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1.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 941, 2021 Sep 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34503508

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Despite prioritization, routine antenatal influenza vaccine coverage is < 16% in South Africa. We aimed to describe maternal influenza vaccine coverage in 27 antenatal clinics (ANCs) in Gauteng and Western Cape (WC) Provinces, where in collaboration with the Department of Health (DoH), we augmented the annual influenza vaccination programme among pregnant women. METHODS: From 2015 through 2018, 40,230 additional doses of influenza vaccine were added to the available stock and administered as part of routine antenatal care. Educational talks were given daily and data were collected on women attending ANCs. We compared characteristics of vaccinated and unvaccinated women using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: We screened 62,979 pregnant women during the period when Southern Hemisphere influenza vaccines were available (27,068 in Gauteng and 35,911 in WC). Vaccine coverage at the targeted clinics was 78.7% (49,355/62682), although pregnant women in WC were more likely to be vaccinated compared to those in the Gauteng (Odds ratio (OR) =3.7 p < 0.001). Women aged 25-29 and > 35 years were less likely to be vaccinated than women aged 18-24 years (OR = 0.9 p = 0.053; OR = 0.9 p < 0.001). HIV positive status was not associated with vaccination (OR = 1.0 p = 0.266). Reasons for not vaccinating included: vaccine stock-outs where ANCs depleted available stock of vaccines and/or were awaiting delivery of vaccines (54.6%, 6949/12723), refusal/indecision (25.8%, 3285), and current illness that contraindicated vaccination (19.6%, 2489). CONCLUSION: Antenatal vaccination uptake was likely improved by the increased vaccine supply and vaccine education offered during our campaign.


Assuntos
Vacinas contra Influenza , Influenza Humana , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez , Feminino , Humanos , Programas de Imunização , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Gravidez , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/prevenção & controle , Gestantes , África do Sul , Vacinação
2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34528769

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We aimed to describe the prevalence of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and evaluate associations between HRSV subgroups and/or genotypes and epidemiologic characteristics and clinical outcomes in patients hospitalized with severe respiratory illness (SRI). METHODS: Between January 2012 and December 2015, we enrolled patients of all ages admitted to two South African hospitals with SRI in prospective hospital-based syndromic surveillance. We collected respiratory specimens and clinical and epidemiological data. Unconditional random effect multivariable logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with HRSV infection. RESULTS: HRSV was detected in 11.2% (772/6908) of enrolled patients of which 47.0% (363/772) were under the age of 6 months. There were no differences in clinical outcomes of HRSV subgroup A-infected patients compared with HRSV subgroup B-infected patients but among patients aged <5 years, children with HRSV subgroup A were more likely be coinfected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (23/208, 11.0% vs. 2/90, 2.0%; adjusted odds ratio 5.7). No significant associations of HRSV A genotypes NA1 and ON1 with specific clinical outcomes were observed. CONCLUSIONS: While HRSV subgroup and genotype dominance shifted between seasons, we showed similar genotype diversity as noted worldwide. We found no association between clinical outcomes and HRSV subgroups or genotypes.

3.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255941, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34383824

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) is an important cause of mortality in young children, especially in children living with HIV infection. Disparities in SARI death in children aged <5 years exist in urban and rural areas. OBJECTIVE: To compare the factors associated with in-hospital death among children aged <5 years hospitalized with SARI in an urban vs. a rural setting in South Africa from 2009-2013. METHODS: Data were collected from hospitalized children with SARI in one urban and two rural sentinel surveillance hospitals. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were tested for ten respiratory viruses and blood for pneumococcal DNA using polymerase chain reaction. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify patient and clinical characteristics associated with in-hospital death. RESULTS: From 2009 through 2013, 5,297 children aged <5 years with SARI-associated hospital admission were enrolled; 3,811 (72%) in the urban and 1,486 (28%) in the rural hospitals. In-hospital case-fatality proportion (CFP) was higher in the rural hospitals (6.9%) than the urban hospital (1.3%, p<0.001), and among HIV-infected than the HIV-uninfected children (9.6% vs. 1.6%, p<0.001). In the urban hospital, HIV infection (odds ratio (OR):11.4, 95% confidence interval (CI):5.4-24.1) and presence of any other underlying illness (OR: 3.0, 95% CI: 1.0-9.2) were the only factors independently associated with death. In the rural hospitals, HIV infection (OR: 4.1, 95% CI: 2.3-7.1) and age <1 year (OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 1.9-7.2) were independently associated with death, whereas duration of hospitalization ≥5 days (OR: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.8) and any respiratory virus detection (OR: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.3-0.8) were negatively associated with death. CONCLUSION: We found that the case-fatality proportion was substantially higher among children admitted to rural hospitals and HIV infected children with SARI in South Africa. While efforts to prevent and treat HIV infections in children may reduce SARI deaths, further efforts to address health care inequality in rural populations are needed.

4.
Lancet HIV ; 8(9): e554-e567, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34363789

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The interaction between COVID-19, non-communicable diseases, and chronic infectious diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis is unclear, particularly in low-income and middle-income countries in Africa. South Africa has a national HIV prevalence of 19% among people aged 15-49 years and a tuberculosis prevalence of 0·7% in people of all ages. Using a nationally representative hospital surveillance system in South Africa, we aimed to investigate the factors associated with in-hospital mortality among patients with COVID-19. METHODS: In this cohort study, we used data submitted to DATCOV, a national active hospital surveillance system for COVID-19 hospital admissions, for patients admitted to hospital with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection between March 5, 2020, and March 27, 2021. Age, sex, race or ethnicity, and comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes, chronic cardiac disease, chronic pulmonary disease and asthma, chronic renal disease, malignancy in the past 5 years, HIV, and past and current tuberculosis) were considered as risk factors for COVID-19-related in-hospital mortality. COVID-19 in-hospital mortality, the main outcome, was defined as a death related to COVID-19 that occurred during the hospital stay and excluded deaths that occurred because of other causes or after discharge from hospital; therefore, only patients with a known in-hospital outcome (died or discharged alive) were included. Chained equation multiple imputation was used to account for missing data and random-effects multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the role of HIV status and underlying comorbidities on COVID-19 in-hospital mortality. FINDINGS: Among the 219 265 individuals admitted to hospital with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and known in-hospital outcome data, 51 037 (23·3%) died. Most commonly observed comorbidities among individuals with available data were hypertension in 61 098 (37·4%) of 163 350, diabetes in 43 885 (27·4%) of 159 932, and HIV in 13 793 (9·1%) of 151 779. Tuberculosis was reported in 5282 (3·6%) of 146 381 individuals. Increasing age was the strongest predictor of COVID-19 in-hospital mortality. Other factors associated were HIV infection (adjusted odds ratio 1·34, 95% CI 1·27-1·43), past tuberculosis (1·26, 1·15-1·38), current tuberculosis (1·42, 1·22-1·64), and both past and current tuberculosis (1·48, 1·32-1·67) compared with never tuberculosis, as well as other described risk factors for COVID-19, such as male sex; non-White race; underlying hypertension, diabetes, chronic cardiac disease, chronic renal disease, and malignancy in the past 5 years; and treatment in the public health sector. After adjusting for other factors, people with HIV not on antiretroviral therapy (ART; adjusted odds ratio 1·45, 95% CI 1·22-1·72) were more likely to die in hospital than were people with HIV on ART. Among people with HIV, the prevalence of other comorbidities was 29·2% compared with 30·8% among HIV-uninfected individuals. Increasing number of comorbidities was associated with increased COVID-19 in-hospital mortality risk in both people with HIV and HIV-uninfected individuals. INTERPRETATION: Individuals identified as being at high risk of COVID-19 in-hospital mortality (older individuals and those with chronic comorbidities and people with HIV, particularly those not on ART) would benefit from COVID-19 prevention programmes such as vaccine prioritisation as well as early referral and treatment. FUNDING: South African National Government.


Assuntos
COVID-19/mortalidade , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Tuberculose/epidemiologia , Antirretrovirais/uso terapêutico , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Estudos de Coortes , Comorbidade , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , SARS-CoV-2 , África do Sul/epidemiologia
5.
Lancet Glob Health ; 9(9): e1216-e1225, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34252381

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The first wave of COVID-19 in South Africa peaked in July, 2020, and a larger second wave peaked in January, 2021, in which the SARS-CoV-2 501Y.V2 (Beta) lineage predominated. We aimed to compare in-hospital mortality and other patient characteristics between the first and second waves. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, we analysed data from the DATCOV national active surveillance system for COVID-19 admissions to hospital from March 5, 2020, to March 27, 2021. The system contained data from all hospitals in South Africa that have admitted a patient with COVID-19. We used incidence risk for admission to hospital and determined cutoff dates to define five wave periods: pre-wave 1, wave 1, post-wave 1, wave 2, and post-wave 2. We compared the characteristics of patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to hospital in wave 1 and wave 2, and risk factors for in-hospital mortality accounting for wave period using random-effect multivariable logistic regression. FINDINGS: Peak rates of COVID-19 cases, admissions, and in-hospital deaths in the second wave exceeded rates in the first wave: COVID-19 cases, 240·4 cases per 100 000 people vs 136·0 cases per 100 000 people; admissions, 27·9 admissions per 100 000 people vs 16·1 admissions per 100 000 people; deaths, 8·3 deaths per 100 000 people vs 3·6 deaths per 100 000 people. The weekly average growth rate in hospital admissions was 20% in wave 1 and 43% in wave 2 (ratio of growth rate in wave 2 compared with wave 1 was 1·19, 95% CI 1·18-1·20). Compared with the first wave, individuals admitted to hospital in the second wave were more likely to be age 40-64 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1·22, 95% CI 1·14-1·31), and older than 65 years (aOR 1·38, 1·25-1·52), compared with younger than 40 years; of Mixed race (aOR 1·21, 1·06-1·38) compared with White race; and admitted in the public sector (aOR 1·65, 1·41-1·92); and less likely to be Black (aOR 0·53, 0·47-0·60) and Indian (aOR 0·77, 0·66-0·91), compared with White; and have a comorbid condition (aOR 0·60, 0·55-0·67). For multivariable analysis, after adjusting for weekly COVID-19 hospital admissions, there was a 31% increased risk of in-hospital mortality in the second wave (aOR 1·31, 95% CI 1·28-1·35). In-hospital case-fatality risk increased from 17·7% in weeks of low admission (<3500 admissions) to 26·9% in weeks of very high admission (>8000 admissions; aOR 1·24, 1·17-1·32). INTERPRETATION: In South Africa, the second wave was associated with higher incidence of COVID-19, more rapid increase in admissions to hospital, and increased in-hospital mortality. Although some of the increased mortality can be explained by admissions in the second wave being more likely in older individuals, in the public sector, and by the increased health system pressure, a residual increase in mortality of patients admitted to hospital could be related to the new Beta lineage. FUNDING: DATCOV as a national surveillance system is funded by the National Institute for Communicable Diseases and the South African National Government.


Assuntos
COVID-19/mortalidade , COVID-19/terapia , Mortalidade Hospitalar/tendências , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Idoso , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco , África do Sul/epidemiologia
6.
Euro Surveill ; 26(29)2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34296675

RESUMO

BackgroundIn South Africa, COVID-19 control measures to prevent SARS-CoV-2 spread were initiated on 16 March 2020. Such measures may also impact the spread of other pathogens, including influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) with implications for future annual epidemics and expectations for the subsequent northern hemisphere winter.MethodsWe assessed the detection of influenza and RSV through facility-based syndromic surveillance of adults and children with mild or severe respiratory illness in South Africa from January to October 2020, and compared this with surveillance data from 2013 to 2019.ResultsFacility-based surveillance revealed a decline in influenza virus detection during the regular season compared with previous years. This was observed throughout the implementation of COVID-19 control measures. RSV detection decreased soon after the most stringent COVID-19 control measures commenced; however, an increase in RSV detection was observed after the typical season, following the re-opening of schools and the easing of measures.ConclusionCOVID-19 non-pharmaceutical interventions led to reduced circulation of influenza and RSV in South Africa. This has limited the country's ability to provide influenza virus strains for the selection of the annual influenza vaccine. Delayed increases in RSV case numbers may reflect the easing of COVID-19 control measures. An increase in influenza virus detection was not observed, suggesting that the measures may have impacted the two pathogens differently. The impact that lowered and/or delayed influenza and RSV circulation in 2020 will have on the intensity and severity of subsequent annual epidemics is unknown and warrants close monitoring.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Vacinas contra Influenza , Influenza Humana , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial , Vírus Sincicial Respiratório Humano , Adulto , Criança , Humanos , Influenza Humana/diagnóstico , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/diagnóstico , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/epidemiologia , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/prevenção & controle , SARS-CoV-2 , África do Sul/epidemiologia
7.
Nature ; 592(7854): 438-443, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33690265

RESUMO

Continued uncontrolled transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in many parts of the world is creating conditions for substantial evolutionary changes to the virus1,2. Here we describe a newly arisen lineage of SARS-CoV-2 (designated 501Y.V2; also known as B.1.351 or 20H) that is defined by eight mutations in the spike protein, including three substitutions (K417N, E484K and N501Y) at residues in its receptor-binding domain that may have functional importance3-5. This lineage was identified in South Africa after the first wave of the epidemic in a severely affected metropolitan area (Nelson Mandela Bay) that is located on the coast of the Eastern Cape province. This lineage spread rapidly, and became dominant in Eastern Cape, Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal provinces within weeks. Although the full import of the mutations is yet to be determined, the genomic data-which show rapid expansion and displacement of other lineages in several regions-suggest that this lineage is associated with a selection advantage that most plausibly results from increased transmissibility or immune escape6-8.


Assuntos
COVID-19/virologia , Mutação , Filogenia , Filogeografia , SARS-CoV-2/genética , SARS-CoV-2/isolamento & purificação , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/imunologia , COVID-19/transmissão , Análise Mutacional de DNA , Evolução Molecular , Aptidão Genética , Humanos , Evasão da Resposta Imune , Modelos Moleculares , SARS-CoV-2/imunologia , SARS-CoV-2/patogenicidade , Seleção Genética , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/química , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/genética , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/metabolismo , Fatores de Tempo
8.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(3): e745-e753, 2021 08 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33530100

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Policy recommendations on pertussis vaccination need to be guided by data, which are limited from low- and middle-income countries. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of pertussis in South Africa, a country with high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence and routine pertussis vaccination for 6 decades including the acellular vaccine since 2009. METHODS: Hospitalized patients of all ages were enrolled at 5 sentinel sites as part of a pneumonia surveillance program from January 2013 through December 2018. Nasopharyngeal specimens and induced sputum were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Bordetella pertussis. In addition, demographic and clinical information were collected. Incidence rates were calculated for 2013-2016, and multivariable logistic regression performed to identify factors associated with pertussis. RESULTS: Over the 6-year period 19 429 individuals were enrolled, of which 239 (1.2%) tested positive for B. pertussis. Detection rate was highest in infants aged <6 months (2.8%, 155/5524). Mean annual incidence was 17 cases per 100 000 population, with the highest incidence in children <1 year of age (228 per 100 000). Age-adjusted incidence was 65.9 per 100 000 in HIV-infected individuals compared to 8.5 per 100 000 in HIV-uninfected individuals (risk ratio 30.4, 95% confidence interval: 23.0-40.2). Ten individuals (4.2%) with pertussis died; of which 7 were infants aged <6 months and 3 were immunocompromised adults. CONCLUSIONS: Pertussis continues to be a significant cause of illness and hospitalization in South Africa, despite routine vaccination. The highest burden of disease and death occurred in infants; however, HIV-infected adults were also identified as an important group at risk of B. pertussis infection.


Assuntos
Coqueluche , Adulto , Bordetella pertussis , Criança , Humanos , Incidência , Lactente , Vacina contra Coqueluche , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Coqueluche/epidemiologia
9.
Nat Med ; 27(3): 440-446, 2021 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33531709

RESUMO

The first severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in South Africa was identified on 5 March 2020, and by 26 March the country was in full lockdown (Oxford stringency index of 90)1. Despite the early response, by November 2020, over 785,000 people in South Africa were infected, which accounted for approximately 50% of all known African infections2. In this study, we analyzed 1,365 near whole genomes and report the identification of 16 new lineages of SARS-CoV-2 isolated between 6 March and 26 August 2020. Most of these lineages have unique mutations that have not been identified elsewhere. We also show that three lineages (B.1.1.54, B.1.1.56 and C.1) spread widely in South Africa during the first wave, comprising ~42% of all infections in the country at the time. The newly identified C lineage of SARS-CoV-2, C.1, which has 16 nucleotide mutations as compared with the original Wuhan sequence, including one amino acid change on the spike protein, D614G (ref. 3), was the most geographically widespread lineage in South Africa by the end of August 2020. An early South African-specific lineage, B.1.106, which was identified in April 2020 (ref. 4), became extinct after nosocomial outbreaks were controlled in KwaZulu-Natal Province. Our findings show that genomic surveillance can be implemented on a large scale in Africa to identify new lineages and inform measures to control the spread of SARS-CoV-2. Such genomic surveillance presented in this study has been shown to be crucial in the identification of the 501Y.V2 variant in South Africa in December 2020 (ref. 5).


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/virologia , SARS-CoV-2/genética , Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Genoma Viral , Humanos , Tipagem Molecular , Mutação , Pandemias , Filogenia , Filogeografia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real , SARS-CoV-2/classificação , SARS-CoV-2/isolamento & purificação , Análise de Sequência de RNA , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Sequenciamento Completo do Genoma
10.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses ; 15(4): 446-456, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33452708

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There are conflicting data concerning the impact of antenatal influenza vaccination on birth outcomes including low birthweight (LBW), preterm birth, small for gestational age (SGA), and stillbirth. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study of infants born to women residing in Mitchells Plain, Cape Town. Infants were born at 4 health facilities during May 28 - December 31, 2015 and April 15 - December 31, 2016. We performed crude and multivariable logistic regression, propensity score (PS) matching logistic regression, and inverse probability of treatment weighted (IPTW) regression to assess vaccine effectiveness (VE) against LBW, preterm birth, SGA, and stillbirth adjusting for measured confounders. RESULTS: Maternal vaccination status, antenatal history, and ≥1 birth outcome(s) were available for 4084/5333 (76.6%) pregnancies, 2109 (51.6%) vaccinated, and 1975 (48.4%) unvaccinated. The proportion LBW was lower in vaccinated (6.9%) vs. unvaccinated (12.5%) in multivariable [VE 0.27 (95% CI 0.07-0.42)], PS [VE 0.30 (95% CI 0.09-0.51)], and IPTW [VE 0.24 (95% CI 0.04-0.45)]. Preterm birth was less frequent in vaccinated (8.6%) than unvaccinated (16.4%) in multivariable [VE 0.26 (0.09-0.40)], PS [VE 0.25 (95% CI 0.09-0.41)], and IPTW [VE 0.34 (95% CI 0.18-0.51)]. The proportion SGA was lower in vaccinated (6.0%) than unvaccinated (8.8%) but not in adjusted models. There were few stillbirths in our study population, 30/4084 (0.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Using multiple analytic approaches, we found that influenza vaccination was associated with lower prevalence of LBW (24-30%) and preterm birth (25-34%) in Cape Town during 2015-2016.

11.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses ; 15(4): 495-505, 2021 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33150650

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Influenza surveillance helps time prevention and control interventions especially where complex seasonal patterns exist. We assessed influenza surveillance sustainability in Africa where influenza activity varies and external funds for surveillance have decreased. METHODS: We surveyed African Network for Influenza Surveillance and Epidemiology (ANISE) countries about 2011-2017 surveillance system characteristics. Data were summarized with descriptive statistics and analyzed with univariate and multivariable analyses to quantify sustained or expanded influenza surveillance capacity in Africa. RESULTS: Eighteen (75%) of 24 ANISE members participated in the survey; their cumulative population of 710 751 471 represent 56% of Africa's total population. All 18 countries scored a mean 95% on WHO laboratory quality assurance panels. The number of samples collected from severe acute respiratory infection case-patients remained consistent between 2011 and 2017 (13 823 vs 13 674 respectively) but decreased by 12% for influenza-like illness case-patients (16 210 vs 14 477). Nine (50%) gained capacity to lineage-type influenza B. The number of countries reporting each week to WHO FluNet increased from 15 (83%) in 2011 to 17 (94%) in 2017. CONCLUSIONS: Despite declines in external surveillance funding, ANISE countries gained additional laboratory testing capacity and continued influenza testing and reporting to WHO. These gains represent important achievements toward sustainable surveillance and epidemic/pandemic preparedness.

12.
Vaccine ; 38(45): 7007-7014, 2020 10 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32980198

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Data on influenza economic burden in risk groups for severe influenza are important to guide targeted influenza immunization, especially in resource-limited settings. However, this information is limited in low- and middle-income countries. METHODS: We estimated the cost (from a health system and societal perspective) and years of life lost (YLL) for influenza-associated illness in South Africa during 2013-2015 among (i) children aged 6-59 months, (ii) individuals aged 5-64 years with HIV, pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and selected underlying medical conditions (UMC), separately, (iii) pregnant women and (iv) individuals aged ≥65 years, using publicly available data and data collected through laboratory-confirmed influenza surveillance and costing studies. All costs were expressed in 2015 prices using the South Africa all-items Consumer Price Index. RESULTS: During 2013-2015, the mean annual cost of influenza-associated illness among the selected risk groups accounted for 52.1% ($140.9/$270.5 million) of the total influenza-associated illness cost (for the entire population of South Africa), 45.2% ($52.2/$115.5 million) of non-medically attended illness costs, 43.3% ($46.7/$107.9 million) of medically-attended mild illness costs and 89.3% ($42.0/$47.1 million) of medically-attended severe illness costs. The YLL among the selected risk groups accounted for 86.0% (262,069 /304,867 years) of the total YLL due to influenza-associated death. CONCLUSION: In South Africa, individuals in risk groups for severe influenza accounted for approximately half of the total influenza-associated illness cost but most of the cost of influenza-associated medically attended severe illness and YLL. This study provides the foundation for future studies on the cost-effectiveness of influenza immunization among risk groups.


Assuntos
Efeitos Psicossociais da Doença , Influenza Humana , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Análise Custo-Benefício , Feminino , Humanos , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gravidez , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Vacinação , Adulto Jovem
13.
Microbiol Resour Announc ; 9(27)2020 Jul 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32616644

RESUMO

As a contribution to the global efforts to track and trace the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, here we present the sequence, phylogenetic analysis, and modeling of nonsynonymous mutations for a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) genome that was detected in a South African patient with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

14.
Vaccine ; 38(27): 4288-4297, 2020 06 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32389494

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Data on influenza burden in risk groups for severe influenza are important to guide targeted influenza immunization, especially in resource limited settings. However, this information is limited overall and in particular in low- and middle-income countries. We sought to assess the mean annual national burden of medically and non-medically attended influenza-associated mild, severe-non-fatal and fatal illness among potential target groups for influenza immunization in South Africa during 2013-2015. METHODS: We used published mean national annual estimates of mild, severe-non-fatal, and fatal influenza-associated illness in South Africa during 2013-2015 and estimated the number of such illnesses occurring among the following risk groups: (i) children aged 6-59 months; (ii) individuals aged 5-64 years with HIV, and/or pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), and/or selected underlying medical conditions (UMC); (iii) pregnant women; and (iv) individuals aged ≥65 years. We also estimated the number of individuals among the same risk groups in the population. RESULTS: During 2013-2015, individuals in the selected risk groups accounted for 45.3% (24,569,328/54,086,144) of the population and 43.5% (4,614,763/10,598,138), 86.8% (111,245/128,173) and 94.5% (10,903/11,536) of the mean annual estimated number of influenza-associated mild, severe-non-fatal and fatal illness episodes, respectively. The rates of influenza-associated illness were highest in children aged 6-59 months (23,983 per 100,000 population) for mild illness, in pregnant women (930 per 100,000 population) for severe-non-fatal illness and in individuals aged ≥65 years (138 per 100,000 population) for fatal illness. CONCLUSION: Influenza immunization of the selected risk groups has the potential to prevent a substantial number of influenza-associated severe illness. Nonetheless, because of the high number of individuals at risk, South Africa, due to financial resources constrains, may need to further prioritize interventions among risk populations. Cost-burden and cost-effectiveness estimates may assist with further prioritization.


Assuntos
Influenza Humana , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Efeitos Psicossociais da Doença , Análise Custo-Benefício , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gravidez , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Vacinação , Adulto Jovem
15.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses ; 14(3): 266-273, 2020 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32058677

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In June 2017, an outbreak of the highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) was detected in commercial poultry farms in South Africa, which rapidly spread to all nine South African provinces. OBJECTIVES: We conducted active surveillance for the transmission of influenza A(H5N8) to humans working with infected birds during the South African outbreak. METHODS: Influenza A(H5N8)-positive veterinary specimens were used to evaluate the ability of real-time PCR-based assays to detect contemporary avian influenza A(H5N8) strains. Whole genome sequences were generated from these specimens by next-generation sequencing for phylogenetic characterization and screening for mammalian-adaptive mutations. RESULTS: Human respiratory samples from 74 individuals meeting our case definition, all tested negative for avian influenza A(H5) by real-time PCR, but 2 (3%) were positive for human influenza A(H3N2). 54% (40/74) reported wearing personal protective equipment including overalls, boots, gloves, masks, and goggles. 94% (59/63) of veterinary specimens positive for H5N8 were detected on an influenza A(H5) assay for human diagnostics. A commercial H5N8 assay detected H5 in only 6% (3/48) and N8 in 92% (44/48). Thirteen (13/25; 52%) A(H5N8) genomes generated from veterinary specimens clustered in a single monophyletic clade. These sequences contained the NS (P42S) and PB2 (L89V) mutations noted as markers of mammalian adaptation. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnostic assays were able to detect and characterize influenza A(H5N8) viruses, but poor performance is reported for a commercial assay. Absence of influenza A(H5N8) in humans with occupational exposure and no clear impression of molecular adaptation for mammalian infection suggest that this avian pathogen continues to be low-risk human pathogen.


Assuntos
Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H5N8/genética , Influenza Aviária/virologia , Influenza Humana/virologia , Doenças das Aves Domésticas/virologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Animais , Animais Selvagens/virologia , Galinhas/virologia , Surtos de Doenças , Patos/virologia , Monitoramento Epidemiológico , Feminino , Gansos/virologia , Humanos , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H3N2/genética , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H3N2/isolamento & purificação , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H5N8/classificação , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H5N8/isolamento & purificação , Influenza Aviária/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Filogenia , Doenças das Aves Domésticas/epidemiologia , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Struthioniformes/virologia , Adulto Jovem
16.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses ; 14(1): 77-91, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31568678

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: There are limited data on risk of severe disease or outcomes in patients with influenza and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) co-infection compared to those with single infection. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of published literature on the interaction of influenza viruses and PTB. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they presented data on prevalence, disease association, presentation or severity of laboratory-confirmed influenza among clinically diagnosed or laboratory-confirmed PTB cases. We searched eight databases from inception until December 2018. Summary characteristics of each study were extracted, and a narrative summary was presented. Cohort or case-control studies were assessed for potential bias using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. RESULTS: We assessed 5154 abstracts, reviewed 146 manuscripts and included 19 studies fulfilling selection criteria (13 human and six animal). Of seven studies reporting on the possible effect of the underlying PTB disease in patients with influenza, three of four analytical studies reported no association with disease severity of influenza infection in those with PTB, whilst one study reported PTB as a risk factor for influenza-associated hospitalization. An association between influenza infection and PTB disease was found in three of five analytical studies; whereas the two other studies reported a high frequency of PTB disease progression and complications among patients with seasonal influenza co-infection. CONCLUSION: Human analytical studies of an association between co-infection and severe influenza- or PTB-associated disease or increased prevalence of influenza co-infection in individuals' hospitalized for PTB were not conclusive. Data are limited from large, high-quality, analytical epidemiological studies with laboratory-confirmed endpoints.


Assuntos
Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/complicações , Tuberculose/complicações , Animais , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Estudos de Coortes , Coinfecção/complicações , Humanos , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Tuberculose/epidemiologia
17.
Euro Surveill ; 24(45)2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31718744

RESUMO

We compared 2019 influenza seasonality and vaccine effectiveness (VE) in four southern hemisphere countries: Australia, Chile, New Zealand and South Africa. Influenza seasons differed in timing, duration, intensity and predominant circulating viruses. VE estimates were also heterogeneous, with all-ages point estimates ranging from 7-70% (I2: 33%) for A(H1N1)pdm09, 4-57% (I2: 49%) for A(H3N2) and 29-66% (I2: 0%) for B. Caution should be applied when attempting to use southern hemisphere data to predict the northern hemisphere influenza season.


Assuntos
Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H1N1/genética , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H3N2/genética , Vírus da Influenza B/genética , Vacinas contra Influenza/imunologia , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Vacinação/estatística & dados numéricos , Potência de Vacina , Adolescente , Adulto , Austrália/epidemiologia , Criança , Chile/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H1N1/imunologia , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H1N1/isolamento & purificação , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H3N2/imunologia , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H3N2/isolamento & purificação , Vírus da Influenza B/imunologia , Vírus da Influenza B/isolamento & purificação , Vacinas contra Influenza/administração & dosagem , Influenza Humana/diagnóstico , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/virologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nova Zelândia/epidemiologia , Vigilância da População , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase Via Transcriptase Reversa , Estações do Ano , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , África do Sul/epidemiologia
18.
Vaccine ; 37(46): 6874-6884, 2019 10 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31575494

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pregnant women and infants are at increased risk of severe disease from influenza. Antenatal influenza vaccination is safe and can reduce the risk of illness for women and their infants. We evaluated for South Africa the health effects of antenatal influenza vaccination among pregnant women and their infants aged <6 months old and assessed its cost-effectiveness. METHODS: We constructed a decision tree model to simulate the population of pregnant women and infants aged <6 months in South Africa using TreeAge Pro Suite 2015. The model evaluated the change in societal costs and outcomes associated with a vaccination campaign that prioritized HIV-infected over HIV-uninfected pregnant women compared with no vaccination. We also examined the impacts of a campaign without prioritization. Upper and lower 90% uncertainty intervals (90% UI) were generated using probabilistic sensitivity analysis on 10000 Monte Carlo simulations. The cost-effectiveness threshold was set to the 2015 per capita gross domestic product of South Africa, US$5724. RESULTS: Antenatal vaccination with prioritization averted 9070 (90% UI: 7407-11217) total cases of influenza among pregnant women and infants, including 411 (90% UI: 305-546) hospitalizations and 30 (90% UI: 22-40) deaths. This corresponds to an averted fraction of 13.5% (90% UI: 9.0-20.5%). Vaccinating without prioritization averted 7801 (90% UI: 6465-9527) cases of influenza, including 335 (90% UI: 254-440) hospitalizations and 24 (90% UI: 18-31) deaths. This corresponds to an averted fraction of 11.6% (90% UI: 7.8-17.4%). Vaccinating the cohort of pregnant women with prioritization had societal cost of $4689 (90% UI: $3128-$7294) per Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY) gained while vaccinating without prioritization had a cost of $5924 (90% UI: $3992-$9056) per QALY. CONCLUSIONS: Antenatal influenza vaccination campaigns in South Africa would reduce the impact of influenza and could be cost-effective.


Assuntos
Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Análise Custo-Benefício , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/imunologia , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/imunologia , Masculino , Método de Monte Carlo , Gravidez , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Vacinação/estatística & dados numéricos
19.
PLoS One ; 14(9): e0222294, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31536552

RESUMO

In 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a new severe influenza surveillance case definition, which has not been evaluated in a high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence setting. Our study aimed to assess the performance of this proposed case definition in identifying influenza among HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected children aged <5 years in South Africa. We prospectively enrolled children aged <5 years hospitalised with physician-diagnosed lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) at two surveillance sites from January 2011 to December 2015. Epidemiologic and clinical data were collected. We tested nasopharyngeal aspirates for influenza using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We used logistic regression to assess factors associated with influenza positivity among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children. We calculated sensitivity and specificity for different signs and symptoms and combinations of these for laboratory-confirmed influenza. We enrolled 2,582 children <5 years of age with LRTI of whom 87% (2,257) had influenza and HIV results, of these 14% (318) were HIV-infected. The influenza detection rate was 5% (104/1,939) in HIV-uninfected and 5% (16/318) in HIV-infected children. Children with measured fever (≥38°C) were two times more likely to test positive for influenza than those without measured fever among the HIV-uninfected (OR 2.2, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.5-3.4; p<0.001). No significant association was observed between fever and influenza infection among HIV-infected children. Cough alone had sensitivity of 95% (95% CI 89-98%) in HIV-uninfected and of 100% (95% CI 79-100%) in HIV-infected children but low specificity: 7% (95% CI 6-8%) and 6% (95% CI 3-9%) in HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected children, respectively. The WHO post-2014 case definition for severe acute respiratory illness (SARI-an acute respiratory infection with history of fever or measured fever of ≥ 38°C and cough; with onset within the last ten days and requires hospitalization), had a sensitivity of 66% (95% CI 56-76%) and specificity of 46% (95% CI 44-48%) among HIV-uninfected and a sensitivity of 63% (95% CI 35-84%) and a specificity of 42% (95% CI 36-48%) among HIV-infected children. The sensitivity and specificity of the WHO post-2014 case definition for SARI were similar among HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected children. Our findings support the adoption of the 2014 WHO case definition for children aged <5 years irrespective of HIV infection status.


Assuntos
Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/complicações , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Pré-Escolar , Coinfecção/diagnóstico , Coinfecção/virologia , Tosse/etiologia , Feminino , Febre/etiologia , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Humanos , Lactente , Influenza Humana/diagnóstico , Influenza Humana/etiologia , Masculino , Vigilância da População/métodos , Estudos Prospectivos , África do Sul/epidemiologia
20.
Pan Afr Med J ; 33: 42, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31384357

RESUMO

Introduction: We investigated an outbreak of influenza-like illness (ILI) at a boarding school in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. We aimed to confirm the etiological agent, estimate attack rates and identify risk factors for illness. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study including senior school boarders (n=308). Students with ILI (cough and fever) were identified through school medical records. We also conducted a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study among senior students including boarders (n=107) and day students (n=45). We collected respiratory specimens for respiratory pathogen testing by real-time polymerase chain reaction from a subset of symptomatic students. We calculated attack rates of medically attended ILI (medILI) and identified factors associated with medILI using logistic regression. We calculated seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medILI. Results: Influenza A (H3N2) virus was detected in 61% (23/38) of specimens. Attack rate for medILI was 13% among boarders (39/308) in the cohort study and 20% in both day students (9/45) and boarders (21/107) in the cross-sectional study. Playing squash was associated with medILI (aOR 5.35, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.68-17.07). Of the boarders, 19% (57/308) were vaccinated before the outbreak. The adjusted VE against medILI was 18% (aOR 0.82, 95% CI 0.38-1.78). The outbreak led to cancellation of several events and the need for academic remedial sessions. Conclusion: We confirmed an influenza A (H3N2) virus outbreak with a high attack rate. The outbreak affected academic and sports activities. Participation in sports and social gatherings while experiencing ILI should be discouraged to reduce viral transmission and impact on school activities.


Assuntos
Surtos de Doenças , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H3N2/isolamento & purificação , Vacinas contra Influenza/administração & dosagem , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Criança , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Influenza Humana/virologia , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Instituições Acadêmicas , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Estudantes , Adulto Jovem
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