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1.
Elife ; 82019 09 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31498083

RESUMO

Most of our knowledge on human CNS circuitry and related disorders originates from model organisms. How well such data translate to the human CNS remains largely to be determined. Human brain slice cultures derived from neurosurgical resections may offer novel avenues to approach this translational gap. We now demonstrate robust preservation of the complex neuronal cytoarchitecture and electrophysiological properties of human pyramidal neurons in long-term brain slice cultures. Further experiments delineate the optimal conditions for efficient viral transduction of cultures, enabling 'high throughput' fluorescence-mediated 3D reconstruction of genetically targeted neurons at comparable quality to state-of-the-art biocytin fillings, and demonstrate feasibility of long term live cell imaging of human cells in vitro. This model system has implications toward a broad spectrum of translational studies, regarding the validation of data obtained in non-human model systems, for therapeutic screening and genetic dissection of human CNS circuitry.

2.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 27(11): 1738-1744, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31358956

RESUMO

It is challenging to estimate genetic variant burden across different subtypes of epilepsy. Herein, we used a comparative approach to assess the genetic variant burden and genotype-phenotype correlations in four most common brain lesions in patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Targeted sequencing analysis was performed for a panel of 161 genes with a mean coverage of >400×. Lesional tissue was histopathologically reviewed and dissected from hippocampal sclerosis (n = 15), ganglioglioma (n = 16), dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (n = 8), and focal cortical dysplasia type II (n = 15). Peripheral blood (n = 12) or surgical tissue samples histopathologically classified as lesion-free (n = 42) were available for comparison. Variants were classified as pathogenic or likely pathogenic according to American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guidelines. Overall, we identified pathogenic and likely pathogenic variants in 25.9% of patients with a mean coverage of 383×. The highest number of pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants was observed in patients with ganglioglioma (43.75%; all somatic) and dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (37.5%; all somatic), and in 20% of cases with focal cortical dysplasia type II (13.33% somatic, 6.67% germline). Pathogenic/likely pathogenic positive genes were disorder specific and BRAF V600E the only recurrent pathogenic variant. This study represents a reference for the genetic variant burden across the four most common lesion entities in patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy. The observed large variability in variant burden by epileptic lesion type calls for whole exome sequencing of histopathologically well-characterized tissue in a diagnostic setting and in research to discover novel disease-associated genes.

3.
Genet Med ; 21(11): 2496-2503, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31056551

RESUMO

PURPOSE: We aimed to gain insight into frequencies of genetic variants in genes implicated in neurodevelopmental disorder with epilepsy (NDD+E) by investigating large cohorts of patients in a diagnostic setting. METHODS: We analyzed variants in NDD+E using epilepsy gene panel sequencing performed between 2013 and 2017 by two large diagnostic companies. We compared variant frequencies in 6994 panels with another 8588 recently published panels as well as exome-wide de novo variants in 1942 individuals with NDD+E and 10,937 controls. RESULTS: Genes with highest frequencies of ultrarare variants in NDD+E comprised SCN1A, KCNQ2, SCN2A, CDKL5, SCN8A, and STXBP1, concordant with the two other epilepsy cohorts we investigated. In only 46% of the analyzed 262 dominant and X-linked panel genes ultrarare variants in patients were reported. Among genes with contradictory evidence of association with epilepsy, CACNB4, CLCN2, EFHC1, GABRD, MAGI2, and SRPX2 showed equal frequencies in cases and controls. CONCLUSION: We show that improvement of panel design increased diagnostic yield over time, but panels still display genes with low or no diagnostic yield. With our data, we hope to improve current diagnostic NDD+E panel design and provide a resource of ultrarare variants in individuals with NDD+E to the community.

4.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(6): 1060-1072, 2019 Jun 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31104773

RESUMO

The developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEEs) are heterogeneous disorders with a strong genetic contribution, but the underlying genetic etiology remains unknown in a significant proportion of individuals. To explore whether statistical support for genetic etiologies can be generated on the basis of phenotypic features, we analyzed whole-exome sequencing data and phenotypic similarities by using Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) in 314 individuals with DEEs. We identified a de novo c.508C>T (p.Arg170Trp) variant in AP2M1 in two individuals with a phenotypic similarity that was higher than expected by chance (p = 0.003) and a phenotype related to epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures. We subsequently found the same de novo variant in two individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders and generalized epilepsy in a cohort of 2,310 individuals who underwent diagnostic whole-exome sequencing. AP2M1 encodes the µ-subunit of the adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2), which is involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) and synaptic vesicle recycling. Modeling of protein dynamics indicated that the p.Arg170Trp variant impairs the conformational activation and thermodynamic entropy of the AP-2 complex. Functional complementation of both the µ-subunit carrying the p.Arg170Trp variant in human cells and astrocytes derived from AP-2µ conditional knockout mice revealed a significant impairment of CME of transferrin. In contrast, stability, expression levels, membrane recruitment, and localization were not impaired, suggesting a functional alteration of the AP-2 complex as the underlying disease mechanism. We establish a recurrent pathogenic variant in AP2M1 as a cause of DEEs with distinct phenotypic features, and we implicate dysfunction of the early steps of endocytosis as a disease mechanism in epilepsy.

5.
Epilepsia ; 60(5): e31-e36, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30719712

RESUMO

Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a common syndrome of genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs). Linkage and association studies suggest that the gene encoding the bromodomain-containing protein 2 (BRD2) may increase risk of JME. The present methylation and association study followed up a recent report highlighting that the BRD2 promoter CpG island (CpG76) is differentially hypermethylated in lymphoblastoid cells from Caucasian patients with JME compared to patients with other GGE subtypes and unaffected relatives. In contrast, we found a uniform low average percentage of methylation (<4.5%) for 13 CpG76-CpGs in whole blood cells from 782 unrelated European Caucasians, including 116 JME patients, 196 patients with genetic absence epilepsies, and 470 control subjects. We also failed to confirm an allelic association of the BRD2 promoter single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3918149 with JME (Armitage trend test, P = 0.98), and we did not detect a substantial impact of SNP rs3918149 on CpG76 methylation in either 116 JME patients (methylation quantitative trait loci [meQTL], P = 0.29) or 470 German control subjects (meQTL, P = 0.55). Our results do not support the previous observation that a high DNA methylation level of the BRD2 promoter CpG76 island is a prevalent epigenetic motif associated with JME in Caucasians.

6.
Neurology ; 92(11): e1238-e1249, 2019 Mar 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30737342

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to expand the spectrum of epilepsy syndromes related to STX1B, encoding the presynaptic protein syntaxin-1B, and establish genotype-phenotype correlations by identifying further disease-related variants. METHODS: We used next-generation sequencing in the framework of research projects and diagnostic testing. Clinical data and EEGs were reviewed, including already published cases. To estimate the pathogenicity of the variants, we used established and newly developed in silico prediction tools. RESULTS: We describe 17 new variants in STX1B, which are distributed across the whole gene. We discerned 4 different phenotypic groups across the newly identified and previously published patients (49 patients in 23 families): (1) 6 sporadic patients or families (31 affected individuals) with febrile and afebrile seizures with a benign course, generally good drug response, normal development, and without permanent neurologic deficits; (2) 2 patients with genetic generalized epilepsy without febrile seizures and cognitive deficits; (3) 13 patients or families with intractable seizures, developmental regression after seizure onset and additional neuropsychiatric symptoms; (4) 2 patients with focal epilepsy. More often, we found loss-of-function mutations in benign syndromes, whereas missense variants in the SNARE motif of syntaxin-1B were associated with more severe phenotypes. CONCLUSION: These data expand the genetic and phenotypic spectrum of STX1B-related epilepsies to a diverse range of epilepsies that span the International League Against Epilepsy classification. Variants in STX1B are protean and contribute to many different epilepsy phenotypes, similar to SCN1A, the most important gene associated with fever-associated epilepsies.

7.
Brain ; 142(2): 376-390, 2019 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30615093

RESUMO

Ion channel mutations can cause distinct neuropsychiatric diseases. We first studied the biophysical and neurophysiological consequences of four mutations in the human Na+ channel gene SCN8A causing either mild (E1483K) or severe epilepsy (R1872W), or intellectual disability and autism without epilepsy (R1620L, A1622D). Only combined electrophysiological recordings of transfected wild-type or mutant channels in both neuroblastoma cells and primary cultured neurons revealed clear genotype-phenotype correlations. The E1483K mutation causing mild epilepsy showed no significant biophysical changes, whereas the R1872W mutation causing severe epilepsy induced clear gain-of-function biophysical changes in neuroblastoma cells. However, both mutations increased neuronal firing in primary neuronal cultures. In contrast, the R1620L mutation associated with intellectual disability and autism-but not epilepsy-reduced Na+ current density in neuroblastoma cells and expectedly decreased neuronal firing. Interestingly, for the fourth mutation, A1622D, causing severe intellectual disability and autism without epilepsy, we observed a dramatic slowing of fast inactivation in neuroblastoma cells, which induced a depolarization block in neurons with a reduction of neuronal firing. This latter finding was corroborated by computational modelling. In a second series of experiments, we recorded three more mutations (G1475R, M1760I, G964R, causing intermediate or severe epilepsy, or intellectual disability without epilepsy, respectively) that revealed similar results confirming clear genotype-phenotype relationships. We found intermediate or severe gain-of-function biophysical changes and increases in neuronal firing for the two epilepsy-causing mutations and decreased firing for the loss-of-function mutation causing intellectual disability. We conclude that studies in neurons are crucial to understand disease mechanisms, which here indicate that increased or decreased neuronal firing is responsible for distinct clinical phenotypes.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto/genética , Canal de Sódio Disparado por Voltagem NAV1.6/genética , Neurônios/fisiologia , Animais , Células Cultivadas , Humanos , Potenciais da Membrana/fisiologia , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Ratos
8.
BMC Neurol ; 18(1): 114, 2018 Aug 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30115021

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Deficits in gait and balance are common among neurological inpatients. Currently, assessment of these patients is mainly subjective. New assessment options using wearables may provide complementary and more objective information. METHODS: In this prospective cross-sectional feasibility study performed over a four-month period, all patients referred to a normal neurology ward of a university hospital and aged between 40 and 89 years were asked to participate. Gait and balance deficits were assessed with wearables at the ankles and the lower back. Frailty, sarcopenia, Parkinsonism, depression, quality of life, fall history, fear of falling, physical activity, and cognition were evaluated with questionnaires and surveys. RESULTS: Eighty-two percent (n = 384) of all eligible patients participated. Of those, 39% (n = 151) had no gait and balance deficit, 21% (n = 79) had gait deficits, 11% (n = 44) had balance deficits and 29% (n = 110) had gait and balance deficits. Parkinson's disease, stroke, epilepsy, pain syndromes, and multiple sclerosis were the most common diseases. The assessment was well accepted. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that the use of wearables for the assessment of gait and balance features in a clinical setting is feasible. Moreover, preliminary results confirm previous epidemiological data about gait and balance deficits among neurological inpatients. Evaluation of neurological inpatients with novel wearable technology opens new opportunities for the assessment of predictive, progression and treatment response markers.


Assuntos
Transtornos Neurológicos da Marcha/diagnóstico , Transtornos Neurológicos da Marcha/fisiopatologia , Marcha/fisiologia , Equilíbrio Postural/fisiologia , Dispositivos Eletrônicos Vestíveis , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Transtornos Neurológicos da Marcha/epidemiologia , Alemanha/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pacientes Internados , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Projetos de Pesquisa
9.
Epilepsy Behav ; 2018 Jul 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30076047

RESUMO

The glucose transporter type 1 (Glut1) is the most important energy carrier of the brain across the blood-brain barrier. In the early nineties, the first genetic defect of Glut1 was described and known as the Glut1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1-DS). It is characterized by early infantile seizures, developmental delay, microcephaly, and ataxia. Recently, milder variants have also been described. The clinical picture of Glut1 defects and the understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease have significantly grown. A special form of transient movement disorders, the paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesia (PED), absence epilepsies particularly with an early onset absence epilepsy (EOAE) and childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), myoclonic astatic epilepsy (MAE), episodic choreoathetosis and spasticity (CSE), and focal epilepsy can be based on a Glut1 defect. Despite the rarity of these diseases, the Glut1 syndromes are of high clinical interest since a very effective therapy, the ketogenic diet, can improve or reverse symptoms especially if it is started as early as possible. The present article summarizes the clinical features of Glut1 syndromes and discusses the underlying genetic mutations, including the available data on functional tests as well as the genotype-phenotype correlations. This article is part of the Special Issue "Individualized Epilepsy Management: Medicines, Surgery and Beyond".

10.
Lancet Neurol ; 17(8): 699-708, 2018 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30033060

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genetic generalised epilepsy is the most common type of inherited epilepsy. Despite a high concordance rate of 80% in monozygotic twins, the genetic background is still poorly understood. We aimed to investigate the burden of rare genetic variants in genetic generalised epilepsy. METHODS: For this exome-based case-control study, we used three different genetic generalised epilepsy case cohorts and three independent control cohorts, all of European descent. Cases included in the study were clinically evaluated for genetic generalised epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing was done for the discovery case cohort, a validation case cohort, and two independent control cohorts. The replication case cohort underwent targeted next-generation sequencing of the 19 known genes encoding subunits of GABAA receptors and was compared to the respective GABAA receptor variants of a third independent control cohort. Functional investigations were done with automated two-microelectrode voltage clamping in Xenopus laevis oocytes. FINDINGS: Statistical comparison of 152 familial index cases with genetic generalised epilepsy in the discovery cohort to 549 ethnically matched controls suggested an enrichment of rare missense (Nonsyn) variants in the ensemble of 19 genes encoding GABAA receptors in cases (odds ratio [OR] 2·40 [95% CI 1·41-4·10]; pNonsyn=0·0014, adjusted pNonsyn=0·019). Enrichment for these genes was validated in a whole-exome sequencing cohort of 357 sporadic and familial genetic generalised epilepsy cases and 1485 independent controls (OR 1·46 [95% CI 1·05-2·03]; pNonsyn=0·0081, adjusted pNonsyn=0·016). Comparison of genes encoding GABAA receptors in the independent replication cohort of 583 familial and sporadic genetic generalised epilepsy index cases, based on candidate-gene panel sequencing, with a third independent control cohort of 635 controls confirmed the overall enrichment of rare missense variants for 15 GABAA receptor genes in cases compared with controls (OR 1·46 [95% CI 1·02-2·08]; pNonsyn=0·013, adjusted pNonsyn=0·027). Functional studies for two selected genes (GABRB2 and GABRA5) showed significant loss-of-function effects with reduced current amplitudes in four of seven tested variants compared with wild-type receptors. INTERPRETATION: Functionally relevant variants in genes encoding GABAA receptor subunits constitute a significant risk factor for genetic generalised epilepsy. Examination of the role of specific gene groups and pathways can disentangle the complex genetic architecture of genetic generalised epilepsy. FUNDING: EuroEPINOMICS (European Science Foundation through national funding organisations), Epicure and EpiPGX (Sixth Framework Programme and Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission), Research Unit FOR2715 (German Research Foundation and Luxembourg National Research Fund).

11.
Nat Genet ; 50(7): 1048-1053, 2018 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29942082

RESUMO

Epilepsy is a frequent feature of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs), but little is known about genetic differences between NDDs with and without epilepsy. We analyzed de novo variants (DNVs) in 6,753 parent-offspring trios ascertained to have different NDDs. In the subset of 1,942 individuals with NDDs with epilepsy, we identified 33 genes with a significant excess of DNVs, of which SNAP25 and GABRB2 had previously only limited evidence of disease association. Joint analysis of all individuals with NDDs also implicated CACNA1E as a novel disease-associated gene. Comparing NDDs with and without epilepsy, we found missense DNVs, DNVs in specific genes, age of recruitment, and severity of intellectual disability to be associated with epilepsy. We further demonstrate the extent to which our results affect current genetic testing as well as treatment, emphasizing the benefit of accurate genetic diagnosis in NDDs with epilepsy.

12.
Epilepsy Behav ; 82: 64-67, 2018 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29587187

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to collect systematic data on the care of adult patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in German epilepsy centers, to describe the characteristics of patients in this age group, and to clarify whether and how the recommended interdisciplinary care is implemented. METHODS: This retrospective survey involved 12 major epilepsy centers in Germany. Aggregated data were collected based on an electronic questionnaire that addressed the sociodemographic data, characteristics of the epilepsy syndromes, and general healthcare setting of adult patients with TSC. RESULTS: The survey included 262 patients (mean age: 36.2±9.0years) with TSC, most of whom were reported to live in either a home for persons with a disability (37.0%), a residential care home (6.9%), or with their parents (31.1%). A further 13.0% were self-sustaining, and 8.8% were living with a partner. Most patients presented with focal (49.6%) or multifocal (33.2%) epilepsy, with complex partial, dialeptic, and automotor seizures in 66% of patients and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in 63%. Drug-refractory epilepsy was seen in 78.2% of patients, and 17.6% were seizure-free at the time of the survey. Of the 262 patients, presurgical diagnostics were performed in 27% and epilepsy surgery in 9%, which rendered 50% of these patients seizure-free. Renal screening had been performed in 56.1% within the last three years and was scheduled to be performed in 58.0%. Cases of renal angiomyolipoma were present in 46.9% of the patients. Dermatologic and pulmonary screenings were known to be planned for only few patients. CONCLUSION: Despite TSC being a multisystem disorder causing considerable impairment, every fifth adult patient is self-sustaining or living with a partner. In clinical practice, uncontrolled epilepsy and renal angiomyolipoma are of major importance in adult patients with TSC. Most patients suffer from focal or multifocal epilepsy, but epilepsy surgery is performed in less than 10% of these patients. Interdisciplinary TSC centers may help to optimize the management of patients with TSC regardless of age and ensure early and adequate treatment that also considers the advances in new therapeutic options.

13.
Epilepsia ; 59(2): 389-402, 2018 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29315614

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Pathogenic SLC6A1 variants were recently described in patients with myoclonic atonic epilepsy (MAE) and intellectual disability (ID). We set out to define the phenotypic spectrum in a larger cohort of SCL6A1-mutated patients. METHODS: We collected 24 SLC6A1 probands and 6 affected family members. Four previously published cases were included for further electroclinical description. In total, we reviewed the electroclinical data of 34 subjects. RESULTS: Cognitive development was impaired in 33/34 (97%) subjects; 28/34 had mild to moderate ID, with language impairment being the most common feature. Epilepsy was diagnosed in 31/34 cases with mean onset at 3.7 years. Cognitive assessment before epilepsy onset was available in 24/31 subjects and was normal in 25% (6/24), and consistent with mild ID in 46% (11/24) or moderate ID in 17% (4/24). Two patients had speech delay only, and 1 had severe ID. After epilepsy onset, cognition deteriorated in 46% (11/24) of cases. The most common seizure types were absence, myoclonic, and atonic seizures. Sixteen cases fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for MAE. Seven further patients had different forms of generalized epilepsy and 2 had focal epilepsy. Twenty of 31 patients became seizure-free, with valproic acid being the most effective drug. There was no clear-cut correlation between seizure control and cognitive outcome. Electroencephalography (EEG) findings were available in 27/31 patients showing irregular bursts of diffuse 2.5-3.5 Hz spikes/polyspikes-and-slow waves in 25/31. Two patients developed an EEG pattern resembling electrical status epilepticus during sleep. Ataxia was observed in 7/34 cases. We describe 7 truncating and 18 missense variants, including 4 recurrent variants (Gly232Val, Ala288Val, Val342Met, and Gly362Arg). SIGNIFICANCE: Most patients carrying pathogenic SLC6A1 variants have an MAE phenotype with language delay and mild/moderate ID before epilepsy onset. However, ID alone or associated with focal epilepsy can also be observed.


Assuntos
Epilepsias Mioclônicas/fisiopatologia , Proteínas da Membrana Plasmática de Transporte de GABA/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/fisiopatologia , Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/fisiopatologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Anticonvulsivantes/uso terapêutico , Ataxia/complicações , Ataxia/genética , Ataxia/fisiopatologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Eletroencefalografia , Epilepsias Mioclônicas/complicações , Epilepsias Mioclônicas/tratamento farmacológico , Epilepsias Mioclônicas/genética , Epilepsias Parciais/complicações , Epilepsias Parciais/tratamento farmacológico , Epilepsias Parciais/genética , Epilepsias Parciais/fisiopatologia , Epilepsia Generalizada/complicações , Epilepsia Generalizada/tratamento farmacológico , Epilepsia Generalizada/genética , Epilepsia Generalizada/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/complicações , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/complicações , Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/genética , Masculino , Mutação , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/complicações , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/genética , Fenótipo , Resultado do Tratamento , Ácido Valproico/uso terapêutico , Adulto Jovem
14.
J Med Genet ; 54(9): 598-606, 2017 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28756411

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Microdeletions are known to confer risk to epilepsy, particularly at genomic rearrangement 'hotspot' loci. However, microdeletion burden not overlapping these regions or within different epilepsy subtypes has not been ascertained. OBJECTIVE: To decipher the role of microdeletions outside hotspots loci and risk assessment by epilepsy subtype. METHODS: We assessed the burden, frequency and genomic content of rare, large microdeletions found in a previously published cohort of 1366 patients with genetic generalised epilepsy (GGE) in addition to two sets of additional unpublished genome-wide microdeletions found in 281 patients with rolandic epilepsy (RE) and 807 patients with adult focal epilepsy (AFE), totalling 2454 cases. Microdeletions were assessed in a combined and subtype-specific approaches against 6746 controls. RESULTS: When hotspots are considered, we detected an enrichment of microdeletions in the combined epilepsy analysis (adjusted p=1.06×10-6,OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.51 to 2.35). Epilepsy subtype-specific analyses showed that hotspot microdeletions in the GGE subgroup contribute most of the overall signal (adjusted p=9.79×10-12, OR 7.45, 95% CI 4.20-13.5). Outside hotspots , microdeletions were enriched in the GGE cohort for neurodevelopmental genes (adjusted p=9.13×10-3,OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.62-4.94). No additional signal was observed for RE and AFE. Still, gene-content analysis identified known (NRXN1, RBFOX1 and PCDH7) and novel (LOC102723362) candidate genes across epilepsy subtypes that were not deleted in controls. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show a heterogeneous effect of recurrent and non-recurrent microdeletions as part of the genetic architecture of GGE and a minor contribution in the aetiology of RE and AFE.


Assuntos
Deleção Cromossômica , Epilepsias Parciais/genética , Epilepsia Generalizada/genética , Epilepsia Rolândica/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Estudos de Coortes , Variações do Número de Cópias de DNA , Expressão Gênica , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos
15.
Expert Rev Mol Diagn ; 17(8): 739-750, 2017 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28548558

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. More than 500 epilepsy-associated genes have been described in the literature. Most of these genes play an important role in neuronal excitability, cortical development or synaptic transmission. A growing number of genetic variations have implications on diagnosis and prognostic or therapeutic advice in terms of a personalized medicine. Area covered: The review presents the different forms of genetic epilepsies with respect to their underlying genetic and functional pathophysiology and aims to give advice for recommended genetic testing. Moreover, it discusses ethical and legal guidelines, costs and technical limitations which should be considered. Expert commentary: Genetic testing is an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of many forms of epilepsy.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/diagnóstico , Epilepsia/genética , Epilepsia/terapia , Testes Genéticos/métodos , Epilepsia/economia , Testes Genéticos/economia , Testes Genéticos/legislação & jurisprudência , Humanos
16.
Epilepsia Open ; 2(3): 334-342, 2017 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29588962

RESUMO

Objective: Genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE) encompasses seizure disorders characterized by spike-and-wave discharges (SWD) originating within thalamo-cortical circuits. Hyperpolarization-activated (HCN) and T-type Ca2+ channels are key modulators of rhythmic activity in these brain regions. Here, we screened HCN4 and CACNA1H genes for potentially contributory variants and provide their functional analysis. Methods: Targeted gene sequencing was performed in 20 unrelated familial cases with different subtypes of GGE, and the results confirmed in 230 ethnically matching controls. Selected variants in CACNA1H and HCN4 were functionally assessed in tsA201 cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes, respectively. Results: We discovered a novel CACNA1H (p.G1158S) variant in two affected members of a single family. One of them also carried an HCN4 (p.P1117L) variant inherited from the unaffected mother. In a separate family, an HCN4 variant (p.E153G) was identified in one of several affected members. Voltage-clamp analysis of CACNA1H (p.G1158S) revealed a small but significant gain-of-function, including increased current density and a depolarizing shift of steady-state inactivation. HCN4 p.P1117L and p.G153E both caused a hyperpolarizing shift in activation and reduced current amplitudes, resulting in a loss-of-function. Significance: Our results are consistent with a model suggesting cumulative contributions of subtle functional variations in ion channels to seizure susceptibility and GGE.

18.
PLoS One ; 11(3): e0150426, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26990884

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are generating an ever-increasing catalogue of SCN1A variants. Variants are more likely to be classified as pathogenic if they have already been identified previously in a patient with epilepsy. Here, we critically re-evaluate the pathogenicity of this class of variants in a cohort of patients with common epilepsy syndromes and subsequently ask whether a significant fraction of benign variants have been misclassified as pathogenic. METHODS: We screened a discovery cohort of 448 patients with a broad range of common genetic epilepsies and 734 controls for previously reported SCN1A mutations that were assumed to be disease causing. We re-evaluated the evidence for pathogenicity of the identified variants using in silico predictions, segregation, original reports, available functional data and assessment of allele frequencies in healthy individuals as well as in a follow up cohort of 777 patients. RESULTS AND INTERPRETATION: We identified 8 known missense mutations, previously reported as pathogenic, in a total of 17 unrelated epilepsy patients (17/448; 3.80%). Our re-evaluation indicates that 7 out of these 8 variants (p.R27T; p.R28C; p.R542Q; p.R604H; p.T1250M; p.E1308D; p.R1928G; NP_001159435.1) are not pathogenic. Only the p.T1174S mutation may be considered as a genetic risk factor for epilepsy of small effect size based on the enrichment in patients (P = 6.60 x 10-4; OR = 0.32, fishers exact test), previous functional studies but incomplete penetrance. Thus, incorporation of previous studies in genetic counseling of SCN1A sequencing results is challenging and may produce incorrect conclusions.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/genética , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Canal de Sódio Disparado por Voltagem NAV1.1/genética , Substituição de Aminoácidos , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Epilepsia/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores de Risco , Síndrome
19.
Ann Neurol ; 79(3): 428-36, 2016 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26677014

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS), paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), and their combination-known as infantile convulsions and paroxysmal choreoathetosis (ICCA)-are related autosomal dominant diseases. PRRT2 (proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 gene) has been identified as the major gene in all 3 conditions, found to be mutated in 80 to 90% of familial and 30 to 35% of sporadic cases. METHODS: We searched for the genetic defect in PRRT2-negative, unrelated families with BFIS or ICCA using whole exome or targeted gene panel sequencing, and performed a detailed cliniconeurophysiological workup. RESULTS: In 3 families with a total of 16 affected members, we identified the same, cosegregating heterozygous missense mutation (c.4447G>A; p.E1483K) in SCN8A, encoding a voltage-gated sodium channel. A founder effect was excluded by linkage analysis. All individuals except 1 had normal cognitive and motor milestones, neuroimaging, and interictal neurological status. Fifteen affected members presented with afebrile focal or generalized tonic-clonic seizures during the first to second year of life; 5 of them experienced single unprovoked seizures later on. One patient had seizures only at school age. All patients stayed otherwise seizure-free, most without medication. Interictal electroencephalogram (EEG) was normal in all cases but 2. Five of 16 patients developed additional brief paroxysmal episodes in puberty, either dystonic/dyskinetic or "shivering" attacks, triggered by stretching, motor initiation, or emotional stimuli. In 1 case, we recorded typical PKD spells by video-EEG-polygraphy, documenting a cortical involvement. INTERPRETATION: Our study establishes SCN8A as a novel gene in which a recurrent mutation causes BFIS/ICCA, expanding the clinical-genetic spectrum of combined epileptic and dyskinetic syndromes.


Assuntos
Coreia/genética , Epilepsia Neonatal Benigna/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Canal de Sódio Disparado por Voltagem NAV1.6/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Coreia/diagnóstico , Epilepsia Neonatal Benigna/diagnóstico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Mutação/genética
20.
Seizure ; 32: 52-61, 2015 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26552564

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study investigates the performance of a cardiac-based seizure detection algorithm (CBSDA) that automatically triggers VNS (NCT01325623). METHODS: Thirty-one patients with drug resistant epilepsy were evaluated in an epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) to assess algorithm performance and near-term clinical benefit. Long-term efficacy and safety were evaluated with combined open and closed-loop VNS. RESULTS: Sixty-six seizures (n=16 patients) were available from the EMU for analysis. In 37 seizures (n=14 patients) a ≥ 20% heart rate increase was found and 11 (n=5 patients) were associated with ictal tachycardia (iTC, 55% or 35 bpm heart rate increase, minimum of 100 bpm). Multiple CBSDA settings achieved a sensitivity of ≥ 80%. False positives ranged from 0.5 to 7.2/h. 27/66 seizures were stimulated within ± 2 min of seizure onset. In 10/17 of these seizures, where triggered VNS overlapped with ongoing seizure activity, seizure activity stopped during stimulation. Physician-scored seizure severity (NHS3-scale) showed significant improvement for complex partial seizures (CPS) at EMU discharge and through 12 months (p<0.05). Patient-scored seizure severity (total SSQ score) showed significant improvement at 3 and 6 months. Quality of life (total QOLIE-31-P score) showed significant improvement at 12 months. The responder rate (≥ 50% reduction in seizure frequency) at 12 months was 29.6% (n=8/27). Safety profiles were comparable to prior VNS trials. CONCLUSIONS: The investigated CBSDA has a high sensitivity and an acceptable specificity for triggering VNS. Despite the moderate effects on seizure frequency, combined open- and closed-loop VNS may provide valuable improvements in seizure severity and QOL in refractory epilepsy patients.


Assuntos
Algoritmos , Epilepsia Resistente a Medicamentos/diagnóstico , Epilepsia Resistente a Medicamentos/terapia , Convulsões/diagnóstico , Convulsões/terapia , Estimulação do Nervo Vago/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Epilepsia Resistente a Medicamentos/fisiopatologia , Eletrocardiografia , Eletroencefalografia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Frequência Cardíaca/fisiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Reconhecimento Automatizado de Padrão/métodos , Estudos Prospectivos , Qualidade de Vida , Convulsões/fisiopatologia , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Taquicardia/fisiopatologia , Estimulação do Nervo Vago/efeitos adversos , Adulto Jovem
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