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1.
J Perinatol ; 2019 Aug 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31395954

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the proportion of infant deaths occurring in the setting of a confirmed genetic disorder. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective analysis of the electronic medical records of infants born from 1 January, 2011 to 1 June, 2017, who died prior to 1 year of age. RESULTS: Five hundred and seventy three deceased infants were identified. One hundred and seventeen were confirmed to have a molecular or cytogenetic diagnosis in a clinical diagnostic laboratory and an additional seven were diagnosed by research testing for a total of 124/573 (22%) diagnosed infants. A total of 67/124 (54%) had chromosomal disorders and 58/124 (47%) had single gene disorders (one infant had both). The proportion of diagnoses made by sequencing technologies, such as exome sequencing, increased over the years. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of confirmed genetic disorders within our cohort of infant deaths is higher than that previously reported. Increased efforts are needed to further understand the mortality burden of genetic disorders in infancy.

2.
Pediatrics ; 143(Suppl 1): S27-S32, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30600268

RESUMO

The authors of current professional guidelines generally do not support the return of information about genetic carrier status for infants and children because of a perceived lack of immediate benefit and an abundance of caution regarding potential harm and desire to protect the children's future autonomy. The advent of genomic sequencing, used either as a diagnostic or a screening tool, and the increasing use of this technology in childhood creates the potential for the identification of carrier status in the pediatric period. As part of the BabySeq Project, researchers are exploring the implications of genomic sequencing in both newborns who are healthy and newborns who are sick and developing policies and procedures for the return of carrier status information to the parents and physicians of newborns. In this commentary, we review the history of carrier testing in children and explore the potential benefits, risks, and challenges of returning such results both for the children, their parents, and potential future siblings.

3.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 27(5): 738-746, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30679813

RESUMO

Determining pathogenicity of genomic variation identified by next-generation sequencing techniques can be supported by recurrent disruptive variants in the same gene in phenotypically similar individuals. However, interpretation of novel variants in a specific gene in individuals with mild-moderate intellectual disability (ID) without recognizable syndromic features can be challenging and reverse phenotyping is often required. We describe 24 individuals with a de novo disease-causing variant in, or partial deletion of, the F-box only protein 11 gene (FBXO11, also known as VIT1 and PRMT9). FBXO11 is part of the SCF (SKP1-cullin-F-box) complex, a multi-protein E3 ubiquitin-ligase complex catalyzing the ubiquitination of proteins destined for proteasomal degradation. Twenty-two variants were identified by next-generation sequencing, comprising 2 in-frame deletions, 11 missense variants, 1 canonical splice site variant, and 8 nonsense or frameshift variants leading to a truncated protein or degraded transcript. The remaining two variants were identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization and consisted of a partial deletion of FBXO11. All individuals had borderline to severe ID and behavioral problems (autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, aggression) were observed in most of them. The most relevant common facial features included a thin upper lip and a broad prominent space between the paramedian peaks of the upper lip. Other features were hypotonia and hyperlaxity of the joints. We show that de novo variants in FBXO11 cause a syndromic form of ID. The current series show the power of reverse phenotyping in the interpretation of novel genetic variances in individuals who initially did not appear to have a clear recognizable phenotype.

4.
BMC Med Genet ; 19(1): 197, 2018 Nov 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30424743

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: TRRAP encodes a multidomain protein kinase that works as a genetic cofactor to influence DNA methylation patterns, DNA damage repair, and chromatin remodeling. TRRAP protein is vital to early neural developmental processes, and variants in this gene have been associated with schizophrenia and childhood disintegrative disorder. CASE PRESENTATION: Here, we report on a patient with a de novo nonsynonymous TRRAP single-nucleotide variant (EST00000355540.3:c.5957G > A, p.Arg1986Gln) and early onset major depression accompanied by a psychotic episode (before age 10) that occurred in the context of longer standing nonverbal learning disability and a past history of obsessions and compulsions. CONCLUSIONS: The de novo variant and presentation of very early onset psychosis indicate a rare Mendelian disorder inheritance model. The genotype and behavioral abnormalities of this patient are reviewed.

5.
Genet Med ; 2018 Sep 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30209271

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Newborn genomic sequencing (nGS) has great potential to improve pediatric care. Parental interest and concerns about genomics are relatively unexplored. Understanding why parents decline research consent for nGS may reveal implementation barriers. METHODS: We evaluated parental interest in a randomized trial of nGS in well-baby and intensive care unit nursery settings. Interested families attended an informational enrollment session (ES) with a genetic counselor prior to consenting. Reason(s) for declining participation and sociodemographic associations were analyzed. RESULTS: Of 3860 eligible approached families, 10% attended ES, 67% of whom enrolled. Of 1760 families queried for decline reasons, 58% were uninterested in research. Among 499 families considering research, principal reasons for decline prior to ES included burdensome study logistics (48%), feeling overwhelmed postpartum (17%), and lack of interest/discomfort with genetic testing (17%). Decliners after ES more often cited concerns about privacy/insurability (41%) and uncertain/unfavorable results (23%). CONCLUSION: Low interest in research and study logistics were major initial barriers to postpartum enrollment and are likely generic to many postpartum research efforts. Concerns over privacy and result implications were most commonly cited in decliners after ES. Understanding parental concerns around research nGS may inform future integration of nGS into newborn screening, predictive testing, and pediatric diagnostics.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29728376

RESUMO

Here, we report a newborn female infant from the well-baby cohort of the BabySeq Project who was identified with compound heterozygous BTD gene variants. The two identified variants included a well-established pathogenic variant (c.1612C>T, p.Arg538Cys) that causes profound biotinidase deficiency (BTD) in homozygosity. In addition, a novel splice variant (c.44+1G>A, p.?) was identified in the invariant splice donor region of intron 1, potentially predictive of loss of function. The novel variant was predicted to impact splicing of exon 1; however, given the absence of any reported pathogenic variants in exon 1 and the presence of alternative splicing with exon 1 absent in most tissues in the GTEx database, we assigned an initial classification of uncertain significance. Follow-up medical record review of state-mandated newborn screen (NBS) results revealed an initial out-of-range biotinidase activity level. Levels from a repeat NBS sample barely passed cutoff into the normal range. To determine whether the infant was biotinidase-deficient, subsequent diagnostic enzyme activity testing was performed, confirming partial BTD, and resulted in a change of management for this patient. This led to reclassification of the novel splice variant based on these results. In conclusion, combining the genetic and NBS results together prompted clinical follow-up that confirmed partial BTD and informed this novel splice site's reclassification, emphasizing the importance of combining iterative genetic and phenotypic evaluations.

7.
Am J Med Genet A ; 176(3): 560-569, 2018 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29350460

RESUMO

Latent transforming growth factor binding proteins (LTBP) are a family of extracellular matrix glycoproteins that play an important role in the regulation of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-ß) activation. Dysregulation of the TGF-ß pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inherited disorders predisposing to thoracic aortic aneurysms syndromes (TAAS) including Marfan syndrome (MFS; FBN1) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS; TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, TGFB3, SMAD2, SMAD3). While these syndromes have distinct clinical criteria, they share clinical features including aortic root dilation and musculoskeletal findings. LTBP1 is a component of the TGF-ß pathway that binds to fibrillin-1 in the extracellular matrix rendering TGF-ß inactive. We describe a three-generation family case series with a heterozygous ∼5.1 Mb novel contiguous gene deletion of chromosome 2p22.3-p22.2 involving 11 genes, including LTBP1. The deletion has been identified in the proband, father and grandfather, who all have a phenotype consistent with a TAAS. Findings include thoracic aortic dilation, ptosis, malar hypoplasia, high arched palate, retrognathia, pes planus, hindfoot deformity, obstructive sleep apnea, and low truncal tone during childhood with joint laxity that progressed to reduced joint mobility over time. While the three affected individuals did not meet criteria for either MFS or LDS, they shared features of both. Although the deletion includes 11 genes, given the relationship between LTBP1, TGF-ß, and fibrillin-1, LTBP1 stands out as one of the possible candidate genes for the clinical syndrome observed in this family. More studies are necessary to evaluate the potential role of LTBP1 in the pathophysiology of TAAS.

8.
J Autoimmun ; 86: 116-119, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28942902

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Risk of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is strongly heritable. Multiple genes confer increased risk for AITD, but a monogenic origin has not yet been described. We studied a family with apparent autosomal dominant, early onset Hashimoto thyroiditis. METHODS: The family was enrolled in an IRB-approved protocol. Whole exome sequencing was used to study the proband and an affected sibling. The identified variant was studied in other family members by Sanger sequencing. RESULTS: We identified a previously unreported splice site variant in the thyroglobulin gene (TG c.1076-1G > C). This variant was confirmed in all affected family members who underwent testing, and also noted in one unaffected child. The variant is associated with exon 9 skipping, resulting in a novel in-frame variant transcript of TG. CONCLUSION: We discovered a monogenic form of AITD associated with a splice site variant in the thyroglobulin gene. This finding raises questions about the origins of thyroid autoimmunity; possible explanations include increased immunogenicity of the mutated protein or thyroid toxicity with secondary development of anti-thyroid antibodies. Further study into the effects of this variant on thyroid function and thyroid autoimmunity are warranted.

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