Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 15 de 15
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
Clin Genet ; 2020 Nov 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33140411

RESUMO

Patients with PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS, comprising Cowden, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba, and Proteus-like syndromes) are at increased risk of developing cancer due to pathogenic PTEN germline variants. This review summarizes age-, sex-, and type-specific malignant cancer risks for PHTS patients, which is urgently needed for clinical management. A PubMed literature search for Standardized Incidence Ratios or Cumulative Lifetime cancer risks (CLTRs) resulted in nine cohort studies comprising four independent PHTS cohorts, including mainly index cases and prevalent cancer cases. The median age at diagnosis was 36 years. Reported CLTRs for any cancer varied from 81% to 90%. The tumor spectrum included female breast cancer (CLTRs including sex-specific estimates at age 60-70: 67% to 85%), endometrium cancer (19% to 28%), thyroid cancer (6% to 38%), renal cancer (2% to 24%), colorectal cancer (9% to 32%), and melanoma (0% to 6%). Although these estimates provide guidance for clinical care, discrepancies between studies, sample sizes, retrospective designs, strongly ascertained cases, and lack of pediatric research emphasizes that data should be interpreted with great caution. Therefore, more accurate and more personalized age-, sex-, and cancer-specific risk estimates are needed to enable counseling of all PHTS patients irrespective of ascertainment, and improvement of cancer surveillance guidelines.

2.
Int J Cancer ; 147(8): 2150-2158, 2020 Oct 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32510614

RESUMO

Universal mismatch repair deficiency (dMMR) testing of colorectal cancer (CRC) is promoted as routine diagnostics to prescreen for Lynch syndrome. We evaluated the yield and experience of age-related molecular investigation for heritable and nonheritable causes of dMMR in CRC below age 70 to identify Lynch Syndrome. In a prospective cohort of 3602 newly diagnosed CRCs below age 70 from 19 hospitals, dMMR, MLH1 promoter hypermethylation, germline MMR gene and somatic MMR gene testing was assessed in daily practice. Yield was evaluated using data from the Dutch Pathology Registry (PALGA) and two regional genetic centers. Experiences of clinicians were evaluated through questionnaires. Participating clinicians were overwhelmingly positive about the clinical workflow. Pathologists routinely applied dMMR-testing in 84% CRCs and determined 10% was dMMR, largely due to somatic MLH1 hypermethylation (66%). Of those, 69% with dMMR CRC below age 70 without hypermethylation were referred for genetic testing, of which 55% was due to Lynch syndrome (hereditary) and 43% to somatic biallelic pathogenic MMR (nonhereditary). The prevalence of Lynch syndrome was 18% in CRC < 40, 1.7% in CRC age 40-64 and 0.7% in CRC age 65-69. Age 65-69 represents most cases with dMMR, in which dMMR due to somatic causes (13%) is 20 times more prevalent than Lynch syndrome. In conclusion, up to age 65 routine diagnostics of (non-)heritable causes of dMMR CRCs effectively identifies Lynch syndrome and reduces Lynch-like diagnoses. Above age 64, the effort to detect one Lynch syndrome patient in dMMR CRC is high and germline testing rarely needed.

3.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 112(2): 161-169, 2020 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31076742

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Women with epithelial ovarian cancer (OC) have a higher chance to benefit from poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor (PARPi) therapy if their tumor has a somatic or hereditary BRCA1/2 pathogenic variant. Current guidelines advise BRCA1/2 genetic predisposition testing for all OC patients, though this does not detect somatic variants. We assessed the feasibility of a workflow for universal tumor DNA BRCA1/2 testing of all newly diagnosed OC patients as a prescreen for PARPi treatment and cancer predisposition testing. METHODS: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue was obtained from OC patients in seven hospitals immediately after diagnosis or primary surgery. DNA was extracted, and universal tumor BRCA1/2 testing was then performed in a single site. Diagnostic yield, uptake, referral rates for genetic predisposition testing, and experiences of patients and gynecologists were evaluated. RESULTS: Tumor BRCA1/2 testing was performed for 315 (77.6%) of the 406 eligible OC samples, of which 305 (96.8%) were successful. In 51 of these patients, pathogenic variants were detected (16.7%). Most patients (88.2%) went on to have a genetic predisposition test. BRCA1/2 pathogenic variants were shown to be hereditary in 56.8% and somatic in 43.2% of patients. Participating gynecologists and patients were overwhelmingly positive about the workflow. CONCLUSIONS: Universal tumor BRCA1/2 testing in all newly diagnosed OC patients is feasible, effective, and appreciated by patients and gynecologists. Because many variants cannot be detected in DNA from blood, testing tumor DNA as the first step can double the identification rate of patients who stand to benefit most from PARP inhibitors.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Proteína BRCA2/genética , Neoplasias Ovarianas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Ovarianas/etiologia , Idoso , Gerenciamento Clínico , Feminino , Aconselhamento Genético , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Testes Genéticos , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Terapia de Alvo Molecular , Neoplasias Ovarianas/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Ovarianas/tratamento farmacológico , Inibidores de Poli(ADP-Ribose) Polimerases/administração & dosagem , Inibidores de Poli(ADP-Ribose) Polimerases/efeitos adversos , Inibidores de Poli(ADP-Ribose) Polimerases/uso terapêutico
5.
Cancer Cell ; 35(2): 256-266.e5, 2019 02 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30753826

RESUMO

Biallelic germline mutations affecting NTHL1 predispose carriers to adenomatous polyposis and colorectal cancer, but the complete phenotype is unknown. We describe 29 individuals carrying biallelic germline NTHL1 mutations from 17 families, of which 26 developed one (n = 10) or multiple (n = 16) malignancies in 14 different tissues. An unexpected high breast cancer incidence was observed in female carriers (60%). Mutational signature analysis of 14 tumors from 7 organs revealed that NTHL1 deficiency underlies the main mutational process in all but one of the tumors (93%). These results reveal NTHL1 as a multi-tumor predisposition gene with a high lifetime risk for extracolonic cancers and a typical mutational signature observed across tumor types, which can assist in the recognition of this syndrome.


Assuntos
Biomarcadores Tumorais/genética , Análise Mutacional de DNA , Desoxirribonuclease (Dímero de Pirimidina)/genética , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Síndromes Neoplásicas Hereditárias/genética , Transcriptoma , Adulto , Idoso , Biomarcadores Tumorais/deficiência , Reparo do DNA/genética , Desoxirribonuclease (Dímero de Pirimidina)/deficiência , Europa (Continente) , Feminino , Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Hereditariedade , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Síndromes Neoplásicas Hereditárias/enzimologia , Síndromes Neoplásicas Hereditárias/patologia , Linhagem , Fenótipo , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Adulto Jovem
6.
Fam Cancer ; 18(2): 281-284, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30302652

RESUMO

Approximately 27-36 million patients in Europe have one of the ~ 5.000-8.000 known rare diseases. These patients often do not receive the care they need or they have a substantial delay from diagnosis to treatment. In March 2017, twenty-four European Reference Networks (ERNs) were launched with the aim to improve the care for these patients through cross border healthcare, in a way that the medical knowledge and expertise travels across the borders, rather than the patients. It is expected that through the ERNs, European patients with a rare disease get access to expert care more often and more quickly, and that research and guideline development will be accelerated resulting in improved diagnostics and therapies. The ERN on Genetic Tumour Risk Syndromes (ERN GENTURIS) aims to improve the identification, genetic diagnostics, prevention of cancer, and treatment of European patients with a genetic predisposition for cancer. The ERN GENTURIS focuses on syndromes such as hereditary breast cancer, hereditary colorectal cancer and polyposis, neurofibromatosis and more rare syndromes e.g. PTEN Hamartoma Tumour Syndrome, Li Fraumeni Syndrome and hereditary diffuse gastric cancer.


Assuntos
Serviços de Informação/organização & administração , Síndromes Neoplásicas Hereditárias/terapia , Melhoria de Qualidade , Doenças Raras/terapia , Consulta Remota/organização & administração , Competência Clínica , Bases de Dados Factuais , Europa (Continente) , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Testes Genéticos , Humanos , Disseminação de Informação , Cooperação Internacional , Oncologia/educação , Oncologia/métodos , Oncologia/organização & administração , Síndromes Neoplásicas Hereditárias/diagnóstico , Síndromes Neoplásicas Hereditárias/genética , Doenças Raras/diagnóstico , Doenças Raras/genética , Sistema de Registros , Consulta Remota/métodos , Tempo para o Tratamento
7.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 26(6): 848-857, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29483665

RESUMO

This observational study aimed to investigate whether the reported association between family history (FH) of breast cancer (BC) or ovarian cancer (OC) and OC risks in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers can be explained by mutation position on the gene. In total, 3310 female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers participating in a nationwide prospective cohort (Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer in the Netherlands) were included. FH was classified according to cancer occurrence in first-degree relatives (BC only, OC only, both, neither) and mutations were classified according to their position on the gene (OC cluster region (OCCR), BC cluster region, neither). The main outcome was OC occurrence. Cox proportional-hazard models were applied to investigate the association between FH and OC risks before and after adjusting for mutation position. Of all women included, 202 were diagnosed with OC. A BC-only FH tended to be associated with lower OC risks when compared with a FH without BC/OC (HR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.52-1.17; HR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.33-1.07 for BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively) while an OC-only FH tended to be associated with higher risks (HR: 1.58, 95% CI: 0.90-2.77; HR: 1.75, 95% CI: 0.70-4.37 for BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively). After adjusting for mutation position, association between FH and OC risks was slightly smaller in magnitude (HR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.55-1.30; HR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.34-1.21 for BC-only FH in BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively; HR: 1.46, 95% CI: 0.80-2.68; HR: 1.49, 95% CI: 0.44-4.02 for OC-only FH in BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively), indicating that mutation position explains only part of the association. Considering the magnitude of the observed trend, we do not believe FH should be used to change counseling regarding OC prevention.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Proteína BRCA2/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/patologia , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Anamnese , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mutação , Países Baixos , Neoplasias Ovarianas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Ovarianas/patologia , Fatores de Risco
9.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 25(8): 1251-8, 2016 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27277847

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Paternal transmission of a BRCA mutation has been reported to increase the risk of breast cancer in offspring more than when the mutation is maternally inherited. As this effect might be caused by referral bias, the aim of this study was to assess the parent-of-origin effect of the BRCA1/2 mutation on the breast cancer lifetime risk, when adjusted for referral bias. METHODS: A Dutch national cohort including 1,314 proven BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and covering 54,752 person years. Data were collected by family cancer clinics, via questionnaires and from the national Dutch Cancer Registry. The parent-of-origin effect was assessed using Cox regression analyses, both unadjusted and adjusted for referral bias. Referral bias was operationalized by number of relatives with cancer and by personal cancer history. RESULTS: The mutation was of paternal origin in 330 (42%, P < 0.001) BRCA1 and 222 (42%, P < 0.001) BRCA2 carriers. Paternal origin increased the risk of prevalent breast cancer for BRCA1 [HR, 1.54; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.19-2.00] and BRCA2 carriers (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.95-2.06). Adjusted for referral bias by several family history factors, these HRs ranged from 1.41 to 1.83 in BRCA1 carriers and 1.27 to 1.62 in BRCA2 carriers. Adjusted for referral bias by personal history, these HRs were 0.66 (95% CI, 0.25-1.71) and 1.14 (95% CI, 0.42-3.15), respectively. CONCLUSION: A parent-of-origin effect is present after correction for referral bias by family history, but correction for the personal cancer history made the effect disappear. IMPACT: There is no conclusive evidence regarding incorporating a BRCA1/2 parent-of-origin effect in breast cancer risk prediction models. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(8); 1251-8. ©2016 AACR.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Proteína BRCA2/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Genes BRCA1 , Genes BRCA2 , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Herança Paterna/genética , Adulto , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Testes Genéticos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Fatores de Risco
10.
Gynecol Oncol ; 140(2): 289-94, 2016 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26631606

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: BRCA1/2 carriers are at increased risk of ovarian cancer, and some reports suggest an increasing risk in more recent birth cohorts. In contrast, decreasing incidences have been observed in the general population. The aim was to assess the birth cohort effect on ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1/2 carriers relative to their background general population. METHODS: Data on ovarian cancer incidence was collected for a cohort of 1050 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ascertained by our regional clinic and retrieved from the general Dutch population cancer registry. Birth cohorts were categorized as pre-1935, 1935-1953, post-1953. Birth cohort effects on the ovarian cancer risk were estimated using hazard ratios (HRs) in BRCA1/2 carriers and Poisson rate ratios in the general population. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare populations. HRs were adjusted for mutation position and family history. RESULTS: Compared to the pre-1935 cohort, BRCA1 carriers in the 1935-1953 and post-1953 cohorts had an increased ovarian cancer risk of HRadjusted 1.54 (95% CI 1.11-2.14) and 2.40 (95% CI 1.56-3.69), respectively. BRCA2 carriers in the 1935-1953 cohort had an HRadjusted of 3.01 (95% CI 1.47-6.13). The SIRs for the 1935-1953 and post-1953 cohorts were 1.7 and 2.7, respectively, for the BRCA1 carriers and 1.6 times and 2.4 times, respectively, for BRCA2 carriers. CONCLUSIONS: Mutation carriers, particularly BRCA1 carriers, born in the most recent cohorts, have the highest additional ovarian cancer risk as compared to the general population.


Assuntos
Genes BRCA1 , Genes BRCA2 , Mutação , Neoplasias Epiteliais e Glandulares/genética , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Carcinoma Epitelial do Ovário , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
11.
Maturitas ; 82(2): 197-202, 2015 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26239500

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Assessing the combined impact of mutation position, regarding the ovarian cancer cluster region (OCCR), and type of cancer family history (FH) on age-related penetrance of ovarian cancer (OC) in women from BRCA1/2 families from the northern Netherlands. STUDY DESIGN: A consecutive series of 1763 mutation carriers and their first-degree relatives from 355 proven BRCA1/2 families with a history of breast and/or ovarian cancer with in total 248 OC cases was included. Mutations were stratified for gene (BRCA1 or BRCA2) and location (within or outside the OCCR). FH was stratified for type of cancer occurring in first and second-degree relatives (OC only, breast cancer (BC) only or both OC and BC). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cox-proportional hazard models were applied to estimate the OCCR effect, including and excluding a FH of cancer. RESULTS: Among BRCA1 families, OC risks were higher in women with OCCR mutations versus those with non-OCCR mutations (HR=1.59, 95%CI=1.19-2.12). This effect remained significant after adjustment for the type of FH (HR=1.50, 95%CI=1.11-2.01). In BRCA2 families, mutation position did not significantly affect the OC risk (HR=1.50, 95%CI=0.74-3.04). However, in the BRCA2 group, a FH including only OC presented by itself a strong impact on OC risk (HR=4.63, 95%CI=2.38-9.02), which remained stable after adjustment for mutation position (HR=4.48, 95%CI=2.28-8.81). CONCLUSION: OCCR mutations significantly increased the OC risk in BRCA1 families regardless of the type of FH, but in BRCA2 families, type of FH seems to have a higher impact than mutation position on OC risk.


Assuntos
Genes BRCA1 , Genes BRCA2 , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mutação , Países Baixos , Linhagem , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Fatores de Risco , Adulto Jovem
12.
J Clin Oncol ; 33(23): 2553-62, 2015 Aug 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26150446

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Recommendations for treating patients who carry a BRCA1/2 gene are mainly based on cumulative lifetime risks (CLTRs) of breast cancer determined from retrospective cohorts. These risks vary widely (27% to 88%), and it is important to understand why. We analyzed the effects of methods of risk estimation and bias correction and of population factors on CLTRs in this retrospective clinical cohort of BRCA1/2 carriers. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The following methods to estimate the breast cancer risk of BRCA1/2 carriers were identified from the literature: Kaplan-Meier, frailty, and modified segregation analyses with bias correction consisting of including or excluding index patients combined with including or excluding first-degree relatives (FDRs) or different conditional likelihoods. These were applied to clinical data of BRCA1/2 families derived from our family cancer clinic for whom a simulation was also performed to evaluate the methods. CLTRs and 95% CIs were estimated and compared with the reference CLTRs. RESULTS: CLTRs ranged from 35% to 83% for BRCA1 and 41% to 86% for BRCA2 carriers at age 70 years width of 95% CIs: 10% to 35% and 13% to 46%, respectively). Relative bias varied from -38% to +16%. Bias correction with inclusion of index patients and untested FDRs gave the smallest bias: +2% (SD, 2%) in BRCA1 and +0.9% (SD, 3.6%) in BRCA2. CONCLUSION: Much of the variation in breast cancer CLTRs in retrospective clinical BRCA1/2 cohorts is due to the bias-correction method, whereas a smaller part is due to population differences. Kaplan-Meier analyses with bias correction that includes index patients and a proportion of untested FDRs provide suitable CLTRs for carriers counseled in the clinic.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Proteína BRCA2/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Heterozigoto , Mutação , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Variações Dependentes do Observador , Estudos Retrospectivos , Medição de Risco
13.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 23(11): 2482-91, 2014 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25103822

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We aimed to quantify previously observed relatively high cancer risks in BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA2 carriers) older than 60 in the Northern Netherlands, and to analyze whether these could be explained by mutation spectrum or population background risk. METHODS: This consecutive cohort study included all known pathogenic BRCA1/2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands (N = 1,050). Carrier and general reference populations were: BRCA1/2 carriers in the rest of the Netherlands (N = 2,013) and the general population in both regions. Regional differences were assessed with HRs and ORs. HRs were adjusted for birth year and mutation spectrum. RESULTS: All BRCA1 carriers and BRCA2 carriers younger than 60 had a significantly lower breast cancer risk in the Northern Netherlands; HRs were 0.66 and 0.64, respectively. Above age 60, the breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands was higher than in the rest of the Netherlands [HR, 3.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-14.35]. Adjustment for mutational spectrum changed the HRs for BRCA1, BRCA2 <60, and BRCA2 ≥60 years by -3%, +32%, and +11% to 0.75, 0.50, and 2.61, respectively. There was no difference in background breast cancer incidence between the two regions (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.09). CONCLUSIONS: Differences in mutation spectrum only partly explain the regional differences in breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers, and for an even smaller part in BRCA1 carriers. IMPACT: The increased risk in BRCA2 carriers older than 60 may warrant extension of intensive breast screening beyond age 60.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA2/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Mutação , Países Baixos , Fatores de Risco
14.
Int J Cancer ; 135(12): 2940-9, 2014 Dec 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24789418

RESUMO

Annual MRI and mammography is recommended for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers to reduce breast cancer mortality. Less intensive screening is advised ≥60 years, although effectiveness is unknown. We identified BRCA1/2 mutation carriers without bilateral mastectomy before age 60 to determine for whom screening ≥60 is relevant, in the Rotterdam Family Cancer Clinic and HEBON: a nationwide prospective cohort study. Furthermore, we compared tumour stage at breast cancer diagnosis between different screening strategies in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ≥60. Tumours >2 cm, positive lymph nodes, or distant metastases at detection were defined as "unfavourable." Of 548 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ≥60 years in 2012, 395 (72%) did not have bilateral mastectomy before the age of 60. Of these 395, 224 (57%) had a history of breast or other invasive carcinoma. In 136 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, we compared 148 breast cancers (including interval cancers) detected ≥60, of which 84 (57%) were first breast cancers. With biennial mammography 53% (30/57) of carcinomas were detected in unfavourable stage, compared to 21% (12/56) with annual mammography (adjusted odds ratio: 4·07, 95% confidence interval [1.79-9.28], p = 0.001). With biennial screening 40% of breast cancers were interval cancers, compared to 20% with annual screening (p = 0.016). Results remained significant for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, and first breast cancers separately. Over 70% of 60-year old BRCA1/2 mutation carriers remain at risk for breast cancer, of which half has prior cancers. When life expectancy is good, continuation of annual breast cancer screening of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ≥60 is worthwhile.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/diagnóstico , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Detecção Precoce de Câncer , Genes BRCA1 , Genes BRCA2 , Programas de Rastreamento , Idoso , Proteína BRCA1/genética , Proteína BRCA2/genética , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Mamografia , Mastectomia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mutação , Metástase Neoplásica , Países Baixos , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco
15.
Eur J Cancer ; 49(9): 2101-6, 2013 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23490645

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Risk estimates for proven non-carriers in BRCA mutation families are inconsistent for breast cancer and lacking for ovarian cancer. We aimed to assess the age-related risks for breast and ovarian cancer for proven non-carriers in these families. METHODS: A consecutive cohort study ascertained 464 proven non-carriers who had a first-degree relative with a pathogenic BRCA mutation. Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to estimate the age-related cancer risks, and we calculated standardised incidence ratios. RESULTS: In the 464 non-carriers, 17 breast cancers and two ovarian cancers were detected at a mean age of 47 years (95% confidence interval (CI) 32-61) and 49 years (95% CI 32-67), respectively. Overall, by the age of 50, the breast and ovarian cancer risks among non-carriers were 6.4% (95% CI 2.9-9.8%) and 0.4% (95% CI 0-1.3%), of which the breast cancer risk was statistically significantly higher than the risk in the general population. In particular, the number of breast cancers among non-carriers in BRCA1 families was higher than expected for the general population (standardised incidence ratio (SIR) 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.3). In the BRCA1 cohort, the mean number of breast cancer cases was higher in families in which non-carriers were diagnosed before the age of 50 (p=0.04). CONCLUSION: The age at diagnosis of breast cancer in non-carriers in BRCA mutation families is younger than expected, yielding an increased risk in the fifth decade. This effect is most evident in BRCA1 families. If our results are confirmed by others, this could affect the advice given on breast cancer screening to proven non-carriers between the age of 40 and 50 in such families.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Genes BRCA1 , Genes BRCA2 , Mutação/genética , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Adulto , Idade de Início , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Heterozigoto , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Linhagem , Fatores de Risco
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...