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1.
Blood ; 134(19): 1645-1657, 2019 Nov 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31420334

RESUMO

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality. To advance our understanding of the biology contributing to VTE, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of VTE and a transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) based on imputed gene expression from whole blood and liver. We meta-analyzed GWAS data from 18 studies for 30 234 VTE cases and 172 122 controls and assessed the association between 12 923 718 genetic variants and VTE. We generated variant prediction scores of gene expression from whole blood and liver tissue and assessed them for association with VTE. Mendelian randomization analyses were conducted for traits genetically associated with novel VTE loci. We identified 34 independent genetic signals for VTE risk from GWAS meta-analysis, of which 14 are newly reported associations. This included 11 newly associated genetic loci (C1orf198, PLEK, OSMR-AS1, NUGGC/SCARA5, GRK5, MPHOSPH9, ARID4A, PLCG2, SMG6, EIF5A, and STX10) of which 6 replicated, and 3 new independent signals in 3 known genes. Further, TWAS identified 5 additional genetic loci with imputed gene expression levels differing between cases and controls in whole blood (SH2B3, SPSB1, RP11-747H7.3, RP4-737E23.2) and in liver (ERAP1). At some GWAS loci, we found suggestive evidence that the VTE association signal for novel and previously known regions colocalized with expression quantitative trait locus signals. Mendelian randomization analyses suggested that blood traits may contribute to the underlying risk of VTE. To conclude, we identified 16 novel susceptibility loci for VTE; for some loci, the association signals are likely mediated through gene expression of nearby genes.

3.
Int J Epidemiol ; 2019 Apr 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31038671

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence suggests that conventional adenomas (CAs) and serrated polyps (SPs) represent two distinct groups of precursor lesions for colorectal cancer (CRC). The influence of common genetic variants on risk of CAs and SPs remain largely unknown. METHODS: Among 27 426 participants within three prospective cohort studies, we created a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) based on 40 CRC-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in previous genome-wide association studies; and we examined the association of GRS (per one standard deviation increment) with risk of CAs, SPs and synchronous CAs and SPs, by multivariable logistic regression. We also analysed individual variants in the secondary analysis. RESULTS: During 18-20 years of follow-up, we documented 2952 CAs, 1585 SPs and 794 synchronous CAs and SPs. Higher GRS was associated with increased risk of CAs [odds ratio (OR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12-1.21] and SPs (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.03-1.14), with a stronger association for CAs than SPs (Pheterogeneity=0.01). An even stronger association was found for patients with synchronous CAs and SPs (OR = 1.32), advanced CAs (OR = 1.22) and multiple CAs (OR = 1.25). Different sets of variants were associated with CAs and SPs, with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.02 between the ORs associating the 40 SNPs with the two lesions. After correcting for multiple testing, three variants were associated with CAs (rs3802842, rs6983267 and rs7136702) and two with SPs (rs16892766 and rs4779584). CONCLUSIONS: Common genetic variants play a potential role in the conventional and serrated pathways of CRC. Different sets of variants are identified for the two pathways, further supporting the aetiological heterogeneity of CRC.

4.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 569, 2019 02 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30718517

RESUMO

We introduce cross-trait penalized regression (CTPR), a powerful and practical approach for multi-trait polygenic risk prediction in large cohorts. Specifically, we propose a novel cross-trait penalty function with the Lasso and the minimax concave penalty (MCP) to incorporate the shared genetic effects across multiple traits for large-sample GWAS data. Our approach extracts information from the secondary traits that is beneficial for predicting the primary trait based on individual-level genotypes and/or summary statistics. Our novel implementation of a parallel computing algorithm makes it feasible to apply our method to biobank-scale GWAS data. We illustrate our method using large-scale GWAS data (~1M SNPs) from the UK Biobank (N = 456,837). We show that our multi-trait method outperforms the recently proposed multi-trait analysis of GWAS (MTAG) for predictive performance. The prediction accuracy for height by the aid of BMI improves from R2 = 35.8% (MTAG) to 42.5% (MCP + CTPR) or 42.8% (Lasso + CTPR) with UK Biobank data.


Assuntos
Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Modelos Genéticos , Algoritmos , Genótipo , Humanos , Fenótipo , Locos de Características Quantitativas/genética
5.
Genet Epidemiol ; 43(4): 449-457, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30659681

RESUMO

Although recent Genome-Wide Association Studies have identified novel associations for common variants, there has been no comprehensive exome-wide search for low-frequency variants that affect the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). We conducted a meta-analysis of 11 studies comprising 8,332 cases and 16,087 controls of European ancestry and 382 cases and 1,476 controls of African American ancestry genotyped with the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We used the seqMeta package in R to conduct single variant and gene-based rare variant tests. In the single variant analysis, we limited our analysis to the 64,794 variants with at least 40 minor alleles across studies (minor allele frequency [MAF] ~0.08%). We confirmed associations with previously identified VTE loci, including ABO, F5, F11, and FGA. After adjusting for multiple testing, we observed no novel significant findings in single variant or gene-based analysis. Given our sample size, we had greater than 80% power to detect minimum odds ratios greater than 1.5 and 1.8 for a single variant with MAF of 0.01 and 0.005, respectively. Larger studies and sequence data may be needed to identify novel low-frequency and rare variants associated with VTE risk.


Assuntos
Exoma/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Análise em Microsséries/métodos , Tromboembolia Venosa/genética , Afro-Americanos/genética , Alelos , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Frequência do Gene , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Genótipo , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala/métodos , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Análise em Microsséries/estatística & dados numéricos , Razão de Chances , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Tamanho da Amostra , Tromboembolia Venosa/etnologia
6.
Nat Genet ; 51(2): 237-244, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30643251

RESUMO

Tobacco and alcohol use are leading causes of mortality that influence risk for many complex diseases and disorders1. They are heritable2,3 and etiologically related4,5 behaviors that have been resistant to gene discovery efforts6-11. In sample sizes up to 1.2 million individuals, we discovered 566 genetic variants in 406 loci associated with multiple stages of tobacco use (initiation, cessation, and heaviness) as well as alcohol use, with 150 loci evidencing pleiotropic association. Smoking phenotypes were positively genetically correlated with many health conditions, whereas alcohol use was negatively correlated with these conditions, such that increased genetic risk for alcohol use is associated with lower disease risk. We report evidence for the involvement of many systems in tobacco and alcohol use, including genes involved in nicotinic, dopaminergic, and glutamatergic neurotransmission. The results provide a solid starting point to evaluate the effects of these loci in model organisms and more precise substance use measures.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/genética , Fumar/genética , Tabagismo/genética , Feminino , Variação Genética/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fenótipo , Risco , Tabaco/efeitos adversos
7.
Int J Epidemiol ; 46(6): 1814-1822, 2017 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29232439

RESUMO

Background: There is increasing evidence that elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with reduced survival for women with breast cancer. However, the underlying reasons remain unclear. We conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis to investigate a possible causal role of BMI in survival from breast cancer. Methods: We used individual-level data from six large breast cancer case-cohorts including a total of 36 210 individuals (2475 events) of European ancestry. We created a BMI genetic risk score (GRS) based on genotypes at 94 known BMI-associated genetic variants. Association between the BMI genetic score and breast cancer survival was analysed by Cox regression for each study separately. Study-specific hazard ratios were pooled using fixed-effect meta-analysis. Results: BMI genetic score was found to be associated with reduced breast cancer-specific survival for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cases [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.11, per one-unit increment of GRS, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.22, P = 0.03). We observed no association for ER-negative cases (HR = 1.00, per one-unit increment of GRS, 95% CI 0.89-1.13, P = 0.95). Conclusions: Our findings suggest a causal effect of increased BMI on reduced breast cancer survival for ER-positive breast cancer. There is no evidence of a causal effect of higher BMI on survival for ER-negative breast cancer cases.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/mortalidade , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Receptores Estrogênicos/genética , Causalidade , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Variação Genética , Humanos , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Metanálise como Assunto , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Análise de Sobrevida
8.
PLoS One ; 12(3): e0173997, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28301549

RESUMO

The Nurses' Health Study (NHS), Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII), Health Professionals Follow Up Study (HPFS) and the Physicians Health Study (PHS) have collected detailed longitudinal data on multiple exposures and traits for approximately 310,000 study participants over the last 35 years. Over 160,000 study participants across the cohorts have donated a DNA sample and to date, 20,691 subjects have been genotyped as part of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of twelve primary outcomes. However, these studies utilized six different GWAS arrays making it difficult to conduct analyses of secondary phenotypes or share controls across studies. To allow for secondary analyses of these data, we have created three new datasets merged by platform family and performed imputation using a common reference panel, the 1,000 Genomes Phase I release. Here, we describe the methodology behind the data merging and imputation and present imputation quality statistics and association results from two GWAS of secondary phenotypes (body mass index (BMI) and venous thromboembolism (VTE)). We observed the strongest BMI association for the FTO SNP rs55872725 (ß = 0.45, p = 3.48x10-22), and using a significance level of p = 0.05, we replicated 19 out of 32 known BMI SNPs. For VTE, we observed the strongest association for the rs2040445 SNP (OR = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.79-2.63, p = 2.70x10-15), located downstream of F5 and also observed significant associations for the known ABO and F11 regions. This pooled resource can be used to maximize power in GWAS of phenotypes collected across the cohorts and for studying gene-environment interactions as well as rare phenotypes and genotypes.


Assuntos
Variação Genética , Dioxigenase FTO Dependente de alfa-Cetoglutarato/genética , Índice de Massa Corporal , Estudos de Coortes , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Tromboembolia Venosa/genética
9.
PLoS One ; 12(1): e0169873, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28081215

RESUMO

There is strong evidence for a role of environmental risk factors involved in susceptibility to develop multiple keratinocyte cancers (mKCs), but whether genes are also involved in mKCs susceptibility has not been thoroughly investigated. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with susceptibility for mKCs. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 1,666 cases with mKCs and 1,950 cases with single KC (sKCs; controls) from Harvard cohorts (the Nurses' Health Study [NHS], NHS II, and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study) and the Framingham Heart Study was carried-out using over 8 million SNPs (stage-1). We sought to replicate the most significant statistical associations (p-value≤ 5.5x10-6) in an independent cohort of 574 mKCs and 872 sKCs from the Rotterdam Study. In the discovery stage, 40 SNPs with suggestive associations (p-value ≤5.5x10-6) were identified, with eight independent SNPs tagging all 40 SNPs. The most significant SNP was located at chromosome 9 (rs7468390; p-value = 3.92x10-7). In stage-2, none of these SNPs replicated and only two of them were associated with mKCs in the same direction in the combined meta-analysis. We tested the associations for 19 previously reported basal cell carcinoma-related SNPs (candidate gene association analysis), and found that rs1805007 (MC1R locus) was significantly associated with risk of mKCs (p-value = 2.80x10-4). Although the suggestive SNPs with susceptibility for mKCs were not replicated, we found that previously identified BCC variants may also be associated with mKC, which the most significant association (rs1805007) located at the MC1R gene.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma/genética , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/genética , Loci Gênicos , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Queratinócitos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Adenocarcinoma/epidemiologia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
10.
BMJ ; 355: i6071, 2016 Dec 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27965198

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE:  To determine the inherited factors associated with the ability to smell asparagus metabolites in urine. DESIGN:  Genome wide association study. SETTING:  Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study cohorts. PARTICIPANTS:  6909 men and women of European-American descent with available genetic data from genome wide association studies. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:  Participants were characterized as asparagus smellers if they strongly agreed with the prompt "after eating asparagus, you notice a strong characteristic odor in your urine," and anosmic if otherwise. We calculated per-allele estimates of asparagus anosmia for about nine million single nucleotide polymorphisms using logistic regression. P values <5×10-8 were considered as genome wide significant. RESULTS:  58.0% of men (n=1449/2500) and 61.5% of women (n=2712/4409) had anosmia. 871 single nucleotide polymorphisms reached genome wide significance for asparagus anosmia, all in a region on chromosome 1 (1q44: 248139851-248595299) containing multiple genes in the olfactory receptor 2 (OR2) family. Conditional analyses revealed three independent markers associated with asparagus anosmia: rs13373863, rs71538191, and rs6689553. CONCLUSION:  A large proportion of people have asparagus anosmia. Genetic variation near multiple olfactory receptor genes is associated with the ability of an individual to smell the metabolites of asparagus in urine. Future replication studies are necessary before considering targeted therapies to help anosmic people discover what they are missing.


Assuntos
Asparagus (Planta) , Transtornos do Olfato/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Urina , Idoso , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Feminino , Seguimentos , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Fatores Sexuais , Olfato/genética , Fumar , Estados Unidos
11.
Breast Cancer Res ; 18(1): 109, 2016 11 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27814745

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified thousands of disease susceptibility regions, the underlying causal mechanism in these regions is not fully known. It is likely that the GWAS signal originates from one or many as yet unidentified causal variants. METHODS: Using next-generation sequencing, we characterized 12 breast cancer susceptibility regions identified by GWASs in 2288 breast cancer cases and 2323 controls across four populations of African American, European, Japanese, and Hispanic ancestry. RESULTS: After genotype calling and quality control, we identified 137,530 single-nucleotide variants (SNVs); of those, 87.2 % had a minor allele frequency (MAF) <0.005. For SNVs with MAF >0.005, we calculated the smallest number of SNVs needed to obtain a posterior probability set (PPS) such that there is 90 % probability that the causal SNV is included. We found that the PPS for two regions, 2q35 and 11q13, contained less than 5 % of the original SNVs, dramatically decreasing the number of potentially causal SNVs. However, we did not find strong evidence supporting a causal role for any individual SNV. In addition, there were no significant gene-based rare SNV associations after correcting for multiple testing. CONCLUSIONS: This study illustrates some of the challenges faced in fine-mapping studies in the post-GWAS era, most importantly the large sample sizes needed to identify rare-variant associations or to distinguish the effects of strongly correlated common SNVs.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Grupos Étnicos/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Adulto , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Frequência do Gene , Variação Genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Anotação de Sequência Molecular , Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros , Fases de Leitura Aberta , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
12.
Nat Genet ; 48(12): 1462-1472, 2016 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27798627

RESUMO

The genetic architecture of human reproductive behavior-age at first birth (AFB) and number of children ever born (NEB)-has a strong relationship with fitness, human development, infertility and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, very few genetic loci have been identified, and the underlying mechanisms of AFB and NEB are poorly understood. We report a large genome-wide association study of both sexes including 251,151 individuals for AFB and 343,072 individuals for NEB. We identified 12 independent loci that are significantly associated with AFB and/or NEB in a SNP-based genome-wide association study and 4 additional loci associated in a gene-based effort. These loci harbor genes that are likely to have a role, either directly or by affecting non-local gene expression, in human reproduction and infertility, thereby increasing understanding of these complex traits.


Assuntos
Ordem de Nascimento , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Paridade/genética , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Reprodução/genética , Comportamento Reprodutivo/fisiologia , Feminino , Fertilidade/genética , Humanos , Idade Materna , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Gravidez
13.
Hum Mol Genet ; 25(12): 2612-2620, 2016 06 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27008869

RESUMO

Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological malignancy in the developed world. Although there is evidence of genetic predisposition to the disease, most of the genetic risk remains unexplained. We present the meta-analysis results of four genome-wide association studies (4907 cases and 11 945 controls total) in women of European ancestry. We describe one new locus reaching genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10 -8) at 6p22.3 (rs1740828; P = 2.29 × 10 -8, OR = 1.20), providing evidence of an additional region of interest for genetic susceptibility to endometrial cancer.


Assuntos
Neoplasias do Endométrio/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Cromossomos Humanos Par 6/genética , Neoplasias do Endométrio/patologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Feminino , Genótipo , Humanos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
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