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1.
Acad Med ; 2019 Aug 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31397711

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Most evaluations of quality improvement and patient safety (QI/PS) training programs provide inadequate data on their impact on alumni careers and QI/PS involvement. To address this gap, the authors investigated continued participation in and barriers to QI/PS work, employment, and satisfaction with training among alumni of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Chief Resident in Quality and Safety (CRQS) program. METHOD: A cross-sectional, web-based survey was administered in January 2018 to all 238 CRQS program alumni (program years 2009-2017, 54 program sites). RESULTS: A total of 145 alumni (61%) completed the survey, of whom 40% were employed at the VA. Participants reported various professional roles including academic appointments, QI/PS-specific positions, and hospital leadership positions. Most respondents reported involvement in QI/PS activities within the past year including conducting QI or PS projects and teaching QI or PS. Alumni dedicated a median 15% of their work time to QI/PS. Almost all alumni reported experiencing barriers to QI/PS involvement, most frequently lack of time given clinical responsibilities. Most were satisfied with the training, and almost all reported CRQS participation helped their professional career advancement. CONCLUSIONS: The continued involvement in QI/PS reported by alumni suggests training programs such as the CRQS program may be successful in building a workforce of leaders equipped to conduct and teach QI/PS. Dedicated time for QI/PS efforts is an important barrier. Future research should address possible career options and assess the larger, overall effect training physicians in QI/PS has on health systems and patient care.

2.
Am J Med Qual ; : 1062860619853880, 2019 Jun 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31189327

RESUMO

An important competency for residents developing skills in quality improvement (QI) and patient safety (PS) is to independently carry out an improvement project. The authors describe the development and reliability testing of the Quality Improvement Project Evaluation Rubric (QIPER) for use in rating project presentations in the Department of Veterans Affairs Chief Resident in Quality and Safety Program. QIPER contains 19 items across 6 domains to assess competence in designing, implementing, analyzing results of, and reporting on a QI/PS project. Interrater reliability of the instrument was calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). QIPER scores ranged from 28 to 72 out of a possible 76. QIPER demonstrated good reliability overall (ICC = 0.63). Although further testing is warranted, QIPER shows promise as a tool to assess a comprehensive set of skills involved in conducting QI/PS projects and has the sensitivity to detect varied competence and utility for providing learner feedback.

3.
J Dual Diagn ; : 1-9, 2019 Jun 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31253073

RESUMO

Objective: Substance use disorders are an important risk factor for suicide. While residential drug treatment programs improve clinical outcomes for substance use disorders, less is known about the role of related health care processes in contributing to suicide risk. These data may help to inform strategies to prevent suicide during and after residential treatment. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted on root-cause analysis (RCA) reports of suicide in veterans occurring within 3 months of discharge from a residential drug treatment program that were reported to a Veterans Affairs facility between 2001 and 2017. Demographic information such as age, gender, and psychiatric comorbidity were abstracted from each report. In addition, an established codebook was used to code root causes from each report. Root causes were grouped into categories in order to characterize the key system and organizational-level processes that may have contributed to the suicide. Results: A total of 39 RCA reports of suicide occurring within 3 months after discharge from a residential drug treatment program were identified. The majority of decedents were men and the average age was 42.9 years (SD = 11.2). The most common method of suicide was overdose (33%) followed by hanging (28%). Most suicides occurred in close proximity to discharge, with 56% (n = 22) occurring within seven days of discharge and 36% (n = 14) occurring within 48 hours of discharge. The most common substances used by decedents prior to admission were alcohol or opiates. RCA teams identified a total of 140 root causes and the majority were due to problems with suicide risk assessment (n = 32, 22.9%). Non-engagement with treatment during (n = 20, 14.3%) and after the residential stay (n = 18, 12.9%) was also highlighted as an important concern. Finally, several reports raised concerns that a discharge prior to treatment completion or a precipitous discharge due to program violation negatively impacted treatment outcomes. Conclusions: Efforts to prevent suicide in the period following discharge from a residential drug treatment program should focus on addressing suicide risk factors during admission and helping patients engage more fully in substance use disorder treatment.

4.
Am J Prev Med ; 57(2): 145-152, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31248740

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Published research indicates that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with increased mortality. However, causes of death among treatment-seeking patients with PTSD remain poorly characterized. The study objective was to describe causes of death among Veterans with PTSD to inform preventive interventions for this treatment population. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted for all Veterans who initiated PTSD treatment at any Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center from fiscal year 2008 to 2013. The primary outcome was mortality within the first year after treatment initiation. In 2018, collected data were analyzed to determine leading causes of death. For the top ten causes, standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated from age- and sex-matched mortality tables of the U.S. general population. RESULTS: A total of 491,040 Veterans were identified who initiated PTSD treatment. Mean age was 48.5 (±16.0) years, 90.7% were male, and 63.5% were of white race. In the year following treatment initiation, 1.1% (5,215/491,040) died. All-cause mortality was significantly higher for Veterans with PTSD compared with the U.S. population (SMR=1.05, 95% CI=1.02, 1.08, p<0.001). Veterans with PTSD had a significant increase in mortality from suicide (SMR=2.52, 95% CI=2.24, 2.82, p<0.001), accidental injury (SMR=1.99, 95% CI=1.83, 2.16, p<0.001), and viral hepatitis (SMR=2.26, 95% CI=1.68, 2.93, p<0.001) versus the U.S. POPULATION: Of those dying from accidental injury, more than half died of poisoning (52.3%, 325/622). CONCLUSIONS: Veterans with PTSD have an elevated risk of death from suicide, accidental injury, and viral hepatitis. Preventive interventions should target these important causes of death.

5.
J Eval Clin Pract ; 25(4): 689-699, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31115137

RESUMO

RATIONALE: Identifying predictors of improvement amongst patients receiving routine treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) could provide information about factors that influence the clinical effectiveness of guideline-concordant care. This study builds on prior work by accounting for delivery of specific evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for PTSD while identifying potential predictors of clinical improvement using patient-reported outcomes measurement. METHOD: Our sample consisted of 2 643 US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatients who initiated treatment for PTSD between 2008 and 2013 and received at least four PTSD checklist (PCL) measurements over 12 weeks. We obtained PCL data as well as demographic, diagnostic, and health services use information from the VA corporate data warehouse. We used latent trajectory analysis to identify classes of patients based on PCL scores, then determined demographic, diagnostic, and treatment predictors of membership in each class. RESULTS: Patients who met our PCL-based inclusion criteria were far more likely than those who did not receive EBTs. We identified two latent trajectories of PTSD symptoms. Patients in the substantial improvement group (25.9%) had a mean decrease in PCL score of 16.24, whereas patients in the modest improvement group improved by a mean of 8.09 points. However, there were few differences between the groups, and our model to predict group membership was only slightly better than chance (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.55). Of the 64 covariates we tested, the only robust individual predictor of improvement was gender, with men having lower odds of being in the substantial improvement group compared with women (odds ratio [OR] 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58-0.96). CONCLUSION: VA patients with PTSD can realize significant improvement in routine clinical practice. Although available medical records-based variables were generally insufficient to predict improvement trajectory, this study did indicate that men have lower odds of substantial improvement than women.

6.
Mil Med ; 2019 Mar 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30877803

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: In order to address the problem of suicide, healthcare providers and researchers must be able to accurately identify suicide deaths. Common approaches to detecting suicide in the healthcare setting include the National Death Index (NDI) and Root-Cause Analysis (RCA) methodology. No study has directly compared these two methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Suicide reporting was evaluated within the Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system. All suicides were included that occurred within 7 days of discharge from an inpatient mental health unit and were reported to the VA through the NDI record linkage and/or RCA database between 2002 and 2014. The proportion of suicide deaths that were identified by NDI and found in the RCA database were calculated. Potential misclassification by the NDI was evaluated, whereby the RCA database identified a suicide case, but the NDI classified the death as a non-suicide. RESULTS: In the study period, the NDI identified 222 patients who died by suicide within 7 days of discharge, while the RCA database only detected 95 reports of suicide. A comparison of cases across the two methods indicated that the RCA database identified only 35% (N = 78) of NDI detected suicides (N = 222). Conversely, the RCA database detected 13 suicide cases that the NDI had coded as deaths due to accidental poisoning or other causes. Importantly, RCA accounted for 13% (N = 7) of overdose suicides identified in all databases (N = 52). CONCLUSIONS: Combining national and local approaches to detect suicide may help to improve the classification of suicide deaths in the healthcare setting.

7.
Psychiatry Res ; 273: 247-251, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30658209

RESUMO

The relationship between three markers of chronic hypoxia (altitude, smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)) and suicide risk has not been well-studied. We conducted a population-based cohort study evaluating the association between chronic hypoxia and suicide risk. Patients entered the cohort in their first year with a documented healthcare encounter and remained in the cohort until their death or the end of the study period. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) methodology was used to assess the association between suicide and three risk markers of chronic hypoxia. Findings were summarized using odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Among the 9,620,944 patients in the cohort, there were 22,403 suicide deaths. There was a statistically significant progression of suicide risk as altitude rose in increments of 1000 m (OR: 1.22). There was a strong association between the number of hypoxic conditions and the odds of suicide. Patients with three markers of chronic hypoxia was nearly four times more likely to die by suicide than patients with no markers (OR: 3.96). Chronic hypoxia is a risk factor for suicide and having multiple indicators of hypoxia confers a greater risk for suicide, indicating a dose-response relationship.

8.
Clin Spine Surg ; 2019 Jan 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30640751

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: Basic descriptive analysis was performed for the incident characteristics of wrong level spinal surgery in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of reported occurrence of incorrect spine level surgery in the VHA, causal factors for the events, and propose solutions to the issue. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Wrong site surgery is one of the most common events reported to The Joint Commission. It has been reported that 50% of spine surgeons experience at least 1 wrong site surgery in their career, with events leading to signficant harm to patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined incorrect level spine surgery adverse events reported to the VHA National Center for Patient Safety (NCPS) from 2000 to 2017. A rate of wrong site spine surgery was determined by dividing the number of wrong site cases by the total number of spine surgeries during the study period. Similarly, a rate of wrong site surgery by orthopedist and neurosurgeons was calculated. RESULTS: There were 32 reported cases of wrong site spine surgery between 2000 and 2017. Fourteen cases involved the cervical region, 13 the lumbar region, and 5 the thoracic region. The majority of the root causes (69% or 48 of 69 root causes) fell into 2 broad categories: problems with the radiograph or problems with the intraoperative marker. These were not mutually exclusive and several root cause analyses involved >1 of these issues. CONCLUSIONS: Wrong level surgery of the spine is a significant safety issue facing the field that continues to occur despite surgical teams following guidelines. As poor radiograph quality and interpretability were the most common root causes of these events, interventions aimed at optimizing image quality and accurate interpretation would be a logical first action.

9.
Am J Med Qual ; : 1062860618798697, 2018 Sep 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30196706

RESUMO

With the recent proliferation of quality improvement (QI) and patient safety (PS) education programs, guidance is needed on how to assess the effectiveness of these programs. Without a systematic approach, evaluation efforts may end up being disjointed, lead to excess participant burden, or yield unhelpful feedback because of poor fit with program priorities. This article presents a framework for developing a multilevel evaluation infrastructure using examples from the evaluation of the national Department of Veterans Affairs Chief Resident in Quality and Safety program, a 1-year, post-accreditation program to develop leadership and teaching skills in QI and PS. It illustrates how to apply the framework to establish evaluation priorities and methods, and shares sample results and how they are used to guide program improvements and track important outcomes at multiple levels. The framework is particularly relevant to other nonaccredited advanced QI/PS programs, yet offers useful considerations for evaluating any advanced medical education program.

10.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 79(5)2018 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30257081

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, topiramate, and venlafaxine have consistently shown efficacy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials. However, no study has compared the effectiveness of these agents in routine clinical practice. We conducted a retrospective comparative effectiveness study of these 5 medications using electronic medical record data. METHODS: We identified 2,931 Department of Veterans Affairs outpatients initiating treatment for PTSD between fiscal years 2004 and 2013 who received 1 of the 5 medications at an adequate dose and duration, combined with baseline and endpoint PTSD Checklist (PCL) measurements. Patients were identified based on clinical diagnoses of PTSD (DSM-IV criteria). We weighted participants in order to balance pretreatment characteristics. We compared continuous changes on total PCL score, symptom cluster scores, and sleep items, as well as categorical changes including reliable improvement and loss of PTSD diagnosis, using weighted regression analyses. We conducted exploratory analysis to determine whether any patient characteristics or service use variables predicted loss of PTSD diagnosis. RESULTS: Patients improved by a mean of 5-6 points on the PCL over approximately 6 months of treatment. While half of patients had a reliable improvement of 5 points or more on the PCL, less than a fifth achieved loss of PTSD diagnosis. There were no differences between medications. The only significant (P < .001) predictor of loss of PTSD diagnosis was concurrent treatment with evidence-based psychotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Available evidence-based medications for PTSD are equally effective in clinical practice. Although effective, our data suggest that patients choosing medication treatment for PTSD should consider concurrent treatment with evidence-based psychotherapy in order to maximize their chances of meaningful improvement.

11.
J Oncol Pract ; 14(9): e579-e590, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30110226

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Oncology providers are leaders in patient safety. Despite their efforts, oncology-related medical errors still occur, sometimes resulting in patient injury or death. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) National Center of Patient Safety used data obtained from root cause analysis (RCA) to determine how and why these adverse events occurred in the VHA, and how to prevent future reoccurrence. This study details the types of oncology adverse events reported in VHA hospitals and their root causes and suggests actions for prevention and improvement. METHODS: We searched the National Center for Patient Safety adverse event reporting database for RCA related to oncology care from October 1, 2013, to September 8, 2017, to identify event types, root causes, severity of outcomes, care processes, and suggested actions. Two independent reviewers coded these variables, and inter-rater agreement was calculated by κ statistic. Variables were evaluated using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: We identified 48 RCA reports that specifically involved an oncology provider. Event types included care delays (39.5% [n = 19]), issues with chemotherapy (25% [n = 12]) and radiation (12.5% [n = 6]), other (12.5% [n = 6]), and suicide (10.5% [n = 5]). Of the 48 events, 27.1% (n = 13) resulted in death, 4.2% (n = 2) in severe harm, 18.8% (n = 9) in temporary harm, 20.8% (n = 10) in minimal harm, and 2.1% (n = 1) in no harm. The majority of root causes identified a need to improve care processes and policies, interdisciplinary communication, and care coordination. CONCLUSION: This analysis highlights an opportunity to implement system-wide changes to prevent similar events from reoccurring. These actions include comprehensive cancer clinics, usability testing of medical equipment, and standardization of processes and policies. Additional studies are necessary to assess oncologic adverse events across specialties.

12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30093365

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Adverse events and medical errors have been shown to be a persistent issue in health care. However, little research has been conducted regarding the efficacy of incident reporting systems, particularly within an inpatient psychiatry setting. METHODS: The medical records from a random sample of 40 psychiatric units within Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical centers were screened and evaluated by physicians for 9 types of safety events. The abstracted safety events were then evaluated to assess if they were caused by an error and if they caused harm to the patient. These safety events were then matched to incidents that were reported to the VHA Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS), which includes all reported adverse events, close calls, and root cause analyses that occur within the VHA health system. RESULTS: Overall, 37.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 33.5%-41.5%) of safety events detected in the medical record were reported to the AERS. Among the patient safety events identified, the most commonly reported to the AERS were patient falls (52.3%), assaults (46.2%), and elopements (42.3%). Reporting rates increased when the patient safety event resulted in harm to the patient (48.2%; CI = 41.6%-55.0%). CONCLUSION: The majority of patient safety events that occur on VHA inpatient psychiatric units do not get reported to the VHA's Adverse Event Reporting System. These findings suggest that self-reporting is not a reliable method of tracking patient safety events. Future efforts should target the barriers to inpatient psychiatric reporting and develop mechanisms to overcome these barriers.

13.
Psychooncology ; 27(9): 2237-2244, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30019361

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Vast efforts are directed toward curing or prolonging the life of patients with cancer. However, less attention is given to mental health aspects of cancer care, and there is elevated incidence of death by suicide in this population. Evaluating Root Cause Analyses (RCAs) of cancer-related suicides may further our understanding of system-level factors that may contribute to suicide in patients with cancer and highlight strategies to mitigate this risk. METHODS: We searched the Veterans Health Administration National Center for Patient Safety RCA database for cancer-related suicides between 2002 and 2017 to evaluate the context of the suicides and identify root causes and suggested actions. These variables were coded by consensus and evaluated using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: We identified 64 RCA reports involving cancer-related suicide; 100% were males of older age. Many suicides occurred during treatment with palliative intent (44%, N = 28). Depression (59%, N = 38), medical comorbidities (59%, N = 38), and pain (47%, N = 30) were common suicide risk factors identified. Most suicides occurred within 7 days of a medical visit (67%, N = 43), especially within the first 24 hours (41%, N = 26). Root causes included a need to improve recognition of triggers for assessment and interdisciplinary communication. CONCLUSION: This analysis uncovers opportunities to mitigate risk of death by suicide among patients with cancer. Suggested actions include use of comprehensive cancer centers and development of a distress checklist using information from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines. Further studies should assess additional factors that may increase the risk of other adverse mental health outcomes in this population.

14.
Psychiatr Serv ; 69(9): 1032-1035, 2018 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29852826

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Single-site studies indicate irregular hospital discharges are associated with elevated suicide risk. As part of ongoing analytics in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system, the authors evaluated associations between irregular discharge and suicide over a 15-year period. METHODS: All inpatient discharges and discharge types from 2001 through 2014 were identified using VA administrative data. Mortality and cause-of-death data were drawn from comprehensive VA searches of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Death Index. Suicide risk following regular versus irregular discharge was compared by using survival analysis and adjusting for age, gender, and VA facility. RESULTS: Among 5,051,051 discharges, 2.1% (103,995) were irregular. Adjusted suicide risk was higher following irregular discharge compared with regular discharge (hazard ratio [HR]=2.02, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.78-2.29). Stratified analyses by unit type showed that the association was nonsignificant for psychiatric discharges but significant for general medical discharges (HR=3.01, CI=2.54-3.57). CONCLUSIONS: Patients were at increased suicide risk after irregular hospital discharges.

15.
Mil Med ; 2018 May 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29860477

RESUMO

Introduction: Patients are at increased risk for death by suicide following a psychiatric hospitalization. There has been limited study of the association between patient engagement in follow-up care after psychiatric hospitalization and suicide risk. Understanding why psychiatric inpatients choose to engage in post-discharge care is important in developing effective suicide prevention strategies. Materials and Methods: The theory of planned behavior (TPB) has been widely used to understand many health behaviors including healthcare utilization. Using the TPB, we developed an interview guide that assessed psychiatric inpatients' attitudes and beliefs about the role of post-discharge care in addressing suicide risk. We also inquired about perception of future risk for suicide after discharge. We conducted semi-structured interviews prior to discharge and administered the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). We assessed healthcare utilization at 1 and 3 mo after discharge. We coded and grouped the transcribed data according to the three domains of the TPB model: attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control. Results: Sixteen individuals consented to enrollment. More than half (N = 10) believed that they were at no or low future suicide risk after discharge. Participants who felt that their future risk for suicide was low or none were significantly older (mean 59.3 yr, SD: 8.3) and reported significantly less severe suicidal ideation in the past month (mean CSSR-S 2.5, SD 2.1) compared to those participants who believed that their future risk was high (mean age 47.5, SD: 8.6; mean CSSR-S 4.7, SD 0.5, p < 0.05). However, all participants had a lifetime history of severe suicidal ideation (mean CSSR-S > 4.7). Many participants felt that peers facilitated treatment engagement. However, participants expressed a tendency to avoid treatment if they experienced unwanted side effects, encountered stigma, or experienced poor-therapeutic alliance. Five participants experienced poor continuity of care after discharge. Of these participants, four reported at the time of discharge no or low perceived future risk of suicide and three were readmitted within 90 d after discharge. Conclusions: Individuals may not appreciate that they are at heightened risk for suicide after hospitalization and this may negatively impact treatment engagement.

16.
J Patient Saf ; 14(3): 127-132, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29913462

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Developing a workforce skilled in improving the safety of medical care has often been cited as an important means to achieve safer care. Although some educational programs geared toward patient safety have been developed, few advanced training programs have been described in the literature. We describe the development of a patient safety fellowship program. METHODS: We describe the development and curriculum of an Interprofessional Fellowship in Patient Safety. The 1-year in residence fellowship focuses on domains such as leadership, spreading innovations, medical improvement, patient safety culture, reliability science, and understanding errors. RESULTS: Specific training in patient safety is available and has been delivered to 48 fellows from a wide range of backgrounds. Fellows have accomplished much in terms of improvement projects, educational innovations, and publications. After completing the fellowship program, fellows are obtaining positions within health-care quality and safety and are likely to make long-term contributions. CONCLUSIONS: We offer a curriculum and fellowship design for the topic of patient safety. Available evidence suggests that the fellowship results in the development of patient safety professionals.

17.
J Patient Saf ; 2018 Feb 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29432337

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to improve the safety culture at a Veterans Administration hospital using evidence-based approaches. METHODS: We implemented a patient safety summit with follow-up actions. We measured safety climate before and after the summit using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Culture with modifications and the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The summit brought hospital leaders together to discuss patient safety topics and relate them to our hospital. At the summit's end, hospital workgroups collectively submitted Safety Culture Action forms, indicating their intended actions to improve safety culture. We analyzed all survey results using the χ test. We shared lessons learned. RESULTS: The hospital leadership started safety walk rounds. There were 107 hospital employees at the summit. Attendees submitted 53 Safety Culture Action forms. We received 232 AHRQ survey responses in 2014 and 116 in 2016, for response rates of approximately 11% and 8.9%, respectively. We received 140 SAQ responses (11%) from 1244 employees in 2016 and 242 responses (18%) from 1342 employees in 2017. The AHRQ survey results indicated that perception of teamwork within hospital units improved. The SAQ results indicated that employees' comfort with reporting errors and expressing disagreement with physicians improved, and employees' perceptions of leadership's safety efforts and the levels of staffing worsened. CONCLUSIONS: Although some aspects of safety culture improved after the summit and follow-up interventions, others did not. Future interventions should be targeted toward individual microsystems or units and measure safety climate perceptions for intervention recipients exclusively.

18.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 50: 63-68, 2018 Jan - Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29055232

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: While the study of suicide on mental health units has a long history, the study of patient safety more generally is relatively new. Our objective was to determine the type and relative frequency of adverse events occurring on Veterans Health Administration (VHA) mental health units; the primary root causes for these events; and make recommendations for abating or mitigating these events. METHODS: We searched our national database for any reported adverse event that occurred on an inpatient mental health unit between January 1, 2015 and December 31, 2016. We found 87 Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports and 9780 safety reports. The safety reports were coded for type of event and the RCAs were further coded for underlying causes and severity. RESULTS: Of the 87 RCA reports, there were 31suicide attempts, 16 elopements, 10 assaults, 8 events involving hazardous items on the unit, 7 falls, 6 unexpected deaths, 3 overdoses and 6 cases coded as "other". For the 9780 safety reports falls were the most common event, followed by medication events, verbal assaults, physical assaults, medical problems and hazardous items on the unit. CONCLUSIONS: As with medical units, patients on mental health units are at risk for many types of adverse events. The same focus on patient safety is just as important for our mental health patients as for our medical patients. Mental health unit staff should undertake a structured assessment of all risk on their units. This broad approach may be more successful than focusing on a particular event type.


Assuntos
Acidentes/estatística & dados numéricos , Pacientes Internados/estatística & dados numéricos , Segurança do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Unidade Hospitalar de Psiquiatria/estatística & dados numéricos , Análise de Causa Fundamental/estatística & dados numéricos , Tentativa de Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Recusa do Paciente ao Tratamento/estatística & dados numéricos , United States Department of Veterans Affairs/estatística & dados numéricos , Violência/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
19.
Br J Psychiatry ; 211(6): 396-397, 2017 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29196396
20.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 46: 68-73, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28622819

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Medical hospitalization is a high risk period for suicide. It is important to understand system-level factors that may be associated with suicide after a medical hospitalization. METHOD: Retrospective study of root-cause analysis (RCA) reports of suicide occurring within three months of Veterans Administration (VA) medical hospitalization, 2002-2015. We collected patient and system-level factors to characterize events. RESULTS: There were 96 RCA reports pertaining to suicide within three months of medical hospitalization. A total of 168 root causes for suicide were identified and fell into three major themes including: management of known suicide risk (N=73, 43%), decision making to monitor suicide risk (N=48, 29%), and patient engagement in treatment (N=47, 28%). RCA reports raised concerns that medical teams did not provide mental health treatment when indicated and lacked a standardized process for assessing psychological well-being in patients with a serious medical illness. In 25 cases, patients declined recommended treatment and in 15 cases, patients left against medical advice (AMA). CONCLUSIONS: Challenges with patient engagement in treatment and lack of standardized processes for assessing and managing suicide risk may play an important role in suicide risk after medical hospitalization. Additional high quality studies are needed to confirm our findings.


Assuntos
Alta do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Análise de Causa Fundamental/métodos , Suicídio , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores de Tempo , Estados Unidos , United States Department of Veterans Affairs/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
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