiology. All humans carry lesser or greater numbers of genetic risk factors for major depression. These findings help refine the basis of major depression and imply that a continuous measure of risk underlies the clinical phenotype.

12.
Nat Commun ; 9(1): 989, 2018 03 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29515099

RESUMO

Genomic prediction has the potential to contribute to precision medicine. However, to date, the utility of such predictors is limited due to low accuracy for most traits. Here theory and simulation study are used to demonstrate that widespread pleiotropy among phenotypes can be utilised to improve genomic risk prediction. We show how a genetic predictor can be created as a weighted index that combines published genome-wide association study (GWAS) summary statistics across many different traits. We apply this framework to predict risk of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in the Psychiatric Genomics consortium data, finding substantial heterogeneity in prediction accuracy increases across cohorts. For six additional phenotypes in the UK Biobank data, we find increases in prediction accuracy ranging from 0.7% for height to 47% for type 2 diabetes, when using a multi-trait predictor that combines published summary statistics from multiple traits, as compared to a predictor based only on one trait.

13.
Nat Commun ; 9(1): 224, 2018 01 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29335400

RESUMO

Health risk factors such as body mass index (BMI) and serum cholesterol are associated with many common diseases. It often remains unclear whether the risk factors are cause or consequence of disease, or whether the associations are the result of confounding. We develop and apply a method (called GSMR) that performs a multi-SNP Mendelian randomization analysis using summary-level data from genome-wide association studies to test the causal associations of BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, serum cholesterols, blood pressures, height, and years of schooling (EduYears) with common diseases (sample sizes of up to 405,072). We identify a number of causal associations including a protective effect of LDL-cholesterol against type-2 diabetes (T2D) that might explain the side effects of statins on T2D, a protective effect of EduYears against Alzheimer's disease, and bidirectional associations with opposite effects (e.g., higher BMI increases the risk of T2D but the effect of T2D on BMI is negative).


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Colesterol/sangue , Doença/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Doença de Alzheimer/sangue , Doença de Alzheimer/genética , LDL-Colesterol/sangue , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/sangue , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Doença/etiologia , Humanos , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Risco
14.
Nat Hum Behav ; 2(12): 948-954, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30988446

RESUMO

Preference for mates with similar phenotypes; that is, assortative mating, is widely observed in humans1-5 and has evolutionary consequences6-8. Under Fisher's classical theory6, assortative mating is predicted to induce a signature in the genome at trait-associated loci that can be detected and quantified. Here, we develop and apply a method to quantify assortative mating on a specific trait by estimating the correlation (θ) between genetic predictors of the trait from single nucleotide polymorphisms on odd- versus even-numbered chromosomes. We show by theory and simulation that the effect of assortative mating can be quantified in the presence of population stratification. We applied this approach to 32 complex traits and diseases using single nucleotide polymorphism data from ~400,000 unrelated individuals of European ancestry. We found significant evidence of assortative mating for height (θ = 3.2%) and educational attainment (θ = 2.7%), both of which were consistent with theoretical predictions. Overall, our results imply that assortative mating involves multiple traits and affects the genomic architecture of loci that are associated with these traits, and that the consequence of mate choice can be detected from a random sample of genomes.


Assuntos
Genoma Humano , Casamento , Alelos , Estatura/genética , Escolaridade , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Feminino , Genoma Humano/genética , Humanos , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Característica Quantitativa Herdável
15.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry ; 55(10): 896-905.e6, 2016 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27663945

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to elucidate the influence of common genetic variants on childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, to identify genetic variants that explain its high heritability, and to investigate the genetic overlap of ADHD symptom scores with ADHD diagnosis. METHOD: Within the EArly Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortium, genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and ADHD symptom scores were available for 17,666 children (<13 years of age) from nine population-based cohorts. SNP-based heritability was estimated in data from the three largest cohorts. Meta-analysis based on genome-wide association (GWA) analyses with SNPs was followed by gene-based association tests, and the overlap in results with a meta-analysis in the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) case-control ADHD study was investigated. RESULTS: SNP-based heritability ranged from 5% to 34%, indicating that variation in common genetic variants influences ADHD symptom scores. The meta-analysis did not detect genome-wide significant SNPs, but three genes, lying close to each other with SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium (LD), showed a gene-wide significant association (p values between 1.46 × 10(-6) and 2.66 × 10(-6)). One gene, WASL, is involved in neuronal development. Both SNP- and gene-based analyses indicated overlap with the PGC meta-analysis results with the genetic correlation estimated at 0.96. CONCLUSION: The SNP-based heritability for ADHD symptom scores indicates a polygenic architecture, and genes involved in neurite outgrowth are possibly involved. Continuous and dichotomous measures of ADHD appear to assess a genetically common phenotype. A next step is to combine data from population-based and case-control cohorts in genetic association studies to increase sample size and to improve statistical power for identifying genetic variants.


Assuntos
Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/genética , Adolescente , Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/psicologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Criança , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Genética Populacional/métodos , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino
16.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 25(1): 137-146, 2016 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27552965

RESUMO

Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been successful in discovering SNP trait associations for many quantitative traits and common diseases. Typically, the effect sizes of SNP alleles are very small and this requires large genome-wide association meta-analyses (GWAMAs) to maximize statistical power. A trend towards ever-larger GWAMA is likely to continue, yet dealing with summary statistics from hundreds of cohorts increases logistical and quality control problems, including unknown sample overlap, and these can lead to both false positive and false negative findings. In this study, we propose four metrics and visualization tools for GWAMA, using summary statistics from cohort-level GWASs. We propose methods to examine the concordance between demographic information, and summary statistics and methods to investigate sample overlap. (I) We use the population genetics Fst statistic to verify the genetic origin of each cohort and their geographic location, and demonstrate using GWAMA data from the GIANT Consortium that geographic locations of cohorts can be recovered and outlier cohorts can be detected. (II) We conduct principal component analysis based on reported allele frequencies, and are able to recover the ancestral information for each cohort. (III) We propose a new statistic that uses the reported allelic effect sizes and their standard errors to identify significant sample overlap or heterogeneity between pairs of cohorts. (IV) To quantify unknown sample overlap across all pairs of cohorts, we propose a method that uses randomly generated genetic predictors that does not require the sharing of individual-level genotype data and does not breach individual privacy.


Assuntos
Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/estatística & dados numéricos , Metanálise como Assunto , Locos de Características Quantitativas/genética , Alelos , Estudos de Coortes , Heterogeneidade Genética , Genótipo , Humanos , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Software
17.
Sleep ; 39(10): 1853-1857, 2016 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27397570

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: We sought to examine how much of the heritability of self-report sleep duration is tagged by common genetic variation in populations of European ancestry and to test if the common variants contributing to sleep duration are also associated with other diseases and traits. METHODS: We utilized linkage disequilibrium (LD)-score regression to estimate the heritability tagged by common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CHARGE consortium genome-wide association study (GWAS) of self-report sleep duration. We also used bivariate LD-score regression to investigate the genetic correlation of sleep duration with other publicly available GWAS datasets. RESULTS: We show that 6% (SE = 1%) of the variance in self-report sleep duration in the CHARGE study is tagged by common SNPs in European populations. Furthermore, we find evidence of a positive genetic correlation (rG) between sleep duration and type 2 diabetes (rG = 0.26, P = 0.02), and between sleep duration and schizophrenia (rG = 0.19, P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that increased sample sizes will identify more common variants for self-report sleep duration; however, the heritability tagged is small when compared to other traits and diseases. These results also suggest that those who carry variants that increase risk to type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia are more likely to report longer sleep duration.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Esquizofrenia/genética , Autorrelato , Sono/genética , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/epidemiologia , Feminino , Variação Genética/genética , Humanos , Desequilíbrio de Ligação/genética , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Esquizofrenia/epidemiologia , Fatores de Tempo
18.
Int J Epidemiol ; 2016 Jan 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26819444

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: It is now possible to estimate genetic correlations between two independent samples when there is no overlapping phenotypic information. We applied the latest bivariate genomic methods to children in the UK and older adults in Sweden to ask two questions. Are the same variants driving individual differences in anthropometric traits in these two populations, and are these variants as important in childhood as they are later in life? METHODS: A sample of 3152 11-year-old children in the UK was compared with a sample of 6813 adults with an average age of 65 in Sweden. Genotypes were imputed from 1000 genomes with combined 9 767 136 single nucleotide polymorphisms meeting quality control criteria in both samples. Two cross-sample GCTA-GREML analyses and linkage disequilibrium (LD) score regressions were conducted to assess genetic correlations across more than 50 years: child versus adult height and child versus adult body mass index (BMI). Consistency of effects was tested using the recently proposed polygenic scoring method. RESULTS: For height, GCTA-GREML and LD score indicated strong genetic stability between children and adults, 0.58 (0.16) and 1.335 (1.09), respectively. For BMI, both methods produced similarly strong estimates of genetic stability 0.75 (0.26) and 0.855 (0.49), respectively. In height, adult polygenic score explained 60% of genetic variance in childhood and 10% of variance in BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Here we replicated and extended previous findings of longitudinal genetic stability in anthropometric traits to cross-cultural dimensions, and showed that for height but not BMI these variants are as important in childhood as they are in adulthood.

19.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 113(4): 1098-103, 2016 01 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26711998

RESUMO

Intellectual disability (ID) occurs in almost 3% of newborns. Despite substantial research, a fundamental question about its origin and links to intelligence (IQ) still remains. ID has been shown to be inherited and has been accepted as the extreme low of the normal IQ distribution. However, ID displays a complex pattern of inheritance. Previously, noninherited rare mutations were shown to contribute to severe ID risk in individual families, but in the majority of cases causes remain unknown. Common variants associated with ID risk in the population have not been systematically established. Here we evaluate the hypothesis, originally proposed almost 1 century ago, that most ID is caused by the same genetic and environmental influences responsible for the normal distribution of IQ, but that severe ID is not. We studied more than 1,000,000 sibling pairs and 9,000 twin pairs assessed for IQ and for the presence of ID. We evaluated whether genetic and environmental influences at the extremes of the distribution are different from those operating in the normal range. Here we show that factors influencing mild ID (lowest 3% of IQ distribution) were similar to those influencing IQ in the normal range. In contrast, the factors influencing severe ID (lowest 0.5% of IQ distribution) differ from those influencing mild ID or IQ scores in the normal range. Taken together, our results suggest that most severe ID is a distinct condition, qualitatively different from the preponderance of ID, which, in turn, represents the low extreme of the normal distribution of intelligence.


Assuntos
Deficiência Intelectual/etiologia , Adolescente , Meio Ambiente , Feminino , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Inteligência , Masculino , Gêmeos/genética
20.
PLoS One ; 10(8): e0134865, 2015.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26274327

RESUMO

Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a common anxiety-related diagnosis, affecting approximately 5% of the adult population. One characteristic of GAD is a high degree of anxiety sensitivity (AS), a personality trait which describes the fear of arousal-related sensations. Here we present a genome-wide association study of AS using a cohort of 730 MZ and DZ female twins. The GWAS showed a significant association for a variant within the RBFOX1 gene. A heritability analysis of the same cohort also confirmed a significant genetic component with h2 of 0.42. Additionally, a subset of the cohort (25 MZ twins discordant for AS) was studied for evidence of differential expression using RNA-seq data. Significant differential expression of two exons with the ITM2B gene within the discordant MZ subset was observed, a finding that was replicated in an independent cohort. While previous research has shown that anxiety has a high comorbidity with a variety of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, our analysis suggests a novel etiology specific to AS.


Assuntos
Transtornos de Ansiedade/genética , Doenças em Gêmeos/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a RNA/genética , Transtornos de Estresse Traumático Agudo/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Transtornos de Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Doenças em Gêmeos/epidemiologia , Feminino , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Processamento de RNA , Transtornos de Estresse Traumático Agudo/epidemiologia , Gêmeos Dizigóticos/genética , Gêmeos Monozigóticos/genética
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