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1.
PLoS One ; 16(2): e0245989, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33561141

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Oral bicarbonate solution is known to improve both maternal and perinatal outcomes among women with abnormal labour (dystocia). Its effectiveness and safety among women with obstructed labour is not known. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect and safety of a single-dose preoperative infusion of sodium bicarbonate on maternal and fetal blood lactate and clinical outcomes among women with obstructed labour (OL) in Mbale hospital. METHODS: We conducted a double blind, randomised controlled trial from July 2018 to September 2019. The participants were women with OL at term (≥37 weeks gestation), carrying a singleton pregnancy with no other obstetric emergency, medical comorbidity or laboratory derangements. INTERVENTION: A total of 477 women with OL were randomized to receive 50ml of 8.4% sodium bicarbonate (238 women) or 50 mL of 0.9% sodium chloride (239 women). In both the intervention and controls arms, each participant was preoperatively given a single dose intravenous bolus. Every participant received 1.5 L of normal saline in one hour as part of standard preoperative care. OUTCOME MEASURES: Our primary outcome was the mean difference in maternal venous blood lactate at one hour between the two arms. The secondary outcomes were umbilical cord blood lactate levels at birth, neonatal sepsis and early neonatal death upto 7 days postnatal, as well as the side effects of sodium bicarbonate, primary postpartum hemorrhage, maternal sepsis and mortality at 14 days postpartum. RESULTS: The median maternal venous lactate was 6.4 (IQR 3.3-12.3) in the intervention and 7.5 (IQR 4.0-15.8) in the control group, with a statistically non-significant median difference of 1.2 mmol/L; p-value = 0.087. Vargha and Delaney effect size was 0.46 (95% CI 0.40-0.51) implying very little if any effect at all. CONCLUSION: The 4.2g of preoperative intravenous sodium bicarbonate was safe but made little or no difference on blood lactate levels. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PACTR201805003364421.

2.
Infect Dis (Auckl) ; 13: 1178633720970632, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33223836

RESUMO

Background: HIV viral load suppression (VLS) is the most important indicator of successful antiretroviral therapy. In 2016, Bulambuli District started monitoring HIV patients on ART using viral load tests in an effort to meet the third 90 of the UNAIDS 90-90-90 strategy which is VLS. The objective of this study was to determine the progress in Bulambuli District towards achievement of VLS among HIV infected patients on ART and associated factors that affect this programme. Methods: A retrospective cohort study design was used. One thousand, one hundred and one medical records of HIV infected patients on ART who attended HIV clinic at Muyembe Health Centre IV from June 2016 to April 2018 were reviewed. A data abstraction tool was used for data collection. Chi Square was used to determine factors associated with VLS and logistic regression was used to determine the magnitude by which the ART and clinical factors influence VLS. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics for categorical variables and by computing proportions, means and standard deviation for continuous variables. Results: Of the patients (n = 944, 85.7%) had attained VLS. Adjusting for known confounders, only adherence to ART was a significant predictor of VLS. Individuals with fair adherence (80%-95%) had 2.667 times the odds of VLS, CI = 1.122-9.370, P-value of <.002 compared to individuals with good (>95%) adherence which was used as the reference while those with poor (<80%) adherence had 4.553 times the odds of attaining VLS, CI = 1.31-13.930, P-value of <.001 compared to individuals with good adherence. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Bulambuli District, at 85.7% VLS is on track to attaining the third 90 of the 90, 90, 90 global targets by 2020. It further reveals that adherence is the only significant predictor of VLS in the District.

3.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 7: CD013663, 2020 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32609374

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is commonly defined as bleeding from the genital tract of 500 mL or more within 24 hours of birth. It is one of the most common causes of maternal mortality worldwide and causes significant physical and psychological morbidity. An earlier Cochrane Review considering any treatments for the management of primary PPH, has been split into separate reviews. This review considers treatment with mechanical and surgical interventions. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and safety of mechanical and surgical interventions used for the treatment of primary PPH. SEARCH METHODS: We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (26 July 2019) and reference lists of retrieved studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of mechanical/surgical methods for the treatment of primary PPH compared with standard care or another mechanical/surgical method. Interventions could include uterine packing, intrauterine balloon insertion, artery ligation/embolism, or uterine compression (either with sutures or manually). We included studies reported in abstract form if there was sufficient information to permit risk of bias assessment. Trials using a cluster-RCT design were eligible for inclusion, but quasi-RCTs or cross-over studies were not. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and risk of bias, independently extracted data and checked data for accuracy. We used GRADE to assess the certainty of the evidence. MAIN RESULTS: We included nine small trials (944 women) conducted in Pakistan, Turkey, Thailand, Egypt (four trials), Saudi Arabia, Benin and Mali. Overall, included trials were at an unclear risk of bias. Due to substantial differences between the studies, it was not possible to combine any trials in meta-analysis. Many of this review's important outcomes were not reported. GRADE assessments ranged from very low to low, with the majority of outcome results rated as very low certainty. Downgrading decisions were mainly based on study design limitations and imprecision; one study was also downgraded for indirectness. External uterine compression versus normal care (1 trial, 64 women) Very low-certainty evidence means that we are unclear about the effect on blood transfusion (risk ratio (RR) 2.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66 to 8.23). Uterine arterial embolisation versus surgical devascularisation plus B-Lynch (1 trial, 23 women) The available evidence for hysterectomy to control bleeding (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.15 to 3.57) is unclear due to very low-certainty evidence. The available evidence for intervention side effects is also unclear because the evidence was very low certainty (RR 1.09; 95% CI 0.08 to 15.41). Intrauterine Tamponade Studies included various methods of intrauterine tamponade: the commercial Bakri balloon, a fluid-filled condom-loaded latex catheter ('condom catheter'), an air-filled latex balloon-loaded catheter ('latex balloon catheter'), or traditional packing with gauze. Balloon tamponade versus normal care (2 trials, 356 women) One study(116 women) used the condom catheter. This study found that it may increase blood loss of 1000 mL or more (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.00; 113 women), very low-certainty evidence. For other outcomes the results are unclear and graded as very low-certainty evidence: mortality due to bleeding (RR 6.21, 95% CI 0.77 to 49.98); hysterectomy to control bleeding (RR 4.14, 95% CI 0.48 to 35.93); total blood transfusion (RR 1.49, 95% CI 0.88 to 2.51); and side effects. A second study of 240 women used the latex balloon catheter together with cervical cerclage. Very low-certainty evidence means we are unclear about the effect on hysterectomy (RR 0.14, 95% CI 0.01 to 2.74) and additional surgical interventions to control bleeding (RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.01 to 4.12). Bakri balloon tamponade versus haemostatic square suturing of the uterus (1 trial, 13 women) In this small trial there was no mortality due to bleeding, serious maternal morbidity or side effects of the intervention, and the results are unclear for blood transfusion (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.14 to 2.36; very low certainty). Bakri balloon tamponade may reduce mean 'intraoperative' blood loss (mean difference (MD) -426 mL, 95% CI -631.28 to -220.72), very low-certainty evidence. Comparison of intrauterine tamponade methods (3 trials, 328 women) One study (66 women) compared the Bakri balloon and the condom catheter, but it was uncertain whether the Bakri balloon reduces the risk of hysterectomy to control bleeding due to very low-certainty evidence (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.05 to 5.25). Very low-certainty evidence also means we are unclear about the results for the risk of blood transfusion (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.06). A second study (50 women) compared Bakri balloon, with and without a traction stitch. Very low-certainty evidence means we are unclear about the results for hysterectomy to control bleeding (RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.01 to 3.97). A third study (212 women) compared the condom catheter to gauze packing and found that it may reduce fever (RR 0.47, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.59), but again the evidence was very low certainty. Modified B-Lynch compression suture versus standard B-Lynch compression suture (1 trial, 160 women) Low-certainty evidence suggests that a modified B-Lynch compression suture may reduce the risk of hysterectomy to control bleeding (RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.99) and postoperative blood loss (MD -244.00 mL, 95% CI -295.25 to -192.75). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is currently insufficient evidence from RCTs to determine the relative effectiveness and safety of mechanical and surgical interventions for treating primary PPH. High-quality randomised trials are urgently needed, and new emergency consent pathways should facilitate recruitment. The finding that intrauterine tamponade may increase total blood loss > 1000 mL suggests that introducing condom-balloon tamponade into low-resource settings on its own without multi-system quality improvement does not reduce PPH deaths or morbidity. The suggestion that modified B-Lynch suture may be superior to the original requires further research before the revised technique is adopted. In high-resource settings, uterine artery embolisation has become popular as the equipment and skills become more widely available. However, there is little randomised trial evidence regarding efficacy and this requires further research. We urge new trial authors to adopt PPH core outcomes to facilitate consistency between primary studies and subsequent meta-analysis.


Assuntos
Hemorragia Pós-Parto/terapia , Viés , Transfusão de Sangue/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Hemostasia Cirúrgica/métodos , Técnicas Hemostáticas , Humanos , Histerectomia/métodos , Pressão , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Técnicas de Sutura , Embolização da Artéria Uterina , Tamponamento com Balão Uterino/métodos
4.
PLoS One ; 15(2): e0228856, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32040542

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Obstructed labour (OL) is an important clinical and public health problem because of the associated maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for OL and its associated obstetric squeal are usually context specific. No epidemiological study has documented the risk factors for OL in Eastern Uganda. This study was conducted to identify the risk factors for OL in Mbale Hospital. OBJECTIVE: To identify the risk factors for OL in Mbale Regional Referral and Teaching Hospital, Eastern Uganda. METHODS: We conducted a case control study with 270 cases of women with OL and 270 controls of women without OL. We consecutively enrolled eligible cases between July 2018 and February 2019. For each case, we randomly selected one eligible control admitted in the same 24-hour period. Data was collected using face-to-face interviews and a review of patient notes. Logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors for OL. RESULTS: The risk factors for OL were, being a referral from a lower health facility (AOR 6.80, 95% CI: 4.20-11.00), prime parity (AOR 2.15 95% CI: 1.26-3.66) and use of herbal medicines in active labour (AOR 2.72 95% CI: 1.49-4.96). Married participants (AOR 0.59 95% CI: 0.35-0.97) with a delivery plan (AOR 0.56 95% CI: 0.35-0.90) and educated partners (AOR 0.57 95% CI: 0.33-0.98) were less likely to have OL. In the adjusted analysis, there was no association between four or more ANC visits and OL, adjusted odds ratio [(AOR) 0.96 95% CI: 0.57-1.63)]. CONCLUSIONS: Prime parity, use of herbal medicines in labour and being a referral from a lower health facility were identified as risk factors. Being married with a delivery plan and an educated partner were protective of OL. Increased frequency of ANC attendance was not protective against obstructed labour.


Assuntos
Distocia/epidemiologia , Adulto , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Distocia/etiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Razão de Chances , Gravidez , Fatores de Risco , Uganda/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
5.
BMJ Open ; 9(4): e026675, 2019 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31048444

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: To improve maternal and fetal outcomes among patients with obstructed labour (OL) in low-resource settings, the associated electrolyte and metabolic derangements must be adequately corrected. Oral fluid intake during labour and preoperative intravenous fluid replacement following OL corrects the associated dehydration and electrolyte changes, but it does not completely reverse the metabolic acidosis, that is, a cause of intrapartum birth asphyxia and a risk factor for primary postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony. Sodium bicarbonate is a safe, effective, cheap and readily available acid buffer, that is widely used by sportspeople to improve performance. It also appears to improve fetal and maternal outcomes in abnormally progressing labour. However, its effects on maternal and fetal outcomes among patients with OL is unknown. We aim at establishing the effect of a single-dose preoperative infusion of sodium bicarbonate on maternal and fetal lactate levels and clinical outcomes among patients with OL. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This will be a double blind, randomised controlled clinical phase IIb trial. We will randomise 478 patients with OL to receive either 50 mL of placebo with standard preoperative infusion of normal saline (1.5 L) or 4.2 g of sodium bicarbonate solution (50 mL of 50 mmol/L) with the preoperative infusion of normal saline (1.5 L). The primary outcome will be mean lactate levels in maternal capillary blood at 1 hour after study drug administration and in the arterial cord blood at birth. We will use the intention-to-treat analysis approach. Secondary outcomes will include safety, maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality up to 14 days postpartum. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Makerere University School of Medicine Research and Ethics Committee and Uganda National Council for Science and Technology have approved the protocol. Each participant will give informed consent at enrollment. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: PACTR201805003364421.


Assuntos
Ensaios Clínicos Fase II como Assunto/métodos , Resultado da Gravidez , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto/métodos , Projetos de Pesquisa , Bicarbonato de Sódio/administração & dosagem , Método Duplo-Cego , Distocia , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Gravidez , Encaminhamento e Consulta
6.
BMC Public Health ; 11: 565, 2011 Jul 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21756355

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Women with severe maternal morbidity are at high risk of dying. Quality and prompt management and sometimes luck have been suggested to reduce on the risk of dying. The objective of the study was to identify the direct and indirect causes of severe maternal morbidity, predictors of progression from severe maternal morbidity to maternal mortality in Mulago hospital, Kampala, Uganda. METHODS: This was a longitudinal follow up study at the Mulago hospital's Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Participants were 499 with severe maternal morbidity admitted in Mulago hospital between 15th November 2001 and 30th November 2002 were identified, recruited and followed up until discharge or death. Potential prognostic factors were HIV status and CD4 cell counts, socio demographic characteristics, medical and gynaecological history, past and present obstetric history and intra- partum and postnatal care. RESULTS: Severe pre eclampsia/eclampsia, obstructed labour and ruptured uterus, severe post partum haemorrhage, severe abruptio and placenta praevia, puerperal sepsis, post abortal sepsis and severe anaemia were the causes for the hospitalization of 499 mothers. The mortality incidence rate was 8% (n = 39), maternal mortality ratio of 7815/100,000 live births and the ratio of severe maternal morbidity to mortality was 12.8:1.The independent predictors of maternal mortality were HIV/AIDS (OR 5.1 95% CI 2-12.8), non attendance of antenatal care (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.3-9.2), non use of oxytocics (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.7-9.7), lack of essential drugs (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.1-11.3) and non availability of blood for transfusion (OR 53.7, 95% CI (15.7-183.9) and delivery of amale baby (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.6-10.1). CONCLUSION: The predictors of progression from severe maternal morbidity to mortality were: residing far from hospital, low socio economic status, non attendance of antenatal care, poor intrapartum care, and HIV/AIDS.There is need to improve on the referral system, economic empowerment of women and to offer comprehensive emergency obstetric care so as to reduce the maternal morbidity and mortality in our community.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/mortalidade , HIV-1 , Mortalidade Hospitalar/tendências , Mortalidade Materna/tendências , Complicações na Gravidez/mortalidade , Adulto , Feminino , Previsões , Humanos , Incidência , Estudos Longitudinais , Razão de Chances , Gravidez , Uganda/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
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