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1.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 1164, 2021 02 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33608517

RESUMO

Understanding how natural selection has shaped genetic architecture of complex traits is of importance in medical and evolutionary genetics. Bayesian methods have been developed using individual-level GWAS data to estimate multiple genetic architecture parameters including selection signature. Here, we present a method (SBayesS) that only requires GWAS summary statistics. We analyse data for 155 complex traits (n = 27k-547k) and project the estimates onto those obtained from evolutionary simulations. We estimate that, on average across traits, about 1% of human genome sequence are mutational targets with a mean selection coefficient of ~0.001. Common diseases, on average, show a smaller number of mutational targets and have been under stronger selection, compared to other traits. SBayesS analyses incorporating functional annotations reveal that selection signatures vary across genomic regions, among which coding regions have the strongest selection signature and are enriched for both the number of associated variants and the magnitude of effect sizes.

2.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 1146, 2021 02 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33608531

RESUMO

Genetic factors are recognized to contribute to peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and other gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here, genome-wide association study (GWAS) analyses based on 456,327 UK Biobank (UKB) individuals identify 8 independent and significant loci for PUD at, or near, genes MUC1, MUC6, FUT2, PSCA, ABO, CDX2, GAST and CCKBR. There are previously established roles in susceptibility to Helicobacter pylori infection, response to counteract infection-related damage, gastric acid secretion or gastrointestinal motility for these genes. Only two associations have been previously reported for duodenal ulcer, here replicated trans-ancestrally. The results highlight the role of host genetic susceptibility to infection. Post-GWAS analyses for PUD, GORD, IBS and IBD add insights into relationships between these gastrointestinal diseases and their relationships with depression, a commonly comorbid disorder.

3.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 1050, 2021 02 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33594080

RESUMO

Attributing the similarity between individuals to genetic and non-genetic factors is central to genetic analyses. In this paper we use the genomic relationship ([Formula: see text]) among 417,060 individuals to investigate the phenotypic covariance between pairs of individuals for 32 traits across the spectrum of relatedness, from unrelated pairs through to identical twins. We find linear relationships between phenotypic covariance and [Formula: see text] that agree with the SNP-based heritability ([Formula: see text]) in unrelated pairs ([Formula: see text]), and with pedigree-estimated heritability in close relatives ([Formula: see text]). The covariance increases faster than [Formula: see text] in distant relatives ([Formula: see text]), and we attribute this to imperfect linkage disequilibrium between causal variants and the common variants used to construct [Formula: see text]. We also examine the effect of assortative mating on heritability estimates from different experimental designs. We find that full-sib identity-by-descent regression estimates for height (0.66 s.e. 0.07) are consistent with estimates from close relatives (0.82 s.e. 0.04) after accounting for the effect of assortative mating.


Assuntos
Genoma Humano , Filogenia , Adulto , Idoso , Bancos de Espécimes Biológicos , Índice de Massa Corporal , Escolaridade , Humanos , Padrões de Herança/genética , Desequilíbrio de Ligação , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos Genéticos , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Característica Quantitativa Herdável , Análise de Regressão , Reino Unido
4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33595649

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Studies evaluating the relationship between chronic inflammation and cognitive functioning have produced heterogeneous results. A potential reason for this is the variability of inflammatory mediators which could lead to misclassifications of individuals' persisting levels of inflammation. DNA methylation has shown utility in indexing environmental exposures and could be leveraged to provide proxy signatures of chronic inflammation. METHODS: We conducted an elastic net regression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in a cohort of 875 older adults (Lothian Birth Cohort 1936; mean age: 70 years) to develop a DNA methylation-based predictor. The predictor was tested in an independent cohort (Generation Scotland; n=7,028 [417 with measured IL-6], mean age: 51 years). RESULTS: A weighted score from 35 CpG sites optimally predicted IL-6 in the independent test set (Generation Scotland; R 2=4.4%, p=2.1x10 -5). In the independent test cohort, both measured IL-6 and the DNA methylation proxy increased with age (serum IL-6: n=417, ß=0.02, SE=0.004 p=1.3x10 -7; DNAm IL-6 score: n=7,028, ß=0.02, SE=0.0009, p<2x10 -16). Serum IL-6 did not associate with cognitive ability (n=417, ß=-0.06, SE=0.05, p=0.19); however, an inverse association was identified between the DNA methylation score and cognitive functioning (n=7,028, ß=-0.16, SE=0.02, pFDR<2x10 -16). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest methylation-based predictors can be used as proxies for inflammatory markers, potentially allowing for further insight into the relationship between inflammation and pertinent health outcomes.

5.
Mol Autism ; 12(1): 12, 2021 02 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33568206

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental condition whose biological basis is yet to be elucidated. The Australian Autism Biobank (AAB) is an initiative of the Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC) to establish an Australian resource of biospecimens, phenotypes and genomic data for research on autism. METHODS: Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes were available for 2,477 individuals (after quality control) from 546 families (436 complete), including 886 participants aged 2 to 17 years with diagnosed (n = 871) or suspected (n = 15) ASD, 218 siblings without ASD, 1,256 parents, and 117 unrelated children without an ASD diagnosis. The genetic data were used to confirm familial relationships and assign ancestry, which was majority European (n = 1,964 European individuals). We generated polygenic scores (PGS) for ASD, IQ, chronotype and height in the subset of Europeans, and in 3,490 unrelated ancestry-matched participants from the UK Biobank. We tested for group differences for each PGS, and performed prediction analyses for related phenotypes in the AAB. We called copy-number variants (CNVs) in all participants, and intersected these with high-confidence ASD- and intellectual disability (ID)-associated CNVs and genes from the public domain. RESULTS: The ASD (p = 6.1e-13), sibling (p = 4.9e-3) and unrelated (p = 3.0e-3) groups had significantly higher ASD PGS than UK Biobank controls, whereas this was not the case for height-a control trait. The IQ PGS was a significant predictor of measured IQ in undiagnosed children (r = 0.24, p = 2.1e-3) and parents (r = 0.17, p = 8.0e-7; 4.0% of variance), but not the ASD group. Chronotype PGS predicted sleep disturbances within the ASD group (r = 0.13, p = 1.9e-3; 1.3% of variance). In the CNV analysis, we identified 13 individuals with CNVs overlapping ASD/ID-associated CNVs, and 12 with CNVs overlapping ASD/ID/developmental delay-associated genes identified on the basis of de novo variants. LIMITATIONS: This dataset is modest in size, and the publicly-available genome-wide-association-study (GWAS) summary statistics used to calculate PGS for ASD and other traits are relatively underpowered. CONCLUSIONS: We report on common genetic variation and rare CNVs within the AAB. Prediction analyses using currently available GWAS summary statistics are largely consistent with expected relationships based on published studies. As the size of publicly-available GWAS summary statistics grows, the phenotypic depth of the AAB dataset will provide many opportunities for analyses of autism profiles and co-occurring conditions, including when integrated with other omics datasets generated from AAB biospecimens (blood, urine, stool, hair).

6.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 98, 2021 Feb 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33542196

RESUMO

Cross-species translational approaches to human genomic analyses are lacking. The present study uses an integrative framework to investigate how genes associated with nicotine use in model organisms contribute to the genetic architecture of human tobacco consumption. First, we created a model organism geneset by collecting results from five animal models of nicotine exposure (RNA expression changes in brain) and then tested the relevance of these genes and flanking genetic variation using genetic data from human cigarettes per day (UK BioBank N = 123,844; all European Ancestry). We tested three hypotheses: (1) DNA variation in, or around, the 'model organism geneset' will contribute to the heritability to human tobacco consumption, (2) that the model organism genes will be enriched for genes associated with human tobacco consumption, and (3) that a polygenic score based off our model organism geneset will predict tobacco consumption in the AddHealth sample (N = 1667; all European Ancestry). Our results suggested that: (1) model organism genes accounted for ~5-36% of the observed SNP-heritability in human tobacco consumption (enrichment: 1.60-31.45), (2) model organism genes, but not negative control genes, were enriched for the gene-based associations (MAGMA, H-MAGMA, SMultiXcan) for human cigarettes per day, and (3) polygenic scores based on our model organism geneset predicted cigarettes per day in an independent sample. Altogether, these findings highlight the advantages of using multiple species evidence to isolate genetic factors to better understand the etiological complexity of tobacco and other nicotine consumption.

7.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 20211, 2021 01 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33436567

RESUMO

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have discovered numerous genetic variants associated with human behavioural traits. However, behavioural traits are subject to misreports and longitudinal changes (MLC) which can cause biases in GWAS and follow-up analyses. Here, we demonstrate that individuals with higher disease burden in the UK Biobank (n = 455,607) are more likely to misreport or reduce their alcohol consumption levels, and propose a correction procedure to mitigate the MLC-induced biases. The alcohol consumption GWAS signals removed by the MLC corrections are enriched in metabolic/cardiovascular traits. Almost all the previously reported negative estimates of genetic correlations between alcohol consumption and common diseases become positive/non-significant after the MLC corrections. We also observe MLC biases for smoking and physical activities in the UK Biobank. Our findings provide a plausible explanation of the controversy about the effects of alcohol consumption on health outcomes and a caution for future analyses of self-reported behavioural traits in biobank data.


Assuntos
Comportamento , Viés , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Característica Quantitativa Herdável , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/genética , Bancos de Espécimes Biológicos , Índice de Massa Corporal , Humanos , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Reino Unido
9.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 2020 Sep 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32997097

RESUMO

Importance: Polygenic risk scores (PRS) are predictors of the genetic susceptibilities of individuals to diseases. All individuals have DNA risk variants for all common diseases, but genetic susceptibility differences between people reflect the cumulative burden of these. Polygenic risk scores for an individual are calculated as weighted counts of thousands of risk variants that they carry, where the risk variants and their weights have been identified in genome-wide association studies. Here, we review the underlying basic science of PRS, providing a foundation for understanding the potential clinical utility and limitations of PRS. Observations: Polygenic risk scores can be calculated for a wide range of diseases from a saliva or blood sample using genotyping technologies that are inexpensive. While genotyping only needs to be done once for each individual in their lifetime, the PRS can be recalculated as identification of risk variants improves. On their own, PRS will never be able to establish or definitively predict future diagnoses of common complex conditions because genetic factors only contribute part of the risk, and PRS will only ever capture part of the genetic contributions. Nonetheless, just as clinical medicine uses a multitude of other predictive measures, PRS either on their own or as part of multivariable predictive algorithms could play a role. Conclusions and Relevance: Utility of PRS in clinical medicine and ethical issues related to their use should be evaluated in the context of realistic expectations of what PRS can and cannot deliver. For different diseases, PRS could have utility in community settings (stratification to better triage people into established screening programs) or could contribute to clinical decision-making for those presenting with symptoms but where formal diagnosis is unclear. In principle, PRS could contribute to treatment choices, but more data are needed to allow development of PRS in this context.

10.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4799, 2020 09 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32968074

RESUMO

Genetic association studies have identified 44 common genome-wide significant risk loci for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). However, LOAD genetic architecture and prediction are unclear. Here we estimate the optimal P-threshold (Poptimal) of a genetic risk score (GRS) for prediction of LOAD in three independent datasets comprising 676 cases and 35,675 family history proxy cases. We show that the discriminative ability of GRS in LOAD prediction is maximised when selecting a small number of SNPs. Both simulation results and direct estimation indicate that the number of causal common SNPs for LOAD may be less than 100, suggesting LOAD is more oligogenic than polygenic. The best GRS explains approximately 75% of SNP-heritability, and individuals in the top decile of GRS have ten-fold increased odds when compared to those in the bottom decile. In addition, 14 variants are identified that contribute to both LOAD risk and age at onset of LOAD.


Assuntos
Doença de Alzheimer/genética , Estudos de Associação Genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Adulto , Idade de Início , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Risco
11.
PLoS Genet ; 16(9): e1008780, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32925905

RESUMO

Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) in large human cohorts have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits and diseases. For identifying the genes and gene-associated variants that underlie complex traits in livestock, especially where sample sizes are limiting, it may help to integrate the results of GWAS for equivalent traits in humans as prior information. In this study, we sought to investigate the usefulness of results from a GWAS on human height as prior information for identifying the genes and gene-associated variants that affect stature in cattle, using GWAS summary data on samples sizes of 700,000 and 58,265 for humans and cattle, respectively. Using Fisher's exact test, we observed a significant proportion of cattle stature-associated genes (30/77) that are also associated with human height (odds ratio = 5.1, p = 3.1e-10). Result of randomized sampling tests showed that cattle orthologs of human height-associated genes, hereafter referred to as candidate genes (C-genes), were more enriched for cattle stature GWAS signals than random samples of genes in the cattle genome (p = 0.01). Randomly sampled SNPs within the C-genes also tend to explain more genetic variance for cattle stature (up to 13.2%) than randomly sampled SNPs within random cattle genes (p = 0.09). The most significant SNPs from a cattle GWAS for stature within the C-genes did not explain more genetic variance for cattle stature than the most significant SNPs within random cattle genes (p = 0.87). Altogether, our findings support previous studies that suggest a similarity in the genetic regulation of height across mammalian species. However, with the availability of a powerful GWAS for stature that combined data from 8 cattle breeds, prior information from human-height GWAS does not seem to provide any additional benefit with respect to the identification of genes and gene-associated variants that affect stature in cattle.


Assuntos
Estatura/genética , Bovinos/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Animais , Cruzamento/métodos , Bases de Dados Genéticas , Variação Genética/genética , Humanos , Gado/genética , Herança Multifatorial/genética , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Locos de Características Quantitativas/genética
12.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3865, 2020 07 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32737319

RESUMO

Polygenic scores (PGS) have been widely used to predict disease risk using variants identified from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To date, most GWAS have been conducted in populations of European ancestry, which limits the use of GWAS-derived PGS in non-European ancestry populations. Here, we derive a theoretical model of the relative accuracy (RA) of PGS across ancestries. We show through extensive simulations that the RA of PGS based on genome-wide significant SNPs can be predicted accurately from modelling linkage disequilibrium (LD), minor allele frequencies (MAF), cross-population correlations of causal SNP effects and heritability. We find that LD and MAF differences between ancestries can explain between 70 and 80% of the loss of RA of European-based PGS in African ancestry for traits like body mass index and type 2 diabetes. Our results suggest that causal variants underlying common genetic variation identified in European ancestry GWAS are mostly shared across continents.


Assuntos
Asma/genética , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Hipertensão/genética , Modelos Genéticos , Herança Multifatorial , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Adulto , África/epidemiologia , Idoso , Alelos , Ásia/epidemiologia , Asma/diagnóstico , Asma/epidemiologia , Asma/etnologia , Índice de Massa Corporal , Colesterol/sangue , Simulação por Computador , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/diagnóstico , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/etnologia , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Frequência do Gene , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Hipertensão/diagnóstico , Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Hipertensão/etnologia , Desequilíbrio de Ligação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico , Característica Quantitativa Herdável , Risco
13.
Genome Med ; 12(1): 60, 2020 07 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32641083

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The molecular factors which control circulating levels of inflammatory proteins are not well understood. Furthermore, association studies between molecular probes and human traits are often performed by linear model-based methods which may fail to account for complex structure and interrelationships within molecular datasets. METHODS: In this study, we perform genome- and epigenome-wide association studies (GWAS/EWAS) on the levels of 70 plasma-derived inflammatory protein biomarkers in healthy older adults (Lothian Birth Cohort 1936; n = 876; Olink® inflammation panel). We employ a Bayesian framework (BayesR+) which can account for issues pertaining to data structure and unknown confounding variables (with sensitivity analyses using ordinary least squares- (OLS) and mixed model-based approaches). RESULTS: We identified 13 SNPs associated with 13 proteins (n = 1 SNP each) concordant across OLS and Bayesian methods. We identified 3 CpG sites spread across 3 proteins (n = 1 CpG each) that were concordant across OLS, mixed-model and Bayesian analyses. Tagged genetic variants accounted for up to 45% of variance in protein levels (for MCP2, 36% of variance alone attributable to 1 polymorphism). Methylation data accounted for up to 46% of variation in protein levels (for CXCL10). Up to 66% of variation in protein levels (for VEGFA) was explained using genetic and epigenetic data combined. We demonstrated putative causal relationships between CD6 and IL18R1 with inflammatory bowel disease and between IL12B and Crohn's disease. CONCLUSIONS: Our data may aid understanding of the molecular regulation of the circulating inflammatory proteome as well as causal relationships between inflammatory mediators and disease.

14.
Sleep ; 2020 Jul 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32671396

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Sleep disturbances and genetic variants have been identified as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Our goal was to assess whether genome-wide polygenic risk scores (PRS) for AD associate with sleep phenotypes in young adults, decades before typical AD symptom onset. METHODS: We computed whole-genome Polygenic Risk Scores (PRS) for AD and extensively phenotyped sleep under different sleep conditions, including baseline sleep, recovery sleep following sleep deprivation and extended sleep opportunity, in a carefully selected homogenous sample of healthy 363 young men (22.1 y ± 2.7) devoid of sleep and cognitive disorders. RESULTS: AD PRS was associated with more slow wave energy, i.e. the cumulated power in the 0.5-4 Hz EEG band, a marker of sleep need, during habitual sleep and following sleep loss, and potentially with large slow wave sleep rebound following sleep deprivation. Furthermore, higher AD PRS was correlated with higher habitual daytime sleepiness. CONCLUSIONS: These results imply that sleep features may be associated with AD liability in young adults, when current AD biomarkers are typically negative, and the notion that quantifying sleep alterations may be useful in assessing the risk for developing AD.

15.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(14): 14092-14124, 2020 07 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32697766

RESUMO

DNA methylation has fundamental roles in gene programming and aging that may help predict mortality. However, no large-scale study has investigated whether site-specific DNA methylation predicts all-cause mortality. We used the Illumina-HumanMethylation450-BeadChip to identify blood DNA methylation sites associated with all-cause mortality for 12, 300 participants in 12 Cohorts of the Heart and Aging Research in Genetic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium. Over an average 10-year follow-up, there were 2,561 deaths across the cohorts. Nine sites mapping to three intergenic and six gene-specific regions were associated with mortality (P < 9.3x10-7) independently of age and other mortality predictors. Six sites (cg14866069, cg23666362, cg20045320, cg07839457, cg07677157, cg09615688)-mapping respectively to BMPR1B, MIR1973, IFITM3, NLRC5, and two intergenic regions-were associated with reduced mortality risk. The remaining three sites (cg17086398, cg12619262, cg18424841)-mapping respectively to SERINC2, CHST12, and an intergenic region-were associated with increased mortality risk. DNA methylation at each site predicted 5%-15% of all deaths. We also assessed the causal association of those sites to age-related chronic diseases by using Mendelian randomization, identifying weak causal relationship between cg18424841 and cg09615688 with coronary heart disease. Of the nine sites, three (cg20045320, cg07839457, cg07677157) were associated with lower incidence of heart disease risk and two (cg20045320, cg07839457) with smoking and inflammation in prior CHARGE analyses. Methylation of cg20045320, cg07839457, and cg17086398 was associated with decreased expression of nearby genes (IFITM3, IRF, NLRC5, MT1, MT2, MARCKSL1) linked to immune responses and cardiometabolic diseases. These sites may serve as useful clinical tools for mortality risk assessment and preventative care.

16.
Hum Brain Mapp ; 41(14): 4062-4076, 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32687259

RESUMO

The recent availability of large-scale neuroimaging cohorts facilitates deeper characterisation of the relationship between phenotypic and brain architecture variation in humans. Here, we investigate the association (previously coined morphometricity) of a phenotype with all 652,283 vertex-wise measures of cortical and subcortical morphology in a large data set from the UK Biobank (UKB; N = 9,497 for discovery, N = 4,323 for replication) and the Human Connectome Project (N = 1,110). We used a linear mixed model with the brain measures of individuals fitted as random effects with covariance relationships estimated from the imaging data. We tested 167 behavioural, cognitive, psychiatric or lifestyle phenotypes and found significant morphometricity for 58 phenotypes (spanning substance use, blood assay results, education or income level, diet, depression, and cognition domains), 23 of which replicated in the UKB replication set or the HCP. We then extended the model for a bivariate analysis to estimate grey-matter correlation between phenotypes, which revealed that body size (i.e., height, weight, BMI, waist and hip circumference, body fat percentage) could account for a substantial proportion of the morphometricity (confirmed using a conditional analysis), providing possible insight into previous MRI case-control results for psychiatric disorders where case status is associated with body mass index. Our LMM framework also allowed to predict some of the associated phenotypes from the vertex-wise measures, in two independent samples. Finally, we demonstrated additional new applications of our approach (a) region of interest (ROI) analysis that retain the vertex-wise complexity; (b) comparison of the information retained by different MRI processings.

17.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 2865, 2020 06 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32513961

RESUMO

Linking epigenetic marks to clinical outcomes improves insight into molecular processes, disease prediction, and therapeutic target identification. Here, a statistical approach is presented to infer the epigenetic architecture of complex disease, determine the variation captured by epigenetic effects, and estimate phenotype-epigenetic probe associations jointly. Implicitly adjusting for probe correlations, data structure (cell-count or relatedness), and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker effects, improves association estimates and in 9,448 individuals, 75.7% (95% CI 71.70-79.3) of body mass index (BMI) variation and 45.6% (95% CI 37.3-51.9) of cigarette consumption variation was captured by whole blood methylation array data. Pathway-linked probes of blood cholesterol, lipid transport and sterol metabolism for BMI, and xenobiotic stimuli response for smoking, showed >1.5 times larger associations with >95% posterior inclusion probability. Prediction accuracy improved by 28.7% for BMI and 10.2% for smoking over a LASSO model, with age-, and tissue-specificity, implying associations are a phenotypic consequence rather than causal.


Assuntos
Epigênese Genética , Característica Quantitativa Herdável , Adulto , Algoritmos , Teorema de Bayes , Biomarcadores/análise , Índice de Massa Corporal , Simulação por Computador , Metilação de DNA/genética , Humanos , Anotação de Sequência Molecular , Especificidade de Órgãos/genética , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
18.
Twin Res Hum Genet ; 23(2): 107-108, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32423516

RESUMO

The classical twin design relies on a number of strong number of assumptions in order to yield unbiased estimates of heritability. This includes the equal environments assumption - that monozygotic and dizygotic twins experience similar degrees of environmental similarity - an assumption that is likely to be violated in practice for many traits of interest. An alternative method of estimating heritability that does not suffer from many of these limitations is to model trait similarity between sibling pairs as a function of their empirical genome-wide identity by descent sharing, estimated from genetic markers. In this review, I recount the story behind Nick Martin's and my development of this method, our first attempts at applying it in a human population and more recent studies using the original and related methods to estimate trait heritability.

19.
Mol Biol Evol ; 37(10): 3076-3080, 2020 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32442309

RESUMO

We report on the first meeting of SMBE in Africa. SMBE Malawi was initiated to bring together African and international researchers who use genetics or genomics to study natural systems impacted by human activities. The goals of this conference were 1) to reach a world-class standard of science with a large number of contributions from Africa, 2) to initiate exchange between African and international researchers, and 3) to identify challenges and opportunities for evolutionary genomics research in Africa. As repored, we think that we have achieved these goals and make suggestions on the way forward for African evolutionary genomics research.

20.
Mol Psychiatry ; 2020 May 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32398722

RESUMO

Substantial genetic liability is shared across psychiatric disorders but less is known about risk variants that are specific to a given disorder. We used multi-trait conditional and joint analysis (mtCOJO) to adjust GWAS summary statistics of one disorder for the effects of genetically correlated traits to identify putative disorder-specific SNP associations. We applied mtCOJO to summary statistics for five psychiatric disorders from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium-schizophrenia (SCZ), bipolar disorder (BIP), major depression (MD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism (AUT). Most genome-wide significant variants for these disorders had evidence of pleiotropy (i.e., impact on multiple psychiatric disorders) and hence have reduced mtCOJO conditional effect sizes. However, subsets of genome-wide significant variants had larger conditional effect sizes consistent with disorder-specific effects: 15 of 130 genome-wide significant variants for schizophrenia, 5 of 40 for major depression, 3 of 11 for ADHD and 1 of 2 for autism. We show that decreased expression of VPS29 in the brain may increase risk to SCZ only and increased expression of CSE1L is associated with SCZ and MD, but not with BIP. Likewise, decreased expression of PCDHA7 in the brain is linked to increased risk of MD but decreased risk of SCZ and BIP.

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