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1.
Gastroenterology ; 158(5): 1326-1333, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31926173

RESUMO

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Lynch syndrome is caused by variants in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes and associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). In patients with Lynch syndrome, CRCs can develop via different pathways. We studied associations between Lynch syndrome-associated variants in MMR genes and risks of adenoma and CRC and somatic mutations in APC and CTNNB1 in tumors in an international cohort of patients. METHODS: We combined clinical and molecular data from 3 studies. We obtained clinical data from 2747 patients with Lynch syndrome associated with variants in MLH1, MSH2, or MSH6 from Germany, the Netherlands, and Finland who received at least 2 surveillance colonoscopies and were followed for a median time of 7.8 years for development of adenomas or CRC. We performed DNA sequence analyses of 48 colorectal tumors (from 16 patients with mutations in MLH1, 29 patients with mutations in MSH2, and 3 with mutations in MSH6) for somatic mutations in APC and CTNNB1. RESULTS: Risk of advanced adenoma in 10 years was 17.8% in patients with pathogenic variants in MSH2 vs 7.7% in MLH1 (P < .001). Higher proportions of patients with pathogenic variants in MLH1 or MSH2 developed CRC in 10 years (11.3% and 11.4%) than patients with pathogenic variants in MSH6 (4.7%) (P = .001 and P = .003 for MLH1 and MSH2 vs MSH6, respectively). Somatic mutations in APC were found in 75% of tumors from patients with pathogenic variants in MSH2 vs 11% in MLH1 (P = .015). Somatic mutations in CTNNB1 were found in 50% of tumors from patients with pathogenic variants in MLH1 vs 7% in MSH2 (P = .002). None of the 3 tumors with pathogenic variants in MSH6 had a mutation in CTNNB1, but all had mutations in APC. CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of clinical and DNA sequence data from patients with Lynch syndrome from 3 countries, we associated pathogenic variants in MMR genes with risk of adenoma and CRC, and somatic mutations in APC and CTNNB1 in colorectal tumors. If these findings are confirmed, surveillance guidelines might be adjusted based on MMR gene variants.

2.
Genet Med ; 22(1): 15-25, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31337882

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Pathogenic variants affecting MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 cause Lynch syndrome and result in different but imprecisely known cancer risks. This study aimed to provide age and organ-specific cancer risks according to gene and gender and to determine survival after cancer. METHODS: We conducted an international, multicenter prospective observational study using independent test and validation cohorts of carriers of class 4 or class 5 variants. After validation the cohorts were merged providing 6350 participants and 51,646 follow-up years. RESULTS: There were 1808 prospectively observed cancers. Pathogenic MLH1 and MSH2 variants caused high penetrance dominant cancer syndromes sharing similar colorectal, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risks, but older MSH2 carriers had higher risk of cancers of the upper urinary tract, upper gastrointestinal tract, brain, and particularly prostate. Pathogenic MSH6 variants caused a sex-limited trait with high endometrial cancer risk but only modestly increased colorectal cancer risk in both genders. We did not demonstrate a significantly increased cancer risk in carriers of pathogenic PMS2 variants. Ten-year crude survival was over 80% following colon, endometrial, or ovarian cancer. CONCLUSION: Management guidelines for Lynch syndrome may require revision in light of these different gene and gender-specific risks and the good prognosis for the most commonly associated cancers.

3.
Z Gastroenterol ; 57(11): 1309-1320, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31739377

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome and accounts for ~3 % of all CRCs. This autosomal dominant disorder is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM). One in 300 individuals of the general population are considered to be mutation carriers (300 000 individuals/Germany). Mutation carriers are at a high CRC risk of 15-46 % till the age of 75 years. LS also includes a variety of extracolonic malignancies such as endometrial, small bowel, gastric, urothelial, and other cancers. METHODS: The German Consortium for Familial Intestinal Cancer consists of 14 university centers in Germany. The aim of the consortium is to develop and evaluate surveillance programs and to further translate the results in clinical care. We have revisited and updated the clinical management guidelines for LS patients in Germany. RESULTS: A surveillance colonoscopy should be performed every 12-24 months starting at the age of 25 years. At diagnosis of first colorectal cancer, an oncological resection is advised, an extended resection (colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis) has to be discussed with the patient. The lifetime risk for gastric cancer is 0.2-13 %. Gastric cancers detected during surveillance have a lower tumor stage compared to symptom-driven detection. The lifetime risk for small bowel cancer is 4-8 %. About half of small bowel cancer is located in the duodenum and occurs before the age of 35 years in 10 % of all cases. Accordingly, patients are advised to undergo an esophagogastroduodenoscopy every 12-36 months starting by the age of 25 years. CONCLUSION: LS colonic and extracolonic clinical management, surveillance and therapy are complex and several aspects remain unclear. In the future, surveillance and clinical management need to be more tailored to gene and gender. Future prospective trials are needed.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/patologia , Reparo de Erro de Pareamento de DNA , Endoscopia do Sistema Digestório/métodos , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Comportamento de Redução do Risco , Neoplasias Colorretais , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/genética , Alemanha , Humanos , Vigilância da População , Fatores de Tempo
5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30858900

RESUMO

Background: Recent epidemiological evidence shows that colorectal cancer (CRC) continues to occur in carriers of pathogenic mismatch repair (path_MMR) variants despite frequent colonoscopy surveillance in expert centres. This observation conflicts with the paradigm that removal of all visible polyps should prevent the vast majority of CRC in path_MMR carriers, provided the screening interval is sufficiently short and colonoscopic practice is optimal. Methods: To inform the debate, we examined, in the Prospective Lynch Syndrome Database (PLSD), whether the time since last colonoscopy was associated with the pathological stage at which CRC was diagnosed during prospective surveillance. Path_MMR carriers were recruited for prospective surveillance by colonoscopy. Only variants scored by the InSiGHT Variant Interpretation Committee as class 4 and 5 (clinically actionable) were included. CRCs detected at the first planned colonoscopy, or within one year of this, were excluded as prevalent cancers. Results: Stage at diagnosis and interval between last prospective surveillance colonoscopy and diagnosis were available for 209 patients with 218 CRCs, including 162 path_MLH1, 45 path_MSH2, 10 path_MSH6 and 1 path_PMS2 carriers. The numbers of cancers detected within < 1.5, 1.5-2.5, 2.5-3.5 and at > 3.5 years since last colonoscopy were 36, 93, 56 and 33, respectively. Among these, 16.7, 19.4, 9.9 and 15.1% were stage III-IV, respectively (p = 0.34). The cancers detected more than 2.5 years after the last colonoscopy were not more advanced than those diagnosed earlier (p = 0.14). Conclusions: The CRC stage and interval since last colonoscopy were not correlated, which is in conflict with the accelerated adenoma-carcinoma paradigm. We have previously reported that more frequent colonoscopy is not associated with lower incidence of CRC in path_MMR carriers as was expected. In contrast, point estimates showed a higher incidence with shorter intervals between examinations, a situation that may parallel to over-diagnosis in breast cancer screening. Our findings raise the possibility that some CRCs in path_MMR carriers may spontaneously disappear: the host immune response may not only remove CRC precursor lesions in path_MMR carriers, but may remove infiltrating cancers as well. If confirmed, our suggested interpretation will have a bearing on surveillance policy for path_MMR carriers.

6.
Eur J Cancer ; 104: 91-103, 2018 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30342310

RESUMO

Patients with hereditary gastrointestinal (GI) cancers represent a substantial fraction of the overall affected population. Although awareness for hereditary GI cancer syndromes is on the rise, identification of patients and measures of surveillance are often unclear in everyday clinical routine. Therefore, the European Society of Digestive Oncology expert discussion 2018 at the World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer focussed on screening and surveillance of hereditary colorectal, gastric and pancreatic cancers. An international panel of experts and opinion leaders developed the here presented recommendations based on published evidence and on profound clinical expertise to facilitate clinical routine in identification and caretaking of patients with familial GI cancers.


Assuntos
Detecção Precoce de Câncer/normas , Neoplasias Gastrointestinais/genética , Síndromes Neoplásicas Hereditárias/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/genética , Idade de Início , Quimioprevenção , Colonoscopia , Análise Mutacional de DNA , Detecção Precoce de Câncer/métodos , Neoplasias Gastrointestinais/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Gastrointestinais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Gastrointestinais/prevenção & controle , Aconselhamento Genético , Testes Genéticos/normas , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Humanos , Técnicas de Diagnóstico Molecular/normas , Síndromes Neoplásicas Hereditárias/diagnóstico , Oncogenes , Especificidade de Órgãos , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/prevenção & controle , Medição de Risco , Análise de Sequência de DNA/métodos , Análise de Sequência de DNA/normas
7.
Int J Cancer ; 143(11): 2800-2813, 2018 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29987844

RESUMO

In many families with suspected Lynch syndrome (LS), no germline mutation in the causative mismatch repair (MMR) genes is detected during routine diagnostics. To identify novel causative genes for LS, the present study investigated 77 unrelated, mutation-negative patients with clinically suspected LS and a loss of MSH2 in tumor tissue. An analysis for genomic copy number variants (CNV) was performed, with subsequent next generation sequencing (NGS) of selected candidate genes in a subgroup of the cohort. Genomic DNA was genotyped using Illumina's HumanOmniExpress Bead Array. After quality control and filtering, 25 deletions and 16 duplications encompassing 73 genes were identified in 28 patients. No recurrent CNV was detected, and none of the CNVs affected the regulatory regions of MSH2. A total of 49 candidate genes from genomic regions implicated by the present CNV analysis and 30 known or assumed risk genes for colorectal cancer (CRC) were then sequenced in a subset of 38 patients using a customized NGS gene panel and Sanger sequencing. Single nucleotide variants were identified in 14 candidate genes from the CNV analysis. The most promising of these candidate genes were: (i) PRKCA, PRKDC, and MCM4, as a functional relation to MSH2 is predicted by network analysis, and (ii) CSMD1, as this is commonly mutated in CRC. Furthermore, six patients harbored POLE variants outside the exonuclease domain, suggesting that these might be implicated in hereditary CRC. Analyses in larger cohorts of suspected LS patients recruited via international collaborations are warranted to verify the present findings.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/genética , Variações do Número de Cópias de DNA/genética , Adulto , Neoplasias Colorretais/genética , Reparo de Erro de Pareamento de DNA/genética , Feminino , Genótipo , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa/genética , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala/métodos , Humanos , Masculino
8.
Mol Oncol ; 11(2): 208-219, 2017 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28106345

RESUMO

An accurate blood-based RAS mutation assay to determine eligibility of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients for anti-EGFR therapy would benefit clinical practice by better informing decisions to administer treatment independent of tissue availability. The objective of this study was to determine the level of concordance between plasma and tissue RAS mutation status in patients with mCRC to gauge whether blood-based RAS mutation testing is a viable alternative to standard-of-care RAS tumor testing. RAS testing was performed on plasma samples from newly diagnosed metastatic patients, or from recurrent mCRC patients using the highly sensitive digital PCR technology, BEAMing (beads, emulsions, amplification, and magnetics), and compared with DNA sequencing data of respective FFPE (formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded) tumor samples. Discordant tissue RAS results were re-examined by BEAMing, if possible. The prevalence of RAS mutations detected in plasma (51%) vs. tumor (53%) was similar, in accord with the known prevalence of RAS mutations observed in mCRC patient populations. The positive agreement between plasma and tumor RAS results was 90.4% (47/52), the negative agreement was 93.5% (43/46), and the overall agreement (concordance) was 91.8% (90/98). The high concordance of plasma and tissue results demonstrates that blood-based RAS mutation testing is a viable alternative to tissue-based RAS testing.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais/sangue , Neoplasias Colorretais/genética , DNA de Neoplasias/sangue , DNA de Neoplasias/genética , Genes ras , Mutação , Idoso , Neoplasias Colorretais/tratamento farmacológico , Receptores ErbB/antagonistas & inibidores , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
9.
Nat Med ; 21(10): 1163-71, 2015 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26390243

RESUMO

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal human cancers and shows resistance to any therapeutic strategy used. Here we tested small-molecule inhibitors targeting chromatin regulators as possible therapeutic agents in PDAC. We show that JQ1, an inhibitor of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family of proteins, suppresses PDAC development in mice by inhibiting both MYC activity and inflammatory signals. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor SAHA synergizes with JQ1 to augment cell death and more potently suppress advanced PDAC. Finally, using a CRISPR-Cas9-based method for gene editing directly in the mouse adult pancreas, we show that de-repression of p57 (also known as KIP2 or CDKN1C) upon combined BET and HDAC inhibition is required for the induction of combination therapy-induced cell death in PDAC. SAHA is approved for human use, and molecules similar to JQ1 are being tested in clinical trials. Thus, these studies identify a promising epigenetic-based therapeutic strategy that may be rapidly implemented in fatal human tumors.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma/tratamento farmacológico , Carcinoma Ductal Pancreático/tratamento farmacológico , Epigênese Genética , Inibidores de Histona Desacetilases/uso terapêutico , Proteínas/antagonistas & inibidores , Adenocarcinoma/terapia , Animais , Carcinoma Ductal Pancreático/terapia , Repetições Palindrômicas Curtas Agrupadas e Regularmente Espaçadas , Humanos , Camundongos
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